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Alabama Unnecessarily Halts Third Execution Over Problems With Injections

Alabama Unnecessarily Halts Third Execution Over Problems With Injections; But There’s a Simple and Proven Solution to Stop the Many Legal Challenges Alabama Governor Orders State To Halt All Further Executions WASHINGTON, D.C. (November 23, 2022) – Alabama Governor Kay Ivey has ordered the state to halt all further executions; a decision made following the […] Alabama Unnecessarily Halts Third Execution Over Problems With Injections; But There’s a Simple and Proven Solution to Stop the Many Legal Challenges Alabama Governor Orders State To Halt All Further Executions WASHINGTON, D.C. (November 23, 2022) – Alabama Governor Kay Ivey has ordered the state to halt all further executions; a decision made following the recent cancellation of the execution Alan Eugene Miller because, after an hour of trying, prison personnel could not locate suitable veins for the lethal injection. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Henry Singleton Series in PDF Get the entire 4-part series on Henry Singleton in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q3 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more   This is reportedly the third consecutive lethal injection execution in Alabama to be riddled with problems and controversy, and there have been many more in the other states which execute murderers by lethal injection, and likewise suffered from a variety of problems with the injections. Indeed, Miller's was only the latest in a long string of bungled lethal injection executions. But there's a simple alternative to using lethal injections which would avoid all the problems with bungling injections and with meeting the new legal standard for executions, says public interest law professor John Banzhaf. This is important because the Supreme Court just held in June 2022 that murderers on death row can challenge their method of execution. Since the legal standard for challenging an execution is easily met with a well-recognized and generally accepted method for painlessly ending a life, the public should expect many more challenges to scheduled executions; including challenges, like many successful ones in the past, which significantly delay the imposition of justice, warns Banzhaf. An Alternative Method As Justice Elena Kagan explained in NANCE v. WARD, "In several recent decisions, this Court has set out rules for challenging a State’s proposed method of execution under the Eighth Amendment. To prevail on such a claim, a prisoner must identify a readily available alternative method of execution that would significantly reduce the risk of severe pain. In doing so, the prisoner is not confined to proposing a method authorized by the executing State’s law; he may instead ask for a method used in other States." Although this initial language might seem to suggest that a murderer challenging his execution may point only to an alternative measure already in use or authorized in a different state, other language strongly suggests that this other-state language is not a necessary requirement. For example, Kagan writes: "To succeed on that claim, the Court held in GLOSSIP, he must satisfy two requirements. First, he must establish that the State’s method of execution presents a 'substantial risk of serious harm'—severe pain over and above death itself. Second, and more relevant here, he 'must identify an alternative [method] that is feasible, readily implemented, and in fact significantly reduce[s]' the risk of harm involved." She goes on to write that In identifying an alternative method, the Court in BUCKLEW held, an inmate is “'not limited to choosing among those presently authorized by a particular State’s law.' The prisoner may, for example, 'point to a well-established protocol in another State as a potentially viable option.'" [emphasis added] The use of the word "may" clearly suggests that it is not a legal requirement for a challenge. Thus, if there is an alternative to using lethal injections to execute murderers which "reduce[s]” the risk of harm involved." the prisoner apparently may raise it to challenge his own execution, even if it is not authorized in a different state, argues Banzhaf. If, in fact, it is authorized to cause a painless death in one or more other states, that would simply make his argument and challenge stronger and more likely to be successful. The opinion went on to stress that the prisoner may challenge his execution even if it means a significant delay while the state, if it wishes and is able to do so, adopts by statute a new method of carrying out the death penalty; a step which gives death penalty opponents an additional opportunity to end executions. Thus the opinion states: "That remains true even where, as here, the proposed alternative is one unauthorized by present state law. Nance’s requested relief still places his execution in Georgia’s control. If Georgia wants to carry out the death sentence, it can enact legislation approving what a court has found to be a fairly easy-to-employ method of execution. Although that may take more time and effort than changing an agency protocol, Hill explained that the 'incidental delay' involved in changing a procedure is irrelevant to the vehicle question—which focuses on whether the requested relief would 'necessarily' invalidate the death sentence." Banzhaf notes that there is - and has long existed - a "readily available alternative method of execution" which would "significantly reduce the risk of severe pain," and one which is used in several states to cause legally sanctioned death. Using Injectable Drugs  The simple alternative, Banzhaf notes, and an alternative to using injectable drugs for executions generally - with the many legal and other challenges this method has faced, and will continue to face - is putting the