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A judge reminded everyone that Steve Bannon was accused of taking $1 million from a border wall fundraising scheme while approving Trump"s pardon

The judge's order took pains to go through the allegations against Bannon, who fo.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytMay 25th, 2021

The guy who crowdfunded $25 million to build Trump"s border wall can"t use the money for his legal defense, a judge ruled

Brian Kolfage was hit with a separate indictment Thursday, claiming he underreported his taxes the year he allegedly took money from "We.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytMay 7th, 2021

Gov. Greg Abbott of Texas applauded border enforcement for a miles-long "steel barrier" of vehicles deterring Haitian migrants in Del Rio

Abbott lauded state troopers and border officials for stopping migrants from entering the US while blaming the Biden administration for the situation. Gov. Greg Abbott talking to reporters at a news conference along the Texas-Mexico border. Julio Cortez/The Associated Press Gov. Greg Abbott lauded Texas state troopers for a "steel barrier" of vehicles at the border. He said Texas wanted anyone thinking of crossing the border illegally to know they might be jailed. Thousands of people seeking to enter the US are camped under a bridge near Del Rio, Texas. See more stories on Insider's business page. Gov. Greg Abbott on Tuesday praised border officials and state troopers for erecting a "steel barrier" of police vehicles stretching miles along the southern US border to deter Haitian migrants from crossing into Texas."One day there were countless people coming across the border, then that very same day the Texas Department of Public Safety put up all these DPS vehicles, and suddenly, in an instant, people stopped crossing the border in this location," he said at a news conference.Abbott added that the state was taking "unprecedented steps" to control the border and was sending a message to anyone trying to cross the Rio Grande that they "may wind up having handcuffs on their hands going straight to jail."Thousands of Haitians are camped under a bridge near Del Rio - a Texas border town of about 35,000 on the about 150 miles west of San Antonio. They have fled Haiti after President Jovenel Moïse was assassinated in July and a 7.2 magnitude earthquake rocked the country in August. Reports differ on exactly how many people are now gathered at the Texas border, but estimates place the number at about 8,000 after some were sent back or processed by immigration authorities.Footage of border agents on horseback confronting migrants has sparked criticism from the White House and politicians, and prompted the Department of Homeland Security to launch an investigation. Some are decrying the situation as inhumane and cruel.As Abbott spoke with reporters on Tuesday, he said President Joe Biden was not doing enough to secure the southern border and said the president's policies prompted the flood of people to seek illegal entry in Del Rio, per CNN."When you have an administration that is not enforcing the law in this country, when you have an administration that has abandoned any pretense of securing the border and securing our sovereignty, you see the onrush of people like what we saw walking across this dam that is right behind me," he told the network.It's unclear why so many migrants have amassed at Del Rio so quickly, but misinformation that the border would be easier to cross there may have played a part, The New York Times reported."False information, misinformation, and misunderstanding might have created a false sense of hope," Guerline Jozef, the executive director of the Haitian Bridge Alliance, a group that works with migrants, told The Times.The Biden administration had been denying entry at the border under Title 42, a Trump-era immigration policy that allows migrants to be deported as a measure to keep COVID-19 from spreading. Last week, however, a judge ruled that Title 42 was "likely unlawful" and issued a preliminary injunction against it. The Biden administration has said it's appealing the decision. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider18 min. ago

Texas Governor Greg Abbott applauded border enforcement for a miles-long "steel barrier" of vehicles deterring Haitian migrants at Del Rio

Texas Governor Greg Abbott lauded state troopers and border officials for stopping migrants from crossing into the US, while blaming the Biden administration for the situation. Texas Governor Greg Abbott speaks to reporters at a news conference along the Texas border. Julio Cortez/The Associated Press Texas Governor Greg Abbott lauded state troopers for erecting a "steel barrier" of vehicles to stop people from crossing into the US. He said Texas is sending a message to those thinking about crossing the border that they may be jailed. Thousands of refugees seeking to enter the US are camped underneath a bridge in Del Rio, Texas. See more stories on Insider's business page. Texas Governor Greg Abbott praised border officials and state troopers on Tuesday for erecting a "steel barrier" of police vehicles stretching miles along the southern US border to deter Haitian migrants from crossing into the state."One day there were countless people coming across the border, then that very same day the Texas Department of Public Safety put up all these DPS vehicles, and suddenly, in an instant, people stopped crossing the border in this location," he said at a news conference.Abbott added that the state is taking "unprecedented steps" to control the border, and is sending a message to anyone who tries to cross the Rio Grande river that they "may wind up having handcuffs on their hands going straight to jail."Thousands of Haitian refugees are camped underneath a bridge in Del Rio, Texas - a border town of around 35,000 on the about 150 miles west of San Antonio. Migrants there are fleeing Haiti after the assassination of their president Jovenel Moïse in July and a 7.2 magnitude earthquake rocked the country in August. Reports differ on exactly how many migrants are now gathered at the Texan border, but estimates place the number at around 8,000 people after some were sent back or processed by immigration authorities.Footage of border enforcement confronting migrants on horseback with whips has sparked criticism from the White House and politicians, and prompted the Department of Homeland Security to launch an investigation. Some are decrying the situation as inhumane and cruel.As Abbott spoke to reporters on Tuesday, he blamed President Joe Biden for not doing enough to secure the southern border, and said the president's lax policies led to the flood of illegal immigrants in Del Rio, per CNN."When you have an administration that is not enforcing the law in this country, when you have an administration that has abandoned any pretense of securing the border and securing our sovereignty, you see the onrush of people like what we saw walking across this dam that is right behind me," he told the network.It's unclear why so many migrants have amassed at Del Rio so quickly, but misinformation that the border would be easier to cross there may have played a part, reported The New York Times."False information, misinformation and misunderstanding might have created a false sense of hope," Guerline M. Jozef, the executive director of the Haitian Bridge Alliance, a group that works with migrants, told The Times.The Biden administration had been denying immigrants at the border under Title 42, a Trump-era immigration policy that allows migrants to be deported as a measure to keep COVID-19 from spreading. However, last week a judge ruled that Title 42 was "likely unlawful" and issued a preliminary injunction against it. The Biden administration has said they are appealing the decision. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider8 hr. 46 min. ago

The Houston doctor who was fired for administering leftover vaccine doses is suing Harris County, Texas, after being acquitted by a grand jury

"I don't think I was treated fairly, so I'm hoping to get a sense of fairness out of this, that's number one," Dr. Hasan Gokal told Insider. Dr. Hasan Gokal Courtesy of David Oates/PR Security Dr. Hasan Gokal was fired in January for giving away 10 COVID-19 vaccine doses that were due to expire. The Harris County District Attorney charged Gokal with theft but a grand jury acquitted him in June. Gokal is now suing Harris County for more than $1 million for discrimination. See more stories on Insider's business page. A Houston doctor who was accused of stealing COVID-19 vaccine doses and later acquitted by a grand jury is now suing Harris County in Texas for discrimination for more than $1 million. Last December, Dr. Hasan Gokal was working with Harris County Public Health at their first vaccination site. At the end of a shift, Gokal tried to find eligible people for leftover doses of the Moderna vaccine that would have expired and went door-to-door to administer shots.Gokal was accused of violating protocols and fired. District Attorney Kim Ogg also filed theft charges against him.Harris County Public Health also reached out to the Texas Medical Board to initiate an investigation for unethical behavior which was dismissed in March. Gokal was unable to work until that investigation was complete. In June, a grand jury acquitted Gokal of the charges. Gokal told Insider it was soon after the charges were dropped that he began thinking about suing the county, but it wasn't until about a month ago that he seriously discussed it with a lawyer. He said while he was relieved the case against him has been dropped, the past nine months weighed heavily on him and his family and hopes the suit will bring him justice."The first few months of this was rough, not being able to do a job. Not sure if my career is over. What's going to happen with the criminal charges and so on and so forth. Anybody in that level of stress and degree of uncertainty in life is going to be impacted by that uncertainty," Gokal said. "It was felt throughout my family. The kids are young and you can see the stress on them. My wife, certainly her condition got worse through all the stress."Gokal added that he's also hoping to ensure this doesn't happen again: "You're talking about a physician who does what a physician does, and you suddenly turn it into a criminal issue. That shouldn't happen to anybody else. Any way you cut it, it's just wrong," he told Insider. Additionally, Gokal said he wants to bring attention to the issue that Harris County Public Health, like other public health agencies across the country, is "not using physicians anymore and they're making decisions on their own without it." He said these agencies are making decisions about public health without necessary experts like doctors. "This has changed in the last year, and it's a very worrisome and dangerous trend," Gokal said. In a press release emailed to Insider, Gokal and his attorney said the public health department told him "he picked the wrong people to help - too many of them had 'Indian' names, too many of them were Asian.""It's very clear that if he had vaccinated people named Anderson, Smith, and Jones he would have been called a hero and not have been fired, charged, vilified, and brought before a grand jury that thankfully refused to indict him," Gokal's attorney, Joe Ahmad, said. The Harris County District Attorney did not respond to Insider's request for comment at the time of publication but previously told CBS News "The District Attorney's Office prosecutes state crimes that occur in Harris County. In pursuing prosecution against all accused, our intent is to seek and obtain justice in every case. We follow a strict protocol of evidence-based prosecution. The criminal charges of Theft by a Public Servant against this Defendant were based upon evidence obtained from witnesses and statements of the accused, both before and after his employment was terminated by the Harris County Health Dept. While grand jury witnesses are also prohibited in Texas from revealing what occurred in the grand jury, they are free to tell you about what they witnessed in an incident."Ahmad told Insider it's not clear how much of a financial loss the charges and case against Gokal will cost him, but they assume the impact will extend for years. "The full nature of the damages isn't known yet because frankly, the economic damages are still being suffered. Dr. Gokal is working, he's taking some shifts in the ER room. It's not the ideal job, but he's doing it," Ahmad told Insider.Gokal told Insider the case caused him a lot of stress and he wasn't able to dedicate his attention to patients full time. Additionally, Ahmad told Insider the publicity from the case has negatively impacted Gokal's reputation. "We believe he's going to be suffering a year from now, two years from now, if for no other reason than the nature of the publicity against him - how he was vilified, nationwide, worldwide," Ahmad said. "And so, do we believe that the damages could exceed $1 million? Absolutely. We'll know more as time goes by."Gokal said he's frustrated because he did what he was supposed to do."I don't think I was treated fairly, so I'm hoping to get a sense of fairness out of this, that's number one," he said. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider8 hr. 46 min. ago

The 20 most popular books of all time, according to Goodreads members

Goodreads is the world's largest platform for readers to rate and review books. Here are the 20 most popular books of all time, ranked by Goodreads. When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. According to Goodreads, some of the most popular books of all time include "The Great Gatsby," "Pride & Prejudice," and "The Hunger Games." Amazon; Rachel Mendelson/Insider Goodreads is the world's largest platform for readers to rate and review books. Below are the 20 most popular books of all time, ranked by Goodreads members. Want more books? Check out the most popular books of 2021, based on Goodreads. Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers to rate and review their favorite books and authors, track their reading, participate in challenges, and discover new book recommendations. No matter what you like to read, you can find it on Goodreads along with tons of fellow readers who love the same books. With millions of ratings and community reviews, readers are encouraged to share their opinions to help others determine their next read. We used the number of ratings of each book to determine the most popular books amongst Goodreads members, so whether you're curious if your favorite book made the list or are looking for a new read with millions of recommendations, here are the top 20 most popular books on Goodreads. The 20 most popular books of all time on Goodreads: "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" by J.K. Rowling Bookshop "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" by J.K. Rowling, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $6.98With nearly 8 million ratings, "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" is the most popular book of all time on Goodreads and has sold over 120 million copies. In this first book of the "Harry Potter" series, readers meet a young orphan boy who learns he's a wizard and begins his magical training at Hogwarts, a special school for witches and wizards. "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins Bookshop "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $11.69With almost 7 million ratings on Goodreads, "The Hunger Games" is the first book in a young adult dystopian series where the country is divided up into districts that annually select one boy and one girl to fight to the death in a highly publicized arena. When Katniss's little sister is chosen for the games, she volunteers in her sister's place and immediately begins training before entering the deadly arena. "Twilight" by Stephenie Meyer Bookshop "Twilight" by Stephenie Meyer, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.16"Twilight" is an iconic young adult vampire romance novel about a high school girl named Bella who falls in love with a mysterious boy named Edward and quickly finds out he's a vampire. As the threat of a nearby nomadic vampire looms, Bella chooses to be with Edward and discovers the secrets of his world, despite the nearly constant risks to her life.  "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee Bookshop "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.19"To Kill A Mockingbird" is an American classic from 1960, a Pulitzer Prize winner, and frequently voted as one of the best books of the 20th century. It's about a young girl named Scout who's growing up in a time of racial division, amplified as her lawyer father defends an innocent Black man wrongly accused of a horrible crime.  "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald Bookshop "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $5.97First published in 1925, "The Great Gatsby" is a classic Jazz Age novel about millionaire Jay Gatsby and his love for Daisy Buchanan. Narrated by Gatsby's neighbor, Nick Carraway, the novel follows Gatsby's shady business dealings, extravagant parties, and pursuit of Daisy's affection.  "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green Bookshop "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $6.10In this absolute tear-jerker, Hazel is battling a terminal cancer diagnosis, offered a few extra years by a miracle medical advancement. In her cancer support group, she meets Augustus Waters and they immediately begin to fall for each other in this tragic and beautiful young adult love story.  "1984" by George Orwell Bookshop "1984" by George Orwell, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.48In this novel predicting a dystopian future from its original publication in 1949, Winston Smith is living in a totalitarian world defined by strict mass surveillance and inundating propaganda. Winston works at the Ministry of Truth, rewriting history to fit the government's narrative, and can't help but wonder what the world was truly like before the revolution.  "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen Bookshop "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $5.47"Pride and Prejudice" is an 1813 romantic classic about Elizabeth Bennet, a young woman who is pressured to marry a wealthy man in order to provide for her family. She meets the brooding Mr. Darcy, with whom she begins a witty but civilized sparring banter as they slowly fall for each other in this novel about the influences of class and the importance of being true to yourself.  "Divergent" by Veronica Roth Bookshop "Divergent" by Veronica Roth, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $8.46In the dystopian science fiction world of "Divergent," all 16-year-olds must devote themselves to one of five factions in society, each dedicated to a virtue. Beatrice Prior is torn between staying with her family and being true to herself, so she makes a daring and shocking decision, thrusting her into an intense initiation and transformation while keeping a potentially deadly secret and discovering the growing conflict within her seemingly flawless society.  "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" by J.K. Rowling Bookshop "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" by J.K. Rowling, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $8.78When a murderer named Sirius Black escapes the wizarding world's highest security prison, rumor says he's headed to kill Harry since the dark Lord Voldemort's downfall was his as well. Even with the soulless prison guards searching the castle for Sirius, danger seems to follow Harry at every turn.  "The Hobbit" by J.R.R. Tolkien Bookshop "The Hobbit" by J.R.R. Tolkien, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $14.37This fantastical classic introduces readers to magical Middle-Earth where Bilbo Baggins, a hobbit, sets out on a quest to win a treasure guarded by a dragon. Initially written for the author's children, this adventure novel is a prequel to the epic "Lord of the Rings" series and is a charming favorite with over three million ratings and 1.6 million five-star reviews on Goodreads.   "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" by J.K. Rowling Bookshop "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" by J.K. Rowling, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $9.98In the final book of the "Harry Potter" series, Harry and his two best friends are on a cross-country journey to find the final answers that will help them defeat the dark wizard Lord Voldemort. Cumulating in an epic and devastating battle at Hogwarts, this intense novel closes the fantastical series with a shocking and emotional resolution.  "Animal Farm" by George Orwell Bookshop "Animal Farm" by George Orwell, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.48"Animal Farm" is a classic satirical novel about a group of mistreated farm animals who rebel against the human farmer to take over the farm and attempt to create a system where all animals are free and equal. But when the community is betrayed and collapses under a single dictator, the animals' hopes for equality diminish.  "The Diary of a Young Girl" by Anne Frank Bookshop "The Diary of a Young Girl" by Anne Frank, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.35Written by Anne Frank during the Nazi occupation of Holland, this diary is a firsthand, nonfiction account of the two years Anne and her family spent hiding in a secret annex of an old office building. With thoughtful insight and emotional impressions of the time, Anne's diary is a testament to her courage during the final years of her life.  "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" by J.K. Rowling Bookshop "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" by J.K. Rowling, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $6.98Before returning to Hogwarts for his second year of school, Harry receives an ominous message of the danger that awaits him if he's to return. Needing to escape his dreadful aunt and uncle, Harry ignores the warning and happily returns to school — until students begin to turn to stone and a strange voice in the wall means Harry might be the only one who can save them. "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger Bookshop "The Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $5.21"The Catcher in the Rye" is a young adult classic about a 16-year-old boy named Holden Caulfield and his three-day adventure through New York City. Heavily impacted by his experiences, Holden is an example of teenage rebellion as he navigates complex feelings about innocence, connection, and loss.  "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" by J.K. Rowling Bookshop "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" by J.K. Rowling, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $6.92In this fourth book of the "Harry Potter" series, Hogwarts is one of three schools participating in a Triwizard Tournament where one representative witch or wizard from each school must complete three extremely challenging tasks. When Harry's name is picked in addition to the three competitors, he must compete in the tournament, despite not knowing how he was entered.  "Angels & Demons" by Dan Brown Bookshop "Angels & Demons" by Dan Brown, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $16.20"Angels & Demons" is the first book in the "DaVinci Code" series, a thrilling mystery novel where readers meet world-renowned symbologist Robert Langdon as he's called to help explain the mysterious symbols left seared into the chest of a murdered physicist. His research takes him through an intense investigation that leads him towards a deadly vendetta from the Illuminati.  "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" by Stieg Larsson Bookshop "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" by Stieg Larsson, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $9.19In this international psychological thriller, Henrik Vanger is a billionaire whose niece disappeared over 40 years ago. Still searching for answers, he hires Mikal Blomkvist, a renowned journalist who recently lost a libel lawsuit, along with Lisbeth Salander, a mysterious but brilliant computer hacker. As the duo digs deeper into the investigation, they uncover a complex weave of family and financial secrets in this captivating Swedish thriller.  "Catching Fire" by Suzanne Collins Bookshop "Catching Fire" by Suzanne Collins, available on Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.98The second book in the "Hunger Games" saga follows Katniss and her public love interest, Peeta, after their historic arena win. Though they should be celebrating, rumors of a growing rebellion infuriate the Capitol and threaten their safety in this fast-paced, science-fiction sequel. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider19 hr. 18 min. ago

Mitsubishi (MUFG) U.S. Arm Gets OCC"s Cease-and-Desist Order

MUFG Union Bank NA, Mitsubishi UFJ's (MUFG) U.S. unit, served with a cease-and-desist order by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency on unreliable technological deeds. Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group’s MUFG U.S. banking unit, MUFG Union Bank NA, has been slapped with a cease-and-desist order by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) over its unsound technological practices.The regulator detected that the bank engaged in "unsafe or unsound practices" linked with technology and operational risk management. According to the order, the bank was also in non-conformity with certain security guidelines. Nonetheless, Mitsubishi UFG is in progress with the "corrective action" and has "committed resources to remediate the deficiencies".The bank’s board of directors will appoint a compliance committee by Oct 20, comprising at least three members. The majority of these will be directors who are not employees or officers of the bank or any of its subsidiaries or affiliates.DetailsAdditionally, within 90 days of the effective date of the order, Mitsubishi UFG must develop an acceptable, written action plan to include the details related to the corrective actions.The order further stated that by Jan 30, 2022, and thereafter, within a month, following the end of each quarter, the compliance committee should submit a written progress report to the board of directors. It will include details about the description of as well as specific remedial actions required to achieve compliance with each article of the order.The report would also bear the results and status of the reformatory actions. Upon receipt of each written progress report, the board must forward a copy of the same along with any additional comments to the examiner-in-charge within 10 days of the first board meeting subsequent to the board of director’s in-taking of such report.Further, by Feb 14, 2022, and thereafter, within 45 days after the end of each quarter, Mitsubishi UFG should draft, and submit to the board, a written action plan progress report. This must include the details pertaining to the description of the outstanding reformatory actions needed to attain compliance, the specific actions already undertaken, and the results and status of the same.Our TakeMitsubishi UFJ’s robust capital position keeps it well poised to undertake expansion strategies. Also, its intention to enter profitable business operations bodes well for the long term. However, the net interest income continues to remain under pressure due to the unfavorable interest rates.The stock has lost 4.5% over the past six months, against 1% growth recorded by the industry it belongs to.Image Source: Zacks Investment ResearchCurrently, Mitsubishi UFG carries a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold). You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank (Strong Buy) stocks here.Several finance companies continue to encounter legal hassles and are charged with huge sums of money for business malpractices. Even after facing a penalty and an enforcement action entailing business restrictions earlier this month, Well Fargo & Company’s WFC legal hassles are far from over. This is because U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren has addressed a letter to the Federal Reserve, urging the central bank to revoke the bank’s license as a financial holding company.Credit Acceptance Corporation CACC had also announced about the settlement of a lawsuit with the Massachusetts Attorney General and agreed to pay $27.2 million. In August 2020, AG Maura Healey filed a lawsuit in Suffolk County Superior Court, claiming that the company violated state consumer protection, and debt collection laws and regulations.Charles Schwab SCHW had been slapped with a class-action lawsuit over violations of its fiduciary duty by placing its own interest before the protection of its clients through the bank’s robo-adviser Schwab Intelligent Portfolios’ (SIP) cash sweep program. The case, filed in the U.S. District Court in Northern California, also accused the company of breach of contract and the violation of state laws. 5 Stocks Set to Double Each was handpicked by a Zacks expert as the #1 favorite stock to gain +100% or more in 2021. Previous recommendations have soared +143.0%, +175.9%, +498.3% and +673.0%. Most of the stocks in this report are flying under Wall Street radar, which provides a great opportunity to get in on the ground floor.Today, See These 5 Potential Home Runs >>Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report Wells Fargo & Company (WFC): Free Stock Analysis Report The Charles Schwab Corporation (SCHW): Free Stock Analysis Report Credit Acceptance Corporation (CACC): Free Stock Analysis Report Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, Inc. (MUFG): Free Stock Analysis Report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 21st, 2021

Financial Advice To A Recent College Graduate

Whitney Tilson’s email in which he provides financial advice to a recent college graduate. Q2 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more When I was in Yosemite National Park in early August, my friend slipped and mashed his knee, so I took him to the clinic for an X-ray (nothing was broken, fortunately) and a […] Whitney Tilson’s email in which he provides financial advice to a recent college graduate. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Series in PDF Get the entire 10-part series on Charlie Munger in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues. (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q2 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more When I was in Yosemite National Park in early August, my friend slipped and mashed his knee, so I took him to the clinic for an X-ray (nothing was broken, fortunately) and a few stitches. While I was sitting in the waiting room for an hour, I struck up a conversation with a young man whose friend was also getting stitches. I learned that he had just graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno, with a degree in engineering and was looking for a job. When he learned that I was in the investing business, he asked me for advice. Here's what I told him... First, get a job – a real job at a real company where you can put your engineering training to work. Don't even think of trying to start your own business, doing gig work like driving for Uber (NYSE:UBER), or working as a barista at Starbucks (NASDAQ:SBUX). Then, I summarized the main points from this section of my book, The Art of Playing Defense, and e-mailed him a PDF of the entire book... Loss of Wealth I'll acknowledge that the calamity of losing your wealth is a high-class problem (it can only happen to people who have money!). If you're fortunate enough to have a comfortable income and healthy savings, it might be nice to think about making even more, but it's far more important to make sure you don't lose what you already have. Ironically, the surest, fastest way to get poor quickly is to try to get rich quickly. I've known people who spent their whole lives building up their savings only to lose it all in some crazy, half-baked scheme. Common examples include investing everything in their own new business – or someone else's – and it fails; speculating in penny stocks; day trading stocks or, worse yet, options; or getting duped by some online or phone fraudster. Millions of people are ensnared in these traps every year. Another way to become poor, albeit somewhat more slowly, is to lose a good job and not be able to replace it. Or get divorced – boom, there goes half your wealth, plus expenses usually rise (two homes, less favorable tax treatment, etc.). But the most common way to get into financial trouble is to spend more than you earn (after taxes). What this means is that every year, you need to borrow money to fill the gap – and there are lenders galore who will sell you – at a steep price – all the rope you need to hang yourself: credit-card companies, installment lenders, auto dealers, and so forth. To be clear, certain types of debt are fine. It often makes sense to take out a subsidized student loan for a high-quality education or to buy a reasonably valued house with a fixed-rate, low-interest, tax-deductible mortgage. But otherwise, it's usually best to avoid debt. Our economy and, in particular, our financial system is, in many ways, incredibly predatory. It makes it so easy to spend, luring people into living above their means. It is imperative that you resist this siren song. No matter what your income, figure out a way to live within it. Develop Good Financial Habits If you want to build wealth and live comfortably someday, you need to develop good financial habits. A 1996 book called The Millionaire Next Door shaped my thinking on this topic. The authors refuted many misconceptions about financial success, chiefly the idea that to become wealthy, you have to inherit money or have a high-paying job like a Wall Street banker, celebrity, or professional athlete. Instead, the authors discovered that the most common job among millionaires was running a small private business. The second most common was a professional like a doctor or teacher. But, in a fascinating finding, it turned out that income level was only moderately predictive of whether someone would become a millionaire. More important was whether someone lived beneath their means, year in and year out. In their survey of millionaires, the factor that most closely correlated to whether someone was a millionaire was whether they answered "yes" to the question: "Is your spouse more frugal than you are?" Doctors, on average, earn quite a bit more than teachers. Yet, relative to their income, they are less likely to become millionaires because they tend to spend all – or more than all – of their high incomes on big houses in upscale neighborhoods, new cars, country club memberships, fancy vacations, private schools, and so forth. Meanwhile, teachers are far more likely to become millionaires than their incomes would predict because they tend to live frugally. My parents, both teachers, are perfect examples. They can squeeze a dollar until it screams. Growing up, we almost never went out to eat – going to Friendly's once a month was such a treat! My mom clipped dozens of coupons from the circular in the Sunday paper, and when she came home from the supermarket, would crow about how much she'd saved. And she bought most of our clothes at second-hand stores. She still tells my sister and me that our costly educations were funded by her thriftiness. We never had a new car. My dad is a good mechanic, so we always bought 10-year-old cars that he would nurse along for years. I remember in the 1980s when we lived in western Massachusetts, we had a beaten-up 1960s vintage Mercedes. Its heater had stopped working long ago, which was a big problem during the bitterly cold winters. But no matter – we all bundled up in our down jackets and used de-icer spray on the inside of the windows. Similarly, Warren Buffett, despite being one of the wealthiest men in the world, is still very frugal. He could afford to live in a massive estate, but instead has lived in the same house for 61 years! When he first started flying in a private jet, he felt so embarrassed that he nicknamed it "The Indefensible." Save and Invest Once you've developed good financial habits and are saving money every year, you need to invest your savings wisely. The good news is that it's not hard. First, max out your retirement plan(s) like an IRA or 401(k) – especially if your employer will match at least some portion of it (this is free money – take it!). Tax-deferred savings are much more valuable than taxable ones because you won't have to pay taxes on your realized gains each year. The difference over time is enormous. Also, because there's a penalty for taking the money out before you're 65 years old, you're less likely to do something stupid with it. Ideally, set up automatic withholding from your paycheck into your IRA (or another retirement fund) – this makes it easier to save because you never see the money. Then, set up a plan such that the moment the money hits your account, it's automatically invested in an S&P 500 Index fund. (If you want to set aside some money to invest on your own, that's fine – sign up for my newsletters at Empire Financial Research to help you do so – but index most of it.) Finally – this is key – don't look at it! Just let it build, year after year, decade after decade. Whatever you do, don't panic during times of market turmoil and sell – just about everybody who does this has terrible timing, selling at exactly the wrong time (for example, in March 2009 or 2020). Consider the extreme case of my sister, who had a retirement account at her old employer, then switched jobs – and forgot about it! Years later, she remembered it – and discovered hundreds of thousands of dollars (!) because she'd done everything right up front: her employer automatically withdrew the maximum retirement contribution from her paycheck and then invested all of it in an S&P 500 Index fund. When my parents moved to Africa 24 years ago, first to Ethiopia and then, nine years later, to Kenya, where they've since retired, I took charge of their financial affairs. Though neither of them had ever had a big salary, they had both worked for their entire careers, earned decent incomes, and lived super frugally. As a result, they had built up a nest egg of around $800,000. But they were much too conservative in how they'd invested it. Though they were still in their mid-fifties and would likely work another 15 years and live into their nineties, their savings were mostly in cash and bonds – an allocation more appropriate for eighty-year-olds. So I put a third of their savings into my hedge fund and another third into an index fund, such that two-thirds of their savings were in stocks. It was the right call. Two decades later, they're in their late-seventies, and their net worth is multiples of what it once was. They're comfortably retired – though you wouldn't know it from how frugal they still are. When they came back to the U.S. for a couple of months last summer, as they do every year, my mom refused to get a SIM card for her Kenya cell phone that would allow her to make and receive calls, get her e-mail, etc., because it cost too much: one dollar per day! Best regards, Whitney P.S. I welcome your feedback at WTDfeedback@empirefinancialresearch.com. Updated on Sep 21, 2021, 10:30 am (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkSep 21st, 2021

Trump"s lawyer says he"s not worried prosecutors named Trump personally in the tax-fraud indictment against his namesake company

Donald Trump's lawyer Ronald Fischetti said he's confident the Manhattan DA's office wouldn't charge the former president as part of its inquiry. Former President Donald Trump at an August 21 rally in Cullman, Alabama. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images A tax-fraud indictment against the Trump Organization and its CFO personally named Donald Trump. Still, his lawyer Ronald Fischetti told Insider he didn't think the Manhattan DA would charge Trump. He said Trump's tax savings in the alleged fraud scheme would amount to "pennies." See more stories on Insider's business page. An attorney representing Donald Trump said he wasn't worried that the former president was personally named in the indictment against his namesake company, telling Insider he's confident Trump wouldn't be charged in the Manhattan district attorney's long-running investigation.Prosecutors named Trump in charging documents unsealed July 1. They said he cut checks for family members of Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg, whom they also accused of tax crimes."Trump Corporation personnel, including Weisselberg, arranged for tuition expenses for Weisselberg's family members to be paid by personal checks drawn on the account of and signed by Donald J. Trump, and later drawn on the account of the Donald J. Trump Revocable Trust," prosecutors alleged in the indictment.Trump's lawyer Ronald Fischetti told Insider the mention had no bearing on the former president's personal legal exposure in the district attorney's investigation. He said Trump paid the tuition bills personally, rather than through corporate accounts, and took "no deductions" on them."All that money paid for [Weisselberg's] grandson's tuition - to the same school that Donald Trump's son Barron goes to - was paid by Donald Trump personally, never from the company," Fischetti said. "No checks ever went from the company to pay for that tuition."Fischetti said Trump made the tuition payments because Weisselberg's son, Barry, was undergoing an acrimonious split from his wife, Jennifer Weisselberg. Trump wanted to make sure the grandchildren of a "trusted employee" could remain at their school, Fischetti said."Donald Trump, out of his generosity, paid for it personally," Fischetti said. "No deductions, no nothing."The Trump Organization is expected to face trial next yearWeisselberg and attorneys for the Trump Organization pleaded not guilty to a 15-count indictment, where prosecutors described a wide-ranging tax scheme in which they accused Weisselberg of dodging taxes on $1.7 million of his income, much of which they said came in the form of perks like tuition payments, apartments, and cars.Prosecutors said more than $359,000 of that untaxed compensation came in the form of tuition payments from 2012 to 2017. They alleged the tuition payments were categorized as compensation in the Trump Organization's internal records but not on Weisselberg's personal tax forms. The Trump Organization's CFO, Allen Weisselberg, in State Supreme Court in New York City on Monday. Jefferson Siegel/The New York Times via AP Fischetti said that Trump paying the tuition out of his own pocket, rather than corporate coffers, indicated Trump had already paid all the appropriate taxes on his end."It's not taxable for that person," Fischetti said. "And it's not a deduction for the person who's giving it to them."Weisselberg's grandchildren have attended the Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School in Manhattan's Upper West Side, which was subpoenaed in the district attorney's investigation.Since last fall, Jennifer Weisselberg has been a cooperating witness and has given troves of documents to prosecutors. She told Insider in an interview earlier this year that the Trump Organization sometimes gave employees perks like apartments and tuition payments in lieu of monetary bonuses as a way to control their lives.In a court hearing Monday, New York State Supreme Court Justice Juan Merchan said attorneys for Weisselberg and the Trump Organization had until January to review 6 million pages of documents in the case and submit pretrial motions. Merchan told the attorneys to expect a trial to begin in August or September of next year.Fischetti said Trump's tax savings in the alleged fraud scheme would amount to 'fucking pennies'Bryan Skarlatos, an attorney representing Weisselberg in the case, said in court Monday that he expected more indictments from the grand-jury investigation.Fischetti told Insider he didn't expect Trump to be among the indicted. He said the tax savings prosecutors describe would amount to "pennies" for the former president."This guy's a billionaire. What's he going to get out of this?" he said, adding: "It's fucking pennies! It's ridiculous. They have nothing on the president. Absolutely nothing."Fischetti said he met with prosecutors in June and they'd brought no evidence that Trump had any personal knowledge of or involvement in the alleged tax scheme."They have said nothing about the president knowing about this," Fischetti said. "They have no tape recordings, they have no email, they have no text. They have no documents. They have nothing!" Weisselberg waiting for a car after leaving a court appearance on Monday. AP Photo/Craig Ruttle Prosecutors typically meet with attorneys of people they plan to accuse of white-collar crimes shortly before indictments, but Fischetti said he'd heard nothing from the district attorney's team since that summer meeting. Mark Pomerantz - Fischetti's former law partner and a leading member of the Manhattan district attorney's team - assured Fischetti he'd give him a chance to defend Trump in advance of bringing any charges.Attorneys for other witnesses who've testified before the grand jury said none of the clients had anything to say about Trump's personal involvement, according to Fischetti. He said prosecutors' only hope of indicting Trump would be to "coerce" people to tell the grand jury they acted at Trump's direction."The only thing they could possibly have are witnesses that would go into the grand jury and say, 'Yes, I got a free car and I got a free apartment, and he deducted it from my salary or would give it to me as a bonus so the company made money,'" Fischetti told Insider. "He needs witnesses! He has none! Zero!"A representative for the Manhattan district attorney's office declined to comment for this story.Prosecutors also were said to have been investigating whether the Trump Organization broke tax laws by keeping two sets of books to secure favorable tax, insurance, and loan rates, as well as whether the company broke campaign finance laws by facilitating hush-money payments to Stormy Daniels in advance of the 2016 election.Fischetti said he hasn't heard anything about charges related to those inquiries.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytSep 21st, 2021

Home-Based Business: Why Working for Yourself is a Great Idea?

The year 2020 left us numbed with a whole new share of problems. If there is one thing to learn from living through lockdowns and pandemics, it’s that a lot can change in a year. We came to know ourselves, to better understand what we’re truly capable of and why acquiring new skills even in […] The year 2020 left us numbed with a whole new share of problems. If there is one thing to learn from living through lockdowns and pandemics, it’s that a lot can change in a year. We came to know ourselves, to better understand what we’re truly capable of and why acquiring new skills even in our 30s is still a viable and normal way of coping with the “new normalcy.” The year 2021 taught us something different. Namely, that we’re capable of making challenging decisions no matter the outcome. Starting a home-based business account is one of those bold choices, and we’ve got all the reasons to do so. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get Our Activist Investing Case Study! Get the entire 10-part series on our in-depth study on activist investing in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or print it out to read anywhere! Sign up below! (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q2 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Many of us dream of becoming our “own boss,” taking the plunge and starting a business. While it may be a daunting thought to battle, if you consider the success of nearly 28.8 million small businesses throughout the US alone, you will reach the conclusion that starting a business is a lot easier than it used to be. The truth is you don’t necessarily have to find a “real job” to move on with your life. Believe it or not, there are plenty of ways to earn by working on your own terms than people think. Here are a few reasons why you should start your home-based business today. Your Business, Your Schedule If you’re sick and tired of being told what to do and when to do it, then starting your own business might give you the time flexibility you’ve always dreamed of. Stay up late, sleep in, work half days, or take off every Friday – it’s up to you. The bad news? Not that bad, unless you’re committed to working harder and better, as the early days of your business will be the busiest. However, you will eventually gain more free time as you progress and learn to delegate tasks more efficiently. Need more time for your family? Having your own business means you don’t need to request time off for emergencies and other personal matters. It’s way more convenient when it comes to time, but you may still need to put in long hours, especially when getting your business up and running, Turn Your Passion into Profit Fond of baking or cooking? Why not take the leap and build yourself a home-based bakery? There’s no wrong passion. If you want to fulfil your dream of being a professional baker, there’s no better time to start than now. Of course, like with anything in life, starting from scratch is a long road ahead, not to mention the many responsibilities that come with managing a business. As a food-industry business, you’re exposed to risks. In the insurance world, that means your business operation has the potential to cause something bad to happen to someone - or something. There’s also a chance that someone or something else could cause your business harm. There are loads of examples of risks for bakeries, including property damage, trip and fall accidents, food poisoning, and more. In fact, many risks involved with running a bakery result in something getting broken, someone getting hurt and something getting stolen- usually your bakery equipment. Suppose your business were to be sued for an accident, in that case, you could face thousands of dollars for damages, injuries and more. But that’s where bakers insurance can help. If you’re ready to start your home-based bakery, you should, by all means, consider purchasing bakery insurance. That’s yours to take, which means you have to be fully committed to these responsibilities without compromising your passion. We tend to be passionate about things we’re good at; we relish activities that come naturally to us. However, being good at something you’re passionate about isn’t always enough to create a successful business. The most successful entrepreneurs take their passion and build on it by learning, developing, and cultivating their skills. To feed your passion and make a business out of it, you need to commit to continually improving your experience and skills so you are always moving forward and growing your passion. Become an Expert in Your Field Why wait for someone to give you a chance to be the best at something you’re passionate about when you can create your own opportunity? As the old saying goes, “Do one thing and do it well” rather than wasting your time and money on big ideas that carry little weight. However, becoming an expert takes time. Considerable amounts of time. But many professionals already pour lots of sweat and dedication into becoming an expert in their field. Therefore, in order to build and maintain your expert position and help your business grow, you should dedicate some time for: Studying – Successful entrepreneurs are also students for life. Keep reading books, attend online and offline education webinars or lessons, attend conferences, seminars events, consider networking events. Practicing – Practices make perfect, and you know it. Extending your network of connections in your field and practicing things you learned in your study time. Presenting – An important part of being an expert is learning to share your expertise and finding relevant people. Today, there are many ways to share your knowledge through blogs, articles, eBooks, podcasts, and videos. Enjoy Less Competition Many businesses that started 2020 on the right foot have closed their doors due to the pandemic. Others that managed to stay on top are just now strategizing. The good news? These businesses' gaps left in the market should be seen as opportunities for startups and small businesses to thrive. More often than not, entrepreneurs start businesses when they are up and flourishing, and few will consider 2021 the year to start a business as the world resuscitates itself after a pandemic that wreaked havoc through our economies. For business owners, having fewer competitors means one less thing to stress about. Give Back to the Community Our world is riffed with problems. And more often than not, a lack of funding causes problems. A small business would put you in place to do something about the issues you see and care about in your community. You could even become a social entrepreneur and focus your effort on social value. The world needs valuable people, and you could easily become one who could help young people through challenging times or start a business to assist single parents. Usually, when you focus on doing good instead of making a profit, everyone wins. Last but certainly not least, you will be able to achieve the goals and dreams you had about financial freedom and being able to be your own boss. Updated on Sep 20, 2021, 12:41 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkSep 21st, 2021

Solana-Based Projects Continue To Attract Investor Funding Ahead Of Token Launches

The Solana ecosystem has been of great interest to developers and investors lately. Not only is the native SOL token gaining steam, but several projects on this blockchain completed funding rounds. So there is much to look forward to in this ecosystem over the coming months. Q2 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more The […] The Solana ecosystem has been of great interest to developers and investors lately. Not only is the native SOL token gaining steam, but several projects on this blockchain completed funding rounds. So there is much to look forward to in this ecosystem over the coming months. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Series in PDF Get the entire 10-part series on Charlie Munger in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues. (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q2 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more The Ongoing Success Of Solana A new solution needs to be found in a world where the top public blockchains are either too slow to use or suffer from high transaction fees. Efficiency and speed are two crucial aspects when trying to ring blockchain into the mainstream. Unfortunately, neither Bitcoin or Ethereum fits that bill currently, allowing for alternative blockchains to throw their hats into the ring. Solana is one of these competitors that, while still in beta, has proven to be of tremendous appeal. Despite a recent network outage that lasted over 17 hours, developers remain keen on building applications for the Solana ecosystem. The unforeseen network issue occurred when users pushed the blockchain past 400,000 transactions per second. Theoretically, it can handle up to 750,000 TPS, although it seems there needs to be some tweaking. Nevertheless, Solana is operational again with the help of the Validator community, and services have been resumed. The unexpected outage has some repercussions for projects building and running on Solana. However, the mainnet is still in beta, and there may be hiccups along the way. Such a technical issue is unlikely to dissuade investors from contributing to up-and-coming projects, though. Several ventures have attracted funding recently, and their associated tokens are on the move. The Established Solana Projects Two projects stand out in this ecosystem to date. Solana is a potent blockchain that can serve many use cases, ranging from decentralized finance to non-fungible tokens and everything in between. Solrise Finance, a project bringing non-custodial solutions to the Solana ecosystem, raised $3.4 million in funding last July. The fund management and investment protocol will make DeFi more accessible to investor audiences. Moreover, users can create their own funds to gain asset exposure across the Solana ecosystem. Fund managers will never own investor funds, and investors can enter and exit positions as they see fit. SLRS, the native utility token, notes a 147.2% increase in the past month, confirming this project has merit. The other "big" project on Solana is Serum. The decentralized exchange and ecosystem are created with the help of the Solana Foundation and offer an on-chain central limit order book and matching engine. The project completed a $20 million seed round in July 2020, with ten investors contributing funding. In the past year, the value of the SRM token - used for reducing trading fees and staking - noted a 426% price increase. A strong performance as decentralized exchanges gain momentum. Upcoming Projects Secure Funding As more and more developers want to build on Solana, there will be opportunities for investors to be part of such ventures at an early stage. Several up-and-coming concepts have secured funding recently, indicating investors see the benefit in building on the Solana ecosystem. DeFi Land, a decentralized finance and gaming project, has secured $4.1 million in investment to launch a new DeFi "game". By gamifying the concept of decentralized finance, more people can get acquainted with this new paradigm of financial services and products. Over 40 investors contributed to the funding round for this agriculture simulation game. In addition, offering educational solutions for those who want to explore alternative finance solutions can bring more people into the DeFi fold. In an industry where decentralization is crucial, it can be tricky to source sufficient liquidity for DeFi and decentralized trading purposes. Cyclos, a concentrated liquidity market maker, built on Solana, aims to solve this problem. Its private and public funding round resulted in a $2.1 million investment. Cyclos aims to build the first concentrated liquidity automated market maker on the blockchain. That will benefit Serum and potentially DeFi projects coming to the Solana ecosystem. A few days ago, SolRazr secured $1.5 million in seed funding. SolRazr will help projects efficiently raise capital and allow investors to participate at a fractional cost as a venture platform. It is not just a launchpad, as the team will provide various developer tools to help anyone build new products and services on the Solana blockchain. Ultimately, SolRazr aims to become the go-to fundraising and developer platform for any project in the Solana ecosystem. Closing Thoughts As so many projects successfully secure funding to build on Solana, the excitement continues to build. The three recent projects listed above all secured investments before releasing their native tokens. Those tokens can give investors another opportunity to benefit from the success of these projects. Those who invested in Serum and Solrise early on reaped the rewards. It is plausible that the projects securing funding in the past few months may see similar success once their tokens come to market. Their success will not hinge on token sales and the money raised from it, as they have the financial backing from VCs and other parties to build their ecosystem. Updated on Sep 20, 2021, 2:41 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkSep 21st, 2021

Victor Davis Hanson: The Afghanistization Of America

Victor Davis Hanson: The Afghanistization Of America Authored by Victor Davis Hanson via AmGreatness.com, The United States should be at its pinnacle of strength. It still produces more goods and services than any other nation—China included, which has a population over four times as large. Its fuel and food industries are globally preeminent, as are its graduate science, computer, engineering, medical, and technology university programs. Its constitution is the oldest of current free nations. And the U.S. military is by far the best funded in the world. And yet something has gone terribly wrong within America, from the southern border to Afghanistan.  The inexplicable in Afghanistan—surrendering Bagram Air Base in the middle of the night, abandoning tens of billions of dollars of military equipment to the Taliban, and forsaking both trapped Americans and loyalist Afghans—has now become the new Biden model of inattention and incompetence.  Or to put it another way, when we seek to implant our culture abroad, do we instead come to emulate what we are trying to change? COVID Chaos Take COVID-19. Joe Biden in 2020 (along with Kamala Harris) trashed Trump’s impending Operation Warp Speed vaccinations. Then, after inauguration, Biden falsely claimed no one had been vaccinated until his ascension (in fact, 1million a day were being vaccinated before he assumed office). Then again, Biden claimed ad nauseam that he didn’t believe in mandates to force the new and largely experimental vaccinations on the public. Then, once more, he promised that they were so effective and so many Americans had received vaccines that by July 4 the country would return to a virtual pre-COVID normality.  Then came the delta variant and his self-created disaster in Afghanistan.  To divert his attention away from the Afghan morass, Biden weirdly focused on an equally confused new presidential COVID-19 mandate, seeking to subject federal employees, soldiers, and employees of larger firms to mandatory vaccinations—right as the contagious delta variant seemed to be slowly tapering off, given the millions who have either been vaxxed, have developed natural immunity, or both. Consider other paradoxes. American citizens must be vaccinated, but not the forecasted 2 million noncitizens expected to cross the southern border illegally into the United States over the current fiscal year. Soldiers who bravely helped more than 100,000 Afghan refugees escape must be vaccinated, but not the unvetted foreign nationals from a premodern country? Scientists now are convinced naturally acquired COVID-19 immunity from a previous infection likely provides longer and better protection than does any of the current vaccinations.  Yet those who suffered COVID-19, and now have antibodies and other natural defenses, must likewise be vaccinated. That anomaly raises the obvious logical absurdities: will those with vaccinations—in reciprocal fashion—be forced to be exposed to the virus to obtain additional and superior natural immunity, given the Biden logic of the need for both acquired and vaccinated immunity?  Tribal Lands  We have Afghanistanized the border as well, turning the United States into a pre-state whose badlands borders are absolutely porous and fluid. There is no audit of newcomers, no vaccinations required, no COVID-19 tests—none of the requirements that millions of citizens must meet either entering the United States or working at their jobs. Our Bagram abandonment is matched by abruptly abandoning the border wall in mid-course.  Yet where the barrier exists, there is some order; where Joe Biden abandoned the wall, there is a veritable stampede of illegal migration.  October 7, 2019. Mark Wilson/Getty Images Coups, Juntas and Such Third-World countries suffer military coups when unelected top brass and caudillos often insidiously take control of the country’s governance in slow-motion fashion. The latest Bob Woodward “I heard,” “they say,” and “sources reveal” mythography now claims that General Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs, discussed separating an elected commander-in-chief from control of the military. Woodward and co-author Robert Costa also assert that Milley promised his Chinese Communist military counterpart that he would tip off the People’s Liberation Army of any planned U.S. aggressive action—an odd paranoia when Donald Trump, of the last five presidents, has proved the most reluctant to send U.S. troops into harm’s way.  If that bizarre assertion is true, Milley himself might have essentially risked starting a war by eroding U.S. deterrence in apprising an enemy of perceived internal instability inside the executive branch, and the lack of a unified command. (So, Woodward wrote: “‘General Li, I want to assure you that the American government is stable, and everything is going to be okay,’ Milley said. ‘We are not going to attack or conduct any kinetic operations against you.’ Milley then added, ‘If we’re going to attack, I’m going to call you ahead of time. It’s not going to be a surprise.’”) More germanely, when Milley called in senior officers and laid down his own operational directives concerning nuclear weapons, he was clearly violating the law as established and strengthened in 1947, 1953, and 1986 that clearly states the Joint Chiefs are advisors to the president and are not in the chain of command and are to be bypassed, at least operationally, by the president. The commander in chief sets policy. And if it requires the use of force, he directs the secretary of defense to relay presidential orders to the relevant theater commanders. Milley had no authority to discuss changing nuclear procedures, much less to convey a smear to an enemy that his commander in chief was non compos mentis. Milley has been reduced to a caricature of a caricature right out of “Dr. Strangelove”—and is himself a danger to national security. After Milley’s summer 2020 virtue-signaling “apology” for alleged presidential photo-op misbehavior (found to be completely false by the interior department’s inspector general); after leaked news reports that Milley considered resignation (promises, promises) to signal his anger at Trump in summer 2020; after his dismissal of the 120 days of rioting, 28 deaths, 14,000 arrests, and $2 billion in damage as mere “penny packet protests”; after his “white rage” blathering before Congress; after the collapse of the U.S. military command in Kabul; and after his premature and hasty assessment of a U.S. drone strike that killed 10 innocent civilians as “righteous,” Woodward’s sensationalism may not sound as impossible as his usual fare.  Milley should either deny the Woodward charges and demand a real apology or resign immediately. He has violated the law governing the chain of command, misused his office of chairman of the Joint Chiefs, politicized the military, proved inept in his military judgment and advice, and may well have committed a felony in revealing to a hostile military leader that the United States was, in his opinion, in a crisis mode.  Yet, Milley did not act in isolation. Where did this low-bar Pentagon coup talk originate? And who are those responsible for creating a culture in which unelected current and retired military officers, sworn to uphold the constitutional order and the law of civilian control of the military, believe that they can arbitrarily declare an elected president either incompetent or criminal—and thus subject to their own renegade sort of freelancing justice? As a footnote, remember that after little more than a week of the Trump presidency, Rosa Brooks, an Obama-era Pentagon appointee, published in Foreign Policy various ways to remove the newly inaugurated president. Among those mentioned was a military coup, in which top officers were to collude to obstruct a presidential order, on the basis of their own perceptions of a lack of presidential rectitude or competence.  We note additionally that over a dozen high-ranking retired generals and admirals have serially violated the uniform code of military justice in demonizing publicly their commander in chief with the worst sort of smears and slanders. And they have done so with complete exemption and in mockery of the very code they have sworn to abide.  Two retired army officers, colonels John Nagl and Paul Yingling, on the eve of the 2020 election, urged Milley to order U.S. army forces to remove Trump from office if in their opinion he obstructed the results of the election—superseding in effect a president’s elected powers as well as those constitutional checks and balances of the legislative and judicial branches upon him.  We know that these were all partisan and not principled concerns about an alleged non compos mentis president, because none of these same outspoken “Seven Days in May” generals have similarly violated the military code by negatively commenting publicly on the current dangerous cognitive decline of Joe Biden and the real national security dangers of his impairment, as evidenced by the disastrous skedaddle from Afghanistan and often inability to speak coherently or remember key names and places. In short, is our new freelancing and partisan military also in the process of becoming Afghanized—too many of its leadership electively appealing to pseudo-higher principles to contextualize violating the Constitution of the United States and, sadly, too many trying to reflect the general woke landscape of the corporate board to which so many have retired? Like tribal warlords, our top brass simply do as they please, and then message to us “so what are you going to do about it?” Achin, Afghanistan, 2011. John Moore/Getty Images The Constitution as Construct How paradoxical that the United States has sent teams of constitutional specialists to Iraq and Afghanistan to help tribal societies to draft legal, ordered, and sustainable Western consensual government charters that are not subject to the whims of particular tribes and parties. Yet America itself is descending in the exact opposite direction.  Suddenly in 2021 America, if ancient consensual rules, customs, and constitutional mandates do not facilitate and advance the progressive project, then by all means they must end—by a mere one vote in the Senate. It is as if the centuries of our history, the Constitution, and the logic of the founders were analogous to a shouting match among a squabbling Taliban tribal council of elders. Junk the 233-year-old Electoral College and the constitutional directive to the states to assume primary responsibilities in establishing voting procedures in national elections. End the 180-year-old Senate filibuster. Do away with the now bothersome 150-year nine-justice Supreme Court. And scrap the 60-year-old tradition of a 50-state union.   Impeachment was intended by the founders as a rare reset of the executive branch in extremis. Now it is to be a pro formaattack on the president in his first term by the opposite party as soon as it gains control of the House—without a special counsel, without witnesses and cross-examinations, without any specific high crimes and misdemeanors or bribery and treason charges. And why not from now on impeach a president twice within a year—or try him in the Senate when he is out of office as a private citizen?  When private citizen Joe Biden is retired from the presidency, will his political enemies dig up his sketchy IRS records alleging that he never paid income taxes on the “big guy’s” “10 percent” of the income from the Hunter Biden money machine? American Tribes  We may think virtue-signaling pride flags, gender studies, and George Floyd murals in Kabul remind the world of our postmodern sophistication. Yet, in truth, we are becoming far more like Afghanistan in the current tribalization of America—where tribal, racial, and ethnic loyalties are now essential to an American’s primary identity and loyalty—than we were ever able to make Afghanistan like us. When we read leftist heartthrob Ibram X. Kendi’s endorsement of overt racial discrimination or academic and media obsessions with a supposed near-satanic “whiteness,” or the current fixations on skin color and first loyalties to those who share superficial racial affinities, then we are not much different from the Afghan tribalists. We in America apparently have decided the warring badlands of the Pashtuns, Tajiks, Hazaras, and Uzbeks have their advantages over a racially blind, consensual republic. They are the model to us, not us of the now-discredited melting pot to them. How sad in our blinkered arrogance that we go across the globe to the tribal Third World to teach the impoverished a supposedly preferrable culture and politics, while at home we are doing our best to become a Third-World country of incompetency, constitutional erosion, a fractious and politicized military elite, and racially and ethnically obsessed warring tribes.  Tyler Durden Mon, 09/20/2021 - 23:40.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeSep 21st, 2021

Donald Trump"s lawyer says he"s not worried prosecutors named Trump personally in the tax fraud indictment against his namesake company

Donald Trump's lawyer, Ronald Fischetti, said he's confident the Manhattan DA's office won't charge the former president as part of its investigation. Former U.S. President Donald Trump addresses supporters during a "Save America" rally at York Family Farms on August 21, 2021 in Cullman, Alabama. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images A tax fraud indictment against the Trump Organization and its CFO Allen Weisselberg personally named Donald Trump. Still, his lawyer Ronald Fischetti told Insider he doesn't believe the Manhattan DA will charge the ex-president. He said Trump's tax savings in the alleged fraud scheme would amount to "fucking pennies." See more stories on Insider's business page. An attorney representing Donald Trump said he isn't worried that the former president is personally named in the indictment against his namesake company, telling Insider he's confident Trump won't be charged in the Manhattan District Attorney's long-running investigation.Prosecutors named Trump in charging documents unsealed on July 1. They said he cut checks for family members of Trump Organization CFO Allen Weisselberg, who they also accused of tax crimes."Trump Corporation personnel, including Weisselberg, arranged for tuition expenses for Weisselberg's family members to be paid by personal checks drawn on the account of and signed by Donald J. Trump, and later drawn on the account of the Donald J. Trump Revocable Trust," prosecutors alleged in the indictment.Trump's lawyer, Ronald Fischetti, told Insider that the mention had no bearing on the former president's personal legal exposure in the DA's investigation. He said that Trump paid the tuition bills personally, rather than through corporate accounts, and took "no deductions" on them."All that money paid for [Weisselberg's] grandson's tuition - to the same school that Donald Trump's son Barron goes to - was paid by Donald Trump personally, never from the company," Fischetti said. "No checks ever went from the company to pay for that tuition."Fischetti said Trump made the tuition payments because Weisselberg's son, Barry, was undergoing an acrimonious split from his wife, Jennifer Weisselberg. Trump wanted to make sure the grandchildren of a "trusted employee" could remain at their school, Fischetti said."Donald Trump, out of his generosity, paid for it personally," Fischetti said. "No deductions, no nothing."The Trump Organization is expected to face trial next yearWeisselberg and attorneys for the Trump Organization pleaded not guilty to a 15-count indictment, where prosecutors described a wide-ranging alleged tax scheme in which Weisselberg dodged taxes on $1.7 million of his income, much of which they said came in the form of perks like tuition payments, apartments, and cars.More than $359,000 of that untaxed compensation came in the form of tuition payments from 2012 to 2017, prosecutors said. They alleged the tuition payments were categorized as compensation in the Trump Organization's internal records, but not on Weisselberg's personal tax forms. The Trump Organization's Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg appears in State Supreme Court in Manhattan on Monday, Sept. 20, 2021 in New York. Jefferson Siegel/The New York Times via AP Fischetti said that Trump paying the tuition out of his own pocket, rather than corporate coffers, indicated that the ex-president had already paid all the appropriate taxes on his end."It's not taxable for that person," Fischetti said. "And it's not a deduction for the person who's giving it to them."Weisselberg's grandchildren have attended the Columbia Grammar & Preparatory School in Manhattan's Upper West Side, which was subpoenaed in the DA's investigation.Since last fall, Jennifer Weisselberg has been a cooperating witness and has given troves of documents to prosecutors. She told Insider in an interview earlier this year that the Trump Organization sometimes gave employees perks like apartments and tuition payments in lieu of monetary bonuses as a way to control their lives.In a court hearing Monday, New York State Supreme Court Judge Juan Merchan said attorneys for Weisselberg and the Trump Organization had until January 2022 to review 6 million pages of documents in the case and submit pre-trial motions. Merchan told the attorneys to expect a trial to begin in August or September 2022.Fischetti said Trump's tax savings in the alleged fraud scheme would amount to 'fucking pennies'Bryan Skarlatos, an attorney representing Weisselberg in the case, said in court Monday that he expects more indictments from the grand jury investigation.Fischetti told Insider he doesn't expect Trump to be among the indicted. He said the tax savings prosecutors describe would amount to "fucking pennies" for the former president."This guy's a billionaire. What's he going to get out of this?" he said, adding: "It's fucking pennies! It's ridiculous. They have nothing on the president. Absolutely nothing."Fischetti said he met with prosecutors in June, and that they've brought no evidence that Trump had any personal knowledge of or involvement in the alleged tax scheme."They have said nothing about the president knowing about this," Fischetti said. "They have no tape recordings, they have no email, they have no text. They have no documents. They have nothing!" The Trump Organization's Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg, center, awaits a car after leaving a courtroom appearance in New York, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021. AP Photo/Craig Ruttle Prosecutors typically meet with attorneys of people they plan to accuse of white-collar crimes shortly before indictments, but Fischetti said he's heard nothing from the district attorney's team since that summer meeting. Mark Pomerantz - Fischetti's former law partner and a leading member of the Manhattan DA's team - assured Fischetti he'd give him a chance to defend Trump in advance of bringing any charges.Attorneys for other witnesses who've testified before the grand jury said none of the clients had anything to say about Trump's personal involvement, according to Fischetti. He said that prosecutors' only hope of possibly indicting Trump was to "coerce" people to tell the grand jury that they acted at Trump's direction."The only thing they could possibly have are witnesses that would go into the grand jury and say, 'Yes, I got a free car and I got a free apartment, and he deducted it from my salary or would give it to me as a bonus so the company made money,'" Fischetti told Insider. "He needs witnesses! He has none! Zero!"A representative for the Manhattan DA's office declined to comment for this story.Prosecutors also were said to have been investigating whether the Trump Organization broke tax laws by keeping two sets of books in order to secure favorable tax, insurance, and loan rates, as well as whether the company broke campaign finance laws by facilitating hush-money payments to Stormy Daniels in advance of the 2016 election.Fischetti said he hasn't heard anything about charges related to those inquiries.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 21st, 2021

Biden"s Pentagon says it"s canceling all border wall projects paid for with money Trump took from the military

One of Biden's first acts after taking office as president was to halt construction of the border wall. Government contractors erect a section of Pentagon-funded border wal.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderApr 30th, 2021

A judge approved a $17 million sexual misconduct settlement for Weinstein accusers

The settlement will allow women who have accused Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct to seek compensation confidentially. Harvey Weinstein exits a Manhattan court house as a .....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJan 26th, 2021

Suspected darknet drug dealers stand accused of hiding a huge stash of Bitcoin that"s now worth $16 million. They bought a fishing boat and a squid permit to conceal their crime, say US attorneys.

A federal judge issued a warrant for seizure of about 392 Bitcoin worth $16 million, which attorneys say were used by Darknet drug dealers Treasury officials are putting new regulations in place to curb money laund.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 14th, 2021

Darknet drug dealers have been accused of hiding a Bitcoin stash that"s now worth $16 million. They bought an old fishing boat and a squid permit to conceal their crime, say US attorneys.

A federal judge issued a warrant for seizure of about 392 Bitcoin worth $16 million, which attorneys say were used by Darknet drug dealers A representation of virt.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 10th, 2021

Charlotte restaurant owner charged with fraud over $1.7M in PPP

The owner of La Shish Kabob in Charlotte denies his role in an alleged scheme to fraudulently obtain more than $1.7 million in Covid-19 relief funding. “We are not guilty. We trust the judge and the courts,” Izzat Freitekh told the Charlotte.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsDec 20th, 2020

The US Army just gave a contractor with a history of GOP donations $569 million to build parts of Trump"s border wall

Matt York/AP The US Army Corps of Engineers has reportedly doled out over a half a billion dollars to a fe.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderApr 17th, 2020

The New York Post: Trump acted unlawfully in declaring national emergency to divert military funds to border wall: federal judge

President Trump acted unlawfully when he declared a national emergency in order to fund his long-promised border wall, a federal judge ruled Friday......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchOct 11th, 2019

Businessman arrested in Pinellas County for alleged Ponzi scheme

Deputies have arrested a man accused of operating his Pinellas County business as a Ponzi scheme, costing his victims $1.5 million, according to a Fox 13 News report. The Pinellas County Sheriff's Office said a monthslong investigation revealed that .....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsSep 22nd, 2019