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Natural Solution For Spinal Cord Injury Pain: Australian Scientists Granted $1.7M To Test CBD As Treatment

Australian scientists were recently granted $1.7 million from NSW Health to develop new ways to treat chronic pain in patients with spinal cord injuries. read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

How Aggressive Will The Fed Be This Week? Why Powell"s Comments Are "The Fulcrum Issue For The Markets"

The SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (NYSE: SPY) was giving up some of its January gains on Monday ahead of a critical Federal Open Market Committ read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

Why Genius Group Shares Are Trading Higher Today

Genius Group (NYSE: GNS) shares are trading higher after the company's board approved the spinoff of its Entrepreneur Resorts subsidiary. read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

South Korea Takes Steps To Track Crypto Transactions, Combat Money Laundering

The South Korean Ministry of Justice has outlined a plan to fight money laundering via cryptocurrency in a task report released Thursday. read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

Party Like It"s 1999: The Nasdaq Is Back With A Bang, Will 2023 Unfold The Same Way?

In January 1999, investors partied to the tune of skyrocketing tech stocks, 24 years later, investors are doing the same. read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

Why Micron Shares Are Moving

Micron Technology Inc (NASDAQ: MU) shares are trading lower by 2.90% to $62.02 Monday afternoon. read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

Weed Chronicles: High School Edibles Scandal, Masked Robbers" Cannabis Heist, Heathrow Boosts Security

High School Cafeteria Worker Arrested For Selling THC Edibles To Students A high school cafeteria employee, Tymetrica Cohn was arrested on Jan. 20 in Louisana, under the suspicion that she was selling cannabis edibles to students. What happened read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

"Like A Sprained Ankle, Boy, I Ain"t Nothin" To Play With": Here"s How Patrick Mahomes Helped Drake Win Millions Despite His Injury

Rapper Drake has become known in the sports betting community as a potential curse with several large wagers placed on teams or athletes he’s a fan of turning into losing bets. A million-dollar bet on the NFL Playoffs over the weekend may have broken the Drake curse and netted him a nice return. read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

Virginia Senate Reconsiders Psychedelics Legalization: A Green Light To Rescheduling Bill

Not all is bad news for psychedelics in Virginia. read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

Celsius Network"s Controversial Rebranding Plan Sparks Outrage In Crypto Community

Amid the ongoing bankruptcy proceedings, Celsius Network has announced a plan to rebrand as a publicly traded recovery corporation. The crypto lender's lawyers stated that if the plan is approved, creditors with assets above an unspecified threshold would receive the Asset Share Token (AST), which would reflect the value of their assets. read more.....»»

Source:  benzingaCategory: blog~4 min. ago Related News

: Gold futures end lower after posting gains for six weeks in a row

Gold futures ended lower on Monday after posting weekly gains over the last six consecutive weeks. With so much uncertainty ahead of this week’s Federal Reserve meeting, gold prices have slipped back, “although the lows for the last 5 days have been pretty steady at around $1,915 and $1,920,” said Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets UK. “A hawkish surprise from the Fed could see prices slip back towards $1,900 in the short term.” The Fed will announce its monetary policy decision on Wednesday. Gold for April delivery GCJ23 fell $6.40, or 0.3%, to settle at $1,939.20 an ounce on Comex.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Source:  marketwatchCategory: top~4 min. ago Related News

: U.S. oil prices settle at their lowest in two and a half weeks

Oil futures declined on Monday, with U.S. benchmark prices settling at their lowest in about two and a half weeks. Uncertainty surrounds the outlook for demand and production ahead of an expected interest-rate hike by the Federal Reserve and a committee meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and their allies, both due Wednesday. U.S. benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude for March delivery CLH23 declined by $1.78, or 2.2%, to settle at $77.90 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange, the lowest front-month contract finish since Jan. 11, according to Dow Jones Market Data.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Source:  marketwatchCategory: top~4 min. ago Related News

: UPS stock falls a day ahead of earnings report; both profit and revenue expectations were beat the past 10 quarters

Shares of United Parcel Service Inc. UPS slumped 2.5% in afternoon trading Monday, a day before the package delivery giant reports fourth-quarter results. The company has beat both profit and revenue expectations for the 10-straight quarters, but the stock has declined the day earnings were reported five times, including the days after the past three quarterly results, according to FactSet data. The report is scheduled to be released before Tuesday’s open, with third-quarter results being released at 6 a.m. Eastern. The current FactSet consensus for earnings per share is $3.58, down from $3.59 a year ago, and for revenue to rise 0.9% to a record $28.09 billion. For the full-year 2023, the FactSet consensus is for EPS of $12.05 and revenue of $99.83 billion. Citi analyst Christian Wetherbee reiterated the buy rating on the stock. “Short-term, we believe sentiment is negative and results/guidance is likely to be good enough to support shares,” Wetherbee wrote in a note to clients. “However, big follow through will be challenging as the looming union negotiation may offset attractive valuation.” The stock has gained 6.2% over the past three months, while shares of rival FedEx Corp. have rallied 14.8% and the S&P 500 SPX has tacked on 3.1%.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Source:  marketwatchCategory: top~4 min. ago Related News

VIDEO: Iran reports that drones attacked a military factory in Isfahan

Iran says multiple drones targeted one of its military factories. US media reported Israel was behind the attack. Iran says that several drones targeted a military factory in Isfahan. US media outlets reported that Israel was behind the attacks, citing senior US officials. The attacks come as Iran supplies Russia with arms in its war on Ukraine. Iran says multiple drones targeted one of its military factories. US media reported Israel was behind the attack.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~20 min. ago Related News

Meet the typical Walmart shopper, a 59-year-old white suburban woman earning $80,000 a year

The typical Walmart shopper visits at least once per week — about 63 trips per year — and picks up 13 products for a total cost of about $54 per trip. REUTERS/ Kevork Djansezian Walmart has more than 3,500 Supercenters across the US and made $600 billion in sales last year. The retail giant has the highest customer loyalty among the leading brands in a survey of shoppers. Walmart's average customer is a woman who is 59.5 years old, white, married, and earning $80,000 per year. Walmart is the largest retailer in the world, pulling in more than $600 billion in sales last year. Each week, 220 million customers visit its stores across 24 countries.In the US, the company has more than 5,000 locations, including 3,570 Supercenters, and it employs nearly 1.6 million people.Because of the retail giant's scale, the average Walmart shopper has a lot in common with the average US consumer, according to data from the analytics firm Numerator prepared for Insider.Roughly 95% of the shoppers in Numerator's survey visited Walmart two or more times in the past year. Not only that, Walmart has the highest customer loyalty of the leading retailers profiled by Numerator.More than 97% of those who shopped in 2021 visited the store in 2022, while only 1.4% quit shopping there – the lowest percentage of leavers of any brand in the survey.Numerator found that Walmart's typical shopper in the US is a white woman between 55 and 64 years old, who is married and living in the suburbs of the Southeast. She typically has an undergraduate degree and earns about $80,000 per year.She visits Walmart at least once per week — almost 65 trips per year — and picks up 13 products for a total cost of about $54 per trip. 13.5% of her spending takes place at Walmart, while she spends about 11% at Amazon.Her primary shopping categories in-store are groceries, including chicken, fruit, snacks and sweets, but she also gets a lot of fast food. Her favorite five brands at Walmart are Turkey Knob, Cheetos, Betty Crocker, Dole, and Tyson.Read more of our typical shopper profiles:Costco: A 39-year-old Asian American woman earning more than $125,000 a yearWhole Foods: A highly educated West Coast millennial woman earning $80,000Target: A millennial suburban mom with a household income of $80,000Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~20 min. ago Related News

HBO"s "The Last of Us" has some key differences from the video game. Here"s how they compare.