condemned on the pill. Providing a condemned man with barbiturate pills to cause a quick and painless death - as is done in 'death with dignity' jurisdictions - is well tested, established, and accepted, does not require any trained personnel, and could avoid the many medical, legal. And other problems with lethal injections and other current methods of execution, including unexpected adverse reactions, possible pain, finding a suitable vein, etc. suggests Professor Banzhaf, who takes no position on the fundamental issue of capital punishment. Interestingly, Arizona has approved the use of barbiturates for executions, but oddly only if they are injected. Moreover, and more importantly, in at least eight states (California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington) and in the District of Columbia, physicians are permitted to prescribe barbiturate pills so that terminally ill (and often old and frail) patients can achieve death with dignity without any pain or other suffering. The pills for this purpose are readily available, do not expire quickly, do not require refrigeration as injectable drugs often do, nor do they cause adverse reactions to the elderly even though they are typically frail, and may also suffer from a wide variety of pre-existing medical conditions. "If this method of ending life is safe and appropriate for totally innocent and often frail elderly people with a wide variety of medical conditions who are seeking a quick and painless death with dignity, it should be more than good enough for murderers about to be executed for their crimes," Banzhaf argues. Since only a few grams of certain barbiturates are necessary to cause death, and pills are apparently much harder for drug companies to restrict than liquid injectable drugs, the amount necessary to cause a quick and painless death might be administered in the form of several easy-to-obtain pills offered by jailers to the murderer in the death chamber. Using these well-known, more readily available pills rather than injections or other methods for executions would probably mute most legal objections, avoid the major problems with injections highlighted by death penalty opponents, eliminate the need for medically trained personnel (who often refuse on ethical and/or professional grounds to give injections, or even to insert needles) to participate in executions, and have many other advantages, suggests Banzhaf. If the prisoner refuses to take the pills and/or cannot be forced to, or if he only pretends to swallow them, he can hardly complain about unconstitutional "cruel and unusual punishment," and/or about “a substantial risk of severe pain," if the state thereafter has no choice but to use lethal injections, or other arguably cruel or painful execution protocols, with all the possible risks involved. To paraphrase an old legal saying, the condemned had the key to his own freedom from pain in his own hands, says Banzhaf. In addition, since oral administration of pills takes longer for the drugs to reach the murderer's system than injections, and works far more slowly. This method of capital punishment is much less likely to trigger the sudden and sometimes violent reactions lethal injections have sometimes been said to cause, and which death penalty opponents always cite - often with great success in courts - to stop executions. If state governments don't take advantage of this simple and proven method to cause death without any pain, they can only expect further legal challenges by death penalty opponents who can probably then show. According to the existing legal standard, that current execution methods - including lethal injections and the electric chair - create substantial risks of harm relative to a viable alternative; that viable alternative being painless barbiturate pills, Banzhaf predicts......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkNov 23rd, 2022

“Year of Botched Executions” – A Simple Cure

“Year of Botched Executions” – A Simple Cure; Lethal Injection Mess Letting Murderers Escape A Third Of Executions Went Wrong In 2022 WASHINGTON, D.C. (December 16, 2022) – The New York Times calls 2022 the “Year of Botched Executions,” noting that “several high-profile failures forced states including Alabama and Tennessee to temporarily halt executions.” In […] “Year of Botched Executions” – A Simple Cure; Lethal Injection Mess Letting Murderers Escape A Third Of Executions Went Wrong In 2022 WASHINGTON, D.C. (December 16, 2022) – The New York Times calls 2022 the “Year of Botched Executions,” noting that “several high-profile failures forced states including Alabama and Tennessee to temporarily halt executions.” In the same vein, the Washington Post reports “a third of executions went wrong in 2022.” if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get Our Activist Investing Case Study! Get the entire 10-part series on our in-depth study on activist investing in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or print it out to read anywhere! Sign up below! (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q3 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more   One of the most recent occurred just weeks ago when Alabama Governor Kay Ivey ordered the state to halt all further executions; a decision made following the recent cancellation of the execution Alan Eugene Miller because, after an hour of trying, prison personnel could not locate suitable veins for the lethal injection. This is reportedly the third consecutive lethal injection execution in Alabama to be riddled with problems and controversy, and there have been many more in the other states which execute murderers by lethal injection, and likewise suffered from a variety of problems with the injections. Indeed, Miller's was only the latest in a long string of bungled lethal injection executions. But there's a simple alternative to using lethal injections which would avoid all the problems with bungling injections and with meeting the new legal standard for executions, says public interest law professor John Banzhaf. This is important because the Supreme Court just held in June 2022 that murderers on death row can challenge their method of execution. Since the legal standard for challenging an execution is easily met with a well-recognized and generally accepted method for painlessly ending a life, the public should expect many more challenges to scheduled executions; including challenges, like many successful ones in the past, which significantly delay the imposition of justice, warns Banzhaf. As Justice Elena Kagan explained in NANCE v. WARD, "In several recent decisions, this Court has set out rules for challenging a State’s proposed method of execution under the Eighth Amendment. To prevail on such a claim, a prisoner must identify a readily available alternative method of execution that would significantly reduce the risk of severe pain. In doing so, the prisoner is not confined to proposing a method authorized by the executing State’s law; he may instead ask for a method used in other States." Although this initial language might seem to suggest that a murderer challenging his execution may point only to an alternative measure already in use or authorized in a different state, other language strongly suggests that this other-state language is not a necessary requirement. For example, Kagan writes: "To succeed on that claim, the Court held in GLOSSIP, he must satisfy two requirements. First, he must establish that the State’s method of execution presents a 'substantial risk of serious harm'—severe pain over and above death itself. Second, and more relevant here, he 'must identify an alternative [method] that is feasible, readily implemented, and in fact significantly reduce[s]' the risk of harm involved." An Alternative Method She goes on to write that In identifying an alternative method, the Court in BUCKLEW held, an inmate is “'not limited to choosing among those presently authorized by a particular State’s law.' The prisoner may, for example, 'point to a well-established protocol in another State as a potentially viable option.'" [emphasis added] The use of the word "may" clearly suggests that it is not a legal requirement for a challenge. Thus, if there is an alternative to using lethal injections to execute murderers which "reduce[s]” the risk of harm involved." the prisoner apparently may raise it to challenge his own execution, even if it is not authorized in a different state, argues Banzhaf. If, in fact, it is authorized to cause a painless death in one or more other states, that would simply make his argument and challenge stronger and more likely to be successful. The opinion went on to stress that the prisoner may challenge his execution even if it means a significant delay while the state, if it wishes and is able to do so, adopts by statute a new method of carrying out the death penalty; a step which gives death penalty opponents an additional opportunity to end executions. Thus the opinion states: "That remains true even where, as here, the proposed alternative is one unauthorized by present state law. Nance’s requested relief still places his execution in Georgia’s control. If Georgia wants to carry out the death sentence, it can enact legislation approving what a court has found to be a fairly easy-to-employ method of execution. Although that may take more time and effort than changing an agency protocol, Hill explained that the 'incidental delay' involved in changing a procedure is irrelevant to the vehicle question—which focuses on whether the requested relief would 'necessarily' invalidate the death sentence." Banzhaf notes that there is - and has long existed - a "readily available alternative method of execution" which would "significantly reduce the risk of severe pain," and one which is used in several states to cause legally sanctioned death. The simple alternative, Banzhaf notes, and an alternative to using injectable drugs for executions generally - with the many legal and other challenges this method has faced, and will continue to face - is putting the condemned on the pill. Providing a condemned man with barbiturate pills to cause a quick and painless death - as is done in 'death with dignity' jurisdictions - is well tested, established, and accepted, does not require any trained personnel, and could avoid the many medical, legal, and other problems with lethal injections. And other current methods of execution, including unexpected adverse reactions, possible pain, finding a suitable vein, etc. suggests Professor Banzhaf, who takes no position on the fundamental issue of capital punishment. Interestingly, Arizona has approved the use of barbiturates for executions, but oddly only if they are injected. Barbiturate Pills Moreover, and more importantly, in at least eight states (California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington) and in the District of Columbia, physicians are permitted to prescribe barbiturate pills so that terminally ill (and often old and frail) patients can achieve death with dignity without any pain or other suffering. The pills for this purpose are readily available, do not expire quickly, do not require refrigeration as injectable drugs often do, nor do they cause adverse reactions to the elderly even though they are typically frail, and may also suffer from a wide variety of pre-existing medical conditions. "If this method of ending life is safe and appropriate for totally innocent and often frail elderly people with a wide variety of medical conditions who are seeking a quick and painless death with dignity, it should be more than good enough for murderers about to be executed for their crimes," Banzhaf argues. Since only a few grams of certain barbiturates are necessary to cause death, and pills are apparently much harder for drug companies to restrict than liquid injectable drugs, the amount necessary to cause a quick and painless death might be administered in the form of several easy-to-obtain pills offered by jailers to the murderer in the death chamber. Using these well-known, more readily available pills rather than injections or other methods for executions would probably mute most legal objections, avoid the major problems with injections highlighted by death penalty opponents, eliminate the need for medically trained personnel (who often refuse on ethical and/or professional grounds to give injections, or even to insert needles) to participate in executions, and have many other advantages, suggests Banzhaf. If the prisoner refuses to take the pills and/or cannot be forced to, or if he only pretends to swallow them, he can hardly complain about unconstitutional "cruel and unusual punishment," and/or about “a substantial risk of severe pain," if the state thereafter has no choice but to use lethal injections, or other arguably cruel or painful execution protocols, with all the possible risks involved. To paraphrase an old legal saying, the condemned had the key to his own freedom from pain in his own hands, says Banzhaf. In addition, since oral administration of pills takes longer for the drugs to reach the murderer's system than injections, and works far more slowly, this method of capital punishment is much less likely to trigger the sudden and sometimes violent reactions lethal injections have sometimes been said to cause, and which death penalty opponents always cite - often with great success in courts - to stop executions. If state governments don't take advantage of this simple and proven method to cause death without any pain, they can only expect further legal challenges by death penalty opponents who can probably then show, according to the existing legal standard, that current execution methods - including lethal injections and the electric chair - create substantial risks of harm relative to a viable alternative; that viable alternative being painless barbiturate pills, Banzhaf predicts......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkDec 17th, 2022

Alabama Unnecessarily Halts Third Execution Over Problems With Injections

Alabama Unnecessarily Halts Third Execution Over Problems With Injections; But There’s a Simple and Proven Solution to Stop the Many Legal Challenges Alabama Governor Orders State To Halt All Further Executions WASHINGTON, D.C. (November 23, 2022) – Alabama Governor Kay Ivey has ordered the state to halt all further executions; a decision made following the […] Alabama Unnecessarily Halts Third Execution Over Problems With Injections; But There’s a Simple and Proven Solution to Stop the Many Legal Challenges Alabama Governor Orders State To Halt All Further Executions WASHINGTON, D.C. (November 23, 2022) – Alabama Governor Kay Ivey has ordered the state to halt all further executions; a decision made following the recent cancellation of the execution Alan Eugene Miller because, after an hour of trying, prison personnel could not locate suitable veins for the lethal injection. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Henry Singleton Series in PDF Get the entire 4-part series on Henry Singleton in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q3 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more   This is reportedly the third consecutive lethal injection execution in Alabama to be riddled with problems and controversy, and there have been many more in the other states which execute murderers by lethal injection, and likewise suffered from a variety of problems with the injections. Indeed, Miller's was only the latest in a long string of bungled lethal injection executions. But there's a simple alternative to using lethal injections which would avoid all the problems with bungling injections and with meeting the new legal standard for executions, says public interest law professor John Banzhaf. This is important because the Supreme Court just held in June 2022 that murderers on death row can challenge their method of execution. Since the legal standard for challenging an execution is easily met with a well-recognized and generally accepted method for painlessly ending a life, the public should expect many more challenges to scheduled executions; including challenges, like many successful ones in the past, which significantly delay the imposition of justice, warns Banzhaf. An Alternative Method As Justice Elena Kagan explained in NANCE v. WARD, "In several recent decisions, this Court has set out rules for challenging a State’s proposed method of execution under the Eighth Amendment. To prevail on such a claim, a prisoner must identify a readily available alternative method of execution that would significantly reduce the risk of severe pain. In doing so, the prisoner is not confined to proposing a method authorized by the executing State’s law; he may instead ask for a method used in other States." Although this initial language might seem to suggest that a murderer challenging his execution may point only to an alternative measure already in use or authorized in a different state, other language strongly suggests that this other-state language is not a necessary requirement. For example, Kagan writes: "To succeed on that claim, the Court held in GLOSSIP, he must satisfy two requirements. First, he must establish that the State’s method of execution presents a 'substantial risk of serious harm'—severe pain over and above death itself. Second, and more relevant here, he 'must identify an alternative [method] that is feasible, readily implemented, and in fact significantly reduce[s]' the risk of harm involved." She goes on to write that In identifying an alternative method, the Court in BUCKLEW held, an inmate is “'not limited to choosing among those presently authorized by a particular State’s law.' The prisoner may, for example, 'point to a well-established protocol in another State as a potentially viable option.'" [emphasis added] The use of the word "may" clearly suggests that it is not a legal requirement for a challenge. Thus, if there is an alternative to using lethal injections to execute murderers which "reduce[s]” the risk of harm involved." the prisoner apparently may raise it to challenge his own execution, even if it is not authorized in a different state, argues Banzhaf. If, in fact, it is authorized to cause a painless death in one or more other states, that would simply make his argument and challenge stronger and more likely to be successful. The opinion went on to stress that the prisoner may challenge his execution even if it means a significant delay while the state, if it wishes and is able to do so, adopts by statute a new method of carrying out the death penalty; a step which gives death penalty opponents an additional opportunity to end executions. Thus the opinion states: "That remains true even where, as here, the proposed alternative is one unauthorized by present state law. Nance’s requested relief still places his execution in Georgia’s control. If Georgia wants to carry out the death sentence, it can enact legislation approving what a court has found to be a fairly easy-to-employ method of execution. Although that may take more time and effort than changing an agency protocol, Hill explained that the 'incidental delay' involved in changing a procedure is irrelevant to the vehicle question—which focuses on whether the requested relief would 'necessarily' invalidate the death sentence." Banzhaf notes that there is - and has long existed - a "readily available alternative method of execution" which would "significantly reduce the risk of severe pain," and one which is used in several states to cause legally sanctioned death. Using Injectable Drugs  The simple alternative, Banzhaf notes, and an alternative to using injectable drugs for executions generally - with the many legal and other challenges this method has faced, and will continue to face - is putting the condemned on the pill. Providing a condemned man with barbiturate pills to cause a quick and painless death - as is done in 'death with dignity' jurisdictions - is well tested, established, and accepted, does not require any trained personnel, and could avoid the many medical, legal. And other problems with lethal injections and other current methods of execution, including unexpected adverse reactions, possible pain, finding a suitable vein, etc. suggests Professor Banzhaf, who takes no position on the fundamental issue of capital punishment. Interestingly, Arizona has approved the use of barbiturates for executions, but oddly only if they are injected. Moreover, and more importantly, in at least eight states (California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington) and in the District of Columbia, physicians are permitted to prescribe barbiturate pills so that terminally ill (and often old and frail) patients can achieve death with dignity without any pain or other suffering. The pills for this purpose are readily available, do not expire quickly, do not require refrigeration as injectable drugs often do, nor do they cause adverse reactions to the elderly even though they are typically frail, and may also suffer from a wide variety of pre-existing medical conditions. "If this method of ending life is safe and appropriate for totally innocent and often frail elderly people with a wide variety of medical conditions who are seeking a quick and painless death with dignity, it should be more than good enough for murderers about to be executed for their crimes," Banzhaf argues. Since only a few grams of certain barbiturates are necessary to cause death, and pills are apparently much harder for drug companies to restrict than liquid injectable drugs, the amount necessary to cause a quick and painless death might be administered in the form of several easy-to-obtain pills offered by jailers to the murderer in the death chamber. Using these well-known, more readily available pills rather than injections or other methods for executions would probably mute most legal objections, avoid the major problems with injections highlighted by death penalty opponents, eliminate the need for medically trained personnel (who often refuse on ethical and/or professional grounds to give injections, or even to insert needles) to participate in executions, and have many other advantages, suggests Banzhaf. If the prisoner refuses to take the pills and/or cannot be forced to, or if he only pretends to swallow them, he can hardly complain about unconstitutional "cruel and unusual punishment," and/or about “a substantial risk of severe pain," if the state thereafter has no choice but to use lethal injections, or other arguably cruel or painful execution protocols, with all the possible risks involved. To paraphrase an old legal saying, the condemned had the key to his own freedom from pain in his own hands, says Banzhaf. In addition, since oral administration of pills takes longer for the drugs to reach the murderer's system than injections, and works far more slowly. This method of capital punishment is much less likely to trigger the sudden and sometimes violent reactions lethal injections have sometimes been said to cause, and which death penalty opponents always cite - often with great success in courts - to stop executions. If state governments don't take advantage of this simple and proven method to cause death without any pain, they can only expect further legal challenges by death penalty opponents who can probably then show. According to the existing legal standard, that current execution methods - including lethal injections and the electric chair - create substantial risks of harm relative to a viable alternative; that viable alternative being painless barbiturate pills, Banzhaf predicts......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkNov 23rd, 2022

Generational Poverty: How To Break The Cycle Of Poverty

Are you familiar with escape rooms? The only way you can escape is to solve a complicated problem. But what happens if you fail to escape the room on time? Having lost, you are then “imprisoned” in the room. OK, not literally. However, you will not be able to leave the room until a staff […] Are you familiar with escape rooms? The only way you can escape is to solve a complicated problem. But what happens if you fail to escape the room on time? Having lost, you are then “imprisoned” in the room. OK, not literally. However, you will not be able to leave the room until a staff member enters the room and shows you the clues you missed, walks you through the solution, and escorts you safely outside. .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Ray Dalio Series in PDF Get the entire 10-part series on Ray Dalio in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q3 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more   Find A Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn't have to be hard. SmartAsset's free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you're ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. What if the moderator never arrived and you were stuck waiting for your kids to figure the puzzle out? During your wait, all you have is what you brought into the room. As a result of generational poverty, it is as if you are locked in a room full of puzzles. In addition, you only have a limited time to escape before you are permanently imprisoned. As another way of putting it, generational poverty is the opposite of generational wealth. Instead of learning about finance and gaining a leg up in life, kids grow up living hand to mouth. In the United States, millions of people are affected by it. But is it possible to break the cycle of generational poverty? Well, let’s find out. What is Poverty? First, we must understand poverty overall in order to understand generational poverty. Poverty is a state of economic hardship. More specifically, it is a situation where people lack certain commodities that they need for their lives, such as money and material goods. As a result, poverty encompasses social, economic, and political aspects. Poverty is derived from the French word “poverté.” If you’re case, this translates to poor. Poverty is a complex concept. The reason? This is due to the many factors that influence it, such as geography, inequality, lack of education, or economic conditions. Listed below are some quick facts about poverty provided by Poverty USA: The poverty threshold for an individual is approximately $13000 per year, and for a family of four, it is roughly $26000 per year. The poverty rate in America is 11.4%, which corresponds to some 37 million people living in poverty. Poverty affects over 11 million children. The number of Americans living in deep poverty is 3 million. Nearly 93 million Americans live in poverty. In terms of poverty, there is a racial disparity. Approximately 20% of black families live in poverty, 17% of Hispanic families, and 10% of white and Asian families. families. Native Americans have the highest rate of poverty, at 25%. Moreover, in terms of social, economic, and political factors, there are many ways to identify poverty: Absolute poverty Poverty, which includes the lack of basic foods, clean water, health, shelter, education, and information, is also referred to as extreme poverty or abject poverty. In absolute poverty, there is a high death rate among children from preventable diseases like malaria, cholera, and water-borne diseases. In developed countries, absolute poverty is rare. Absolute poverty was introduced in 1990 to measure absolute poverty by the standards of the poorest countries in the world. The World Bank reset it to $1.90 a day in October 2015. Due to the controversy surrounding this number, each nation has its own measure of absolute poverty. As of 2022, the poverty threshold for individuals in the United States is $13,590. This amounts to $27,750 per year for a family of four. As defined by Robert McNamara, who was the president of the World Bank from 1968-1981, “It is a condition so limited by malnutrition, illiteracy, disease, squalid surroundings, high infant mortality, and low life expectancy as to be beneath any reasonable definition of human decency.” Relative poverty In social terms, it is the standard of living compared to those living in the surrounding area. In other words, it measures income inequality. An example of being poor is not having the money for vacations, buying presents for the kids at Christmas, or sending them to college. In general, relative poverty is measured as the portion of the population with incomes below a certain median income level. Furthermore, developed nations with wealth use it to assess poverty rates. In European Union, the “relative poverty measure is the most prominent and most–quoted of the EU social inclusion indicators.” Situational poverty This type of poverty occurs as a result of adverse events such as environmental disasters, job losses, and serious health problems. Even a small piece of assistance can make a difference since this type of poverty comes from unfortunate events. Generational poverty Individuals and families inherit it from one generation to the next. Since the people are trapped in the cause, there is no escape since they cannot access the tools needed to escape. “Generational poverty occurs in families where at least two generations have been born into poverty,” Eric Jensen writes in Teaching with Poverty in Mind. “Families living in this type of poverty are not equipped with the tools to move out of their situation.” Rural poverty Typically, it occurs in rural areas with populations below 50,000. