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Airlines trimming their 4Q flights. Here"s what"s happening in Buffalo.

Even after the Covid-19 Delta variant's effects on the economy began to wane, airlines have continued to reduce flight schedules for the fourth quarter. However, some airline executives are anticipating a strong December......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 25th, 2021

Airlines trimming their 4Q flights. Here"s what"s happening in Buffalo.

Even after the Covid-19 Delta variant's effects on the economy began to wane, airlines have continued to reduce flight schedules for the fourth quarter. However, some airline executives are anticipating a strong December......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 25th, 2021

Airlines are trimming their 4Q flights. Here"s what"s happening at Sea-Tac Airport.

Even after the Covid-19 Delta variant's effects on the economy began to wane, airlines have continued to reduce flight schedules for the fourth quarter. However, some airline executives are anticipating a strong December......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 24th, 2021

Airlines trimming their 4Q flights. Here"s what"s happening in Cleveland

Even after the Covid-19 Delta variant's effects on the economy began to wane, airlines have continued to reduce flight schedules for the fourth quarter. However, some airline executives are anticipating a strong December......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 24th, 2021

Airlines trimming their 4Q flights. Here"s what"s happening in New York

Even after the Covid-19 Delta variant's effects on the economy began to wane, airlines have continued to reduce flight schedules for the fourth quarter. However, some airline executives are anticipating a strong December......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 24th, 2021

Airlines trimming their 4Q flights. Here"s what"s happening in Chicago

Even after the Covid-19 Delta variant's effects on the economy began to wane, airlines have continued to reduce flight schedules for the fourth quarter. However, some airline executives are anticipating a strong December......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 24th, 2021

Airlines trimming their 4Q flights. Here"s what"s happening at LAX

Even after the Covid-19 Delta variant's effects on the economy began to wane, airlines have continued to reduce flight schedules for the fourth quarter. However, some airline executives are anticipating a strong December......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 23rd, 2021

Airlines trimming flights for Q4 across the county, including at Albuquerque"s Sunport

Even after the Covid-19 Delta variant's effects on the economy began to wane, airlines have continued to reduce flight schedules for the fourth quarter. However, some airline executives are anticipating a strong December......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 21st, 2021

New airline ITA has officially taken over for Alitalia - see the full history of Italy"s troubled flag carrier

Alitalia has officially ceased operations and handed the baton to newcomer ITA, which stands for Italian Air Transport. ITA Airways Chairman Alfredo Altavilla poses with rendering of new livery ITA Press Office/Handout via REUTERS Government-owned Alitalia ceased operations on October 15, marking the end of its 74-year era. Alitalia has been replaced by ITA Airways, a brand new airline that will not be responsible for the old carrier's debt. ITA plans to buy 28 Airbus jets, create a new aircraft livery, and launch a new loyalty program. Alitalia has officially ceased operations and handed the baton to newcomer ITA Airways, which stands for Italian Air Transport.Italy's national carrier Alitalia has had a rocky past full of financial struggles, employee strikes, and other damaging events, forcing it to make the decision to cease operations on October 15 after 74 years of service. The airline stopped the sale of tickets in August and has committed to refunding all passengers who were booked on flights after October 14.On Thursday, the airline flew its final flight from Cagliari, Italy to Rome, according to FlightAware, officially sealing the fate of Alitalia. On Friday, the country's new flag carrier ITA took its place with a new livery, airplanes, and network, flying its first route from Milan Linate Airport to Bari International Airport in southern Italy.-João ☕ (@joaointhesky) October 14, 2021 Here's a look at Alitalia's storied past and the plan of its successor. Alitalia as a brand began in 1946, one year after World War II ended, first flying in 1947 within Italy and quickly expanding to other European countries and even opening intercontinental routes to South America. Passengers disembarking from an Alitalia Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The full name of the airline was Italian International Airlines, a joint effort between the United Kingdom through British European Airways - a precursor to British Airways - and the Italian government. A British European Airways Vickers Viscount. Museum of Flight/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia True to its name, Alitalia flew its first with Italian aircraft produced by now-defunct manufacturers in aerospace including Fiat and Savoia-Marchetti. An Alitalia Fiat G-12. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Following a merger with Italy's other airline, aptly named Italian Airlines or Linee Aeree Italiane, in 1957, Alitalia - Linee Aeree Italiane became Italy's top carrier. A Linee Aeree Italiane Douglas DC-3. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Armed with a sizeable fleet of 37 aircraft including the four-engine Douglas DC-6 and Corvair 340, the airline was ranked 12 in the world for international carriers. Passengers disembarking an Alitalia aircraft. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia As Europe returned to normalcy following the war, so did Italy and the 1960s became a pivotal decade for both the country and its airline as the 1960 Summer Olympics would be held in Rome. An Alitalia poster highlighting the upcoming Olympic Games in Rome. David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The year saw Alitalia carry over one million passengers, introduce jets into its fleet, and move to a new home at Rome's Fiumicino Airport. Rome's Leonardo da Vinci Fiumicino Airport in 1961. Carlo Bavagnoli/Mondadori via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia entered the jet age with a mix of European and American aircraft such as the Sud Caravelle SE210… An Alitalia Sud Caravelle. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia And the Douglas DC-8. An Alitalia DC-8. Adams/Fairfax Media via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia American aircraft largely comprised the airline's fleet once settled into the jet age with a short-haul fleet featuring the McDonnell Douglas DC-9 and later the McDonnell Douglas MD-80... An Alitalia MD-80. Etienne DE MALGLAIVE/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Complemented by a similarly American-dominated long-haul fleet consisting of aircraft such as the Boeing 747. An Alitalia Boeing 747 chartered by Pope John Paul II. Scott Peterson/Liaison/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The arrival of the 747 was a seminal moment for Alitalia and it was the first aircraft to wear the airline's famed green, white, and red livery with an "A" shape on the tail. Alitalia's red and green "A" tail design. Etienne DE MALGLAIVE/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia was the first European airline to transition fully into the jet age and continued the switch with more wide-body aircraft such as the Airbus A300. An Alitalia Airbus A300. aviation-images.com/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Other aircraft that would join the Alitalia jet fleet included the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, McDonnell Douglas DC-10... An Alitalia McDonnell Douglas MD-11. Education Images/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia And Boeing 767-300ER for long-haul flights. An Alitalia Boeing 767-300ER. JOKER/Hady Khandani/ullstein bild/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia even had uniforms designed by Georgio Armani, who also contributed to aircraft interior designs. Italian designer Georgio Armani. Vittoriano Rastelli/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Source: Alitalia The airline's short-haul fleet later included a European favorite, the Airbus A320 family. An Alitalia Airbus A320 airplane approaches to land at Fiumicino airport in Rome Reuters Source: Boeing As Italy's national airline, Alitalia was also known for flying the Pope with the papal plane using the flight number AZ4000, better known as Shepherd One An Alitalia plane chartered by the Pope. AP Photo/Plinio Lepri Source: Telegraph Despite rising traffic throughout its history with Italy being a popular European tourist and leisure destination, the airline struggled with profitability. Alitalia check-in desks at Rome's Fiumicino Airport. ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty As a state-owned airline, Alitalia could always depend on the government to keep it flying, until the European Union stepped in and forbade financial support in 2006. An Alitalia Airbus A330. AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca Source: New York Times The 2000s then saw serious discussion into Alitalia's future with the Italian government wanting to sell its stake in the airline. The airline was opened for bidders in 2007 but yielded no results. A crow flying passed an Alitalia plane. AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia Source: New York Times Air France-KLM Group, the parent company of Air France and KLM as well as several smaller European airlines, then offered to buy the struggling airline but couldn't get labor unions on board and the deal collapsed. Alitalia and Air France-KLM Group signage. FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP via Getty Source: Reuters The Italian government, not wanting to lose its flag carrier, continued to prop up its airline via emergency loans in violation of European Union rules. The European Commission in Brussels. Greg Sandoval/Business Insider Source: European Union The third attempt in two years to sell the airline came after the Air France-KLM Group deal collapsed with an investors group forming the Compagnia Aerea Italiana to purchase the airline, despite heavy pushback from labor unions. An Alitalia Boeing 777. VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Source: Reuters This Alitalia began operations in 2009, with Air France-KLM soon coming back into the picture taking a 25% stake from CAI. Alitalia meeting with Air France, Delta, and KLM executives. ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP via Getty Source: Financial Times The new airline quickly began differentiating itself from its former self, leasing aircraft instead of purchasing them with the fleet consisting of the Airbus A330 family… An Alitalia Airbus A330. Alberto Lingria/Reuters Source: FlightGlobal And Boeing 777 family comprising the airline's long-haul fleet. An Alitalia Boeing 777. Abner Teixeira/Getty Source: FlightGlobal It wasn't long before Alitalia was plagued with issues ranging from union strikes to underperforming subsidiaries and even a sting operation that saw Alitalia employees arrested for theft, according to contemporaneous news reports. Alitalia workers protesting at Fiumicino Airport. AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino Source: New York Times and BBC With bankruptcy looming in 2013, Alitalia secured another bailout with help from the government that highlighted the need for restructuring. An Alitalia Airbus A320. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: New York Times Alitalia saw a new investor in 2015, Eithad Airways, which would take a 49% stake in the airline and Alitalia - Compagnia Aerea Italiana became Alitalia - Societa Aerea Italiana. Alitalia and Etihad celebrating a new partnership. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: Alitalia With a new investor in tow, Alitalia began cost-cutting measures but facing a backlash from employees due to planned job cuts, the airline began bankruptcy proceedings and the government announced Alitalia would be auctioned. Alitalia and Etihad's merger livery. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: Reuters Meanwhile, another airline was positioning itself to become the new Italian flag carrier, the aptly named Air Italy. An Air Italy Airbus A330-200. Air Italy Rebranded from Meridiana, a regional Italian airline, Air Italy was jointly owned by private company Alisarda and Qatar Airways. A Qatar Airways Boeing 777-200LR. Thomas Pallini/Business Insider The airline chose Milan as its main hub ceding Rome to Alitalia. Long-haul flights from Milan to New York began in June 2018, with expansion to Asia happening soon after. Air Italy's inaugural ceremony for Milan-New York flights. David Slotnick/Business Insider Affected by the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max and without the Italian government as a benefactor, Air Italy closed up shop in early 2020, giving back full control of Italy to Alitalia. An Alitalia Airbus A320. ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty While Air Italy was getting its start, the Italian government would once again seek outside investors with European, North American, and Asian airlines expressing interest in Alitalia. Alitalia aircraft in Italy. Alberto Lingria/Reuters Among those interested were UK low-cost carrier EasyJet... EasyJet airplanes are pictured at Tegel airport in Berlin. Reuters Source: Bloomberg Irish low-cost carrier Ryanair… A Ryanair commercial passenger jet takes off in Blagnac near Toulouse. Reuters Source: The Guardian The Lufthansa Group… Strike of Germany's cabin crew union UFO at Frankfurt airport. Reuters Source: CNBC Delta Air Lines… A Delta Air Lines Boeing 777-200. James D. Morgan/Getty Source: Bloomberg And China Eastern Airlines… A China Eastern Airlines Airbus A320. REUTERS/Jon Woo Source: Reuters As well as Italian railway group Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane. A Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane train. TIZIANA FABI/AFP via Getty Source: Reuters One after the other, the airlines dropped their interest, and ultimately, the Italian government re-nationalized the airline on March 17 during the coronavirus pandemic. Alitalia was re-nationalized amid the coronavirus pandemic. Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Source: Reuters  Despite bailouts from the state, the pandemic and subsequent lockdown of Italy took the ultimate toll on Alitalia, forcing it to make the decision to close the airline and launch a new one. Alitalia aircraft at the Frankfurt airport Vytautas Kielaitis/Shutterstock Source: The Local On August 25, the airline stopped selling tickets and announced on its website that it would be offering free flight changes or refunds for passengers booked on Alitalia flights after October 14. People at Alitalia check in counter TK Kurikawa/Shutterstock Source: The Local When the airline ceased operations, its successor, Italia Transporto Aereo, took its place. Alitalia's last flight flew from Cagliari, Italy to Rome on October 14, and ITA launched operations with a flight from Milan to Bari, Italy on October 15. ITA app and logo rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: AeroTime Talks between the European Commission and Italy over Alitalia and ITA began in March 2021, with Rome designating 3 billion euros ($3.6 billion) to establish the new flag carrier. ITA signage at Catania airport rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Initially, ITA was slated to begin operations in April 2021, but lengthy discussions between Italy and the European Commission delayed its launch. Flags outside European Commission building in Brussels VanderWolf Images/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Part of the negotiations focused on confirming ITA's independence of Alitalia to ensure it did not inherit the billions of debt the old carrier owed to the state. Alitalia Airbus A319 Wirestock Creators/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Talks also included asking ITA to forfeit half of Alitalia's slots at Milan Linate Airport, which the airline was unwilling to do. Alitalia aircraft sit at Milan Linate airport Gabriele Maltinti/Shutterstock Source: Reuters ITA determined giving up that many slots at Linarte would be too big of a loss and proposed forfeiting slots at Rome Fiumicino Airport as a compromise. Alitalia check in counter Leonardo da Vinci Fiumicino airport TK Kurikawa/Shutterstock Source: Reuters At the end of the discussions, negotiators agreed to allow ITA to keep 85% of slots at Linate and 43% at Fiumicino. Green ribbon barrier with the ITA airline logo inside the Leonardo da Vinci airport rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Also under negotiation was Alitalia's brand and its loyalty program, MilleMiglia. The European Commission said ITA would have to give up both. Alitalia Airbus A320 Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Under European Commission rules, MilleMiglia cannot be bought by ITA and must be put out for public tender, meaning another airline or entity outside the aviation industry can purchase the program. There are an estimated five million MilleMiglia miles that customers have not been able to use. Customer checking into an Alitalia flight Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: EuroNews However, ITA was able to bid on Alitalia's brand, which it did the day before its launch. The airline bought the Alitalia name for €90 million ($104 million), though ITA executives say they don't plan on replacing the ITA name. Alitalia aircraft Light Orancio/Shutterstock Source: Reuters ITA began operations on October 15, the day after Alitalia's last flight. The new airline secured €700 million ($830 million) in funding earlier this year, which helped it purchase some of Alitalia's assets. Alitalia employees with new livery in 2015 Simone Previdi/Shutterstock Source: Reuters The successor acquired 52 of Alitalia's aircraft, seven being wide-bodies, and has plans to purchase and lease new ones, the first of which will enter the fleet in early 2022. Alitalia Boeing 777 Deni Williams/Shutterstock Source: Reuters By 2025, the airline expects to have 105 aircraft in its fleet and earn over 3.3 billion euros in revenue. ITA logo with Alitalia aircraft Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Reuters, Airways Magazine Moreover, ITA plans to renew its fleet with next-generation aircraft, which is expected to make up 77% of its fleet in four years. According to ITA, the aircraft will reduce CO2 emissions by 750 thousand pounds from 2021 to 2025. Milan Linate Airport Alexandre Rotenberg/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine, ITA Airways The 31 new-generation planes, which include short, medium, and long-haul aircraft, will be leased by Air Lease Corporation. Airbus A320neo Airbus Source: Airways Magazine Meanwhile, 28 new Airbus jets, including ten Airbus A330neos, seven Airbus A220 family aircraft, and 11 Airbus A320neo family jets, will be purchased. Airbus A220 Airbus Source: Airways Magazine As part of a carbon-reducing project, the first 10 flights to depart Rome on October 15 will use sustainable aviation fuels made by Italian energy company Eni. The project will contribute to the EU's "Fit for 55" proposal, which strives to reduce carbon emissions by at least 55% by 2030. Eni headquarters in Rome MyVideoimage.com/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine ITA introduced a new livery on launch day, which includes a light blue paint scheme representing unity, cohesion, and pride of the nation, as well as homage to Italy's national sports team, which wears sky blue during competitions. On the tail will be the Italian tricolor of red, white, and green. ITA Airways Chairman Alfredo Altavilla poses with rendering of new livery ITA Press Office/Handout via REUTERS Source: Airways Magazine In regards to its network, the carrier launched with 59 routes to 44 destinations. ITA plans to increase its routes to 74 in 2022 and 89 by 2025, while destinations are expected to increase to 58 in 2022 and 74 by 2025. ITA logo ITA Airways Source: Airways Magazine ITA will focus its operation out of Rome's Leonardo da Vinci International Airport and Milan Linate Airport, establishing itself as a "reference airline" for both business and leisure travelers. bellena/Shutterstock.com Source: Airways Magazine The carrier also plans to target the North American market, with flights from Rome to New York launching on November 4. Joey Hadden/Insider Source: CNN As for the over 11,000 Alitalia workers, 70% were hired to work for ITA, which has 2,800 employees. 30% of that came from outside Alitalia. The company plans to add 1,000 new jobs in 2022 and reach 5,750 employees by 2025. Alitalia staff at Milan Linate Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: Reuters, Airways Magazine ITA plans to improve upon Alitalia's services, including incentivizing good customer service by attaching employee salary with customer satisfaction. Alitalia staff Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: CNN ITA has set up a loyalty program called Volare, effective October 15, which is split into four levels: smart, plus, premium, and executive. Customers can use accrued points for any flight in ITA's system. ITA app rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine According to ITA executives, the company plans to join a major international alliance, though it has not stated which one it prefers. Alitalia was aligned with the SkyTeam alliance, which is comprised of carriers like Delta, Air France, and KLM. Alitalia Embraer 190LR SkyTeam livery InsectWorld/Shutterstock Source: CNN, Reuters However, ITA chairman Alfredo Altavilla said it was open to all options. "ITA can't be a stand-alone carrier forever," he said. Alitalia Boeing 767 SkyTeam livery Eliyahu Yosef Parypa/Shutterstock Source: Reuters While it is the end of an era with the closing of Alitalia, there are high hopes for its successor. "ITA Airways has been created to intercept the recovery of air traffic in the coming years on the strength of the foundations of its strategy: sustainability, digitalization, customer focus, and innovations," said ITA CEO Fabio Lazzerini. Alitalia plane with ITA logo Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytOct 15th, 2021

Global fear of flying spawns crisis for airlines

As bookings fall sharply, carriers are cutting flights, grounding planes and trimming costs. ‘This coronavirus is driving us all a bit crazy,’ said JetBlue Chief Executive Robin Hayes......»»

Category: topSource: moneycentralMar 9th, 2020

"I relive it daily": Woman describes trauma of being taken off a plane in Qatar and internally examined after authorities found an abandoned newborn baby

A baby was found in a Doha airport bathroom, prompting a search for the mother. Women were taken off planes and given invasive exams without consent. A Qatar Airways jet arriving from Doha, Qatar, in Frankfurt, Germany.AP Photo/Michael Probst, File Last October, a newborn baby was found in a Qatar airport bathroom, prompting a search for the mother. Multiple women said they were taken off their planes and given nonconsensual invasive gynecological searches. One of those women told Insider of the experience and said she relives the trauma daily. On October 2, 2020, Mandy was sitting on a plane in Doha, Qatar, to Jakarta when she was asked to get off, escorted by armed guards into an ambulance on the tarmac, and given an invasive gynecological search against her will — all without being told what was happening.She's now one of multiple women preparing to take legal action against Qatar Airways, Doha's Hamad International Airport, and the Qatar Civil Aviation Authority. Mandy is British, while the other women are Australians who were on a flight from Doha to Sydney. Mandy requested her last name remain private, but it is known and verified by Insider.Qatar has acknowledged multiple women were examined, saying it was because authorities discovered a newborn baby in the airport's bathroom and wanted to find the mother."It was horrifying and I relive that time," Mandy, 51, told Insider. "I relive it daily."Hamad International Airport in Doha, Qatar.Thomas Pallini/InsiderQatar Airways directed Insider's request for comment to Qatar's government. The government, airport, and aviation authority did not respond to Insider.A spokesperson for the UK's Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office told Insider it supported two British women after the incident, adding: "We formally expressed our concern with the Qatari authorities and Qatar Airways, and sought assurances that it would be thoroughly investigated and measures would be put in place to prevent an incident like this happening again."Armed policeMandy had flown from London and was transiting in Doha to ultimately reach Bali, Indonesia, she said.She said she was sitting on the plane and noticed it seemed to be taking off late. Then, she said, everyone on board was told to get off.Mandy.MandyThe passengers were brought to the gate and met by "armed police and officials," she said.They waited, and then a few women from the group were selected, Mandy said."I was approached, which was quite intimidating. It felt quite threatening at that point. I was approached by what I believed to be a female Qatari police officer who sort of picked me and two or three other women, and were demanded to follow her."Mandy said she was then taken in an elevator — where the woman "didn't take her eyes off of me — and then brought to the tarmac and met by more armed police.She was taken into an ambulance, where a female nurse was waiting, she said."She ordered me to lie down on the bed, which I did. Then, she asked me to undress from the waist down."The exam"I was so shocked," Mandy said of the nurse's request."She checked my genital area and checked to see whether or not that I had actually given birth. It was one of those sort of fight-or-flight situations.""I always believed I would be one of those people that would fight because I sort of consider myself as pretty strong, but ... I was frozen," she said.At this point, Mandy still hadn't been told why she was being searched, she said."When I did manage to speak, I asked, why did she need to check me there?"She was then told about the baby.She said she felt confused and insulted, particularly given she was older than the other women taken down to the tarmac but was the only one who was searched."I felt like I had been assaulted. I gave no consent. It felt like I was made to do this under duress, and it was like under gunpoint. I felt like that's exactly how it felt," she said."I had machine gun-wielding police officers three feet away from me. It was awful. It was absolutely awful."Mandy said she spent the next few weeks "in a state of shock. I felt totally violated. Totally, totally violated."That turned to anger, especially when she learned other women were affected.She said she has since been prescribed antidepressants over the effects of that search, as well as for other factors like COVID-19 lockdowns.Mandy said she believes she is the only woman on her flight who was given an invasive search, but she was far from the only one in Doha subjected to that treatment.A Qatar Airways plane.Thomas Pallini/InsiderDamian Sturzaker, Mandy's lawyer, told Insider that women on at least eight more flights from Doha were also taken off, and he believes some of them were examined. The total number of women affected is unclear.Qatar's government acknowledged last year that authorities were "examining a number of female passengers," and "standard procedures were violated," The New York Times reported. Qatar's prime minister apologized, calling the searches "unacceptable."'Under the impression they were being kidnapped'Sturzaker told Insider many of his clients still experience "ongoing effects" of trauma, and many still struggle with work and air travel.Some of the Australian women behind the lawsuit "compared the violation and humiliation as being a victim of rape" when speaking to Australian police, Sturzaker said in an October 2021 letter to Qatar Airways' CEO. Insider has reviewed the letter."They outright feared for their lives and expected to be shot," the letter said."Many were under the impression they were being kidnapped and that a terrorist attack was occurring."Sturzaker told Insider that his clients didn't initially want to take legal action, but Qatari authorities ignored their attempts to talk about what happened and ensure it doesn't happen to other women. A Qatar Airways plane.InsectWorld / Shutterstock.comThe lawsuit is expected in the coming weeks, Sturzaker told Insider.Qatari officials said last November that they had found the baby's mother, identifying her only as an Asian woman who fled Qatar after leaving the baby. It's unclear what has happened to the baby since.Mandy said she's angry at the lack of communication from Qatar and lack of apology from the airline: "It's actually disgusting how we can be treated like that."She now wants to make sure it doesn't happen to anyone else: "I'm just an ordinary person, and it's happened to me. I want to stand up and have a voice about this because it cannot happen to anybody else in any other airport."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider18 hr. 20 min. ago

An Alaska helicopter tour company says it"s seen a 250% surge in business compared to 2019 as an influx of tourists travel to the state

Alaska Helicopter Tours is no stranger to the labor shortage, and its biggest hurdle during the travel surge was hiring enough ground staff. Alaska Helicopter Tours glacier landing.Alaska Helicopter Tours Anchorage-based Alaska Helicopter Tours experienced a 250% boom in 2021 sales compared to 2019. Hiring enough ground staff was the company's biggest challenge during the surge in demand. The operator is expecting a strong 2022 season, with presales already doubling 2021. The pandemic wrecked the tourism industry in the northern-most US state of Alaska, but it's seeing a speedy recovery with one tourism company more than doubling its 2019 sales this year.Anchorage-based Alaska Helicopter Tours is a flightseeing company that flies adventurous customers across the beautiful state, offering aerial views of places like Denali National Park, as well as glacier hiking and dogsled tours. Like many other companies across the country, the operator was a victim of the coronavirus pandemic, having temporarily lost its allowance to serve tourists. However, it was fortunate to be able to operate as an essential service flying for the local electric company on behalf of its parent organization, Alpha Aviation.Following strict health and safety protocols as a utility service, Alaska Helicopter Tours was granted a waiver at the end of March 2020 by the state's Congress to offer flight tours to local Alaskans. According to the company's Director of Operations, Jennifer Hanks, who was born and raised in the state, the service helped keep the business going."We could offer something for locals to do to get out of their house," Hanks told Insider. "We were one of the first companies to be up and running and it was really nice to be able to open our doors to local Alaskans."While the company was able to continue business during the pandemic, which was a rarity for tourism operators, it did not expect a huge travel surge in 2021. But, by January, it was clear Alaska Helicopter Tours was in for a big year."We thought it was going to be pandemic style with not many employees and not many helicopters on the tourism side, but we ended up having the craziest, busiest year ever," Hanks told Insider. "2019 was our busiest season and we are already two and half times over that in sales for 2021. And, for 2022, our presales are already double what they were this year."Hanks explained that the surge comes from people desperate for a vacation and finally being able to travel again. She said a chunk of their guests were big families, and she believes that the airlines offering deals on flights helped people visit the state at a lower cost.With the spike in sales came challenges, including finding enough labor and resources to meet demand. Before the pandemic, the company operated a fleet of three helicopters, including two Robinson R44s and one A-Star Helicopter, but had to add one more of each to handle the surge. The company also plans to grow the fleet event more due to the booming 2022 presales.Alaska Helicopter Tours Robinson R44.Alaska Helicopter ToursThough the company's business is growing, Alaska Helicopter Tours is no stranger to the labor shortage. Hanks told Insider that the company's biggest hurdle during the surge was hiring ground staff."Just like everywhere in the US, we could not find people because the hiring pool was very small and a lot of people were on unemployment," she explained. "A lot of Alaska's employees are also J1 [international] students, but they couldn't enter the US, so we did a lot of local advertising and got set up on Indeed."According to Hanks, finding pilots was not an issue because having "Alaska time" for flight is a big benefit for their resumes.Going into 2022, Alaska Helicopter Tours is cautious about the new COVID-19 Omicron variant, but it still expects a strong season."Realistically, the 2022 sales will be about 30% above what we did this year," Hanks told Insider.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider18 hr. 20 min. ago

The world"s first ultra-low-cost international airline alliance is on the horizon as 2 budget carriers team up to bring cheap fares between Mexico and the US

Allegiant said in a press release that the pair intends the alliance to offer nonstop flights on routes that currently only have connecting service. Allegiant Air and Viva Aerobus have applied to the US DOT to enter into an alliance.Carlos Yudica/Shutterstock and Viva Aerobus Allegiant Air and Viva Aerobus announced plans to enter into the first ultra-low-cost international alliance. The venture will allow the airlines to expand their networks in the US and Mexico via codesharing. The agreement is pending government approval, but the alliance is planned to start in early 2023. On Thursday, Las Vegas-based Allegiant Air and Mexico-based Viva Aerobus announced they have filed a joint application with the US Department of Transportation to create an international alliance.In a press release from Allegiant, the pair shared their plans to enter into a "fully-integrated Commercial Alliance Agreement," pending permission from the DOT and approval for antitrust immunity.Antitrust immunity allows carriers in a joint venture to collude on routes included in the agreement, meaning they can modify prices and earn profits, according to the Department of Justice. Currently, there are 14 active antitrust alliances approved by the DOT, like United Airlines and Germany-based Lufthansa; Delta and UK-based Virgin Atlantic; and American and Australia-based Qantas.Joining as a team, the duo will be able to coordinate their airline operations, including their data systems, loyalty programs, marketing, scheduling, and routes. The alliance will enable Allegiant, which does not currently fly to Mexico, to offer flights to Mexican leisure hotspots.Meanwhile, Viva Aerobus will be able to add several routes to popular destinations in the US where Allegiant has a strong presence, like Las Vegas and Orlando. According to Allegiant, Viva Aerobus will have access to the Las Vegas-based airline's distribution network and point-of-sale process.Allegiant Air and Viva Aerobus' prospective 5-year route map.Allegiant AirAllegiant said in a press release that the pair intends the alliance to start in the first quarter of 2023, offering nonstop flights on routes that currently only have connecting service. However, there is one caveat. In May 2021, the Federal Aviation Administration downgraded Mexico to a Category 2 country, meaning airlines cannot create new service or routes, though that is still subject to change by the time the alliance begins. According to Allegiant, there are over 250 potential routes that have been identified in the DOT application. Allegiant and Viva Aerobus are two individual ultra-low-cost carriers that, according to Allegiant, cannot independently create the network or meet the same level of customer benefit that the alliance will offer."Allegiant and Viva Aerobus operating together will be a tremendous win for consumers seeking affordable, nonstop travel between the US and Mexico," Allegiant CEO Maurice Gallagher said. "This groundbreaking alliance should reduce fares, stimulate traffic, and ultimately link many new trans-border cities with nonstop service. In short, it will bring meaningful ULCC competition to the US-Mexico market for the first time in history."Allegiant said in a statement that it has invested $50 million into Viva Aerobus and Gallagher is planning to join the Mexican carrier's Board of Directors, subject to the approval of the Mexican Federal Economic Competition Commission.Allegiant Chairman and CEO Maurice J. Gallagher, Jr. and Viva Aerobus Chief Executive Officer Juan Carlos Zuazua.Allegiant Air"This unique ULCC alliance will create new non-stop connectivity and more competition, strengthening the immense Hispanic VFR market and offering amazing holiday get-aways for residents of both nations," Viva Aerobus CEO  Juan Carlos Zuazua said.According to Allegiant, the agreement between it and Viva Aerobus will, if approved, be the first ultra-low-cost international alliance in the airline industry. There are two low-cost alliances currently operating in the world, including U-Fly, a collection of airlines from Hong Kong, Mainland China, and South Korea, and the Value Alliance that consists of five Asia-Pacific airlines.Low-cost and ultra-low-cost airlines differ because ULCCs provide fewer amenities and charge more fees than traditional low-cost carriers, therefore offering even lower fares, according to airline pilot Spencer Marker.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider18 hr. 20 min. ago

From dedicated check-in desks to chauffeured cars, here are the perks Big Tech enjoys for spending hundreds of millions on air travel each year

Big Tech spends hundreds of millions of dollars on air travel each year and airlines use every tool in their belt to keep them happy and loyal. Delta Air Lines check-in for Amazon and Microsoft employees in Seattle.Alexei Oreskovic/Insider Companies that spend millions of dollars on air travel are given incredible perks from airlines. One such perk is top-tier frequent flyer status that comes with free upgrades, lounge access, and chauffeurs. Amazon and Microsoft even have dedicated check-in counters at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.  Loyalty has its perks, especially when loyalty means spending hundreds of millions of dollars on airline tickets every year.Business travel is a leading revenue source for airlines and the top corporate spenders are frequently given extra benefits in exchange for their continued business. Some of the perks go way beyond what even the most frequent individual traveler could ever hope to receive.Tech companies are among the top spenders on airline travel given as Big Tech giants have offices and facilities around the world. China, for example, is a top destination for Silicon Valley-based firms like Apple.United Airlines, in 2018, revealed that Apple was buying 50 business class seats every day on flights to Shanghai, China. Apple's business with United at the time was worth more than $150 million in revenue.Airlines, however, lost a big chunk of that revenue during the pandemic as international borders started to close in January 2020. Cost-minded leisure travelers tend not to spend as much as business flyers and are less likely to pay for premium cabin travel or costly last-minute fares when vacationing. When big business does return to the skies, these are the perks that will likely await them.Expedited access to elite statusWelcome email for Delta Silver Medallion status.Thomas Pallini/Business InsiderEmployees that travel enough will often earn elite status with an airline that gives them extra privileges when flying. "The basic idea is you get to bypass a lot of the hassles," Brett Snyder, founder of the aviation blog CrankyFlyer, told Insider. Acquiring elite status requires loyalty to a particular airline to the tune of a few thousand dollars in purchased tickets and tens of thousands of miles flown. But airlines can also offer elite status memberships to corporate travelers as a "sweetener" in a contract even before the first flight, Snyder said.Most of the perks will come from having that elite status but airlines can still go above and beyond for top corporate clients. Dedicated check-in lanesDelta's Sky Priority check-in area at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.Thomas Pallini/Business InsiderFor some companies, spending millions of dollars on travel means never having to wait in line at certain airports. At Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, for example, Delta Air Lines has dedicated check-in desks for Amazon and Microsoft employees. While check-in counters are becoming obsolete given improvements to self-serve kiosks and airline mobile applications, employees can use them to quickly check their bags or have airline staff assist with any flight issues. The scheme isn't replicated at every Delta airport for Microsoft and Amazon employees but they will still likely have access to priority check-in areas. Business travelers often earn elite status on the airlines they frequent and can often use priority check-in lanes as a result, especially when traveling in a premium cabin, as Insider found when testing out the lowest tier of Delta's elite status. Some US airlines have private check-in areas altogether for elite status holders and premium cabin travelers, away from the main check-in desks, such as Delta's Sky Priority check-in area at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.Access to invite-only programsAmerican Airlines' first class check-in at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.Thomas Pallini/Business InsiderWhile elite status is a common perk of frequent business travel, the highest echelons of those programs are reserved for an airline's top spenders. Attaining membership in the unlisted programs is the dream of any frequent traveler and top corporate clients may be given an allotment of memberships for their top travelers. American Airlines has ConciergeKey, United Airlines has Global Services, and Delta Air Lines has 360°."These are highly coveted programs, there's a mystery to them," Henry Harteveldt, a travel analyst and president of Atmosphere Research Group, told Insider.Even if a member of these programs purchases the cheapest economy ticket on a given flight, they will still reap the benefits of complimentary lounge access, priority check-in lanes, early boarding, and a host of other secretive amenities that airlines won't discuss publicly. Airlines have different requirements for who is invited into their programs and limits on the number of memberships they can distribute each year, according to Harteveldt. Companies seeking to get memberships for their flyers would have to spend a significant amount on yearly air travel, with spend requirements varying from city to city. "Delta 360° is an annual, invitation-only program for our top SkyMiles Members, offering an exclusive suite of benefits and services even beyond Diamond Medallion Status," Delta writes on its website. "An invitation into Delta 360° is based on your overall investment with Delta. If you're selected to join, we'll contact you directly."A certain number of memberships are then given to corporate travel managers to distribute to employees, Harteveldt explained, with airlines being incredibly mindful of how many are allocated.Lounge accessAmerican Airlines' Admirals Club at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.Thomas Pallini/Business InsiderAirline lounges are exclusive hideaways that offer private and comfortable seating when waiting for a flight, as well as complimentary snacks, beverages, and food items. Corporate customers flying internationally in business class will often have access to these lounges included in their tickets. Airlines will also give complimentary lounge memberships to their most frequent flyers. On American, for example, executive platinum status holders can choose to receive an Admirals Club membership as one of their free perks.ConciergeKey, Global Services, and Delta 360° members also receive complimentary lounge access for their respective airlines, according to, Harteveldt, Upgraded Points, and SFGate. Airside transfers in a luxury Porsche, General Motors, or Mercedes Benz vehiclesAn American Airlines Cadillac for ConciergeKey members.First Class Photography/Shutterstock.comMembers of the ConciergeKey, Global Services, and Delta 360° programs need not worry about running from one flight to another when passing through an airline hub with a tight connection. Rather, they'll be escorted down to the ramp and driven to their next flight in a luxury vehicle.American will chauffeur passengers in a luxury General Motors vehicle while United transfers its passengers in a Mercedes-Benz and Delta in a Porsche, according to Upgraded Points. [not sure this blog is reputable enough to cite on its own] Cadillac was formerly American's vehicle manufacturer of choice for airside transfers until the switch was made to GM, the airline confirmed to View from the Wing. [caddy is owned by GM — so need different wording here]It's a "surprise and delight" perk, Snyder said, that isn't guaranteed for everyone with a short layover. Airlines may also be more accommodating to passengers on delayed flights by holding their connections, Harteveldt said, depending on the customer and corporate client. Priority BoardingFlying on American Airlines during the pandemic.Thomas Pallini/InsiderElite status holders are often among the first passengers to board a flight, whether they're seated in a premium cabin or not. ConciergeKey members, for example, can board ahead of first class customers and active duty military members even if they've booked a basic economy ticket, according to American's boarding priority list.Early boarding gives flyers first pick at overhead bin space and more time to get settled before the rest of the plane boards.  Better opportunities for first class upgradesFlying Delta One on a Delta Air Lines Boeing 767-400.Thomas Pallini/InsiderComplimentary upgrades to first class are among the most valuable perks for an elite status holder. A single upgrade can be worth more than the price of a ticket and instantly elevate a travel experience, especially on longer flights. In many frequent flyer programs, any elite status holder can request an upgrade and they'll accommodate if there is a seat available. But oftentimes, there ends up being people that don't make the cut because there aren't enough seats available for all elite status holders. Corporate travelers, however, have a better shot at upgrades because airlines consider a variety of factors when determining who to upgrade. The level of elite status and how much a traveler's company spends with the airline in a given year are also taken into consideration. "Generally, if you have all things being equal, the person who works for a large corporate account that may have a major business relationship with an airline would likely get the nod for the upgrade ahead of the person who is an individual traveler," Harteveldt said. An airline also might give a certain number of upgrade coupons to a corporate client that can be used to get a premium cabin seat, Harteveldt added. Drink coupons and free snacksFlying Delta One on a Delta Air Lines Boeing 767-400.Thomas Pallini/InsiderNot all of what corporate clients get are grand gestures, however, and sometimes a free drink can make the difference. Coupons for a complimentary alcoholic beverage are sometimes included in a corporate contract, according to Harteveldt, and offered on certain fares geared towards business travelers.Airlines like Delta and American also offer complimentary alcoholic beverages in their extra legroom sections, which companies may be willing to purchase for their employees. Southwest Airlines' "Business Select" fare also comes with a free drink coupon.Some US airlines aren't currently offering alcohol in regular economy sections until the pandemic subsides but the perk will likely return. Some airlines also might offer complimentary meals or snacks to corporate flyers even if they're sitting in economy on domestic flights. American offers Executive Platinum status holders a complimentary snack and an alcoholic drink in economy, Snyder said. Dedicated reservation linesA Delta Air Lines employee.ReutersAirline hold times have markedly increased as airlines sought to shed their staff during the pandemic. Travelers can find themselves waiting on hold for hours.Elite status holders, however, have special phone numbers to use when calling the reservations desk with shorter hold times, and corporate travelers with elite status can also use them. Some companies were so important to airlines, however, that special phone lines were created just for their employees. "In the past, some airlines would create basically special toll-free numbers for their largest corporate accounts where the employees would call in and get a dedicated sub-group of agents within a reservations office so that they were served faster," Harteveldt said. Harteveldt noted that the perk likely doesn't exist anymore and those phone lines have been merged into the dedicated lines for top frequent flyers. "If you put somebody into the higher tiers of a frequent flyer program, they're going to get expedited service anyway," he said. Travel agents, however, including those with corporate accounts, still have lines to many airline reservation desks, Snyder said. "It's for the travel planners, the people that are doing the work," he said. Free or discounted extra legroom seatsA Delta Comfort+ seat.Thomas Pallini/Business InsiderNot all companies pay to fly their employees in a premium cabin on every flight but airlines can help make the economy experience more enjoyable by offering favorable rates on extra legroom seats, according to Harteveldt. Delta's "Comfort+" seats, for example, offer extra legroom as well as complimentary alcohol and premium snacks. Some airlines also offer complimentary upgrades into extra legroom sections for their elite status holders. Airlines also block certain regular economy seats that don't offer extra legroom but have a more preferable location in the cabin. Snyder says that corporate clients may be given advance access to those seats ahead of the public. Waived checked bag feesA United Airlines check-in counter.United Media LibraryA basic perk of earning elite status is getting a complimentary checked baggage allowance, which can save travelers and their companies money when a trip requires checked baggage. Companies may also be able to negotiate lower fees for checked baggage, Harteveldt said. More flexibility for corporate travelersFlying home from Bogota, Colombia on American Airlines.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMany US airlines have abandoned change fees for domestic flights but tickets can still be restrictive. The nature of corporate travel, however, requires additional leeway that airlines are willing to give to high-spending clients. "You get much more flexibility as a corporate [client]," Snyder said, noting that some airlines have a system for clients where points can be redeemed for perks. Common perks include things like name changes on tickets, flight changes, and converting non-refundable tickets into refundable tickets. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider18 hr. 20 min. ago

I flew from New York to San Diego through Mexico using an obscure border loophole — here"s what it was like

Flying between two US cities via Mexico on a single ticket normally isn't allowed. But a new type of airport terminal makes it perfectly legal. Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/Insider Tijuana International Airport directly connects with the US through a private border crossing called Cross Border Xpress. The cross-border terminal allows travelers to access Tijuana International and its cheap fares to cities inside Mexico without having to enter Tijuana and deal with busy border crossings.  I put Cross Border Xpress to the test by flying from New York to Tijuana and immediately crossing back into the US.  Conventional wisdom dictates that the fastest way to fly between New York and San Diego, California isn't through Mexico. Such a routing on a single ticket isn't even legal thanks to federal cabotage laws.Rigucci/ShutterstockBut that's where Tijuana International Airport's new cross-border terminal comes in. Travelers can book flights to the airport and walk right into San Diego, without ever having to step foot in Tijuana itself.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderCross Border Xpress, as the private border crossing is known, is solely available to passengers flying in and out of Tijuana International, drastically reducing border crossing times for air travelers and taking the hassle out of flying out of Mexico's northwesternmost city.The Cross Border Xpress bridge over the US-Mexico border fence.BILL WECHTER/AFP/GettyThe terminal wasn't built as an alternative to San Diego International Airport so that Americans could fly between two US cities. Rather, it's meant to give travelers more options when flying to Mexico's interior including access to Mexico's ultra-low-cost airlines, and ultimately save them the international air travel taxes that drive up airfares.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut I wanted to test CBX to the extreme so I booked a ticket from New York to Tijuana through Mexico City just to use the crossing. Here's how it went.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMy journey was simple: New York to Mexico City on Delta and Mexico City to Tijuana on Aeromexico. If I played my cards right, I wouldn't have to take one step inside Mexico beyond the two airports.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThere are no direct flights from New York to Tijuana and a stop in Mexico City was about the most direct routing I could get with the fewest connections. The total journey time was scheduled to be just shy of 12 hours.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderTaking a non-stop flight to San Diego is only around six and a half hours. But this was arguably the more interesting, and fun, option.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAlthough San Diego was my final destination, I still needed my passport as I'd have to legally enter Mexico. To the airport staff, I was just any old traveler flying to Tijuana.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThough, it's hard to believe that New York-Tijuana is a common routing because it's probably cheaper to fly direct to San Diego and cross the border at the San Ysidro Port of Entry.The San Ysidro Port of Entry on the US-Mexico border.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMexico doesn't require a negative COVID-19 test to enter and neither does the US when crossing by land. Checking in for the flight was just a matter of checking my passport.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderTaking us down to Mexico City was a Boeing 767-300ER, Delta's workhorse wide-body aircraft. It was a small upgrade from the narrow-body Boeing 757 aircraft flying on the New York-San Diego route.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI even scored an upgrade to Delta's Comfort+ cabin, which is becoming increasingly hard to come by when traveling domestically.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI flew Delta as an elite status holder and saw how difficult it is to get coveted first class upgrades as travel returnsBut even though this was an international flight, Delta wasn't serving up any hot meals or special snacks. We might as well have been flying to San Diego.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFlight attendants came around just after takeoff with a small snack basket, Options for Comfort+ passengers included chocolate chip cookies, potato chips, Kind bars, Biscoff cookies, and more.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderPassengers in regular economy class were just given the standard options including almonds and Biscoff cookies.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe flight itself was largely uneventful as we crossed the Gulf of Mexico bound for Mexico City. I used the time to get some work done and watch a movie.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFlight attendants came around one more time around an hour before landing for the final drink service.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMexico came into view shortly there after and we were greeted with some of the best views I've ever had as a traveler.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe rolling hills of Mexico City showed a side of Mexico that I had never seen before. This detour was worth it for the views alone.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderTouchdown in Mexico City marked the halfway point of the journey. The only things left to conquer now were a two-hour layover and a flight to Tijuana.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut until I could do that, I'd have to go through Mexican customs. Even though I was technically traveling between US cities, I'd still be entering Mexico when I touched down in Mexico City and there was no way around going through passport control.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThat was when I realized that it might sound odd if I had to explain why I was only going to be in Mexico for a few hours. But luckily, the border guard didn't ask too many questions.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd with the stamp of my passport, it was welcome to Mexico.Flying Delta Air Lines from New York to Mexico City, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderConnecting at Mexico City International Airport was quite straightforward and required going through one more security screening and filling out a health declaration required for all domestic flights.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMy flight to Tijuana was on Aeromexico, Mexico's flag carrier, with a flying time of around three and a half hours.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBoarding required taking a bus to a remote gate away from the main terminal. It's arguably one of the worst ways to board a flight and almost always results in a delay.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd the flight to Tijuana was nearly fully loaded, meaning it would be a tight squeeze for the next few hours. All this I was willing to overlook, however, as it was my first flight on Aeromexico.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMasks were required onboard, just like in the US, and numerous announcements reminded passengers to be mindful of their hygiene and well-being.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe Boeing 737-800 taking us north had a tired and old interior. It had seen better days, for sure.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI wasn't as lucky with getting an upgrade as I was on my previous flight, so back to row 25 I went.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe one upside to this old plane was that there were seat-back televisions at every seat.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWe ended up departing late, as expected, due to the extra time it took to board the plane via buses.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut soon enough, we were airborne out of Mexico City bound for the furthest reach of Mexico.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderMexico City once again surprised and delighted with stunning views on takeoff.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWe soon ascended above the clouds and flight attendants began the first of two beverage services. A standard offering of drinks, including alcohol, was served.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI opted for my drink of choice when flying, a club soda.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSmall snack bags with mixed nuts were also on offer; though, that was about it for the entire flight.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe rest of the flight was spent watching movies and getting some work done. In-flight WiFi was also available through Gogo In-flight Internet.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe dirty airplane window and direct sunlight made it hard to sightsee on this flight but there were some good views of the Gulf of California and the Pacific Ocean to be had. It wasn't before long that we started to descend into a cloudy Tijuana.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderTijuana soon appeared from below the clouds and it couldn't have felt any more different from San Diego, just a few miles to the north. Whereas the approach into San Diego is lined with skyscrapers, the approach into Tijuana was mostly warehouses and shacks.Visiting the community of Nueva Esperanza in Tijuana, Mexico next to Amazon's new fulfillment center.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe flight had come to its end but my cross-border journey was just about to begin. We were just about in the US as Tijuana International is right on the borderline.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI could literally see the border wall from my seat on the plane. Before CBX, getting to the other side would've meant journeying by taxi or bus to one of the nearby border crossings.Flying Aeromexico from Mexico City to Tijuana, Mexico.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOnce in the terminal, I was practically taken by the hand and led to CBX thanks to the never-ending branding and signage guiding me to the entrance.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI used CBX, the private border crossing bridge that connects Tijuana airport with the US and found it's one of the best kept secrets for travelersTijuana International has clearly embraced CBX as part of its identity, to the benefit of travelers.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAnd I couldn't have been more impressed by the airport itself. It was very much a place that I wanted to spend more time in.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAmerica, however, beckoned and CBX signage guided the way to baggage claim, with no shortage of ticket kiosks and advertisements along the way.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI had bought my ticket through the CBX mobile application at a cost of $16 one-way. But getting a ticket was probably the easy part as even airlines sell tickets on their websites.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOnly air travelers arriving into Tijuana can use CBX and keeping the entrance behind security helps prevent unauthorized users from making the crossing.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThere was a very short line to use the crossing and staff checked boarding passes and travel documents.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAn automated gate was the final hurdle before beginning the long walk back to the US.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSign after sign said the same thing "US/Mexico border" with an arrow pointing straight, as if there was any other direction in which to walk.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe last stop in Mexico was a small duty free shop, just like in the international departures section of an airport.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAfter endless winding and turning, the border bridge appeared and the US was in sight.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThere's even a plaque at the actual borderline to demarcate the boundary. It was undeniably a long way to go just to end up back in the same country.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut I knew I was home free when I saw the line for Global Entry had only one person in it.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderJust like that, I was back in the US. The US Customs and Border Protection agent only asked if I was bringing anything back from Mexico, and I was free to go after that.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderI got in my rental car and drove off towards San Diego, just 20 minutes away.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIt was a long day but I would absolutely do it again if the price was right. These types of flying adventures make travel fun and now I can say that I've flown between New York and San Diego through Mexico.Using Cross Border Xpress at Tijuana International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider18 hr. 20 min. ago

Delta flights from South Africa have been forced to make stops in places like Boston and Puerto Rico because of "payload" issues

One possibility for the stops is that flights from South Africa to the US may have been more full following the discovery of the Omicron variant. A Delta Air Lines Airbus A350-900 XWB.viper-zero / Shutterstock.com Two Delta Air Lines flights from South Africa have had to make fuel stops in the past week. A mix of worsening weather conditions for aircraft and increased passenger and/or cargo count might be to blame, experts say.  Both flights, operating from Johannesburg to Atlanta, were operated by Airbus A350-900 XWB planes.  Two Delta Air Lines flights from South Africa to the US have had to make unscheduled stops for fuel in recent days on their way back to the US. The first diversion occurred on November 28 when Delta flight 201 from Johannesburg, South Africa to Atlanta made a technical stop in Boston to be refueled.  Another flight from Johannesburg to Atlanta that departed December 2 diverted to San Juan, Puerto Rico, where it also refueled before continuing on. Delta said both stops were "pre-planned" and new flight crews were required to fly the final legs to Atlanta. "The redirection of the flight had to do with the technical specifications of our A350 aircraft and the payload of this particular flight," Delta told Insider of the Boston diversion, in a statement. "This can happen on ultra-long-haul flights when optimal operating conditions can't be met."Numerous factors can play a role in a diversion including weather and payload, especially on an ultra-long-haul flight such as Johannesburg to Atlanta. Delta hasn't seen a diversion on the route since September 6, the earliest date available for viewing using FlightAware tracking data, and the route only relaunched on August 1. One possibility could be a newfound demand for flights out of South Africa leading to fuller flights. The discovery of the Omicron coronavirus variant and the start of travel restrictions imposed by the US government has prompted some travelers to leave South Africa for the US. "You have some unusual market conditions posed by the emergency of the Omicron variant and changes to travel policies in the US," Henry Harteveldt, travel industry analyst and president of Atmosphere Research Group, told Insider. Delta declined to comment on how full its flights were on both occasions. But fuller flights is just one possibility out of many that could affect an ultra-long-haul route such as Atlanta-Johannesburg.The route may be seeing increased cargo demand, Harteveldt said, and weather might also be playing a role as the weather gets warmer in South Africa and colder in the US.Johannesburg is a "hot and heavy" city for airlines meaning that aircraft are operating in high temperatures at a high elevation airport, both of which affect an aircraft's performance capabilities. November and December are in the middle of the spring season in South Africa when temperatures rise and aircraft performance suffers.And in Northern Hemisphere, November and December is the start of the cold season and when winds become stronger. An ultra-long-haul flight such as Johannesburg to Atlanta is at the top end of the Airbus A350-900 XWB's performance capabilities already, and any adverse condition could affect its range. Delta's flight 201 on November 29 was able to make the 7,300-nautical-mile journey non-stop in 17 hours and 16 minutes, FlightAware data shows. Delta formerly flew the Boeing 777-200 on the Atlanta-Johannesburg route, the longest route in Delta's network, until the aircraft was retired in October 2020. As the only aircraft in Delta's fleet capable of flying the route, the A350 was used to relaunch the route in August and Delta is still adjusting to using the aircraft on ultra-long-haul routes. "There might be a little bit of a learning curve here for Delta if they've not used this aircraft on this route before," Bruce McClellan, an aviation analyst at Teal Group, told Insider. "I just think, probably, they had some bad luck and they had pretty bad weather that came at them that caused the plane to divert and refuel." Both experts agree that making fuel stops on scheduled non-stop flights can have reputational issues for Delta if they continue. United is currently Delta's main competition as the only other airline flying non-stop between South Africa and the US.One solution might be to restrict how many passengers and how much freight is carried on the plane even more than it is now. Delta will then need to assess how much it can restrict before the flight becomes unprofitable. If the A350 can't reliably perform the route without making stops and without significantly restricting its payload, Harteveldt said, then, "the airline has a fiduciary responsibility to reassess whether that route should be operated."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytDec 3rd, 2021

United (UAL) Operates Flight Using 100% Sustainable Fuel

For the first time in aviation history, United Airlines (UAL) flew an aircraft from Chicago to Washington using 100% sustainable aviation fuel in one of its two engines. In an effort to decarbonize the airline industry in the United States, United Airlines Holdings, Inc. UAL flew an aircraft full of passengers using 100% sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) in one of its two engines for the first time in aviation history. The fuel was supplied by World Energy, North America's only commercial biofuel producer. The plane took off from Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport and landed at Washington, D.C.’s Reagan National Airport on Dec 1.The flight operated with one of United Airlinaes’ new Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets with 500 gallons of SAF in one engine and 500 gallons of traditional jet fuel in the other. United Airlines CEO, Scott Kirby, stated “United continues to lead from the front when it comes to climate change action.” Sustainable aviation fuels offer the ability to match the performance of petroleum-based jet fuel, while emitting a fraction of its carbon footprint.Currently, airlines are only permitted to use a maximum of 50% SAF on board. The SAF used on United Airlines flight was drop-in ready and is compatible with other aircraft fleets. Meanwhile, United Airlines has committed to buying nearly twice as much sustainable aviation fuel compared with the combined SAF commitments of the rest of the airlines across the globe. According to the company, sustainable aviation fuel is the fastest and most efficient way to reduce emissions generated by aircraft. United Airlines also announced new corporate participants joining the Eco-Skies Alliance, an effort to collectively purchase 7.1 million gallons of SAF this year, including Microsoft, Salesforce and Visa.For future flights, the airline also agreed to buy 1.5 billion gallons of SAF from Alder Fuels, which is enough to fly 57 million passengers. United Airlines can also buy up to 900 million gallons of additional SAF from Fulcrum BioEnergy.Such eco-friendly moves by UAL are highly commendable and expected to reduce carbon emissions in the airline space.Zacks Rank & Stocks to ConsiderUnited Airlines currently carries a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold). You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 (Strong Buy) Rank stocks here.Some better-ranked stocks in the broader Zacks Transportation sector are Knight-Swift Transportation Holdings Inc. KNX, Landstar System, Inc. LSTR and C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Inc. CHRW.The long-term expected earnings per share (three to five years) growth rate for Knight-Swift is pegged at 15%. KNX is benefitting from an improvement in the adjusted operating ratio. Notably, the adjusted operating ratio improved to 82.8% in the first nine months of 2021 compared with 86.6% reported in the first nine months of 2020. In third-quarter 2021, the metric improved to 81.3% from 83.9% a year ago.  This uptick in adjusted operating ratios is primarily driven by higher revenues in the Trucking, Logistics and Intermodal segments. Lower the value of the metric, the better. KNX has surged 36.8% in the past year. Knight-Swift sports a Zacks Rank #1.The long-term expected earnings per share (three to five years) growth rate for Landstar is pegged at 12%. LSTR is benefitting from a gradual recovery in the economy and freight market conditions in the United States.LSTR’s top and the bottom line increased substantially in each quarter from the third quarter of 2020, owing to robust revenues in the primary segment — truck transportation. LSTR has surged 25.7% in the past year. Landstar carries a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy).The long-term expected earnings per share (three to five years) growth rate for C.H. Robinson is pegged at 9%. CHRW benefits from higher pricing and volumes across most of its service lines. Total revenues increased 42.4% year over year in the first nine months of 2021, with higher revenues across all the segments.CHRW’s measures to reward its shareholders are encouraging. Driven by the tailwinds, the stock has moved up 1.4% in the past year. C.H. Robinson sports a Zacks Rank #1. Zacks' Top Picks to Cash in on Artificial Intelligence In 2021, this world-changing technology is projected to generate $327.5 billion in revenue. Now Shark Tank star and billionaire investor Mark Cuban says AI will create "the world's first trillionaires." Zacks' urgent special report reveals 3 AI picks investors need to know about today.See 3 Artificial Intelligence Stocks With Extreme Upside Potential>>Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report United Airlines Holdings Inc (UAL): Free Stock Analysis Report C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Inc. (CHRW): Free Stock Analysis Report KnightSwift Transportation Holdings Inc. (KNX): Free Stock Analysis Report Landstar System, Inc. (LSTR): Free Stock Analysis Report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksDec 3rd, 2021

Stockman: A (Bad) Tale Of Two Inflations

Stockman: A (Bad) Tale Of Two Inflations Authored by David Stockman via Contra Corner blog, Our paint by the numbers central bankers have given the notion of being literalistic a bad name. For years they pumped money like mad all the while insisting that the bogus “lowflation” numbers were making them do it. Now with the lagging measures of inflation north of 5% and the leading edge above 10%, they have insisted loudly that it’s all “transitory”. Well, until today when Powell pulled a U-turn that would have made even Tricky Dick envious. That is, he simply declared “transitory” to be “inoperative”. Or in the context of the Watergate scandal of the time, “This is the operative statement. The others are inoperative.” This 1973 announcement by Richard Nixon’s press secretary, Ron Ziegler, effectively admitted to the mendacity of all previous statements issued by the White House on the Watergate scandal. Still, we won’t believe the Fed heads have given up their lying ways until we see the whites of their eyes. What Powell actually said is they might move forward their taper end from June by a few month, implying that interest rates might then be let up off the mat thereafter. But in the meanwhile, there is at least six month for the Fed to come up with excuses to keep on pumping money at insane rates still longer, while defaulting to one of the stupidest rationalizations for inflation to ever come down the Keynesian pike: Namely, that since the American economy was purportedly harmed badly, and presumably consumers too, with the lowflation between 2012 and 2019, current elevated readings are perforce a “catch-up” boon. That is, more inflation is good for one and all out there on the highways and byways of main street America! You literally can’t make up such rank humbug. Even then, what the hell are they talking about? The shortest inflation measuring stick in town is the Fed’s (naturally) preferred PCE deflator, but here it is since the year 2000. The 21 years gain is 1.93% per annum; and the 9-year gain since inflation targeting became official in January 2012 is 1.73%. Given that the PCE deflator is not a true fixed basket inflation index and that these reading are close enough to target for government work anyway, even the “catch-up” canard fails. That’s especially true because given the virtual certainty of another year or two of 4-6% CPI inflation, even the cumulative measures of inflation will register well above the Fed’s sacrosanct 2.00% target. Moreover, importantly, pray tell what did this really accomplish for the main street economy? On the one hand, savers and fixed income retirees have seen their purchasing power drop by 39% since 2000 and 18% since 2012. At the same time, wage workers in the tradable goods and services sectors got modest wage gains with uniformly bad spill-over effects. To wit, millions lost their jobs to China, India and Mexico etc. because their nominal wages were no longer competitive in the global supply base, while those that hung on to their domestic jobs often lost purchasing ground to domestic inflation. Consequently, the chart below is an unequivocal bad. It is the smoking gun that proves the Fed’s pro-inflation policies and idiotic 2.00% target is wreaking havoc on the main street economy and middle class living standards. Loss of Consumer Purchasing Power, 2000-2021 In short. the group-think intoxicated Fed heads, and their Wall Street and Washington acolytes, are hair-splitting inherently unreliable and misleading numbers as if the BLS inflation data was handed down on stone tablets from financial heaven itself. At the same time, the rampant speculative manias in the financial markets that their oceans of liquidity have actually generated is assiduously ignored or denied. We call this a tale of two inflations because the disaster of today’s rampant financial asset bubbles is rooted in pro-inflation monetary policies which are belied by both theoretical and empirical realities, which we address below. First, however, consider still another aspect of the inflationary asset bubble which is utterly ignored by the Fed. In this case, the group think scribes of the Wall Street Journal inadvertently hit the nail on the head, albeit without the slightest recognition of the financial metastasis they have exposed. We are referring to a recent piece heralding that private-equity firms have announced a record $944.4 billion worth of buyouts in the U.S. so far this year. That 250% of last year’s volume and more than double that of the previous peak in 2007, according to Dealogic. As the WSJ further observed, Driving the urge to go big are the billions of dollars flowing into private-equity coffers as institutions such as pension funds seek higher returns in an era of low interest rates. Buyout firms have raised $314.8 billion in capital to invest in North America so far in 2021, pushing available cash earmarked for the region to a record $755.6 billion, according to data from Preqin. As the end of the year approaches, big buyouts are coming fast and furious. A week ago , private-equity firms Bain Capital and Hellman & Friedman LLC agreed to buy healthcare-technology company Athenahealth Inc. for $17 billion including debt. A week earlier, KKR and Global Infrastructure Partners LLC said they would buy data-center operator CyrusOne Inc. for nearly $12 billion. And the week before that, Advent International Corp. and Permira signed an $11.8 billion deal for cybersecurity-software firm McAfee Corp. The recent string of big LBOs followed the $30 billion-plus deal for medicalsupply company Medline Industries Inc. that H&F, Blackstone Inc. and Carlyle struck in June in the largest buyout since the 2007-08 financial crisis. Needless to say, these LBOs were not done on the cheap, as was the case, oh, 40 years ago. In the case of AthenaHealth, in fact, you have a typical instance of over-the-top “sloppy seconds”. That is, it was taken private by Veritas Capital and Elliott Management three years ago at a fulsome price of $5.7 billion, which is now being topped way up by Bain Capital and Hellman & Friedman LLC in the form of an LBO of an LBO. According to Fitch, AthenaHealth had EBITDA of about $800 million in 2020, which was offset by about $200 million of CapEx or more.That means that at the $17 billion deal value (total enterprise value or TEV), the transaction was being priced at 28X free cash flow to TEV. That’s insane under any circumstances, but when more than half of the purchase price consists of junk debt ($10 billion out of $17 billion), it’s flat out absurd. The reason it is happening is the Fed’s massive financial market distortion: Bain Capital and Hellman & Friedman are so flush with capital that it is burning a hole in their pocket, while the junk debt is notionally so “cheap” that it makes a Hail Mary plausible. But here’s the thing. This is a generic case: the Fed’s radical low interest rate policy is systematically driving the allocation of capital to less and less productive uses. And clearly private equity sponsored LBOs are the poster boy, owing to the inherent double whammy of misallocation described by the WSJ above. On the one hand, capital that should be going to corporate blue chip bonds is ending up on the margin in private equity pools as pension funds, insurance companies and other asset managers struggle to boost returns toward exaggerated benchmarks inherent in their liabilities. At the same time, private equity operators are engaged primarily in the systematic swap of equity for debt in LBO capital structures, such debt taking the form of soaring amounts of junk bonds and loans. The higher coupons on junk debt, in turn, attract more misallocation of capital in the debt markets, while at the same time grinding down the productivity and efficiency of the LBO issuers. That because the hidden truth of LBOs is that on the margin they are nothing more than a financial engineering device that strip-mines cash flows that would ordinarily go into CapEx, R&D, work-force training, marketing, customer development and operational efficiency investments and reallocates these flows to interest payments on onerous levels of the junk debt, instead. That’s the essence of private equity. The underlying false proposition is that 29-year old spread-sheet jockeys at private equity shops tweaking budgets downward for all of these “reinvestment” items—whether on the CapEx or OpEx side of the ledger—know more about these matters than the industry lifetime veterans who typically man either public companies, divested divisions or pre-buyout private companies—before they are treated to the alleged magic of being “LBO’d.” In fact, there is no magic to it, notwithstanding that some LBO’s generate fulsome returns to their private equity owners. But more often than not that’s a function of: Short-term EBITDA gains that are hiding severe underling competitive erosion owing to systematic under-investment; The steady rise of market PE multiples fueled by Fed policies, which policies have drastically inflated LBO “exit” values in the SPAC and IPO markets. So at the end of the day, the Fed’s egregious money-pumping is fueling a massively bloated LBO/junk bond complex that is systematically curtailing productive main street investment and therefore longer-term productivity and economic growth. And, of course, the proceeds of buyouts and junk bonds end up inflating the risk assets, which are mostly held at the tippy top of the economic ladder. And that’s a condition which has gotten far worse since the on-set of Greenspanian “wealth effects” policy in the late 1980s. As shown below, between Q4 1989 and Q2 2021: Top 1%: Share of financial assets rose from 21.0% to 29.2%; Bottom 50%: Share of financial assets fell from 7.2% to 5.6% Meanwhile, the good folks are WSJ saw fit to provide a parallel analysis that further knocks the Fed’s lowflation thesis into a cocked hat. In this case, the authors looked at the average domestic airline ticket price and found that it is about the same today as 25 years ago, $260 today versus $284 in 1996. And that’s before adjusting for cost inflation. So the question recurs: How is it possible that the airline industry hasn’t increased ticket prices in over two decades while its fuel and labor costs, among others, have been marching steadily higher? As the WSJ noted, It isn’t possible really. Most of us are paying a lot more to fly today, thanks to a combination of three covert price increases. First, airlines have unbundled services so that fliers pay extra for checking luggage, boarding early, selecting a seat, having a meal and so on. The charges for these services don’t show up on the ticket price, but they are substantial. Second, the airplane seat’s quality, as measured by its pitch, width, seat material and heft, has declined considerably, meaning customers are getting far less value for the ticket price. And third, many airlines have steadily eroded the value of frequentflier miles, increasing costs for today’s heavy fliers relative to those in 1996. Now, did the hedonics mavens at the BLS capture all these negative quality adjustment in airline ticket prices? They most decidedly did not. As shown below, the BLS says ticket prices have only risen by 5.6% during the same 24 year period or 0.23% per annum. But you wonder with jet fuel costs up by 294% during that period and airline wages higher by 75%—why aren’t they all bankrupt and liquidated? The answer, of course, is that the BLS numbers are a bunch of tommy rot. Adjusted for all the qualitative factors listed above, airline tickets are up by a hell of a lot more than 0.23% per year. Yet the fools in the Eccles Building keep pumping pro-inflation money— so that the private equity game of scalping main street cash flows thrives and middle class living standards continue to fall. CPI for Airline Fares, 1996-2021 Moreover, the backdoor prices increase embedded in airline fares are not unique. These practices are also common in other industries, whether it’s resort fees in hotels, cheaper raw materials in garments and appliances, or more-stringent restaurant and credit-card rewards programs. As the WSJ further queried, Consider the following comparison: Which one is cheaper, a 64-ounce container of mayonnaise at a warehouse club that costs $7.99, or a 48-ounce bottle of the same brand at a supermarket for $5.94? Most people will guess the warehouse club because of its low-price image. If you do the math, the price per ounce is roughly the same. But if you consider that the warehouse club requires a separate mandatory membership fee, the customer is actually paying more per ounce at the warehouse club. Known as two-part pricing, the membership fee camouflages the actual price paid by customers—and is behind the success of Costco,Amazon and likely your neighborhood gym. (A gym’s initiation fee, a landlord’s application or administrative fee, and an online ticket seller’s per-transaction processing fee all serve the same purpose.) Yet this is just a tiny sampling of the complexity of providing apples-to-apples pricing trends at the item level over time—to saying nothing of proper weighting of all the items that go into the index market basket. The implication is crystal clear. As per Powell’s belated recant on the “transitory” matter, the Fed doesn’t know where true inflation has been or have the slightest idea of where it is going. So the idea of inflation targeting against an arbitrary basket of goods and services embodied in the PCE deflator, much of which consists of “imputations” and wildly arbitrary hedonic adjustments, is just plan nuts. They only “inflation” measure that is in the proper remit of the Fed is monetary inflation—-something at least crudely measured by its own balance sheet. On that score the Fed is a infernal inflation machine like no other. And for want of doubt that the resulting massive asset inflation and rampant financial engineering on Wall Street that flows from Fed policies is wreaking havoc on the main street economy, note this insight from the always perceptive Bill Cohan: AT&T bought TimeWarner for a total of $108 billion, including debt assumed, and three years later agreed to spin it off it to Discovery for—what?— $43 billion in stock, cash and assumed debt. By my calculation, that’s a $65 billion destruction of value in three years. That’s not easy to do. He got that right. At the end of the day these massive accounting write-offs are just a proxy for the underlying economic destruction. As we said, a tale of two inflations. And neither of them imply anything good. Tyler Durden Fri, 12/03/2021 - 14:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeDec 3rd, 2021

Phillips 66 (PSX) Scores Deal to Supply SAF to British Airways

Phillips 66's (PSX) Humber refinery will be the first to significantly produce SAF, which can reduce more than 80% of carbon emissions compared with fossil jet fuels. Phillips 66 PSX signed an agreement to provide sustainable aviation fuel ("SAF") produced at its Humber refinery to British Airways.Located in North Lincolnshire, U.K., the Phillips 66 Humber refinery will be the first to significantly produce SAF. It currently produces about 132,000 gallons per day of renewable waste feedstock.The refinery uses sustainable waste feedstock to produce SAF, which can reduce more than 80% of carbon emissions compared with fossil jet fuels.  Phillips 66 will deliver the fuel through its existing pipeline infrastructure that supplies British Airways.British Airways will be the world's first airline to use SAF, aiming to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050. The airline is purchasing enough fuel to reduce emissions that will power the equivalent of 700 net-zero flights between London and New York, which is still a lower fraction of its total carbon footprint.The U.K. has the resources and capabilities to be a global leader in the development of SAF and increase production. International Airlines Group (“IAG”), which combines leading airlines in Ireland, Spain and the U.K., is investing $400 million for the next 20 years to develop SAF. British Airways established partnerships with various technology and fuel companies to develop SAF facilities and purchase the fuel.The latest agreement with British Airways fits well with Phillips 66's strategy to produce fuel from wastes, which will reduce the carbon intensity of its processes. The deal reflects the importance of SAF for the aviation and energy industries, as markets for low-carbon products are growing.Company ProfileEstablished in Houston, TX, Phillips 66's operations involve refining, midstream, marketing and specialties, and chemicals.Zacks Rank & Other Stock to ConsiderPhillips 66 currently sports a Zack Rank #1 (Strong Buy).Investors interested in the energy sector might look at the following companies that also flaunt a Zacks Rank #1 at present. You can see the complete list of today's Zacks #1 Rank stocks here.PDC Energy PDCE is an independent upstream operator that engages in the exploration, development and production of natural gas, crude oil and natural gas liquids. PDCE, which reached its present form following the January 2020 combination with SRC Energy, is currently the second-largest producer in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. As of 2020-end, PDC Energy's total estimated proved reserves were 731,073 thousand barrels of oil equivalent.In the past year, shares of PDCE Energy have gained 150.6% compared with the industry's growth of 85.4%. Moreover, PDCE's 2021 earnings are expected to surge 271% year over year. In the past 60 days, the Zacks Consensus Estimate for PDCE's 2021 earnings has been raised by 26%. PDC Energy beat the Zacks Consensus Estimate in the last four quarters, with an earnings surprise of 51.06%, on average.Centennial Resource Development, Inc. CDEV, based in Denver, CO, is an independent oil and gas exploration and production company. It primarily develops unconventional hydrocarbon reserves in the Delaware Basin, part of the prolific Permian Basin. CDEV's net production in 2020 was recorded at 67,161 barrels of oil equivalent per day, of which oil contributed 53.7% and natural gas and natural gas liquids accounted for the rest.In the past year, shares of Centennial Resource have gained 294.5% compared with the industry's surge of 85.3%. CDEV is expected to see earnings growth of 127.6% in 2021. CDEV has witnessed three upward revisions in the past 30 days. In third-quarter 2021, CDEV's constant focus on cost reduction helped it generate net cash of $153.5 million from operating activities compared with $45.7 million in the year-ago period. The free cash flow generated during the quarter was $77.2 million, significantly increasing from $10.5 million in the year-ago period.TotalEnergies SE TTE is among the top five publicly traded global integrated oil and gas companies based on production volumes, proved reserves and market capitalization. At present, the company has more than 12 years of proved reserves, and more than 20 years of proved and probable reserves. Of the proved reserves, 60% is gas and 40% is oil. TTE is also committed to developing renewable energies as part of its upstream activities.TotalEnergies is expected to see earnings growth of 354% in 2021. TTE witnessed two upward revisions in the past 60 days. In third-quarter 2021, TotalEnergies acquired $126 million worth of assets and sold assets valued at $1,084 million. In the quarter, TTE acquired a 10% interest in the Lapa block in Brazil. Zacks' Top Picks to Cash in on Artificial Intelligence In 2021, this world-changing technology is projected to generate $327.5 billion in revenue. Now Shark Tank star and billionaire investor Mark Cuban says AI will create "the world's first trillionaires." Zacks' urgent special report reveals 3 AI picks investors need to know about today.See 3 Artificial Intelligence Stocks With Extreme Upside Potential>>Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report Phillips 66 (PSX): Free Stock Analysis Report PDC Energy, Inc. (PDCE): Free Stock Analysis Report Centennial Resource Development (CDEV): Free Stock Analysis Report TotalEnergies SE Sponsored ADR (TTE): Free Stock Analysis Report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksDec 3rd, 2021

Here are the airlines most and least likely to arrive on time

According to the study, Allegiant and JetBlue trailed the pack with the most flight delays since January 2016. Spirit Airlines cancelled more than 400 flights on August 3 in the third consecutive delay of cancellations and delays.Al Seib / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images A study on airline punctuality found the carriers with the most and least delayed flights. Allegiant was at the bottom of the pack, while Delta was the most on-schedule carrier in the US. Delays can happen to any airline, but data shows some companies manage schedules better than others. If you have flown since the travel boom started over the summer, you may be one of the thousands of passengers who have had their vacation plans interrupted or flat-out ruined due to airlines delaying or canceling flights within hours of departure.Photo by Bob Riha/WireImageThe past few months have been particularly rough due to staffing shortages, maintenance issues, and weather causing operational meltdowns.A customer service agent tries to calm passengers as they form a line that extends outside LAX Terminal 5 Tuesday morning as Spirit Airlines has canceled 313 flights.Al Seib / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesIn August, Spirit Airlines canceled over 3,000 flights citing bad weather, system outages, and staffing problems.Spirit Airlines A319 aircraft.Marcus Mainka/ShutterstockSource: InsiderMeanwhile, Southwest Airlines had its own breakdown in October, also blaming weather and staffing shortages, though it says air traffic control issues also played a role. The company has since initiated an aggressive hiring campaign to find more workers, including an employee referral bonus worth $300.Southwest Airlines passengers checking in for their flight.Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket/GettySource: Insider, CNBCWith the busy Christmas travel season drawing near, passengers may be worried whether their flight will leave on time or if they will be left waiting for hours to get to their destination. However, a new study from the US Public Interest Research Group may help shed some light on what to expect.Travelers at LAX airport in December 2020Ringo Chiu/ShutterstockSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundThe PIRG looked at data from the Department of Transportation between January 2016 and August 2021 and determined which of 10 airlines fared the best and worst in terms of on-time departures. The carriers studied were Alaska, Allegiant, America, Delta, Frontier, Hawaiian, JetBlue, Southwest, Spirit, and United.Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, and Delta Air Lines aircraft at Los Angeles International Airport.Philip Pilosian/Shutterstock.comSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundAccording to the study, Allegiant and JetBlue trailed the pack with the most flight delays since January 2016. According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, a delayed flight is defined as arriving 15 or more minutes late.Allegiant and JetBlue are the worst airlines in the US for punctuality.Angel DiBilio/Juli Hansen/ShutterstockSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundIn July 2021, Allegiant had just 51.9% of its flights arrive on schedule. Overall, according to the DOT, Allegiant is the least punctual airline in the US with 77.4% of on-time departures since June 2020. It is also the only carrier to fall below 70% since the start of 2021, with just 69.1% of punctual flights.Allegiant Air A320 aircraft.Daniel J. Macy/ShutterstockSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundJetBlue is not far behind with just 71.6% of JetBlue flights arriving on schedule since the start of 2021, with 21.4% delayed flights since June 2020. The carrier particularly struggled this summer with an average of 62.3% of on-time arrivals between June and August.JetBlue A320 aircraft.Marcus Mainka/ShutterstockSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundAccording to the Official Aviation Guide, a global flight data and analytics provider, most people in the aviation industry would say an on-time performance score of 80% or better is "pretty good," meaning four out of five flights were on schedule.Passengers looks at Atlanta departure board.James Kirkikis/ShutterstockSource: Official Aviation GuideAllegiant and JetBlue are the only carriers in the US to not meet the metric since June 2020. There are six carriers that have had 80-89% of flights arrive on schedule since June of last year, including Spirit with 83.2%...Spirit Airlines A320 at Boston airport.Taylor Rains/InsiderSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundFrontier with 83.6%...A Frontier Airlines Airbus A321.Carlos Yudica/Shutterstock.comSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundAmerican with 84.9%...American Airlines aircraft.Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty ImagesSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundUnited with 85.2%...United Airlines at Los Angeles International Airport.Angel DiBilio/ShutterstockSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundSouthwest with 85.4%.Southwest Airlines aircraft.AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, FileSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundAnd Alaska with 88.0%.Alaska Airlines aircraft.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundThere are only two airlines that have had an on-time performance of at least 90% since June 2020. OAG says these are the "very best airlines" but "they remain the exception rather than the rule." The top two carriers are Hawaiian with 90.4%...Hawaiian is one of the best carriers for on-time performance.Thiago B Trevisan/ShutterstockSource: US Public Information Research Group Education Fund, Official Aviation GuideAnd Delta with 90.5%, making it the US' most punctual airline, according to DOT data.Delta Air Lines has the best on-time performance of any other US carrier.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundWhile flight delays and cancelations can happen to any airline, some carriers have proven to have fewer disruptions based on the data from the DOT. Delta, in particular, has only fallen below the 80% on-time performance rate during six different months between January 2016 and August 2021.Thomas Pallini/Business InsiderSource: US Public Information Research Group Education FundFor travelers flying out over the busy holiday season, prepare for delays by checking your flight status, staying close to the customer service desk, having a backup plan, and understanding your credit card benefits, like reimbursements.Customer service employee at Houston HobbySouthwest AirlinesSource: InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 2nd, 2021

An Airbus A340 aircraft just landed on Antarctica for the first time ever — see the history of aviation on the 7th continent

In 1956, the US Navy managed to accomplish what many had thought was impossible — landing an aircraft on the Antarctic ice. The first Airbus A340 to land on Antarctica.Hi Fly An Airbus A340 made history in November when it became the first jet of its type to land on Antarctica. The South Pole has a long history of aviation that has contributed to the exploration of the continent. A number of airliners, military planes, turboprops, and luxury jets have landed on the polar tundra since 1956. Airlines operate regularly scheduled service to nearly every corner of the globe across six continents, connecting people to remote islands, deserts, and tundras. However, the 7th continent has proven difficult to reach, though a number of aircraft have successfully made the trek.Winter kayaking in Antarctica.Song_about_summer/ShutterstockAntarctica is the world's least populated continent and is typically home to about 4,400 people in the summer and only 1,000 in the winter. The inhabitants are settled on the continent's many research stations and tourist camps, which are regularly supplied by chartered cargo jets.Port Lockroy research station in Antarctica.Willem Tims/ShutterstockSource: World Population ReviewOn November 2, 2021, the first-ever Airbus A340 aircraft made the journey down to the White Continent, marking a historical feat. The plane flew from Cape Town, South Africa, and flew 2,500 nautical miles (2,877 miles) to Antarctica in five and a half hours.The first Airbus A340 to land on Antarctica.Hi FlySource: Hi FlyThe jet, which was operated by Portugal-based Hi Fly and chartered by luxury campsite Wolf's Fang, carried supplies for the latter's upscale adventure camp located on the South Pole. The plane carried enough fuel to make the journey to Antarctica and back.The first Airbus A340 to land on Antarctica.Hi FlySource: White Desert, Hi FlyAccording to Carlos Mirpuri, Hi Fly's vice president and the Captain of the historic flight, the 3,000-meter (9843-foot) glacial runway had special grooving to help the jet brake easier, though landing the heavy bird was not a problem. However, the reflective blue ice created a glare during landing.The first Airbus A340 to land on Antarctica.Hi FlySource: Hi Fly"The reflection is tremendous, and proper eyewear helps you adjust your eyes between the outside view and the instrumentation. The non-flying pilot has an important role in making the usual plus extra callouts, especially in the late stages of the approach," Mirpuri said.The first Airbus A340 to land on Antarctica.Hi FlySource: Hi FlyDespite the glare, the landing was smooth. "We flew a textbook approach to an uneventful landing, and aircraft performed exactly as planned, Mirpuri said. "When we reached taxi speed I could hear a round of applause from the cabin. We were joyful. After all, we were writing history."The first Airbus A340 to land on Antarctica.Hi FlyHi Fly's historic flight was just the latest addition to the long history of aviation in Antarctica. In 1928, Australian military pilot George Hubert Wilkins flew a Lockheed vega 1 monoplane from Deception Island in the South Shetland Islands over Antarctica in the first recorded flight to the 7th continent.Australian polar explorer Sir George Hubert Wilkins.Hulton Archive/Stringer/Getty ImagesSource: BBCWilkins was accompanied by co-pilot Carl Ben Eielson and the two spent four and a half hours crossing 1,000 miles of the previously unchartered Antarctic area, dropping a flag and document to claim the land for King George V of the United Kingdom.Document written by Sir Hubert Wilkins outlining claim for Australia at Walkabout Rocks.Daleen Koch via the Australian Antarctic DivisionSource: BBC"For the first time in history, new land was being discovered in the air," Wilkins wrote about the journey.Sir George Hubert Wilkins' Lockheed Vega.George Rayner via the Australian Antarctic DivisionSource: BBCWilliam Randolph Hearst, the American newspaper publishing millionaire, funded the project. Flights like these were how worldwide researchers and scientists learned about Antarctica's topography.Expeditioners reading Sir Hubert Wilkins’ proclamation at Wilkins Cairn.Scott Beardsley via the Australian Antarctic DivisionSource: BBCWhen Australia claimed the title of the first explorers to fly over Antarctica, an American navy man and aviator set out to best his feat. In January 1929, Richard Byrd's "million-dollar expedition" set out for the South Pole carrying three aircraft and setting up the first "Little America" naval base.Richard Byrd visits Little America in 1933.Bettmann/Getty ImagesSource: BBCHowever, Byrd did not fly during his first expedition to Antarctica, worrying his Ford Trimotor plane was too heavy and unreliable. Nevertheless, with determination to beat his rival Wilkins, he set out on November 28, 1929, for the South Pole.Richard Byrd posing next to the plane he used on his expedition to the South Pole.Keystone-France/Contributor/Getty ImagesSource: BBCByrd successfully flew across the Ross Ice Shelf and narrowly climbed above the Liv Glacier to the High Polar Plateau during his journey. He dropped a US flag onto the Antarctic tundra, and his achievements far-outmatched Wilkins. After his success, he vowed to return to the polar region.Richard Byrd in the cockpit of the second aircraft he flew over Antarctica.Bettmann/Getty ImagesSource: BBCAfter a few follow-up expeditions in the 1930s, Admiral Byrd launched Operation Highjump in 1946, sending 13 ships and 33 aircraft to the White Continent for exploration, research, mapping, American territorial sovereignty, and naval preparedness for Antarctic warfare.Dr. Paul A. Siple and Rear Admiral Byrd during Operation Highjump.Bettmann/Getty ImagesSource: BBCIt was the largest expedition in history to the continent, though no planes landed on the ice.Admiral Richard Byrd at his accommodation in Little America during Operation Highjump.ullstein picture Dtl. via Getty ImagesSource: BBCWhile the exploration of the polar wasteland started with "mapping wars," which led to the need for control over the territory, eventually the focus turned to scientific research.Antarctic expeditioners.George Rinhart/Corbis via Getty ImagesSource: BBCIn 1955, the US Navy launched Operation Deep Freeze to assist the National Science Foundation in its participation in the International Geophysical Year. IGY was a 67-country collaborative scientific project that lasted from July 1, 1957, to December 31, 1958, and studied topics like Antarctic weather, marine life, and glacial systems.The USS Arneb, the flagship of the Operation Deep Freeze task force.Bettmann/Getty ImagesSource: BBC, National GuardAs part of its preparations, the US Navy managed to accomplish what many had thought was impossible — landing an aircraft on the Antarctic ice. In October 1956, an R4D-5 Douglas Skytrain touched down on the South Pole for the first time ever.The R4D-5 Skytrain is parked at the South Pole behind the American flag after landing at the South Pole in 1956.US NavySource: BBCAfter the historic landing, a new era of science took off with nearly 70 nations participating in the IGY between 1957 and 1958. After the strong year, the Treaty of Antarctica was signed in which 12 countries committed to peace, science, and research on the continent, though there are 54 parties today.Flags of the original 12 signatory nations of the Antarctic Treaty.Bettmann/Getty ImagesSource: BBC"Aviation helped to confirm the ice-covered nature of Antarctica, which arguably contributed to a willingness to compromise in the Antarctic Treaty because there was little immediate prospect for economic gain," Adrian Howkins, a reader in environmental history at the University of Bristol, said.Australian DHC-2 Beaver flying over Mt Henderson in 1959.Australian Antarctic DivisionSource: BBCA number of aircraft have visited the White Continent since the first landing in 1956, like British Antarctic Survey's fleet of De Havilland Canada Twin Otters and Dash-7s started science flights to the frozen south in 1994.A British Antarctic Survey aircraft in Antarctica.British Antarctic SurveySource: British Antarctic SurveyMeanwhile, the US Navy launched later versions of Operation Deep Freeze, sending to Antarctica a USAF C-124 Globemaster...US Air Force C-124 Globemaster on Antarctica.US NavySource: National Naval Aviation MuseumA Lockheed P-2 Neptune...US Navy P2V Neptune in Antarctica.US NavySource: National Naval Aviation MuseumA De Havilland U-1 Otter...U-1 Otter emerges from the maw of a C-124.US NavySource: National Naval Aviation MuseumAn R5D Skymaster...US Navy workhorse, an R5D Skymaster.US NavySource: National Naval Aviation MuseumAn R4D Skytrain...US Navy R4D Skytrain on Antarctica.US NavySource: National Naval Aviation MuseumAnd a pontooned helicopter.US Navy pontooned helicopter.US NavySource: National Naval Aviation MuseumOther military aircraft have also landed on the continent, including the Royal New Zealand Air Force's Boeing 757, which first landed in 2009 and continues to operate supply flights each year.Royal Air New Zealand Boeing 757 jet on Antarctica.Colin Harnish/ShutterstockSource: Simple FlyingAlthough there is no regularly scheduled service to Antarctica, a handful of airlines have touched down on the polar wasteland, including Swiss airline PrivatAir which flew the first Boeing 737 to the continent in 2012.PrivatAir Boeing 737 on Antarctica.PrivatAirSource: South Pole StationMeanwhile, Icelandair's sister carrier Loftleider Icelandic Airlines was the first airline to land a commercial flight on Antarctica in 2015.The first-ever landing of a commercial Boeing 757 passenger airliner by Loftleidir Icelandic.Antarctic Logistics and ExpeditionsSource: Antarctic Logistics and ExpeditionsThe company ferried 60 tourists on a Boeing 757 to Union Glacier on behalf of Antarctic Logistics & Expeditions ALE. The purpose of both PrivatAir and Loftleider's journeys was to see if airliners could successfully transport people and cargo to Antarctica.The first-ever landing of a commercial Boeing 757 passenger airliner by Loftleidir Icelandic.Antarctic Logistics and ExpeditionsSource: Antarctic Logistics and Expeditions, South Pole StationBetween 2019 and 2020, Titan Airways flew two aircraft to the southern-most continent. The first was a Boeing 767 to Russia's Antarctic station, Novolazarevskaya, which landed several times on a 3,000-meter (9,843-foot) runway made of blue ice...Titan Airways' Boeing 767 on Antarctica.Titan AirwaysSource: Simple FlyingAnd an all-business Boeing 757 carrying World Marathon Challenge participants. The landing gear was modified with extended legs to absorb the shock of the ice.Inside Titan Airways' Boeing 757.Titan AirwaysSource: Simple FlyingIn February 2021, Icelandair made the trek with a Boeing 767 to pick up a group of Norwegian scientists from the Troll airfield in Antarctica. The flight involved a lot of planning due to the treacherous conditions on the continent and required six pilots, 13 crew, and one flight engineer to man the journey.Icelandair Boeing 767 in Antarctica.IcelandairSource: IcelandairTo land on Antarctica, aircraft navigate to one of 50 icy runways designated on the icy tundra, though none are actual airports. Two notable ones are the Phoenix Runway and Williams Field's skiway.LC-130s on Williams Field skiway in Antarctica.National Scientific FoundationSource: National Science FoundationIn addition to airline and military operations, there are several countries and organizations that fly planes to the South Pole for tourism or scientific research.Scientists collect meteorites from a glacial moraine at the base of Mt. Ward, Antarctica.NASAAustralia's Antarctic Division ferries expeditioners and equipment from the country to Antarctica. It flies an Airbus A319...Australian Antarctic Division A319 passenger flight.Australian Antarctic DivisionSource: Australian Antarctic DivisionAnd Royal Australian Air Force C-17As.Australian Royal Air Force C17-A Globemaster.Australian Antarctic DivisionSource: Australian Antarctic DivisionThe National Science Foundation, founded in 1959, also regularly operates polar-modified LC-130 Hercules, Twin Otters and Baslers, helicopters, and the US Air Force's C-17 between Antarctica and two main gateways, including Christchurch, New Zealand, and Puntas Arenas, Chile. The operation is part of the US Antarctic Program.Three year-round US research stations in Antarctica that are part of the program.National Scientific FoundationSource: National Science FoundationThe LC-130 Hercules was introduced into the military's Antarctic program in 1960 and has specially made ski-equipped landing gear for landing on the ice.LC-130 airplanes near McMurdo Station.National Science FoundationSource: National Science FoundationThe De Havilland Twin Otter and Basler turboprops are used for domestic flights within Antarctica. They can carry cargo and land on either ice or snow.Twin Otter on Antarctica.National Science FoundationSource: National Science FoundationFour helicopters are used in Antarctica, including two AS-350-B2 "A-Stars" and two Bell 212s.NSF Helicopter.National Science FoundationSource: National Science FoundationMeanwhile, a C-17 carries the bulk of passengers and cargo between Christchurch, New Zealand, and McMurdo Station each summer. The giant jet can carry approximately 121,254 pounds.US Air Force C-17 on Antarctica.National Science FoundationSource: National Science FoundationCanada-based Kenn Borek Air flies Twin Otters in support of US Antarctic Program science and in 2016 flew a rescue mission to the seventh continent to evacuate two people at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station who were in need of medical help.Kenn Borek rescue mission aircraft.National Science FoundationSource: National Science FoundationA number of tour operators also fly to the South Pole, like Ice Trek, which flies an Ilyushin-76 from Punta Arenas, Chile, to Union Glacier, Antarctica.Icetrek's Ilyushin-76 on Antarctica.IcetrekSource: IcetrekAnd White Desert, the operator of the luxury campsite on the tundra, which operates a Gulfstream 550 between Cape Town and Antarctica. According to the company, the plane makes the journey in five hours flying at .85 Mach.White Desert Gulfstream 550.White DesertSource: White DesertAntarctica's history of aviation is just beginning as airlines and countries continue to push the boundaries of the southern tundra in the name of science and exploration.Royal NZ Air Force aircraft on Antarctica.Colin Harnish/ShutterstockRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 1st, 2021