Some moments in HBO's "The Last of Us" are directly lifted from the game, but the third episode diverged greatly. In the first episode of HBO's "Last of Us" series, viewers being introduced to Joel and his daughter Sarah.Naughty Dog/PlayStation "The Last of Us" takes place in a post-apocalyptic US after a mutant fungus leaves the world in chaos. The show is very faithful to the game so far, but there are some key differences. The third episode especially diverged from the game and added backstory for two characters. This post contains spoilers for both the "Last of Us" video game and the HBO series.HBO's "Last of Us" series starts similarly to the game, with viewers being introduced to Joel and his daughter Sarah.In both the game and show, Sarah gives Joel a watch for his birthday.Naughty Dog/PlayStationThe biggest difference from the beginning of the game and the HBO series' first episode is at the very beginning. The show starts off with an interview with scientists on a talk show during the 1960s. One of the scientists warns that the most devastating pandemic would involve fungus that attacks the brain, eliciting disbelief from the audience.This scene doesn't exist in the game, which begins with Sarah giving Joel a watch for his birthday.The first episode of the HBO series then jumps to 2003 — and the watch scene — next. Like in the game, Sarah, played in the show by Nico Parker, gives Joel, played by Pedro Pascal, a watch. In the show, we see Sarah taking Joel's busted watch to a shop to get it fixed, and it's there she gets a sense that something is wrong, as the shop owner rushes her out.Overall, the first episode spends more time with Sarah than the game does. We even see her spend time with her and Joel's neighbors, who only appear in the game when one of them attacks Joel and Sarah in their home after getting infected by the mutant fungus.In the game, Sarah wakes up in the middle of the night to Joel still gone, and we see signs of disturbance through her eyes.We see signs that something is wrong from Sarah's perspective in the show and game.Naughty Dog/PlayStationIn the game, Joel is at work late and still gone in the middle of the night when Sarah wakes up. The player wanders the house as Sarah and can look at things like newspapers that foreshadow some sort of outbreak.In the show, Joel puts Sarah to bed before having to leave the house to bail his brother Tommy, played by Gabriel Luna, out of jail.But like in the game, Joel returns in time to save Sarah from their infected neighbor.In both the game and show, Sarah, Joel, and Tommy try driving as far as they can.This shot of a burning house is almost exactly replicated in the show.Naughty Dog/PlayStationThey pass a burning house where people they know lived, and the shot is almost identical to the moment in the game.Like in the game, HBO's series sees the trio crash their truck and running from infected people.Tommy crashes the truck in the game amid a swarm of people running from the infected.Naughty Dog/PlayStationThe HBO series adds an even more dramatic component to this moment: a plane crashes, sending their truck rolling.The first half of the HBO series' premiere episode is largely focused on Joel and Sarah, and Sarah's fate is just as heartbreaking.Joel and Sarah being confronted by a soldier in the game.Naughty Dog/PlayStationLike in the game, Sarah is killed in the show by a soldier who is given orders to kill her and Joel out of fear that they're infected. But Joel manages to survive.In both the game and show, Sarah dies in Joel's arms after being shot.Naughty Dog/PlayStationJust as in the game, Tommy arrives in time to save Joel — but is too late to save Sarah, who dies in Joel's arms.The show, like the game, then jumps 20 years ahead.Tess and Joel in the video game.Naughty Dog/PlayStationLike in the game, Joel is now in Boston, doing what he can to survive with his partner Tess, played by Anna Torv. The show focuses more on Joel's desperation to leave the quarantine zone and find his brother Tommy than the game does at the same point in the narrative.In the game, Joel and Tess track down a black-market dealer named Robert to get their supplies back.Naughty Dog/PlayStationIn the game, Tess kills Robert. But in the show, he's already dead when they find him, having been killed in a shootout with the rebel group the Fireflies.When they find Robert's body in the show, Joel and Tess are confronted by the local leader of the Fireflies, Marlene, played by Merle Dandrige, who also voiced the character in the game. She promises to give Joel and Tess their supplies back, including a truck for them to escape, if they can smuggle a girl named Ellie, played by Bella Ramsey, out of the quarantine zone.Joel is incentivized by the promise of a working truck, as he wants to find Tommy, who he says he lost communication with in recent weeks.Both in the game and show, Ellie is reluctant to go with Joel and Tess.Ellie and Marlene.Naughty Dog/PlayStationIn both the game and show, Ellie has been infected, but hasn't turned into one of the deadly "clickers" weeks after being bitten, suggesting that she is immune and could be the key to a vaccine.Joel and Ellie don't hit it off right away in the show, just as in the game.Joel's watch is broken in both the game and show.Naughty Dog/PlayStationEllie tells Joel that his "watch is broken" in the show, just as she does in the game. Joel still wears the watch that Sarah gave her, even though it is shattered.The first episode ends after Joel and Tess find out Ellie is infected.The first episode of "The Last of Us" ends at this moment in the game.Naughty Dog/PlayStationIn both the show and game, Joel, Tess, and Ellie are confronted by a soldier who Ellie stabs — only after he is able to determine that she is infected. Ellie explains to Joel and Ellie that her bite is weeks old.The episode ends with Joel, Ellie, and Tess making their way out of the quarantine zone to take Ellie to a group of Fireflies in exchange for the truck and supplies.Episode two, titled "Infected," followed Joel, Ellie, and Tess out of the Boston quarantine zone to the Massachusetts State House.Joel at the State House in the game.PlayStation/Naughty DogDuring the journey to the State House in the show, viewers learn that the infected are connected. Disturbing one can trigger a response in another miles away, alerting them to a person's location. This is a new aspect to the show that doesn't exist in the game.This moment from the game, where Ellie says, "You can't deny that view," while she and Joel look out at the State House in the distance, is recreated almost line-for-line in the HBO series.Joel and Ellie in the video game.PlayStation/Naughty DogIn both the game and show, it's the first hint of bonding between Joel and Ellie.Before getting to the State House, Joel, Ellie, and Tess make their way through a museum where they're attacked by the infected — just like in the game.Joel crouching in front of one of the infected in the video game.PlayStation/Naughty DogTess is bitten, off-screen, during the attack, and hides it from Joel and Ellie until they get to the State House.In both the game and the TV series, Tess reveals that she's infected when they make it to the State House.Joel finding out Tess was bitten.PlayStation/Naughty DogThe trio finds that the people they were supposed to hand Ellie off to have all been killed.Tess pleads with Joel to keep Ellie safe, because she believes that Ellie is immune. In both the game and TV show, Tess compares her bite to Ellie's. After just a few hours, hers is worse than Ellie's is after a few weeks.Tess sacrifices herself in both the series and game.Joel looking down after the military kills Tess.PlayStation/Naughty DogIn the video game, Joel and Ellie escape, and Tess stays behind to fend off soldiers who are looking for them. In the TV series, Tess tries to thwart a a horde of infected so that Joel and Ellie can escape. She douses the floor with gasoline and grenades, drops a lighter, and blows herself up along with the infected.In episode three of the series, titled "Long, Long Time," viewers meet Bill and Frank. In the game, only Bill is introduced.Bill in the video gamePlayStation/Naughty DogIn the video game, Joel and Ellie meet up with Bill, who is a smuggler, to get a car.This is where the HBO series diverges most from the game so far, as it provides a backstory for Bill, who is played by Nick Offerman, and his lover Frank, played by Murray Bartlett. In flashbacks, we see how the two met and fell in love. Their relationship is only hinted at in the game. The game shows hints of what might have been Bill and Frank's life together.Joel looking at a chess board in the game.PlayStation/Naughty DogBut by the time Joel and Ellie come to Bill for help in the game, Frank is out of the picture.In the game, Joel and Bill find Frank's body, and a note from Frank to Bill saying, "I hated your guts."Frank's note to Bill in the game.PlayStation/Naughty DogThe HBO series takes Bill and Frank's relationship in a completely different direction. As old men, Frank is dying from a disease and wants to end his life on his own terms.Not wanting to live without Frank, Bill decides to do the same, and they die in each other's arms in bed. When Joel and Ellie come to their house, they're already gone, with Bill leaving Joel a note telling him to take what he needs, including his truck.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~20 min. ago Related News

BuzzFeed writers react with a mix of disappointment and excitement at news that AI-generated content is coming to the website

The decision to use tech from ChatGPT maker OpenAI to produce content is part of BuzzFeed's broader cost-cutting strategy in a challenging economy. Some BuzzFeed writers express a mix of disappointment and excitement over the use of AI to generate content.SOPA Images/Getty Images Some BuzzFeed writers told Insider that they are disappointed by the company's move to use AI for content. But one BuzzFeed staffer said that its an exciting development and that it won't replace jobs.  The mixed reactions come amid conversations over whether AI will replace the need for writers. BuzzFeed announced last week that it will be using AI technology made by ChatGPT maker OpenAI to help generate quizzes and new forms of content.The response from writers for the website was mixed.Some told Insider that they are worried about how the AI will impact the quality of Buzzfeed's content. Another source was unfazed by the news, even excited by it.One BuzzFeed writer — a contracted freelancer who requested anonymity in order to speak freely — told Insider that she was "hugely disappointed" to learn that BuzzFeed will be using the chat bot to make content, though she wasn't surprised since BuzzFeed laid off 12% of its workforce last December."It was clear things were only going to go downhill from there," she said.The freelancer said that she doesn't think the AI will squeeze her out of her job. However, she's concerned that readers will stop engaging with BuzzFeed if they realize the articles aren't written by real people and feel the content is worse."My general thought process right now is it's less likely for me to lose the contract because of the AI installation itself and instead a worry that Buzzfeed itself will dissolve after losing all integrity and any remaining trust that existed once the AI articles begin popping up," she said. Another BuzzFeeder who is on-staff told Insider that the adaptation of AI "is obviously a terrible move for all of BuzzFeed Inc's employees.Like the freelancer, the BuzzFeed employee isn't afraid that the move will terminate her job. But she worries that the quality of BuzzFeed content will suffer as a result. "The best thing about BuzzFeed and the part everyone has always gravitated towards is the personality-driven content and the connection it fosters with readers/viewers," the employee said. "If you take that away, I don't see how the quality and performance won't crash and burn."But a second BuzzFeed staffer told Insider that she isn't worried that AI will replace writers at the company. In fact, she said that she is looking forward to the AI integration.During an all-hands meeting Thursday, the second BuzzFeed staffer recalled hearing from CEO Jonah Peretti that AI — as of now — will only be used to generate new forms of quizzes where they will spit out different answers depending on the person. And this is content that only AI can produce, she recalled Peretti saying. "I think the actual applications of how this will apply to new quiz formats is exciting," the second BuzzFeed staffer said.A BuzzFeed spokesperson clarified to Insider that its AI tool will not be fully creating the quizzes. Rather, BuzzFeed staffers will be responsible for writing the quizzes and the AI will only be used to generate an infinite number of responses, they said.It's all part of BuzzFeed's new strategy to "build the premier platform for AI-powered content" with the goal to "maximize the success" of its content creators in an effort to cut costs and stay financially afloat, according to an internal memo from CEO Jonah Peretti sent to BuzzFeed staff that was obtained by Insider.'When you see this work in action, it is pretty amazing'BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti emailed staff about the company's plan to use ChatGPT maker OpenAI's tech in future content.Getty Images/Kimberly White"Our work in AI-powered creativity is also off to a good start, and in 2023, you'll see AI inspired content move from an R&D stage to part of our core business," Peretti wrote in the memo. In addition to generating new quiz formats, BuzzFeed's internal AI tool will also be used for "informing our brainstorming" and "personalizing our content for our audience," the memo said.Amid a challenging economy, the rise of ChatGPT continues to spark debates on whether the impressive AI will replace writers and jobs. An internal AI tool has already been used by tech news site CNET which revealed that it has been using AI to write dozens of articles for months as part of an experiment. However, CNET later announced that it is pausing its usage of AI to produce content after identifying multiple errors, such as incomplete company names and errors in basic math that required corrections.Peretti told CNN that BuzzFeed will use AI responsibly. "There's the CNET path, and then there is the path that BuzzFeed is focused on," Peretti told CNN. "One is about costs and volume of content, and one is about ability."While the move to adapt AI like ChatGPT has irked some writers, investors are loving it. In fact, BuzzFeed's stock jumped to as high as 200% after the news was announced. One concerned BuzzFeed staffer called the stock price jump "darkly hilarious.""It just shows how the free market truly does not care about humans, whether consumers OR laborers, just the perception of growth and innovation," she said. For now, BuzzFeed said that the AI tool will only be used by the quiz team starting in February and expressed excitement over its editorial possibilities."When you see this work in action, it is pretty amazing," Peretti said in the memo. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~20 min. ago Related News

The sizzling rally in stocks is nearing its end as investors are about to realize a recession has merely been postponed, JPMorgan says

Markets are pricing in a 59% chance of a recession, down from 90% in October. But even that could be too optimistic, JPMorgan said. Getty Images The sizzling rally in stocks will come to an end, as the risks of recession have only been postponed, JPMorgan said. Though investors are less worried about a downturn, some areas of GDP data are still weak, and interest rates remain high. "A weak trajectory for US domestic demand keeps recession risk elevated, even as the tightness in labor markets postpones this recession risk." The sizzling rally in stocks is coming to an end soon as investors are about to realize that a recession has only been postponed, not avoided, according to JPMorgan.After a dismal performance in 2022, the S&P 500 has jumped 5% since the start of the year, largely spurred by positive economic data. December inflation clocked in below economists' expectations at 6.5%, and fourth-quarter GDP showed the economy grew a robust 2.9%, leading some investors to worry less about a recession.Not so fast, said JPMorgan strategists led by Marko Kolanovic."We believe investors should fade the [2023] rally as recession risks are merely postponed rather than diminished," the bank said in a note on Monday, warning investors not to grow too bullish on the latest gains in stocks.Markets are now pricing in a 59% chance of a downturn, compared to a 90% chance in mid-October.But that optimism about the economy could be premature, strategists warned. They noted that while headline GDP was strong, the report showed weaker performance in specific areas, such as private demand, fixed investments, and exports – all signs that economic activity is slowing down. "A weak trajectory for US domestic demand keeps recession risk elevated, even as the tightness in labor markets postpones this recession risk," the note said.That weakness is also exacerbated by high interest rates, strategists said, with the fed funds rate approaching 5%. Central bankers hiked interest rates aggressively last year in a scramble to bring down inflation and cool the hot labor market, but rates that high could easily tip the economy into a recession, experts warn. At 4.25%-4.50%, the benchmark rate is currently at its highest level since the 2008 recession, and markets are broadly expecting at least two more 25-basis-point hikes before the Fed pauses its tightening efforts."Unless the Fed starts cutting its nominal policy rates, these restrictive real policy rates would represent an ongoing headwind, keeping the risk of an eventual recession later in the year relatively high," strategists added.Separately, JPMorgan's chief investment officer warned that a recession was needed in order for inflation to come down.CEO Jamie Dimon also has said he saw at least a mild recession hitting the US economy this year, though his team was preparing for a more serious downturn. That could cause the S&P 500 to lose 20%, he predicted, forecasting another tough year for stocks.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~20 min. ago Related News

Investors are pouring cash into crypto at the highest level in 6 months as risk appetite returns and bitcoin wraps up best January since 2013

Investors made a large shift away from short-bets on bitcoin last week. The token's price has climbed about 40% in January. Bitcoin hasUmit Turhan Coskun/Getty Images Inflows into crypto more than tripled last week to the highest amount since July 2022. The bulk of the funds went into bitcoin as the cryptocurrency's price has soared to kick off 2023. Investors veered away from products that made short bets on bitcoin.  Inflows into cryptocurrency investment products more than tripled last week, with the swift spike concentrated in bitcoin as the world's most popular token headed for its strongest January performance in nearly a decade. Investment in digital assets rose to $117 million, the largest amount since July 2022, digital asset management firm CoinShares said in a weekly update published Monday. The bulk of that amount—$116 million—was poured into bitcoin.  A week earlier, inflows into crypto products clocked in at $36 million, but 68% went into short-investment products or those that profit when the price of the underlying asset falls. The funding wave accelerated as bitcoin's price continued to rise from the start of 2023. This month through mid-Monday trade, the cryptocurrency has soared about 40%, putting it on track for its best January gain since 2013. It traded at around $23,125 on Monday. The inflows into short-bitcoin products were "minor" last week, at $4.4 million, CoinShares said. Bitcoin has been in recovery mode so far this year after its 64% plunge in 2022.  "[Speculators] believe that bitcoin's winter is over," Naeem Aslam, chief market analyst at AvaTrade, said in a note late last week. At the same time, weakness in the US dollar as the Federal Reserve appears closer to pausing rate hikes has supported price gains for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, he said. Total assets under management in investment products have risen 43% from their lows in November to $28 billion. Geographically, Germany last week drew in the highest inflow amount, with 40% at $46 million. Canada logged $30 million, the US pulled in $26 million, and Switzerland landed $23 million.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~20 min. ago Related News

The Punch List: 18-story building on Main Bar site could add to downtown density

In this week's Punch List, our regular look at the biggest trends in commercial real estate, we're diving into what's held back skyward development in the city......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~20 min. ago Related News

Lia Group pushes into North Greenbush with Chick-fil-A, Aldi development

The company also has municipal approval for a new 40,000-square-foot Vent Fitness, though it's yet to make a decision on that......»»

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Tampa Bay Rays, Hines chosen to redevelop Tropicana Field

After a search for a new stadium site that spanned 15 years, at least three cities and six mayors, it appears that the Tampa Bay Rays will stay put in St. Petersburg......»»

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Women’s professional soccer could soon return to Boston

Five years after the Boston Breakers folded, women’s professional soccer could be returning to the city......»»

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United Furniture showed poor judgment but not fraud, bankruptcy court judge says in moving case to reorganization

United Furniture chided for decisions but gets approval to pursue Chapter 11 instead of liquidation.....»»

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Saul Centers moves to update industrial zoning on parcels owned in Sterling, hasn"t said for what use

It's surrounded by data centers, though that's only one possibility......»»

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My View: Struggling to implement change? Avoid these 5 fatal leadership flaws

In this guest column, a Valley management consultant looks at ways business leaders can implement change by avoiding certain pitfalls that often get in the way of success......»»

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Tesla driver taken from hospital to jail without bail after being accused of intentionally driving his family off a cliff

The Tesla driver could be brought into court to face charges of attempted murder and child abuse as soon as Monday afternoon, local news reported. A Tesla plunged off a 250-foot cliff on Monday.Twitter A man accused of intentionally driving off a cliff was moved from a hospital to jail, local news reported. The San Mateo District Attorney's Office said the driver was booked without bail. Authorities are seeking to rule out any mechanical issues with the Tesla, including brake failure. Dharmesh Patel, a Tesla driver who was accused of intentionally driving his car off a cliff in California, has been moved from the hospital into jail, local news reported on Sunday.The driver is being held without bail and could be brought into a court room to face charges of attempted murder and child abuse as soon as Monday afternoon, the San Mateo District Attorney's Office told the publication.The San Mateo District Attorney's Office did not respond to a request for comment from Insider ahead of publication.Earlier this month, Patel, his two children, and wife survived a 250-foot dive off a cliff known as Devil's Slide. The San Mateo County Sheriff's Office said in a tweet on January 2 that the children were "unharmed" at the time of rescue. NBC reported that the adults were taken to the hospital in critical condition upon recovery, but were later found to have sustained non-life-threatening injuries. It is unclear whether Patel's wife has been discharged from the hospital as well.At the time of the incident, the family's survival was hailed as "nothing short of a miracle." But, California Highway Patrol later said that "Based on the evidence collected, investigators developed probable cause to believe this incident was an intentional act."District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said investigators are also looking to rule out any issues with the car that could have caused the accident, including issues with the Tesla's brakes, The Los Angeles Times reported. The authorities had previously said that Tesla's driver assist features, Autopilot and Full Self-Driving do "not appear to be a contributing factor in this incident."Insider was unable to contact Patel for comment ahead of publication, and it was not immediately clear whether he has retained an attorney. A spokesperson for Tesla also did not respond to a request for comment. The investigation is ongoing, per The LA Times.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

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A grand jury is hearing evidence against Donald Trump in Stormy Daniels hush-money case

The Manhattan District Attorney's office is presenting evidence to a grand jury concerning Trump's possible role in the payments, the New York Times reported. PALM BEACH, FLORIDA - NOVEMBER 15: Former U.S. President Donald Trump leaves the stage after speaking during an event at his Mar-a-Lago home on November 15, 2022 in Palm Beach, Florida. Trump announced that he was seeking another term in office and officially launched his 2024 presidential campaign.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesThe Manhattan District Attorney's office will begin presenting evidence to a grand jury Monday in connection with Donald Trump's possible role in paying a hush-money settlement to Stormy Daniels in 2016, the New York Times reported.According to the Times, this new presentation of evidence signals that District Attorney Alvin L. Bragg is coming close to making a decision on whether Trump should be charged.David Pecker, the former publisher of the National Enquirer, walked into the lower Manhattan courthouse where the grand jury is sitting on Monday, according to the Times. Pecker helped facilitate the hush-money payment to Stormy Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford. Prosecutors are also seeking to interview Dylan Howard, the tabloid's editor at the time.  This story is developing. Please check back for updates.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

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Tyre Nichols" death has reignited the debate around police brutality. Here are 5 proven ways to reduce it - and 2 strategies that don"t work.

Tyre Nichols died after he was beaten by police at a traffic stop. Campaign Zero has previously revealed research-backed ways to curb such violence. Business InsiderProtesters rally as Philadelphia Police officers and Pennsylvania National Guard soldiers look on, June 1, 2020.AP Photo/Matt Slocum Tyre Nichols, 29, died after he was beaten by police at a traffic stop January 7. Campaign Zero, a police-reform initiative, suggested six ways to reduce police violence. Research has shown that the use of body cams and implicit-bias training don't work. Tyre Nichols' death has brought the debate around police violence back to the fore. Nichols, 29, was beaten by police and sent to the hospital in critical condition after a traffic stop January 7. Three days later, he died.Five fired police officers —  Tadarrius Bean, Demetrius Haley, Emmitt Martin III, Justin Smith, and Desmond Mills Jr. — have been charged with his murder. It is the latest example of police killings of people of color which includes ex-Minneapolis policeman Derek Chauvin's murdering George Floyd on May 25, 2020, Louisville police officers shooting Breonna Taylor in her home on March 13, 2020.According to the Mapping Police Violence database, officer killed 1,123 Americans in 2022. Black people were 2.9 time more likely to be killed by police than white people.Several years ago, the police-reform initiative Campaign Zero weighed in with research-backed ways to curb police violence. Most, of which buck traditional thinking."Everything you've probably heard is a lie. Specifically, the most discussed 'solutions' to police violence have no evidence of effectiveness," Samuel Sinyangwe, a data scientist and the co-founder of a Campaign Zero tweeted in October, 2019.He added: "For example, body cams don't reduce police violence."Here are five proven, data-based changes that could make a difference, and two approaches that don't seem to work, according to Campaign Zero.An immense crowd of protesters occupies Fulton Street as protesters flooded the streets of Crown Heights in Brooklyn in 2020 to demonstrate against police brutality in the wake of George Floyd's death.Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images1. Eliminate language in police union contracts that limit officer accountabilityUnion contracts and police bills of rights have formalized policies that limit police accountability, per Campaign Zero. These contracts erect at least one barrier to proper oversight of law enforcement officers' misconduct.Such provisions include the disqualification of certain complaints from being investigated or resulting in discipline. They also place restrictions on officer interrogations, provide options for officers to appeal for reinstatement, and give officer access to privileged information during investigations.As of 2020, 40 cities and three states gave officers paid leave while they're under investigation. 43 cities and four states erased officers' misconduct records after a period of time, sometimes within as little as two years of an incident.A Washington Post investigation found that of the 1,881 US police officers who were fired for misconduct between 2006 and 2017, 451 of them won their jobs back after an appeal.In many of those cases, arbitrators overruled police chiefs on the terminations — not because there were doubts about whether the officers had engaged in misconduct, but because police departments made bureaucratic errors while disciplining officers, such as missing deadlines.Protesters gather in Minneapolis on June 1, 2020, at a memorial for George Floyd where he died after being restrained by police officers.AP Photo/John MinchilloExperts have recommended that police departments reform their processes for disciplinary appeals to ensure that officers who engage in misconduct are held fully accountable. That might entail eliminating arbitrators from the process and instead leaving the decision to democratically elected officials, such as city councils.2. Track complaints about officers' use of forceMost complaints against officers aren't public, making them hard to track.A 2019 study found that police officers who are partnered with officers who garner complaints about excessive force are more likely to receive such complaints themselves in the future.Researchers examined more than 8,600 Chicago police officers named in multiple complaints between 2005 and 2017. The analysis found that the more officers with histories of excessive force were in a group, the higher the risk that other officers in that group would develop similar track records.According to Andrew Papachristos, one of the study's co-authors, this link could help predict potential bad behavior by officers and give departments better information about when and how to intervene before violent incidents occur.Police prepare to disperse a group of protesters in Richmond, Virginia, on May 31, 2020.AP Photo/Steve HelberInstituting a means of tracking complaints against officers, and making that data public, could provide further oversight.Legislation that prohibits officers who are terminated for serious misconduct from being rehired could also make a difference.3. Use more non-police organizations to respond to emergency callsAccording to a 2015 report from the Treatment Advocacy Center, a nonprofit, at least one in every four people killed by police has a serious mental illness.Not all officers who respond to an emergency call involving a person with mental illness are trained in crisis management, which may result in mismanaging the situation that ends in police violence.Programs like Cahoots, which stands for Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Street, in Eugene, Oregon, can work to alleviate those situations by responding to those calls in lieu of or alongside police officers.A program in Denver that sent mental-health professionals to answer 911 calls about substance abuse and nonviolent emergencies reduced low-level crimes by 34%, a 2022 study found. Leveraging crisis workers and mental health providers to respond to incidents involving substance abuse, mental health crises, and homelessness, for example, could work to minimize violence.In this April 23, 2020 photo, FDNY paramedic Alex Tull prepares to begin his shift outside EMS station 26, the "Tinhouse", in the Bronx borough of New York City.John Minchillo/AP4. Demilitarization is imperativeA common theme at protest scenes across the country has been police officers' use of military-grade equipment against unarmed civilians.That's largely thanks to a Pentagon program known as 1033, which allows the military to send surplus military equipment to police and sheriff's departments. The program has resulted in local law enforcement agencies being outfitted with armored vehicles, bayonets, and even grenade launchers.But research has shown that receiving more military equipment makes police departments more likely to use it. According to a 2017 study, researchers found that just having the equipment "leads to a culture of militarization" within police departments, causing them to "rely more on violence to solve problems."Former President Barack Obama limited in the program in 2015 and barred certain types of equipment from being sent to police departments.President Donald Trump reversed the action in 2017, and as of 2022 Democratic senators were urging President Joe Biden to rein it in again.Reinstating limits around which type of gear can and should be sold to local law enforcement agencies could help reduce police-inflicted violence and death.Vehicles for the District of Columbia National Guard are seen outside the D.C. Armory, June 1, 2020, in Washington DC.Jacquelyn Martin/AP5. More restrictive laws governing use of force"Use of force," according to the international association of chiefs of police, is the "amount of effort required by police to compel compliance by an unwilling subject."That could encompass everything from using a chokehold, mace, or Taser. Police departments that have more restrictive policies around what use-of-force methods are allowed are much less likely to kill people.After cities like Chicago and Los Angeles adopted more restrictive policies in 2017 and 2019, respectively, the number of police shootings dropped.Campaign Zero suggests departments ban chokeholds, and utilize deadly force as a last resort only after officers have tried and failed to use de-escalation — the strategic slowing down of an incident that allows officers more time, distance, and space to peacefully resolve conflict.These changes, along with requiring departments to report and publish online data on all uses of force, could reduce police violence.Hundreds of protesters took to the streets in San Francisco, California, to demonstrate against police brutality on May 31, 2020.Rob Price/Business Insider2 methods that don't work: implicit-bias trainings and body camerasImplicit-bias trainings have become one of the most popular reforms that police and sheriff's departments have implemented in recent years. The idea is that training officers to be more aware of their subconscious biases about class, gender, and race will help reduce conflicts with marginalized communities.Yet experts have grown skeptical over whether this training works. For one, there are few consistent standards and assessments for the trainings, and therefore it's difficult to track exactly how effective they are, The Atlantic reported.Instead, police-reform advocates have pushed for departments to prioritize de-escalation training, rather than implicit-bias training. Body cameras are another method that haven't been proven effective when it comes to excessive force instances.Though police departments across the country have adopted body cameras for officers — often in response to public pressure for transparency — studies have shown mixed results as to whether they actually reduce excessive-force incidents, and whether they lead to police being disciplined or prosecuted for misconduct.A review of 70 empirical studies on body-worn cameras found that they did not have statistically significant or consistent effects in reducing police use of force.Two motor officers, pose with Digital Ally First Vu HD body worn cameras on their chests outside the police department in Colorado Springs April 21, 2015.ReutersFurthermore, the footage appears to more frequently be used against citizens, not police officers. Research has shown that 93% of prosecutors' offices have used body cameras mostly in cases against citizens, not against police.Though it's unlikely that police departments will be giving up their use of body cameras anytime soon, organizations such as Campaign Zero have advocated for police departments to enforce stricter policies to prevent the cameras from being used to surveil marginalized communities.This article was updated to include the news of the killing of Tyre Nichols. Aylin Woodward contributed to the previous version of this article, originally published on June 3, 2020.  Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

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House Democrats just launched a "Dads Caucus" to push for parental leave, the child tax credit, and universal childcare

"Dads need to do our part advancing policies that will make a difference in the lives of so many working families," Rep. Jimmy Gomez told NBC News Getty US parents are struggling to find and afford childcare. A group of House Democrats just established the "Dads Caucus" to push for reforms. They want to expand parental leave, the child tax credit, and childcare funding to help working families.  America has a childcare problem. A group of Democratic congressmen say they want to push for a better way forward. Last Thursday, House Democrats launched the Congressional Dads Caucus, a group that says it will advocate for legislation that includes guaranteed paid parental leave, the expansion of the child tax credit, and universal childcare. The announcement was made at a press conference by California Rep. Jimmy Gomez, who drew attention earlier this month for bringing his four-month-old son to the House floor during the marathon days-long sequence of votes for speaker of the House."Dads need to do our part advancing policies that will make a difference in the lives of so many working families across the country," Gomez told NBC News. Gomez was joined at the press conference by Reps. Andy Kim of New Jersey, Dan Goldman of New York, and Rashida Talib of Michigan. In 2019, Talib founded the Congressional Mamas' Caucus, a group that has called for family-first and maternal health policies. Members say there are plenty of problems to tackle. The US is the only industrialized country that doesn't require employers to offer paid parental leave, and only 25% of workers have access to it, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.The expanded child tax credit passed in the American Rescue Plan, which offered monthly payments to parents between March and December of 2021, helped reduce the child poverty rate to historic lows. But after the expanded credit ended, 3.7 million children fell back into poverty, according to a Columbia University analysis.In 2018, the Center for American Progress found that over half of Americans lived in an area where childcare was sparse, and even when families do find childcare, it's unaffordable almost everywhere in the US. National childcare costs average over $9,000 annually, and could shoot even higher over the next year as federal funds dry up. "We're determined to achieve real solutions by fighting for our national paid family and medical leave program, affordable high-quality child care, and the expanded Child Tax Credit, which cut child poverty in this country by 40 to 60 percent during the nine months that it was in existence," Gomez said.As of last Thursday, the caucus had grown to about 15 members — all Democrats."I think hopefully at some point it can become bipartisan," Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro told The Washington Post. "When you start a caucus, you kind of have to start from a shared consensus around policy and what you're advocating for, and that's been tough with Republicans in the last few years in particular with these issues."Given Republicans have control of the House, it will likely take a certain amount of bipartisanship for any of the caucus's initiatives to be implemented on a federal level.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

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For the lucky workers who survive layoffs, anxiety and heavier workloads rule

Layoff survivors told Insider they felt worried about their job security after cuts. Research suggests their anxiety hurts morale and performance. Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google parent Alphabet, emailed staff to say the company was cutting about 12,000 jobs.Tsering Topgyal/AP Photo Surviving a round of job cuts can be a hard experience, layoff survivors say. Employees who were kept on told Insider they felt anxious about their job security and overworked. Their anxiety and grief for laid-off coworkers is not good for performance, research shows. The drumbeat of layoffs continues as some of the biggest and best-known companies in the world, including  Amazon, Google, and Goldman Sachs, cut workers. And while those who've lost their jobs are experiencing tremendous financial and professional uncertainty, evidence suggests that workers who survive layoffs also suffer. Research in Harvard Business Review shows that remaining employees might struggle with insecurity, low morale, and survivor guilt. This, in turn, leads to disengagement and lower job performance. Hannah, a senior account manager at a UK-based marketing company, is a prime example. In June 2020, Hannah was unexpectedly told she was being put into a redundancy pool with seven other colleagues. The company had been hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic as several clients had pulled budget, putting the firm into turmoil. "There wasn't a lot of time to process the whole thing," Hannah told Insider. "It was communicated that 75% of us would  lose our jobs out of the pool of people."Hannah was pulled into a four-week redundancy process handled by an external agency that would score employees based on the company's values as well as their knowledge. Questions included: "Are you the right fit for the company? Do you have the right attitude? Do you think about growth opportunities?" Initially, a group chat was set up between the pool of people to help support each other find new jobs because "it was at that moment when we realized that we're all in this situation together," Hannah said.But once people saw the scores at the end of the four weeks, the group chat "just went silent," and the sense of unity collapsed. Hannah and another colleague scored highly and were kept on but, she said, the feeling was that the two had gone from "colleagues to contestants."Insider is not naming Hannah's company to protect her privacy, but she said that the experience hurt her relationships with her colleagues and left her feeling the firm's management lacked empathy. In the aftermath, she said, there was little acknowledgement of what the two layoff survivors had endured."It was just us to get on with stuff and you felt so thankful that you had the job that you were then willing to go totally above and beyond, but you felt depreciated because you've been through this process the last four weeks," she said, adding that she and the remaining colleague feel fear whenever there's a call with the managing director.Waves of layoffs swept corporate America in the final months of 2022, and so far this year, companies from IBM to Microsoft to Dow have cut jobs as companies scramble to get ahead of a possible recession.Amid more economic uncertainty, nearly 40% of US workers are "are nervous about being laid off," according to a LinkedIn survey of more than 2,000 US employees conducted in December. "You become very acutely aware that you are dispensable," Hannah told Insider. "If they're willing to put you through that process once, what's to stop them from doing that again? So it definitely has changed your outlook in terms of your job security and that you need to look after yourself."A manager who took on the workload of laid-off staff was asked to take a pay cutEmily, whose name has been changed to protect her identity, was working as a communications manager at a small publishing company in London in April 2020 when she learned that her entire team had been laid off because of the pandemic. The company, which had employed 12 people at the time, largely slashed junior roles and laid off five people."The job role massively increased because I was doing three people's work," Emily said. "So I was doing my job, and the job of a publicist who would be underneath me and a marketing exec who would be underneath me as well." Her workload multiplied, but instead of a pay rise, management suggested a pay cut. She refused."Once the redundancies were gone and I was doing everyone else's stuff, I was like, 'well there's no way they can get rid of me otherwise part of that business just disappears.'" Emily described feeling "pretty unmotivated" in the aftermath because so many of her friends had been let go, and working remotely didn't help. Additionally, her respect for management dropped because "there was clearly no thinking, no care towards the people, just a lack of organization, strategy, and poor management." With her team gone and fewer meetings, she said things "definitely changed culture-wise," because she was "a lot more isolated." Emily left in 2021, saying the ordeal made her pay more attention to a company's culture while job hunting.Hannah, meanwhile, offered this advice: "Remind yourself that as much as you might be seen as valuable to the company, you are dispensable," she said. "Don't ever feel like you're safe and secure."A version of this story published on September 21, 2022.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

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YouTuber MrBeast gifts eye surgery and a Tesla to man whose eyesight was so bad he could never drive

In MrBeast's latest YouTube video, he paid for 1,000 blind and near-blind people to get cataract removal surgery, as well as cash and other gifts. YouTuber MrBeast paid for 1,000 blind and near-blind people around the world to receive cataract surgery.Jeff Cheatham/HCK2 YouTuber MrBeast paid for 1,000 blind and near-blind people to receive cataract removal surgery. The surgery, which can cost between $3,000 and $5,000 per eye, takes only 10 minutes to complete. One man who couldn't drive because of his bad eyesight was also gifted a red Tesla. YouTuber MrBeast just gave the gift of sight — and a Tesla — to a man that couldn't see clearly for his entire life.In his latest YouTube video, MrBeast, whose real name is Jimmy Donaldson, paid for 1,000 blind and near-blind people all over the world to receive surgery. On top of the cataract surgery that the video describes, some patients received gifts, like $10,000 in cash or $50,000 for a college fund. "Half of all the blindness in the world is people who need a 10-minute surgery," Jeff Levenson, the ophthalmologist and surgeon who worked with Donaldson, says in the video.According to the nonprofit MyVision.org, cataract surgery costs an average of $3,500 per eye.Satchel, one of the recipients of the eye surgery, had poor vision from birth and became almost completely blind after a go-karting accident, Donaldson says in the video."He mentioned multiple times he really wants to drive after this procedure fixes his eyesight, so I'll see you at the end of the video when we surprise him with a brand new Tesla," Donaldson tells the camera after Satchel goes into surgery.Three weeks later, Donaldson lets Satchel, who has never driven before, drive him around a parking lot after surprising him with a red Tesla.Levenson told CNN that Donaldson's team called him in September about the idea, but he almost hung up because he'd "never heard of MrBeast."Since the video was uploaded to the MrBeast channel, which has 130 million subscribers, on Sunday, it's been viewed 48 million times. A representative for Donaldson did not immediately reply to Insider's request for comment.Donaldson is one of the most-followed and highest-paid YouTubers in the world. He first went viral in January 2017 after being active on the platform for almost five years. His videos often consist of elaborate stunts — like a real-life version of "Squid Game" — and giveaways.Those viral videos have made Donaldson a popular presence in his hometown of Greenville, North Carolina, where his Beast Philanthropy organizes regular food drives and other charity efforts. Donaldson is a longtime fan of Tesla CEO Elon Musk. "I really want to be Elon one day," he wrote on Twitter in 2020. Later that year, he tweeted that Musk is his dream collaborator. He's since been critical of Musk, tweeting that the Tesla cofounder should step down as Twitter CEO and dismissing Musk's plan for Twitter to compete with YouTube.  Donaldson's solution? Potentially becoming Twitter CEO himself. In December, he tweeted at Musk. asking if he could have the position. Musk responded that "it's not out of the question."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

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What is drag? Here"s everything you need to know.

Drag has evolved throughout history. Learn what a drag queen is, how drag differs from crossdressing, and why drag queen story hours are under threat. RuPaul and Trixie Mattel during the finale of "RuPaul's Drag Race: All Stars" season 3.VH1 Drag culture has centuries of history behind it, from Ancient Greece to the Harlem Renaissance. LGBTQ historians and experts explained the origins of drag to Insider. Here's a guide to drag culture in the US and how what it means today. An art form. A political statement. A source of entertainment. A communal activity.Drag has many functions and a rich history that goes back centuries. But what is it, exactly, and what isn't it? Insider spoke to historians to find out everything you need to know.Is drag the same as cross-dressing?Drag is the act of highlighting and emphasizing various feminine and masculine features, and it provides an avenue through which people can both subvert and celebrate gender expressions. Drag often gets conflated with cross-dressing, but the two are not synonymous, said Melanie Walsh, a psychology professor at the University of New Haven. Drag emphasizes community and celebration, while cross-dressing is generally a more solitary activity."What separates the two is the performative element," Walsh said. Cross-dressing "is not part of that collective community."The popular Robin Williams movie Mrs. Doubtfire, for example, in which the actor pretends to be a woman housekeeper to spend more time around his kids, does not constitute drag, said humanities professor Harris Kornstein with the University of Arizona. Drag is not simply a man putting on a dress, and that's a "simplistic definition of drag that's really focused on the cross-gendered elements," he said.Oftentimes, there are elements of humor, camp, and over-the-top aesthetics incorporated into drag performances, Korstein said."It really pokes fun at what we think is normal and offers some sort of commentary on culture," he said.Robin Williams in "Mrs. Doubtfire."20th CenturyWhere does drag come from? Experts believe drag evolved from theater. In Ancient Greece and during Shakespearean times, for example, men used to play women's parts because women weren't allowed to, Walsh said. But the way we understand drag today is vastly different. In American society, drag is oftentimes understood as something transgressive, according to Christopher Mitchell, a gender studies professor at CUNY Hunter College. And since the 20th century, it's an activity that's become closely associated with gay culture.The first person to use drag in this context was William Dorsey Swann, an LGBTQ activist who's widely known as the Queen of Drag, Mitchell said. Swann was born in the 1850s and started what's commonly described as the first drag house or drag family, in which he hosted drag balls with his friends. That goal, Mitchell said, seemed to be to create community.Drag as we know it today really surfaced during the late 1800s in the lead-up to the Harlem Renaissance, Walsh told Insider. New York City at the turn of the century was a sociopolitical hub with a booming economy, and gender roles for Black people were particularly stringent, Walsh said. This led to the rise of a drag ball culture. The balls were underground because they were largely illegal, Walsh said. What is a drag queen? Can women be drag queens? The common misconception about drag is that only cis gay men do it, Walsh said. But anyone can do drag. When men do drag, they're called drag queens. And when women do it, they're drag kings. But in drag, cis men don't have to present as women, and cis women don't have to present as men. And trans people can certainly do drag as well. Cis people who do drag are oftentimes exploring aspects of femininity, masculinity, or androgyny, Kornstein told Insider. "Drag is for anyone. Drag is for everyone," Walsh said. Within the drag community in the United States, however, there are disagreements about the function of drag. Walsh said some parts of the deep South, for example, do drag mainly for entertainment, while coastal areas like California and New York might use drag as a politicized action. There's sometimes gatekeeping within the drag community and questions about what is appropriately drag or not, Walsh said. But "there is no right or wrong way to do that art, to do that expression, to do drag," Walsh said.  It's also no longer a western concept, thanks in part to the global popularization of drag through mainstream shows like RuPaul's Drag Race. "Drag is performed in pretty much every corner of the world," Kornstein said.What is the connection between drag and politics?Drag has also always been political, Walsh said. It's always been a legal issue that the state has tried to sanction, she said. Leading up to the middle of the 20th century, drag was "almost an acceptable form of entertainment," Mitchell told Insider. Photos from the 50s in New York City show straight couples attending and enjoying drag performances, he said. But as drag became more closely associated with LGBTQ culture, it was stigmatized, according to Mitchell. That stigmatization continues today and is reflected, in part, by the increasing number of bills attempting to suppress it.Sarah Warbelow, legal director of the Human Rights Campaign, told Insider that there's been an "explosion" of legislation targeting drag performances all over the country in the last year. In the 1960s and 1970s, there were laws that targeted people who wore clothing that wasn't consistent with their sex assigned at birth. This new wave of legislation is "a modern take on that," Warbelow said. In addition to legislation, right-wing activists are also targeting drag performances. Last year, members of the Proud Boys and neo-Nazi groups, for example, protested and stormed drag story hours at local libraries and churches. In this September 8, 2018, file photo, a drag performer by the name of Champagne Monroe reads the children's book "Rainbow Fish" to a group of kids and parents at the Mobile Public Library in Mobile, Alabama.AP Photo/Dan AndersonThere have been instances of powerful cis men mocking drag as well. Former New York City Rudy Giuliani dressed up as a woman in 2000 at an event with former President Donald Trump. The scene, which was intended to be a comedy skit, ended with Trump motorboating Giuliani after calling him beautiful."If we look at those instances of these cis white men who have done that, engaged in that, it's always to make a joke," Walsh said. Their intention, Walsh said, is to devalue the idea of femininity. But at the end of the day, Giuliani wasn't actually participating in drag, Walsh said. "One is a celebration of embracing gender differences, and the other is to put down one gender under the other," she said. What's the future of drag?Despite the threats, drag continues to grow. There's been a lot of grassroots-level organization around drag recently, Walsh said, partly in response to the uptick in violence against drag culture. Drag has become mainstream and accessible through technological advances like the internet, Walsh pointed out. Warbelow said drag can keep proliferating through the support of politicians. Conservative legislators need to "stop demonizing a group of people simply because they don't understand or don't want to understand that community," she said. The way to fight these threats?"The answer is more drag, baby," Harris said. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

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Ford Fry files plans for $2.3M Buckhead restaurant

Ford Fry is moving forward with plans for a new restaurant in Buckhead. A representative for Fry submitted a building permit application to the City of Atlanta for the construction of Little Rey on Northside Parkway. The restaurant is slated to operate out of a space within the forthcoming Northcreek Office Park redevelopment. Atlanta Business Chronicle first reported plans for the restaurant and redevelopment in March 2022. Construction on the roughly 5,500-square-foot Little Rey space is estimated….....»»

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Inside the GSA"s new D.C. workplace lab, where the agency experiments on the future of federal office space

The experiment could help big federal agencies figure out what kinds of space — and how much of it — they need......»»

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Miami-Dade approves apartments at Waterford business park

The business park is home to major companies such as Burger King and Subway......»»

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Oak Village Developers plans townhouses on former church site in Miami Gardens

This would be a rental townhouse community......»»

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Adventure Landing"s property sells for $885,000

Adventure Landing, a miniature golf and arcade property in the Town of Tonawanda, åchas landed a new owner – and one with local roots......»»

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Hundreds to get laid off as two Savannah warehouses shut down

OA Logistics, a supply chain and storage company, will lay off 345 workers......»»

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Advocate Health"s co-CEOs to speak at Milwaukee Business Journal"s March 30 Power Breakfast

Advocate Health co-CEOs Eugene Woods and Jim Skogsbergh will be the speakers at the Milwaukee Business Journal's March 30 Power Breakfast, the first time the two top executives at Wisconsin's largest private employer will appear together in southeastern Wisconsin since the combination of Atrium Health and Advocate Aurora Health......»»

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Tidewater Landing pedestrian bridge lands $350K state grant

The Rhode Island Infrastructure Bank awarded the grant to the City of Pawtucket. It's not clear how much the bridge will cost......»»

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Former Credit Suisse leader"s new startup finds work for climate refugees

A former top executive at Credit Suisse has a new mission — and a new startup. “Talent is everywhere, but opportunity is not, and we wanted to change that,” said Sophia Wajnert, the North Carolina-based former site lead for Credit Suisse (NYSE: CS). Wajnert and her co-founders, Nate Dalton and Charlie Liu, have launched Sora Union to capitalize on the remote working trend, fill the tech talent gap and assist workers in war-torn countries – all at the same time. It’s a bold mission –….....»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~48 min. ago Related News

Gas prices in car-loving Los Angeles are on the rise, again

Gas prices in Los Angeles County have been on the upswing since late December, reaching $4.56 Monday. Prices at the pump have been rising across the nation. Gas prices in Los Angeles County have been on the upswing since late December, reaching $4.56 Monday. Prices at the pump have been rising across the nation......»»

Source:  latimesCategory: top~1 hr. 4 min. ago Related News

Medical technology firm Orchestra BioMed listed on Nasdaq after finalizing SPAC merger

Orchestra BioMed's products in development include a potential treatment for high blood pressure in patients with pacemakers......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

"Interstate 35" movie filming in Northern Kentucky

"Interstate 35," a movie described as a character thriller taking place in the 1990s, got tax credits to film in Northern Kentucky......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Legal Roundup: Appointment in 10th Judicial Circuit, Bradley attorneys recognized

Legal Roundup is the BBJ's weekly look at news and notes from the local legal scene. Send items to aoleary@bizjournals.com......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Ohio State-area projects that would tear down Bier Stube, Little Bar face review board pushback

The project, at 1479 N. High St., would tear down the Bier Stube, a convenience store and Chinese restaurant......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Boeing wins contract for 15 more KC-46 tankers

McConnell Air Force Base in Wichita is home already to 24 of the tankers......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

City of St. Louis officials say new system for granting subsidies will shape future development

The new system that the city of St. Louis will use to award subsidies to developers allows the city to shape future projects by granting incentives for the types of development city officials most want to see, the consultant who developed the plan said......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

CEO of Emerson Health to chair state"s hospital industry group

Christine Schuster, the CEO of Emerson Health, has been elected to be the next chair of the Massachusetts Health and Hospital Association Board of Trustees......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

BRGR closes at the Galleria in Mount Lebanon

A sign posted in the window of the BRGR restaurant at the Galleria in Mount Lebanon indicates it has closed permanently......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Saxco International eyes 100 jobs at new Franklin corporate office

"Just think of your last trip to the grocery store, the diversification of products you see on shelves versus five years ago. That's really what our company helped do," says the company's locally based CFO......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

One of Nashville"s "most photographed" homes up for auction — featuring signed chandelier by Dolly Parton

DeCaro Auctions International is auctioning off the 15,000-square-foot home, located at 9600 Concord Road in Brentwood, on Feb. 18 at 11 a.m......»»

Source:  bizjournalsCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

: Kroger cut to near-term sell at R5 Capital

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Source:  marketwatchCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

: April gold settles at $1,939.20/bbl on Comex, down $6.40, or 0.3%

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Source:  marketwatchCategory: top~1 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Deflationary Ether Is Underperforming Bitcoin, Here Are 3 Reasons Why

While bitcoin has gained nearly 43% this month, ether has appreciated by 36%. Analysts said traders are worried that large amount of ether will be offloaded into the market post-Shanghai upgrade......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

New York Regulator Investigating Crypto Exchange Gemini Over FDIC Claims: Report

Gemini reportedly claimed repeatedly that its the assets of customers using its Earn product were safe thanks to being backed by the FDIC.....»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

First Mover Americas: Bitcoin Was Weekend Warrior

The latest price moves in bitcoin (BTC) and crypto markets in context for Jan. 30, 2023. First Mover is CoinDesk’s daily newsletter that contextualizes the latest actions in the crypto markets......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Sam Bankman-Fried Backed Charity Under UK Probe

The inquiry will investigate the extent of the risk to the charity's assets and whether the trustees are complying with their duties around protection of said assets......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Binance Partners With Mastercard to Launch Prepaid Crypto Card in Brazil

The card will allow payments with 13 cryptocurrencies, including bitcoin, ether and Binance USD......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Crypto India Looks for Relief but Holds Out Little Hope in Budget Speech

India is unlikely to change its restrictive crypto tax rules when Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman unveils the country’s new budget on Wednesday, CoinDesk has learned......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Jailed Kickboxer Andrew Tate Promoted Bitcoin for Tax Avoidance in Video

The video of Andrew Tate, who was 2022's 8th most Googled person, was published by popular YouTube personality and criminal lawyer, Bruce Rivers, earlier this month. But the strategy Tate touted for bitcoin tax avoidance would likely run afoul of the law in many jurisdictions......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Investors Pump Money Into Crypto Funds Amid Pickup in Market Sentiment

Bitcoin dominated this week's inflows, accounting for almost all of the $117 million coming in......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Binance lanza tarjeta cripto prepaga en Brasil en asociación con Mastercard

La tarjeta permitirá realizar pagos con 13 criptomonedas, incluyendo bitcoin, ether y Binance USD......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Artists Weigh In on the Battle Over NFT Creator Royalties

While some NFT marketplaces have switched to royalty-optional models, artists behind PFP collections, one-of-one designs and music NFTs share different thoughts on the future of royalty fees......»»

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BlockFi"s Crypto Mining Assets May Be Headed to Market After Bankruptcy Hearing

The crypto lender’s quest to get its hands on $580 million of Robinhood shares originally owned by FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried has taken another turn, the court was told......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Blockchain Scaling Project Sovereign Labs Raises $7.4 Million in Seed Round

The fundraise was led by Haun Ventures and included Maven 11, 1KX, Robot Ventures and Plaintext Capital......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Elon Musk Wants Twitter Payments System to Accommodate Crypto: FT

Elon Musk Wants Twitter Payments System to Accommodate Crypto: FT.....»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Web3 Security Firm Hypernative Secures $9M in Seed Funding

The company also made public its first product, Pre-Cog, a platform aiming to uncover cyber, economic, governance and community threats before they can have an impact......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Crypto-Focused VC Firm Pantera’s Liquid Token Fund Lost 80% in 2022

The fund took a 23% hit in November in the aftermath of FTX's collapse......»»

Source:  coindeskCategory: forex~2 hr. 3 min. ago Related News

Adviser links: managing behavior

Mondays are all about financial adviser-related links here at Abnormal Returns. You can check out last week’s links including a look at... PodcastsDaniel Crosby talks with Jamie Hopkins, Managing Partner of Wealth Solutions at Carson Group, about understanding our money stories. (standarddeviationspod.com)Michael Kitces talks Jennifer Climo, the CEO and a Senior Advisor for Milestone Financial Planning, about the logistics of merging two practices in just 7 years. (kitces.com)Penn Phillips on four pieces of advice you can ignore this year, or any year. (youtube.com)Bruce Kelly and Jeff Benjamin talk all things Betterment with Thomas Moore, director of Betterment for Advisors. (investmentnews.com)Jamie Hopkins & Ana Trujillo Limón talk with Jon Dauphine who is the CEO of the Foundation for Financial Planning, a nonprofit organization that provides grants and resources to underserved families. (carsongroup.com)The bizCharles Schwab ($SCHW) isn't concerned about new RIA custody competitors. (riabiz.com)An infusion of new capital will allow Elements to move upmarket. (citywire.com)Why Zoe Financial launched its own RIA, Zoe Wealth Platform. (riabiz.com)Why the CFP is splitting into two organizations. (thinkadvisor.com)Practice managementHow Thomas Kopelman used content marketing thoughtfully to build an advisory practice. (kitces.com)How to communicate with a client leaving your practice. (spilledcoffee.substack.com)The vast majority of advisers now use digital onboarding. (investmentnews.com)AdvisersMitch Anthony, "Every human being has the need to be understood, but not every financial services client feels understood by their advisor." (thinkadvisor.com)Managing concentrated positions is an important role advisers can play. (advisorperspectives.com)Eight novel ways to bond with your clients. (blogs.cfainstitute.org)Why firms need to proactively think about reaching younger generations. (investmentnews.com)RMDs are associated with increases in inter-generational transfers. (papers.ssrn.com)There's no downside for aging parents to communicating about your financial plans. (bloomberg.com).....»»

Source:  abnormalreturnsCategory: blog~2 hr. 4 min. ago Related News

Elizabeth Warren says Biden could use other tools to carry out student-loan forgiveness if the Supreme Court strikes it down, but "now is not the time to talk about Plan B"

"If the Supreme Court applies the law as it is written, then that cancellation will go through," Sen. Warren said of student-debt relief. Sen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images Sen. Elizabeth Warren said there are other tools to carry out student-debt relief if the Supreme Court strikes it down. But she said a Plan B should not be the focus right now, and she supports the legality of Biden's plan. Warren had previously advocated for using the Higher Education Act, instead of the HEROES Act, to cancel student debt. Elizabeth Warren vows to keep fighting for student-loan forgiveness — but she doesn't think now is the time to worry about the Supreme Court striking down President Joe Biden's plan.In just over a month, the nation's highest court will hear oral arguments on whether Biden's plan to cancel up to $20,000 in student debt is legal and should be upheld. After Biden announced the relief at the end of August, two conservative-backed lawsuits blocked its implementation. Both of them argue that the president does not have the authority to enact broad debt relief without Congressional approval.Massachusetts Sen. Warren, who had previously advocated for $50,000 in student-debt cancellation, said she's confident Biden's relief will go through."If the Supreme Court applies the law as it is written, then that cancellation will go through. I don't have any doubt about that. The problem now is, I'm worried about a Supreme Court that is playing politics instead of law," Warren said during an interview over the weekend with Boston's GBH News."So what are we trying to be able to do instead? And the answer is, I want to say more than anything else, we're not giving up on this," Warren continued. "We still have a legislature. We still have other tools at the administrative level. But now is not the time to talk about Plan B, because now is the time to keep banging on the Supreme Court and say, 'Apply the law as it is written.'"Warren did not elaborate on other tools to cancel student debt in this particular interview, but in the past, she — along with some other Democratic lawmakers — have called for the administration to use the Higher Education Act of 1965 to get debt relief to millions of borrowers.Currently, Biden's plan relies on the HEROES Act of 2003, which gives the Education Secretary the ability to waive or modify student-loan balances in connection with a national emergency. But the lawsuits blocking the relief, and some GOP lawmakers, have claimed Biden cannot continue relying on COVID-19 to cancel student debt, and the Higher Education Act would address that claim because it allows for the modification of student-loan balances without the presence of a national emergency.In September 2020, the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School even wrote a memo for Warren supporting the usage of the Higher Education Act, saying that the "Secretary has the authority to modify a loan to zero, and exercises this authority even in the absence of any implementing regulations."Still, while that option is on the table, the White House said it is not considering that, or anything else at the moment. Bharat Ramamurti, deputy director of the National Economic Council, told reporters on a press call last week that the White House is not discussing a Plan B if the Supreme Court doesn't rule in its favor."We are not deliberating or considering any other kind of alternative approach," he said. "We're fully committed to the approach that the Secretary of Education used in this case, and we're confident in our legal authority."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

I spent $800 for a roomette on a 57-hour Amtrak trip. It gave me a taste of luxury travel — and I don"t want to go back to coach.

After a lifetime of traveling in coach, the three-day Amtrak trip from Montana to New York City was the closest I've ever been to first-class. I was blown away by how luxurious Amtrak's mid-tier accommodation felt.Jordan Parker Erb/Insider This month, I went on my first cross-country train trip, a 57-hour ride from Montana to New York. After a lifetime traveling in coach, I upgraded to a roomette, Amtrak's mid-level accommodation. The private room, meals, and lounge gave me a taste of luxury. Now I don't want to go back to coach. For the past 25 years, all of my travel has been in coach.Traveling by train was my first experience outside economy class.Jordan Parker Erb/InsiderWhether I'm traveling by plane or train, I always book the cheapest tickets possible, typically landing me somewhere near the back.When traveling by plane, I covet the plush, first-class seats at the front. As I board, hauling my bags to the last row, I find myself admiring the luxurious seats — the way they recline into beds; the way the people in them always seem relaxed and are somehow always sipping a mimosa. How do they look so rested, so at peace in the midst of the chaos of travel? I quickly learned that when it comes to travel, money buys rest.While in the Amtrak roomette, I felt more rested than I ever have while traveling.Jordan Parker Erb/InsiderThis month, I booked a roomette on an Amtrak trip from Montana to New York City. For $837, I got a taste of luxury: a private room with two beds, three complimentary meals a day, and access to a private lounge in Chicago's Union Station. Insider paid for the accommodation, per our reporting standards.The trip, which took a total of 57 hours, was the closest I'll ever get to first class. It gave me a glimpse into the lifestyles of rich and rested travelers — and I don't want to go back to coach.By booking an Amtrak roomette, I got access to first-class amenities.With a lie-flat bed to sleep in at night, Amtrak's roomette provided a seamless way to stay rested while traveling.Jordan Parker Erb/InsiderRoomettes are Amtrak's mid-level accommodation, and the cheapest way to travel if you want to have a bed. Because I was traveling alone and the roomettes are designed to fit two people, I had the entire space to myself — and was blown away. Roomettes come with two seats that fold into a bed, and an upper bunk for a second traveler. The sleeper car has a dedicated attendant who helps make the beds when it's time to sleep.With the seats folded into a bed, I had enough room to sleep sprawled out — not folded over a tray table or crammed against the window like I'm used to. With my room door closed, I couldn't hear other travelers or howling infants nearby, and unlike in economy seats, could sleep without headphones.  Each morning I woke feeling rested and energized. My two nights spent in the roomette showed me that there are two key factors that make travel feel more luxurious: privacy and space. Coming in at about 23 square feet, the roomette had more space and amenities than I've ever had while traveling by plane.The roomette came with unexpected amenities, including ample storage and a small mirror.Jordan Parker Erb/InsiderLocated in a car at the back of the train, my roomette had enough space for everything I packed. If I needed my suitcase, it could fit on an extra chair in the room; but when I was done with it, I could put it on a rack in the hallway.With my suitcase stored, I had plenty of room to spread out. The room came with a mirror, hooks, and hangers for my clothes, as well as enough outlets for my devices. The steps that led to the top bunk doubled as shelves, so there was ample space for a book, water bottle, and other little belongings.Unlike in economy class, my roomette came with three complimentary meals each day.The train's dining cart was charming and quaint, and the food was better than expected.Jordan Parker Erb/InsiderWhile on short flights, I'm prepared for measly snacks, like a handful of peanuts or pretzels. While on long flights, I'm prepared for borderline inedible meals. For this trip, I had steeled myself for the same — but was impressed by what I got instead.When I took a seat on the train's dining cart, I found a menu that resembled any given restaurant, offering pasta, burgers, sandwiches, and more. There were even vegetarian options, for herbivores like myself, which were surprisingly good.The vegan Bolognese, sandwiches, and baked potatoes with vegan chili eclipsed anything I've had on an economy flight. The desserts — cheesecake, mousse, layer cake — left Biscoff cookies in the dust.Dinner came with a complimentary alcoholic beverage — so I, too, could have been nonchalantly sipping a mimosa, if I chose to.While on a layover in Chicago, I got access to Union Station's Metropolitan Lounge.The Metropolitan Lounge (left) is inside Chicago's opulent Union Station.Jordan Parker Erb/InsiderPrior to booking a roomette, I had never visited lounges at airports or train stations. I've grown used to spending long layovers stationed wherever I can find a seat. But with the roomette, I was afforded lounge access during my five-hour layover in Chicago's Union Station and got a glimpse at what I've been missing out on all these years.When I arrived at the Metropolitan Lounge at 5 p.m., I found free snacks, coffee, and tea, as well as clean, private showers. Spread out over three floors, the lounge was filled with so much seating I couldn't imagine a situation in which every chair would be taken. After a shower, a meal, and a hot tea, I boarded the train for my final stretch to New York City.Overall, my experience traveling by train was leagues above flying.A view of the sunset over the Hudson River during my final night in the roomette.Jordan Parker Erb/InsiderEven though it took about seven times longer and was twice as expensive as flying, (it can take as few as eight hours and cost as little as $400 to fly from my hometown, Helena, to New York City) taking the train was a far better, more luxurious experience. The meals, extra space, and the ability to get a good night's sleep made me wish that I could travel like this more often. And as I crawled into bed on my final night in the roomette, I thought once again of the relaxed, posh people I see in the first-class airplane seats. "No wonder they're so rested," I thought as I drifted off, rocked to sleep by the motion of the train.For 57 hours, I was lucky enough to live like one of those people.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

The stock market is facing a make-or-break week as investors try to hold onto the latest rally amid Fed moves and big-name earnings

"We believe the rally rests on the shoulders of heavyweights Apple, Amazon, and Alphabet," Fairlead Strategies' Katie Stockton said. Lucas Jackson/ReutersIt's a make-or-break week for the stock market and its current rally, according to Fairlead Strategies' Katie Stockton.She said a lot of stocks need to sustain their recent gains by the end of this week to confirm a breakout.But big volatility events like the Fed's expected rate hike and mega-cap tech earnings could derail the breakouts.This week is make-or-break for the stock market as investors contend with a convergence of key technical breakout confirmations and market-shaking news.According to Fairlead Strategies' Katie Stockton, the year-to-date rally in stocks helped trigger several breakouts last week that are seeking confirmation this Friday based on the level they finish the week at.Specifically, the S&P 500's breakout above resistance of 4,020 last week won't be confirmed unless the index closes this Friday above 4,050, Stockton said in a Monday note. The S&P 500 currently trades at about 4,040."A short-term overbought downturn cautions against positioning for upside follow-through prematurely. If a breakout is confirmed, next resistance is [about] 4,225," Stockton said of the S&P 500.A jump to that level represents potential upside of 5% from current levels. Nvidia is another large-cap stock to watch this week, as it needs to close above $188 this Friday to confirm last week's breakout."Should it hold above $188 through Friday, a breakout would be confirmed in a market positive, whereas a failed breakout would be a setback," Stockton said. Nvidia traded around $196 on Monday.But a lot could happen between now and the closing bell on Friday, as market-shaking news is expected from the Federal Reserve and mega-cap tech earnings.Fed Chairman Jerome Powell is expected to hike interest rates by 25 basis points at the end of the FOMC meeting on Wednesday, while Apple, Amazon, and Alphabet all report earnings results after the market close on Thursday.Microsoft reported its earnings results last week and saw an initial 4% pop that led to a 4% decline before the stock ultimately recovered its losses. So if Microsoft is any example, volatility should pick up later this week.And any negative surprises could derail the recent stock market rally and negate a lot of technical progress made in equities over the past week.So, no pressure mega-cap tech, but pressure."We believe the rally rests on the shoulders of heavyweights Apple, Amazon, and Alphabet, which are showing softness today as the market anticipates their earnings," Stockton said.Those three stocks were down between 1% and 2% on Monday, about on par with the 1.5% decline seen in the Nasdaq 100.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

"Selling Sunset" star Jason Oppenheim says the real-estate market bottomed out in 2022, but a full recovery may still be a couple years away

Oppenheim also said that demand for homes was so hot during the pandemic that sellers would get '10 offers on a crappy home with no yard.' Selling Sunset broker Jason Oppenheim tells Insider Amy Sussman/Staff/Getty Images Jason Oppenheim said the US real estate market will have "a rough couple of years" in an interview with Yahoo. Inventory levels and high interest rates are the two primary concerns among homebuyers, he added. Oppenheim said buying is still a good long-term investment if buyers can limit their short-term costs. Jason Oppenheim, the star of the hit Netflix series "Selling Sunset," offered a somber outlook for the US real estate market in an interview with Yahoo Finance over the weekend. Oppenheim, whose eponymous brokerage is based in Los Angeles, said the real estate market likely bottomed out at the end of 2022, but it could still take a couple of years to fully recover. Two factors Oppenheim pointed out that could impede the recovery include homeowners who are reluctant to put their homes on the market because they have a low interest rate mortgage, as well as an overall low supply of homes for new buyers to purchase. "I'm generally optimistic, but I don't want to pretend like the real estate market is going to be on the rise," Oppenheim said. The US real estate market witnessed a meteoric rise in home prices between early 2020 and last summer as demand surged during the pandemic. Between March 2020 and May 2022, the US national median home price increased by more than 42% up to more than $431,000, according to data from Redfin. However, median home prices have steadily declined by about 10% since May 2022 and currently sit near $388,000. Some western markets have seen their home prices drop more significantly. For example, Redfin data shows the median home price in pandemic boomtowns like Denver has declined by more than 18% to $529,000 since its peak in April 2022. In Boise, Idaho, the median sales price has declined by about 17% since May 2022 to $485,000, according to Redfin stats. That rise in home prices was partly due to historically low inventory and low interest rates, combined with a flood of stimulus money. While interest rates have steadily increased since the beginning of the pandemic, inventory remains a challenge in many markets across the country. In turn, the combination of higher interest rates and lower demand has brought some "homeostasis" to the market because home prices are not rising nearly as fast as they once were, Oppenheim said. However, the market is still in for a "rough couple of years" until inventory levels recover. "In terms of prices, I think there's going to be some stability, which is probably healthy for the market," Oppenheim said. "So, I think we're going to see a relatively healthy market over the next couple of years."Interest rates remain a concern among homebuyers of all income brackets, Oppenheim added, because they make it more expensive to buy a home and can also depress inventory levels. One way that potential homebuyers can reduce their monthly payments is to take out a mortgage with a five- or 10-year term instead of the traditional 30-year fixed mortgage, Oppenheim said. This approach could give buyers more flexibility to refinance their mortgage and get a lower interest rate, or to limit the transaction costs a buyer pays at closing, he added. "It's always better to buy versus rent, especially if you can hold the asset through the ups and downs and take advantage of the appreciation over a decade or two," Oppenheim said about whether buying a home is still a good long-term investment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Source:  nytCategory: world~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

TikTok CEO to testify before Congress in March as US weighs ban

TikTok CEO Shou Zi Chew will testify before Congress for the first time in March as the U.S. continues to consider whether to ban the Chinese-owned app from its shores......»»

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Biden rule letting retirement fund managers consider ESG factors to take effect despite red states" lawsuit

A new rule going into effect Monday allows managers of retirement funds to factor in companies' environmental and social stances when making investment decisions......»»

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Americans fear recession, but most believe their jobs are safe: Survey

Many Americans have a negative outlook on the economy, but say they didn't believe a downturn would impact their jobs, according to a new survey......»»

Source:  foxnewsCategory: top~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Gunther VI, the "richest dog in the world," gets his tale told in Netflix doc: ‘Every good story has secrets’

Gunther, a German shepherd, has a net worth of a reported $400 million. He made headlines for selling a Miami mansion that once belonged to Material Girl Madonna......»»

Source:  foxnewsCategory: top~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Musk gives inside look at Twitter HQ: A "flaming dumpster rolling down the street’

"The Rubin Report" host Dave Rubin was invited to Twitter's headquarters, where Elon Musk showed him how the tech giant was built to "suppress certain voices and elevate others.".....»»

Source:  foxnewsCategory: top~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Ford cutting electric Mustang Mach-E prices by up to $5,900

Ford has announced price reductions for the Mustang Mach-E electric SUV that go into effect immediately and range from $600 to $5,900, depending on the model......»»

Source:  foxnewsCategory: top~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Colorado hardware store robbed in broad daylight: "Decriminalized theft" is the problem

Green Mountain, Colorado Ace Hardware store owner Todd Erwin told FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo that the crime crisis in his area has led to daily retail crime......»»

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Still time to save: Today’s 30-year mortgage rates hold steady | Jan. 30, 2023

Check out the mortgage rates for Jan. 30, 2023, which are largely unchanged from last Friday......»»

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Philips cuts 6K more jobs to improve profitability

Philips announced Monday that it is reducing its global workforce for the second time in recent months as it works to boost profitability following a recall of its sleep apnea machines......»»

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Wall Street economist says recession in 2023 will look like biggest crisis of the 1970s

Piper Sandler chief global economist Nancy Lazar warns people are too focused on a recession that feels like 2008, when it's more similar to volatility in 1973-74......»»

Source:  foxnewsCategory: top~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

US’ tripartite chip alliance should spook China

Japan and the Netherlands are particularly dominant in a manufacturing process called lithography: using light to print tiny circuits on silicon wafers......»»

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Americans delay retirement, looking to gig work to make ends meet

With inflation and the cost of living on the rise, older workers are increasingly looking to the gig economy to keep afloat, according to data released by the AARP......»»

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Chinese consumers seem willing to spend money again after 3 years of economic uncertainty

In 2022, China showed the second-lowest growth level in more than four decades. But with COVID restrictions lifted, Chinese consumers are showing new confidence......»»

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Good news: Personal loan interest rates plummet for 3- and 5-year loans

The latest trends in interest rates for personal loans from the Credible marketplace, updated weekly......»»

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Putin on phone with Saudis ahead of OPEC+ committee meeting on Wednesday

Oil prices are lower after Russian President Vladamir Putin reportedly met with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ahead of OPEC + meeting to discuss global oil market......»»

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The Super Bowl food staples consumers should watch for

Food costs are still elevated, with groceries up 11.8% in December. However, Wells Fargo economists highlight how some staples may have eased in price......»»

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Russia boosts China trade to counter Western sanctions

Russia and China have spent years building stronger economic ties, including a $55 billion gas pipeline and Russia’s increased usage of China’s yuan......»»

Source:  foxnewsCategory: top~2 hr. 20 min. ago Related News

Bexar County foreclosures surged in 2022 following expiration of pandemic moratorium

Following a two-year lull caused by a federal moratorium on evictions during the pandemic, foreclosures in Bexar County surged almost 70% in 2022 – however, those figures are far below 2019 numbers......»»

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Wild Eggs sold to Florida-based investment group

The new ownership group plans to open additional locations in Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio......»»

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Miami-Dade Beacon Council names new CEO

The announcement comes 10 months after the unexpected death of former president and CEO Michael A. Finney......»»

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Why is an Orlando-based construction supplier expanding? Lake County homebuilders know.

In total, the company has 125 employees across its locations in Orlando, Holly Hill and Leesburg......»»

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Rollins starts 2023 with new executive leaders

Pest control giant Rollins Inc. picked its new CEO to succeed Gary Rollins and a new president for subsidiary Orkin......»»

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Rev Group CEO Rod Rushing steps down immediately, CFO named interim chief

Rev Group president and CEO Rod Rushing “has stepped down” from his role leading the company and the Brookfield-based manufacturer of specialty vehicles said chief financial officer Mark Skonieczny has been named interim CEO......»»

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Reed Smith opens Orange County office

Pittsburgh's biggest law firm marks fifth location in California......»»

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Workplace well-being: Taking care of those who care for our patients

As we enter 2023, Virginia Mason Franciscan Health will be focused on our workforce. As staffing shortages continue to plague our industry, we need to increase the talent pipeline of health care professionals not only in the Pacific Northwest, but across the country. There are many reasons health systems across the country are facing chronic staffing vacancies; in particular, nurses, who are consistently in high demand. The unparalleled nursing shortage we are facing is a result of many contributing….....»»

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