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$87.8 Million Bel Air Mansion Horribly Flops At Auction

$87.8 Million Bel Air Mansion Horribly Flops At Auction Crashed crypto markets, plunging stocks and bonds, looming housing market meltdown, interest rate shock, and the threat of a recession have spooked speculators, including ones bidding on a massive Bel Air mansion that flopped at auction, according to CNBC.  The mood among 'movers and shakers' is sheer pessimism as financial markets are stuck in a doom loop of turmoil thanks to the Federal Reserve embarking on one of the most aggressive tightening cycles in decades, if not ever.  So the timing of dermatologist-turned-developer Alex Khadavi to auction off 777 Sarbonne Road, located in a residential neighborhood on the Westside of Los Angeles, was particularly bad. Though listing the modern mansion wasn't his choice considering he filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection before listing the mansion last year.  Khadavi owes several creditors tens of millions of dollars. The mansion sat on the market for a year and was just auctioned off with Concierge Auctions. He was hoping for $87.8 million, though the highest bid came in just under $45.8 million, falling short of the $50 million reserve. The bankruptcy court will now decide if the highest bid is an acceptable offer and determine if the home sale will move forward in early June. The sale would help Khadavi satisfy his debt with creditors.  Despite controversy between Khadavi and the auctioneer for not starting the bid at the reserve, Concierge's president, Chad Roffers, said: "After a spirited auction, the bidding is closed and the high bid is in the hands of the Trustee. With over 80 qualified showings in the last 60 days, we are confident market value was delivered."  Co-listing agent, Aaron Kirman of Compass, said he wasn't pleased with the highest bid, though, "at the end of the day, the highest bidder is the highest bidder." It just so happens it's a 50% haircut from the initial list price one year ago.  The auction results suggest a souring mood among wealthy elites generally viewed as smart money. Perhaps this is an example of the shifting tide in real estate markets and how a broader market cooling is just ahead.  Tyler Durden Wed, 05/18/2022 - 21:45.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytMay 18th, 2022

Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen owned 2 pro sports teams before he died in 2018. Rumors are swirling about their fate — and now Nike"s founder could pay $2 billion to own one of them.

When Allen died in 2018, he left behind a collection of assets ranging from luxury properties to a 414-foot megayacht — and two pro sports teams. Portland Trail Blazers owner Paul Allen during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Golden State Warriors in January 2017.Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Speculation is mounting that late Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen's pro sports teams could be sold. Nike founder Phil Knight already submitted a $2 billion bid for the Portland Trail Blazers. Allen's trust has sold off other assets, including property and a yacht, since his death in 2018. When Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen died in 2018, he left behind a collection of assets ranging from multimillion-dollar properties to a 414-foot megayacht.While much of it has been sold in the years since, two expensive — and high-profile — holdings remain: the NBA' Portland Trail Blazers and the NFL' Seattle Seahawks. The fates of Allen's pro sports teams have been unclear since his death, when his trust passed into the hands of his sister, Jody Allen. Jody Allen hasn't given a single interview in the intervening years, which means there are few clues about the future of the two teams. But speculation is mounting that both teams could be sold off to fulfill the terms of Paul Allen's estate, and sold off in the near future. With both teams valued at or above $2 billion, there's a small pool of moguls wealthy enough to submit a bid — and one famous exec has already made an offer. Here's what we know about Allen's estate, and the future of his teams. Allen made his fortune building Microsoft with Bill GatesAnn E. Yow-Dyson/Getty ImagesPaul Allen and his Microsoft cofounder, Bill Gates, met in high school and founded the company in 1975 — it was Allen who coined the name "Microsoft." Allen left the company in the early 1980s after being diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma. In the decades that followed, he spent his time as a philanthropist, donating millions, and pursuing his hobbies, like exploring shipwrecks, music, collecting art and mansions, and, eventually, purchasing the Blazers and the Seahawks. At the time of Allen's death, Forbes placed his net worth at $20 billion. He bought the Portland Trail Blazers in 1988Portland Trail Blazers center J.J. Hickson, left, and Atlanta Hawks forward Al Horford battle for the ball as team owner Paul Allen looks on in the background.Don Ryan/APAllen paid $70 million for the Blazers back in the late 1980s and promised to keep the team in Portland — today, the Blazers are valued at $2.05 billion, according to Forbes. Allen frequently flew from Seattle to sit courtside at Blazers games, sometimes with his Microsoft cofounder, Gates. In the early 1990s, only a few years after Allen bought the team, the Blazers reached the NBA finals twice in two years, though the team has never won a championship under his ownership. The Blazers were beset by challenges throughout Allen's tenure as owner, including coaching issues, ill-advised trades, financial issues with a new arena, and, in the mid-2000s, a losing record that led to plummeting fan attendance. Allen almost sold the team in 2006 but later called it off — soon after, the team turned things around, journalist Mike Tokito wrote in Forbes in 2018."Once you own a team for as many years as I have, and you root for that team for that period of time, you've got rooting for the Blazers in your blood," Allen once told Tokito.Allen picked up the Seattle Seahawks in 1996Seattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen lifts the Vince Lombardi trophy after the team won the Super Bowl in 2014.Ted S. Warren/APAllen bought the Seahawks in 1997, paying $194 million for his hometown team. His ownership came about after then-owner Ken Behring mulled moving the team to Los Angeles because he couldn't get the public funding he needed to build the team a new stadium. Allen stepped in, purchasing the exclusive option to buy the team and keep it in Seattle, according to The New York Times. Allen later spent hundreds of millions of dollars on stadium upgrades and saw the team make it to three Super Bowls, including a win in 2014. Now worth $3.5 billion, the Seahawks are the 12th-most valuable team in the NFL, according to Forbes.Allen died in 2018 and his assets have slowly been sold offSeattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen before a game against the San Francisco 49ers in 2010.Elaine Thompson/APAllen died on October 15, 2018 due to complications from non-Hodgkins lymphoma. "My brother was a remarkable individual on every level," Jody Allen wrote in a statement at the time. "At this time of loss and grief for us — and so many others — we are profoundly grateful for the care and concern he demonstrated every day."After Allen's death, Jody Allen became head of his trust and soon after, some of Allen's assets were put up for sale. A 120-acre property in a coveted Beverly Hills neighborhood went on the market for $150 million in 2018 — it was almost sold to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and was eventually purchased by ex-Google CEO Eric Schmidt earlier this year. Another property, Allen's Silicon Valley mansion, went on the market in 2019 and sold for $35.2 million in early 2020. And in 2021, a buyer shelled out for Allen's megayacht, Octopus, which was listed for $278 million.  The rest of Allen's trust now needs to be sold, according to reportsA makeshift memorial for Portland Trail Blazers' owner Paul Allen outside the team's arena in 2018.Jaime Valdez-USA TODAY Sports/ReutersJohn Canzano, a Portland-based sports writer and talk-show host, recently reported that the sales of Allen's other assets are in line with the terms of his trust, which was established in the early 1990s.Canzano said he spoke with people familiar with the terms who told him that Allen wanted the trust liquidated after his death and the money used to fund causes he was passionate about, like brain research. "None of this is up in the air," one source told him. "The instructions are clear: The sports franchises and everything in the trust must be sold."The Blazers say they're not for sale — but the team already has one high-profile offerChristian Petersen/Getty ImagesCanzano reported that the Trail Blazers could be put up for auction in the next six to 18 months — and bidders are already swooping in. The New York Times reported Thursday that Nike founder Phil Knight and Alan Smolinisky, a part-owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers, submitted a bid over $2 billion to buy the team. Knight and Smolinisky have had discussions with Jody Allen about a sale over the past several weeks, The Times reported. A Blazers spokesperson confirmed that Knight made an offer, but added: "The team remains not for sale."The future of Allen's two teams is unclear, but we could see major sales in the futureSeattle Seahawks owner Paul Allen waves as he is honored for his 20 years of team ownership in September 2017.Elaine Thompson/APKnight may not be the only business mogul in the running for one of Allen's teams — there are only so many pro sports teams and only so many people or private equity firms equipped to make a billion-dollar deal.Canzano reported that Oracle billionaire Larry Ellison could also consider buying the Blazers. Ellison's net worth hovers around $91 billion, and he's tried multiple times in the past to purchase an NBA franchise.And Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, the world's second-richest person, has been linked to four NFL teams over the past few years. Both disgruntled team owners and diehard fans have hoped for a Bezos bailout, and multiple media reports have said Bezos is interested in team ownership, though he's never confirmed it.According to the Seattle Times, the Seahawks have also said that they're not for sale and won't be anytime in the near future. But as ESPN reported Thursday, "the belief has long been that sales of the Blazers and the NFL's Seattle Seahawks are part of an eventual plan for the trust."While it's unclear when and if these franchises will sell — and who they'll sell to — it's likely that rumors will only continue to swirl about the future of Allen's teams. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 5th, 2022

This over-the-top Beverly Hills mansion struggled to find a buyer for years. It finally sold last year but is back on the market for $120 million, more than twice its sale price — take a look inside.

Beverly Hills mansion Villa Firenze is back on the market. It has 12 bedrooms, 14 bathrooms, a two-story guest house, and even a gift-wrapping room. Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty A 31,000-square foot Beverly Hills mansion just listed for $120 million, just over a year after it sold for $51 million. Villa Firenze has 12 bedrooms, 14 bathrooms, a two-story guest house, and even a gift-wrapping room. Take a look inside the massive home, which spans nearly 10 acres. An uber-extravagant megamansion has hit the market...Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty...for the cool price of $120 million. (Pocket change, I know.)Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyIt's called Villa Firenze.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyIt's not, however, in Florence.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyIt's in Beverly Hills.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyVilla Firenze covers 9.85 acres across three lots.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Sotheby's International RealtyThere's 31,624 square feet of interior living space.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Sotheby's International RealtyThe property has 12 bedrooms...Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Sotheby's International Realty...including separate maid's quarters, according to its previous Zillow listing.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: ZillowThere are 14 full bathrooms...Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Sotheby's International Realty...and four partial bathrooms.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Sotheby's International RealtyVilla Firenze is located in "the most exclusive guard-gated community in Los Angeles," according to the Zillow listing.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: ZillowIt's accessed via its own private street.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyIts many rooms include a wine cellar, a den, and a massive center hall.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: ZillowThere's a library with a secret passage to the master suite.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyIt has a large formal dining room in addition to family dining off of the kitchen.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Sotheby's International RealtySpeaking of kitchens, there are several of those, including this one...Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty...and this one.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyThere's also a two-story guest house, as well as a spa and even a gift-wrapping room.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Zillow and Sotheby's International RealtyMany rooms have exposed wood beams, like this one. Others have features like 20-foot ceilings and stone floors.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyFor recreation, there's a gym, an outdoor tennis court, and a jogging path encircling the property.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyAlso outside, there's a large motor court and a courtyard with room to park 30 cars.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyThe home's backyard spans more than four acres.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: ZillowThere's a pool and jacuzzi...Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty...as well as a two-bedroom pool house nearby.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyThere's a storied history to the home's ownership over the years.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyFor starters, this is the second time the mansion has been up for sale in just over a year.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyVilla Firenze was built in 1998.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyAirplane leasing tycoon Steven Udvar-Hazy owned the property at the time.REUTERS/Jean-Philippe ArlesIn 2018, he put the home on the market with an asking price of a whopping $165 million.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Mansion GlobalWhen no one bit, Udvar-Hazy put Villa Firenze up for auction in January 2021.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: Mansion GlobalBiotech entrepreneur Roy Eddleman scooped up the property at a heavily discounted price.Rachel Murray/Getty Images for Carl F. BuchererVilla Firenze sold for $51 million at the time.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyThat's a discount of nearly 70% off of Udvar-Hazy's original $165 million asking price.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyAfter transfer taxes, fees, and commissions, Eddleman's final bill came out to $57 million, listing agent Richard Klug told Insider.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyAt the time, the sale set the record for the most expensive property to ever be sold at auction.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySource: The Wall Street JournalSo why is Villa Firenze's $120 million listing price so much higher just a year later?Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty"At the time of the purchase, I thought it was worth considerably more, but only three buyers showed up at the auction and shortly dropped out," Klug said.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyHe says another factor behind the drastic price increase is the high cost of other homes in the area.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty"This year, Beverly Park has become very popular with some very high sales, which have driven the values up," Klug said.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyThe $120 million price tag was determined based on a home sale in the area, he says.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty"49 Beverly Park sold for $70 million in March of this year with almost the identical size of home and guest houses but with only 2.2 acres of land on one Beverly Park parcel," Klug said. "Villa Firenze is 9.8 acres on three Beverly Park Parcels and is worth much more due to the acreage. We took the $70 million comparable sale and added for the extra land to compute the asking price."Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyAs for the home's quick return to the market, Klug says Eddleman initially "bought it for investment and planned to live there for several years."Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyHowever, "he has found that the property is just too big for him and has his eye on a smaller property," Klug said.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtySo who's biting now?Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyKlug says most of the inquiries he's gotten about Villa Firenze so far have been from local residents. Given the size of the property, most of the people expressing interest are also those who could really use a lot of space.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty"This property can easily accommodate a large family and plenty of guests in the guest house and pool house," he said. "Most of our inquiries so far have been from this type of buyer."Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyFor all the home's amenities, Klug thinks the size of the lawn and pool are "probably the most eye-catching features."Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International Realty"This is a rare opportunity to buy one of the largest estates in the Los Angeles area," Klug said.Adam Latham for Sotheby’s International RealtyRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 19th, 2022

$87.8 Million Bel Air Mansion Horribly Flops At Auction

$87.8 Million Bel Air Mansion Horribly Flops At Auction Crashed crypto markets, plunging stocks and bonds, looming housing market meltdown, interest rate shock, and the threat of a recession have spooked speculators, including ones bidding on a massive Bel Air mansion that flopped at auction, according to CNBC.  The mood among 'movers and shakers' is sheer pessimism as financial markets are stuck in a doom loop of turmoil thanks to the Federal Reserve embarking on one of the most aggressive tightening cycles in decades, if not ever.  So the timing of dermatologist-turned-developer Alex Khadavi to auction off 777 Sarbonne Road, located in a residential neighborhood on the Westside of Los Angeles, was particularly bad. Though listing the modern mansion wasn't his choice considering he filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection before listing the mansion last year.  Khadavi owes several creditors tens of millions of dollars. The mansion sat on the market for a year and was just auctioned off with Concierge Auctions. He was hoping for $87.8 million, though the highest bid came in just under $45.8 million, falling short of the $50 million reserve. The bankruptcy court will now decide if the highest bid is an acceptable offer and determine if the home sale will move forward in early June. The sale would help Khadavi satisfy his debt with creditors.  Despite controversy between Khadavi and the auctioneer for not starting the bid at the reserve, Concierge's president, Chad Roffers, said: "After a spirited auction, the bidding is closed and the high bid is in the hands of the Trustee. With over 80 qualified showings in the last 60 days, we are confident market value was delivered."  Co-listing agent, Aaron Kirman of Compass, said he wasn't pleased with the highest bid, though, "at the end of the day, the highest bidder is the highest bidder." It just so happens it's a 50% haircut from the initial list price one year ago.  The auction results suggest a souring mood among wealthy elites generally viewed as smart money. Perhaps this is an example of the shifting tide in real estate markets and how a broader market cooling is just ahead.  Tyler Durden Wed, 05/18/2022 - 21:45.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytMay 18th, 2022

Russian oligarch"s most prized assets, from superyachts and jets to properties are being targeted by sanctions. Here"s what"s been seized so far.

Sanctioned individuals by Western countries have had their most precious assets seized by authorities amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Phi, seized by the UK (left), Roman Abramovich, and Alexei Mordashov's Nord arriving in Vladivostok.Richard Baker/Alexander Hassenstein/Pavel Korolyov/Getty Images Oligarchs have been the target of Western countries' sanctions amid Russia's war in Ukraine.  Some of their assets, including superyachts and properties, have been seized by governments.  Here's a look at the assets that have been seized. Sanctioned Russian oligarchs have had their assets seized by governments due to sanctions levied against them by Western countries following Russia's invasion of Ukraine on February 24. Sanctions have hit some of the wealthiest businessmen, including Chelsea FC's owner Roman Abramovich, Alexei Mordashov, who is currently Russia's third-richest man, and the family of Dmitry Peskov, who is Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesperson.The actions taken against key Russian figures aimed to choke off the country's ability to access critical cash reserves and cut it off from the world. Meanwhile, Russian billionaires have had their superyachts and properties seized, as well as their jets detained on the grounds. The whereabouts of Abramovich's two superyachts, worth more than $1 billion, have been scrutinized and monitored in recent weeks. He has been spotted at peace talks between Russia and Ukraine, and was reportedly the target of a suspected poison attack. A month on from Russia invading Ukraine, here's a look at what has been seized so far. SuperyachtsThe yacht "Lady M," which is owned by Russian oligarch Alexei Mordashov.ANDREA BERNARDI/AFP via Getty Images.Superyachts, many of which are worth millions of dollars, have been primarily targeted by sanctions. However, while authorities have tried to seize several of the 400 sanctioned Russian oligarchs, some remain untraceable. At least nine superyachts owned by Russian tycoons switched off their tracking systems after the Ukraine war began. Amore VeroLinked to Igor Sechin, Russia's former deputy prime minister and CEO of state-controlled oil giant Rosneft, Amore Vero was seized by French authorities on March 3. Sechin, whose yacht is valued at $120 million, has been sanctioned by the US, UK and EU. Lena and Lady MItaly seized two superyachts in the following days. Lena was seized on March 5, and belongs to Gennady Timchenko, whose family have also been sanctioned. The second superyacht seized belongs to Russia's wealthiest businessman Alexei Mordashov, according to Forbes. Timchenko has been sanctioned by the EU, who described him as a "long-time acquaintance" of Putin. He has also been sanctioned by the UK and the US. Mordashov has been sanctioned by the UK and the EU, who says he is "benefitting from his links from Russian decision-makers."Sailing Yacht ABelonging to Andrey Melnichenko, his megayacht was seized by Italian authorities on March 11, and is worth $578 million.Sailing Yacht A is the world's largest sailing yacht at around 469 feet long and has eight decks.Melnichenko, who is worth $11 billion according to Forbes, founded fertilizer producer EuroChem Group and coal energy company SUEK.  ValerieSpanish authorities seized Valerie on March 14. In a televised speech, however, Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez did not name the owner. Two sources told Reuters that it belonged to oligarch Sergei Chemezov, and the yacht is worth $153 million. Chemezov, CEO of Russian state-owned defense conglomerate Rostec was named in US sanctions in March 2022 after Russia invaded Ukraine. The most recent US sanctions also target Chemezov's wife, son, and stepdaughter.CrescentLinked to Igor Sechin, Crescent was seized by Spain, two weeks following Amore Vero being seized by France.The yacht is worth $600 million. Lady AnastasiaSpain detained Lady Anastasia, which is owned by Alexander Mikheev, on March 15. Mikheev is the CEO of Russian state-owned military weapons company, Rosoboronexport. He was sanctioned by the US on March 15. The yacht was subject to a sinking attempt from a Ukrainian crew member while it was docked in Mallorca on February 26. PhiWorth $50 million, Phi was seized by the UK after mooring in London for an awards ceremony. The National Crime Agency did not reveal the name of the owner but mentioned it belongs to a Russian businessman and that the yacht is valued at £38 million ($49.9 million.)AxiomaGibraltar's government said it seized the $75 million superyacht belonging to a sanctioned Russian oligarch. Dmitry Pumpyansky, who has an estimated net worth of $1.1 billion, is the owner of Russia's largest steel-pipe-maker, TMK. PropertiesSquatters entered Oleg Deripaska's mansion in Belgrave Square, London.Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images.Alexei Mordashov's building complex, worth $116 million, was seized on March 18 in Portisco, Sardinia, Italy.Swiss authorities, who broke their neutral status to adopt sanctions, seized a mountain home, believed to belong to oligarch Petr Aven.According to Reuters, Italy authorities seized both Alisher Usmanov's luxury villa worth $19 million in Sardinia, and Russian politician Oleg Savchenko's mansion worth $3 million in Tuscany. Some properties in the UK, which have not been seized or detained but belong to sanctioned individuals, have been frozen. Squatters entered the mansion belonging to Oleg Deripaska in Belgrave Square, London on March 14.JetsA Bombardier Global 6500 private jet.Thomas Pallini/Business InsiderThe UK detained two jets belonging to Eugene Shvidler — $45 million Bombardier Global 6500 (not pictured) and $13 million Cessna Citation Latitude. Shvidler was added to the UK sanctions list on March 24, which said he had "close business links to Roman Abramovich." Shvidler partnered with Abramovich to gain control of oil giant Sibneft via an auction in 1995, and he was chairman of Abramovich's investment and asset management company Millhouse LLC, but stepped down when Abramovich was sanctioned.  Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytApr 3rd, 2022

Take a tour of Michael Jordan"s Chicago mansion that"s been on the market for 10 years and why he can"t sell it

It was first listed for $29 million and has cool, personalized touches like a Jordan-branded basketball court. But that may be working against him. Jordan's estate has been on the market since 2012.Concierge Auctions; Stephan Savoia/APMichael Jordan's enormous house in Chicago is still on the market after 10 years.Michael Jordan has tried to sweeten the pot by cutting the price nearly in half and throwing in a complete set of Air Jordans with the purchase of the house.He pays more than $100,000 in annual property taxes."Any time you have these homes that are just kind of gross over-improvements for the area they do lead to very, very lengthy marketing times," said Gail Lissner of Integra Realty Resources. The house was originally listed for $29 million and has every bell and whistle you can think of. Some of the "over-improvements" Lissner may be referring to are the pool with a grass island in the middle of it, a door from the Playboy Mansion, a table based on the streets of Baghdad, and MJ-branded golf flags.Below, we take a closer look at the house and why it's struggling to find a buyer. Most images are from footage provided by Concierge Auctions.Tony Manfred contributed to this post.Michael Jordan's 56,000-square-foot, 7-acre compound looks massive even from the air.Concierge AuctionsAnyone who approaches from the ground can tell right away that this estate belongs to the legendary No. 23, Michael Jordan — and that might be what's keeping it from selling. "It's clearly his home," said Bruce Bowers of Bowers Realty Group. "... There's a lot of work that would have to be done to make it your own."ZillowSource: Business InsiderThe price on the house has dropped several times and is now going for $14.9 million, or about $265 per square foot — that's a far cry from the original price of $517 per square foot. The exact price is $14,855,000, and the numbers in that price add up to 23 — Jordan's basketball jersey number.Concierge AuctionsThe long drive from the gate and the full-grown trees ensure that the house has complete privacy.Concierge AuctionsJordan had the house — and the surrounding property — built from scratch to his personal tastes.Concierge AuctionsThe outdoor space proves to be spectacular. There's a tennis court ...Concierge Auctions... an infinity pool with a grass island in the middle ...Concierge Auctions... which lies in the center of a large patio ...Concierge Auctions... and down on the lawn there's a putting green.Concierge AuctionsThe putting green is complete with Jordan Brand flag sticks.Concierge AuctionsThere's also a pond stocked with fish.Concierge AuctionsWhile the outdoor space is sprawling and undoubtedly impressive ...Concierge Auctions... the inside is equally spectacular. When guests first walk in the front door, they are greeted by this view, which includes a piano in the background.Concierge AuctionsThe piano room doubles as one of many sitting rooms in the house.Concierge AuctionsAnd here's a look at another sitting area dubbed the "great room" — this isn't the only great room around the house, though.Concierge AuctionsJordan's luxurious taste even shows itself in details like doorways. The set of doors seen below are from the original Playboy Mansion in Chicago.Concierge AuctionsThey lead to a game room with a pool table.Concierge AuctionsOf course, since this is the former home of Michael Jordan, there is a full-court basketball court. It's the centerpiece of the house.Concierge AuctionsThe court has the legend's name at both ends ...Concierge Auctions... and the Jumpman logo at center court, which includes the names of his children — his daughter's name is out of view.Concierge AuctionsWhile guests wait for their turn on the court, they can hang out in this sitting area.Concierge AuctionsMoving along to the dining room, guests were able to eat at this "Baghdad table."Concierge AuctionsThat grid seen on the tabletop is based on the streets of Baghdad.Concierge AuctionsDetailed eating areas are somewhat of a theme. Here we can see a beautiful skylight positioned perfectly over the kitchen table.Concierge AuctionsIn one of the dining areas just off the kitchen, there is a large aquarium built into the wall.Concierge AuctionsThe house has nine bedrooms ...Concierge Auctions... and 19 bathrooms.Concierge AuctionsThere is also a cigar room, which has been decorated intricately with a detailed ceiling.Concierge AuctionsEven the railing in the cigar room is ornate.Concierge AuctionsThe cigar room also has plenty of card tables where we're guessing Jordan played some high-stakes poker games — he is known for his love of gambling, after all.ZillowThe home also features a full gym.Concierge AuctionsJordan's Bulls teammates used to work out there every morning, according to an interview shared by Concierge Auctions.Concierge AuctionsSource: Concierge AuctionsAnother luxurious part of Jordan's estate is the expansive wine cellar.Concierge AuctionsThe library upstairs was said to be MJ's favorite room. It features a drop-down movie screen.Concierge AuctionsSource: Concierge AuctionsBetween the house and the patio, there's another TV room with a 110-inch screen.Concierge AuctionsThis area used to be an indoor pool. Jordan renovated it after he moved in and added sliding walls to both sides that can make the gathering room either indoor or outdoor depending on the mood and the weather.Concierge AuctionsThere are plenty of media rooms throughout the house. Even the seemingly random nooks like this one below have TVs.Concierge AuctionsThe property also boasts a three-bedroom guest house ...Concierge Auctions... which has its own family room and kitchen.Concierge AuctionsMJ himself lived in the main house for 19 years.Concierge AuctionsThe house comes fully furnished, although some of the pieces may be a tad dated.Concierge AuctionsDespite how awesome the house seems, it's been on the market since 2012. Jordan tried to auction the house in 2013, but the minimum bid of $13 million was never met.ZillowJordan said, "Many of the world's most desirable items are sold at auction, and Concierge Auctions is the hands-down leader when it comes to auctioning one-of-a-kind real estate."Concierge AuctionsSource: Concierge AuctionsMJ's estate remained unsold despite attempts to get creative, including marketing to wealthy people in basketball-crazed China.Concierge AuctionsSource: MaximIn 2015, the agent working to sell the house at the time promised that the buyer would also receive every edition of Air Jordans in his or her size — but that didn't work either.Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Tribeca Film FestivalSource: MaximAdam Rosenfeld, of the luxury-real-estate startup Mercer Vine, told Marketwatch in 2016 that Jordan was likely struggling to sell the house because of all of the personalized customizations.Concierge AuctionsSource: MarketwatchRosenfeld said the house also just isn't in an area where wealthy celebs are looking for houses. Gail Lissner of Integra Realty Resources called the area "much more modest" than what Jordan's property suggests.ZillowSource: Marketwatch, Business InsiderThere is no need to worry about the house rotting while remaining unsold, though. The house is still occupied by staff who Jordan employed to keep it looking fresh.Concierge AuctionsSource: The Real DealJordan is still paying a lot in property taxes. The annual bill is more than $100,000, and he has paid nearly $700,000 in property taxes since he put it on the market in 2012.ZillowSource: ZillowOne problem is that Jordan may feel his celebrity status adds value to the house, but, according to Stephen Shapiro of the Westside Agency, people do not pay more for a house just because somebody famous owned it.Chuck Burton/APSource: The Real Deal"But you know who tends to think a property is worth more because a celebrity lived there?" Shapiro said. "The celebrity trying to sell it."Concierge AuctionsSource: The Real DealAnother issue is the location. Most of the homes in this price range in this area are closer to Lake Michigan, a few miles east of Jordan's former house. "Buyers at that level in that area tend to want to be closer to the lake," Missy Jerfita of Berkshire Hathaway Homes Services told The Real Deal.Concierge AuctionsSource: The Real DealSince Jordan put his Chicago home on the market, he has since purchased a lakefront house in North Carolina in a golf-course community.ZillowThe house is in Cornelius, about a 30-minute drive from the Charlotte Hornets' arena — Jordan owns the NBA team. MJ purchased the house for $2.8 million after it was originally listed for $4 million.ZillowSource: Fox SportsJordan also reportedly bought a house on a golf course in Jupiter, Florida, for $4.8 million in 2013 and spent $7.6 million on renovations.ZillowSource: Jeff RealtyHe also owns a condo in downtown Charlotte, in the same building as Cam Newton. The condos reportedly go for between $1.5 and $3.5 million.YouTubeSource: Charlotte AgendaMost recently, Jordan listed his 10,000-square-foot home in Park City, Utah, for $7.5 million. Experts think it will likely sell faster than the Chicago compound.Isaac Brekken/GettySource: Forbes, Business InsiderHe continues to wait for a buyer for the Chicago-area home. Of course, MJ is estimated to be worth $1.9 billion, so he can afford to wait for the right owner to come along on his old Chicago digs.Jordan Brand via Getty ImagesRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytMar 19th, 2022

The Keys to Marketing a Luxury Estate in a Highly Desirable Neighborhood

Built in 1905, and listed for a cool $7 million, a Seattle mansion in the desirable Queen Anne neighborhood requires an expert real estate professional to list and sell such a significant property. Concierge Auctions, the largest luxury real estate auction marketplace in the world, is selling the home in partnership with agent Doreen Alhadeff […] The post The Keys to Marketing a Luxury Estate in a Highly Desirable Neighborhood appeared first on RISMedia. Doreen Alhadeff Built in 1905, and listed for a cool $7 million, a Seattle mansion in the desirable Queen Anne neighborhood requires an expert real estate professional to list and sell such a significant property. Concierge Auctions, the largest luxury real estate auction marketplace in the world, is selling the home in partnership with agent Doreen Alhadeff of Windermere Real Estate. Despite the current listing price, Concierge Auctions will be putting the property up for a no reserve auction from March 1st through March 4th. The 8,882 square foot, six bedroom and six-bathroom home underwent extensive upgrades before being listed. Although there are modern amenities throughout, such as a chef’s kitchen and a large outdoor patio, great care was taken by the seller to preserve the home’s original charm and grandeur. We recently had an opportunity to discuss this incredible listing with Alhadeff, and her strategy for marketing the home. She also explained how a listing like this differs from a typical home sale and offered advice to agents looking to break into the luxury real estate market. Jameson Doris: Tell us about your background in luxury real estate? Doreen Alhadeff: I started selling in 1989 and was successful right away. A lot of that had to do with the fact that I grew up in the area and had connections. I was able to sell some luxury properties along the way. Where I currently live, in the Queen Anne neighborhood, there is a lot of luxury real estate for sure. Fifteen years ago, myself and a partner opened a branch of the real estate company we were with. We did most of our luxury deals while there, but that branch has since been purchased by Compass. At the end of last year, I went to Windermere, so I’m still immersed in that market. JD: How did you secure this listing? DA: I actually sold the house in 1992. It’s in the neighborhood that I lived and worked in. I’m friends with the seller and listed and sold their house that they were living in before they purchased this property as well. I also have other listings in the area. JD: What was your strategy for marketing this property?  DA: I’m focusing on getting the home out there as much as possible. I’m contacting agents that I know sell these sorts of properties consistently. Every property is different, but we have no marketing budget for this one. I believe printed materials are very important, so we did mass mailings as soon as we listed the property. You never know where the buyer will come from. We replaced a lot of the furnishings and made the interior more current. We also did extensive quality upgrades and really talked them up. You know the agents that you trust and could sell these sorts of properties, but you have to go broader than that as well. JD: How is showing a property like this different from showing a more typical single-family home? DA: With some agents, you know they’re not going to waste your time, but besides them you need to be sure you’re properly vetting buyers. The buyer’s agents should really be doing proper vetting and making sure they have proof of funds so you’re not wasting everyone’s time by doing a showing. With that though, it also becomes a security issue for the seller. I only represent the seller; I don’t believe in dual agency, because I think the seller and buyer should both be individually represented. JD: What would your advice be to any other real estate professionals who may be looking to dip their toes in the luxury market? DA: I think it’s a good experience to shadow someone. Luxury real estate moves much slower than many agents are used to. It is very different from selling regular real estate. It’s important to first learn the ins and outs of the luxury real estate market, because there are unusual things that can and do happen in this market. Jameson Doris is RISMedia’s blog and social media editor. Email him your real estate news ideas to jdoris@rismedia.com. The post The Keys to Marketing a Luxury Estate in a Highly Desirable Neighborhood appeared first on RISMedia......»»

Category: realestateSource: rismediaFeb 24th, 2022

Once listed for $30 million, a motorcyclist"s mansion sells for $6.5 million

After asking $30 million for his Bird Streets home, retired motorcycle racer John Kocinski has sold the property at auction for $6.526 million.After asking $30 million for his Bird Streets home, retired motorcycle racer John Kocinski has sold the property at auction for $6.526 million......»»

Category: topSource: latimesFeb 5th, 2022

Mohamed Hadid"s infamous Bel-Air estate is auctioned off for $5 million

Mohamed Hadid's code-violating mega-mansion in Bel-Air, which a judge ordered to be torn down, has sold at auction for $5 million.Mohamed Hadid's code-violating mega-mansion in Bel-Air, which a judge ordered to be torn down, has sold at auction for $5 million......»»

Category: topSource: latimesJan 1st, 2022

See inside this 105,000-square-foot Los Angeles megamansion that could go up for auction for $250 million next month

The 105,000-square-foot Los Angeles mansion, called The One Bel Air, reportedly has 21 bedrooms, 42 bathrooms, a 10,000-bottle wine cellar, and more. An aerial view of "The One Bel Air", a 105,000-square-foot mansion with a sky deck and putting green, night club, several swimming pools, a 50-seat theater, a four-lane bowling alley and more by Nile Niami of Skyline Development and designed by Paul McClean (McClean Design). The One is shown by court-appointed receiver Ted Lanes, who now controls the property and is in charge of finding a buyer and paying off the lenders and other creditors, gives a tour of The One, the 105,000 square foot house on sale in Bel Air. This is apparently the largest home for sale in the United States. The developer Nial Niami "listed" it for $500 million but got into financial trouble and was foreclosed upon by Don Hankey. Photo taken in Bel Air on Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2021 in Beverly Hills, CA. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The One Bel Air is a 105,000-square-foot megamansion said to be the biggest modern home in the US. It was once marketed for $500 million but could be up for auction for $250 million next month, the LA Times reports. It reportedly has 21 bedrooms, 42 bathrooms, a 10,000-bottle wine cellar, a nightclub, and more. See more stories on Insider's business page. A sprawling Los Angeles megamansion believed to be the biggest modern home in the US could be yours next month for the cool price of $250 million.Known as The One Bel Air, the property, which is still under construction, comes from film producer-turned-real estate developer Nile Niami, who initially hoped to sell it for a whopping $500 million, which would have made it one of the most expensive homes in the world.In recent weeks, however, Niami's company, Crestlloyd, announced it may put the megamansion up for auction starting at $250 million in January, according to The Los Angeles Times.It comes with 21 bedrooms and 42 bathrooms, according to Architectural Digest. It also boasts amenities like a 10,000-bottle wine cellar, a 50-car garage, 50-person movie theater, nightclub, cigar room, sky deck, putting green, salon, bowling alley, and more, according to the LA Times.Here's a look inside the enormous mansion: At 105,000 square feet, the mansion is believed to be the biggest modern home in the US, according to the Los Angeles Times.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesIt's called The One Bel Air and boasts 21 bedrooms and 42 bathrooms, according to Architectural Digest.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesIts developer, Nile Niami, initially hoped to sell it for $500 million.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesIn the mansion's sprawling yard, you'll find a sculpture from Italian glass maker Simone Cenedese.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesHere's the main entrance to the property.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesInside, the mansion's foyer has a rotating sculpture and floor-to-ceiling windows.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesIn the dining room, you'll find a 10,000-bottle wine cellar.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThere's plenty of space to lounge around in the family living room.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesFor some pampering, there's a hair and beauty salon.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe salon seems to be one of the more vibrantly colored rooms in the mansion, with glossy red walls.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe mansion also boasts an entertainment room with its own bar.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesNext to the entertainment room, there's a private bowling alley.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesIt has four lanes, several shelves of bowling shoes at the ready, and bowling balls oddly evocative of Trix cereal.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesFor even more active recreation, the property's future residents can take advantage of the mansion's private nightclub.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesOr, for less active leisure, there's a private 50-seat movie theater.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe One's 4,000-square-foot master bedroom has a walk-in closet with plenty of space for clothes, shoes, and accessories.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe mansion's future owners will find room for plenty of books in their private library, which has its own balcony.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesMultiple swimming pools dot the property.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThere's this one indoors, in a room with a living wall and a mirror on the ceiling...Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images...and these two outdoors, one of which is on the rooftop of a 4,000-square-foot bedroom...Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images...while the other is above the private nightclub.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesAnother pool functions as a floating lounge.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThough the home was built in the last decade, it has taken a cue from the construction of centuries past with its moat surrounding the entire property.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesVisitors to the mansion can have the guest house to themselves.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe guest house also has floor-to-ceiling windows...Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images...and three bedrooms on its own.An interior view of three-bedroom guest house at The One Bel Air, a 105,000-square-foot mansion with a sky deck and putting green, night club, several swimming pools, a 50-seat theater, a four-lane bowling alley and more by Nile Niami of Skyline Development and designed by Paul McClean (McClean Design). The One is shown by court-appointed receiver Ted Lanes, who now controls the property and is in charge of finding a buyer and paying off the lenders and other creditors, gives a tour of The One, the 105,000 square foot house on sale in Bel Air. This is apparently the largest home for sale in the United States. The developer Nial Niami "listed" it for $500 million but got into financial trouble and was foreclosed upon by Don Hankey. Photo taken in Bel Air on Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2021 in Beverly Hills, CA. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesLawrence Perkins, manager at Niami's Crestlloyd, has said the company is still "going back and forth" over the listing price but that it's expected to be around $250 million, according to the LA Times.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images"Our goal is to run a thoughtful sale process to maximize the value from the small group of people in the world that can buy a property like this," Perkins said.Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytDec 27th, 2021

Haunted houses that were once worth over $1 million

Despite their murderous or paranormal reputations, many haunted homes are listed for millions when they're put on the market. The Pillars Estate in Albion, New York. Steve Shoemaker/Amity Photos Some haunted houses have been put on the market in recent years, and the prices may surprise you. Despite their eerie reputations, some haunted homes are listed for millions when they go on sale. However, some have sold for much less, perhaps due to their reputations or just dilapidation. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A common horror movie plotline involves innocent folks believing they're getting an incredible deal on a new home, only to discover the place is haunted. A haunted house. Vladimir Mulder/Shutterstock What if that were to happen in real life?Many homes are made only more valuable due to their haunted reputations. Some haunted houses have become tourist attractions or even the subjects of big Hollywood horror franchises, attracting fans from across the world to their doors. However, other haunted houses have only been sold after dramatic price cuts. We consulted Zillow records to determine the price history of some of America's most notorious haunted houses. While they were all priced at more than $1 million at one point, they are all now worth considerably less, either due to changing housing markets, dilapidation, or perhaps even paranormal occurrences scaring away buyers. Here are seven haunted houses that were once listed for millions, but are now worth much less.  The Amityville Horror House in Long Island, New York, has a reputation for being haunted. The Amityville Horror House in Long Island, New York. Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images Popularly known as the Amityville Horror House, 112 Ocean Avenue still stands and is remembered as the site of a mass murder in which six people were killed. According to Biography.com, on the night of November 13, 1974, 23-year-old Ronald J. DeFeo Jr. shot and murdered his entire family while they slept. Those murdered included DeFeo's two parents and his four siblings. A little over a year after the murders, the Lutz family purchased the home for a reduced price of $80,000, on account of the house's sinister reputation. They only lasted 28 days before moving out of the house, citing paranormal happenings like strange odors, green slime oozing out of the walls and keyholes, and cold spots appearing throughout the house.Stepfather George Lutz also reported waking up at 3:15 a.m. every night, around the time DeFeo carried out the murders. Perhaps the strangest and most terrifying instances of all, the family claimed wife Kathy and sons Daniel and Christopher levitated off their beds.The home, which underwent renovations and an address change in order to deter investigators or horror fans from visiting the property, was listed for $1.15 million in 2010. However, it sold for $950,000. In 2017, it sold for $605,000. It has been repeatedly cited as one of the most haunted places in America.  Charming Forge Mansion in Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania, has reportedly been the site of multiple paranormal occurrences. Charming Forge Mansion in Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania. Google Maps Built in 1784 and restored in 1994, this Georgian-style mansion has seven bedrooms, four bathrooms, seven working fireplaces, and original Colonial-era details and woodwork. Described by Realtor.com as the perfect home for "thrill-seekers," the Charming Forge Mansion in Womelsdorf, Pennsylvania, has been the site of multiple reported paranormal occurrences. Ghost stories include reports of a woman heard crying in the hallways, sightings of a man in the house's backyard, and various noises reportedly sounding like German prisoners of war circa the American Revolution. The mansion was originally listed for $2,500,000 in 2009 but it has been on and off the market for the past ten years. Its most recent listing was for $695,000 but it sold for $650,000 in 2019, according to Zillow.  Franklin Castle in Cleveland, Ohio, has a seriously spooky history. Franklin Castle in Cleveland, Ohio. Seph Lawless Considered one of the most haunted places in Ohio, Franklin Castle in Cleveland has quite the paranormal history. According to Atlas Obscura, the Victorian-style home was originally built in the 1880s by grocer-turned-banker Hannes Tiedemann. Many of Tiedemann's close relatives died in the house, including his 15-year-old daughter, his mother, his wife, and three other of his infant children. After Tiedemann died in 1908, it spent many years as a German cultural center and base for the German Socialist Party. However, throughout the 1960s, tales surfaced of paranormal activity within the castle walls. Visitors have claimed they've experienced electrical surges, heard crying babies, and even saw a mysterious woman emerging from black steam.According to Cleveland.com, rumors of heinous acts, like multiple murders and a mass shooting motivated by Nazi politics in the basement, have emerged. However, many of these claims are unsubstantiated. Regardless, people have claimed to see apparitions such as Tiedemann's illegitimate daughter, who is rumored to have been hanged by her father, and his mistress, who he also allegedly killed with an axe. In early 1984, Michael DeVinko, an actor and the last husband of Judy Garland, purchased Franklin Castle. DeVinko spent close to $1 million renovating Franklin Castle before selling, according to Cleveland.com. However, fires occurred over the years that damaged the home. In 2011, it sold for a mere $260,000, down from its $350,000 selling price in 1999. The home has since been converted into apartments. The LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans, Louisiana, is one of the most notoriously haunted homes in the country. The LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans, Louisiana. DMBrooks/Shutterstock Located at 1140 Royal St in New Orleans, Louisiana, the LaLaurie Mansion has six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, and one horrifying history. Originally built for visiting French royalty, the mansion dates back to the 1800s.According to New Orleans Historical, in 1832, Madame Delphine LaLaurie moved into the mansion. Many lavish parties were thrown in the residence, and LaLaurie established herself as a member of New Orleans' elite class. However, rumors and accusations surfaced of LaLaurie's mistreatment of her slaves.When a fire broke out at the residence in 1834, firefighters attempting to contain the blaze discovered "seven horribly mutilated slaves who had been imprisoned in the house for some time," according to Atlas Obscura. An angry mob descended on the house, destroying as much as they could get their hands on. Madame LaLaurie then fled to Paris, where she lived out the rest of her days. The house is still featured on many New Orleans ghost tours, as people speculate the souls of the slaves mistreated within its walls still haunt the premises. However, no one is allowed inside as the home is now a private residence. In 2020, Zillow valued the property at an estimated $910,527, compared to its $2,100,000 selling price in 2010. The Pillars Estate in Albion, New York, was once worth millions. The Pillars Estate in Albion, New York. Steve Shoemaker/Amity Photos The Pillars Estate in Albion, New York, was built in 1878 and has six bedrooms, six bathrooms, and many antique and original details that seemingly transport you back in time to another era.According to Realtor.com, members of the household staff have said they've heard footsteps following them as they walk up the stairs. Cora Goyette, hired by owner Tony McMurtrie to help him care for the historic home he bought in 2006, claims to have heard the piano located in the parlor being played when no one was in the room. Apparitions like a woman in a white dress have also been spotted by McMurtrie throughout the house.In 2015, the Pillars Estate was listed for $1,000,000. However, the price of the home has lowered over the years. In July 2020, the home sold for $450,000.  The Sallie House in Atchison, Kansas, has been investigated by multiple ghost hunters. The Sallie House in Atchison, Kansas. Visit Atchison/Atchison Area Chamber of Commerce According to a post by Visit Atchison, one residence in the small Kansas town has quite the paranormal reputation. Built around the 1900s, the home served as the place of business for an Atchison physician.According to legend, a 6-year-old girl was brought to the doctor's office, believed to be experiencing appendicitis. The doctor reportedly began operating on the young girl before the anesthesia took full effect. She died on the operating table, and her spirit is said to haunt the house, reportedly causing strange scratches to appear on visitors' bodies, objects to move, unexplained fires, and cold spots being felt in what used to be the operating room. The home's listing on Zillow actually calls attention to the home's ghostly reputation, saying it "is the internationally known home of Sallie the Heartland ghost," and that the home has a "record of $400 per night with word of mouth only," encouraging potential owners to actually rent out the house to investigators and fans of the paranormal.In February 2016, it was listed for $1,000,000. By August of that same year, the asking price had lowered to $499,900. In November 2017, the three-bedroom, two-bath residence went off the market. However, visitors are able to take self-guided tours or even stay a night in the Sallie House in the hope of catching a real ghost on tape. Highland Cottage in Ossining, New York, once served as a mental hospital. Highland Cottage (The Squire House) in Ossining, New York. Google Maps The Highland Cottage, or Squire House, has quite the eerie history. Built as a single-family home in 1872, the Swiss-inspired home has been owned by multiple people over the years. The estate is located in Ossining, New York, home to the infamous Sing Sing prison.In 1905, the home was bought by Sing Sing's chief physician, Dr. Amos Osborne Squire, who reportedly witnessed more than 138 executions during his time working at the prison. Around 1912, Squire converted the home into a privately run psychiatric facility, giving the home a creepy and even haunted reputation, according to local legend.The extravagant and beautifully constructed home was once listed for $1.25 million but sold in 2018 for $925,000. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 24th, 2021

Beverly Park mansion sells at auction for $51 million, an all-time record

Villa Firenze, a nearly 10-acre estate.....»»

Category: topSource: latimesApr 9th, 2021

A Malibu beach house featured in "Keeping Up With The Kardashians" is heading to auction. Here"s a look inside the oceanfront mansion last listed for nearly $8 million.

Concierge Auctions A beach house in Malibu will hit the auction blo.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 4th, 2020

NFL player turns profit on Charlotte home recently sold in auction (Photos)

The south Charlotte mansion of Houston Texans' Johnathan Joseph has sold following an online auction last month. According to Mecklenburg County property records, the 15,454-square-foot gated home carried a sale price of $3.25 million — more than .....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 30th, 2018

Inside a $44B Italian mansion that"s making cryptocurrency history

Nestled in the heart of Rome, this 16th century Italian Renaissance mega-mansion — valued at nearly $44 million — is about to become the first piece of real estate to accept cryptocurrency bids at auction......»»

Category: topSource: moneycentralJun 24th, 2018

Inside a $44B Italian mansion that"s making cryptocurrency history

Nestled in the heart of Rome, this 16th century Italian Renaissance mega-mansion — valued at nearly $44 million — is about to become the first piece of real estate to accept cryptocurrency bids at auction......»»

Category: topSource: moneycentralJun 24th, 2018

Rolling Hills mansion once listed at $53 million to sell at auction

A 51,000-square-foot mansion with a panoramic view of Los Angeles and the ocean will be put up on auction without reserve, five years after its owner was unable to sell it at the listing price of $53 million. The estate, known as Hacienda de la Paz, .....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsJun 25th, 2018

Flip this mansion: Former Hicks estate back on market for a mere $38.5M

The $36.2 million sale of a gated luxury estate in Dallas' Old Preston Hollow — once owned by former Texas Rangers and Dallas Stars owner Tom Hicks — set a U.S. record as the highest price paid for a residential property hitting the auction bloc.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsJul 17th, 2018

Photos: Another mansion in posh Woodlands community up for auction

A mansion previously listed for $6.75 million in the posh Carlton Woods section of The Woodlands will now be sold to the highest bidder. Platinum Luxury Auctions will sell the property without a reserve on Aug. 18, according to a press release and the.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsAug 6th, 2018

Photos: Custom-built Woodside mansion targets Chinese buyers in no-reserve auction

This Woodside estate, which was recently listed for $18 million, go.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 15th, 2018

Why you don"t need a great resume to work at the real estate brokerage run by "Real Housewives" star Mauricio Umansky

The boss of America's most successful real estate brokerage, The Agency, has a set of rules for hiring agents and says you don't need a great resume. Mauricio Umansky with his wife Kyle Richards of the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills.Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images 'Real Housewives' star Mauricio Umansky is also CEO of America's most successful real estate broker. Umansky is highly selective about who he hires but doesn't like looking at resumes. His rules include not hiring 'assholes', and you need to wow him in the subject line of your email.  Mauricio Umansky found fame alongside his wife Kyle Richards in "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills."However, he is also CEO of America's biggest real estate brokerage, selling properties including the Playboy mansion and the Walt Disney estate on its way to annual sales worth $9 billion.It comes as no surprise that Beverly Hills-based The Agency, where the average sale is worth a record $2.5 million, is an exclusive place to work.And Umansky has a set of rules he uses to find his next employee, be it in marketing, legal, or sales. As he prepares for his own Netflix show to rival "Selling Sunset," and plans on expanding The Agency globally using a franchise model, these are the rules to keep in mind if you want to land a job with a high-end broker. Character beats a resumeHigh-profile brokers are beginning to cut jobs as the housing market starts to falter. Redfin laid off 470 employees last month, while Compass let go 450 as big companies contract to cope with falling demand. Umansky's plans to expand The Agency, come at a welcome time for established realtors. But Umansky isn't a fan of resumes. While he'll hire those with a proven track record that include selling homes worth tens of millions of dollars, he also likes young, hungry faces with limited real estate experience."We definitely look at characteristics more than a resume," Umansky says. "I mean, a lot of employees don't even need to be in real estate.""It comes from people that have sold fashion, people that have sold medical equipment, and then there's people that have never sold anything – they're just getting out of college." Umansky said he was looking for someone ready to build a wide network and is willing to be different. "Finding new talent and helping them grow, that's certainly the most rewarding part of my job," he says.To do that, applicants must grab his attention in the subject line and the preview section of an email. "And if you haven't caught my eye by then, I am out," Umansky says.Even once they're through the door, Umansky says the odds are still against them, with only one in five succeeding at The Agency.'No assholes'Umansky expanded the company as it was coming out of the last recession. He rejected the model that encouraged agents to compete with each other and instead embraced the "no assholes" rule, popularized by Stanford professor Robert I Sutton and employed by tech giants such Google. For The Agency, that includes not stealing information from a fellow agent, or misleading clients to secure a sale."I'm looking for people that believe real estate should be collaborative and not cut-throat, people that are excited about making the industry better," Umansky says. "Unless we have people preaching the same qualities that we are, then we're going to lose quality control."Umansky says this approach has allowed him to help some of America's biggest brokers make their way to huge commissions, including James Harris and David Parnes of "Million Dollar Listings"."There's not a lot of difference between selling a $100 million house and selling a $5 million house. It just has a couple of extra zeros in it." But as his new Netflix show "Buying Beverly Hills" that features him and his daughters, launches in the fall, Umansky accepts the hiring process might get a bit more challenging, and he'll probably have to hire someone to start looking at his emails.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJul 2nd, 2022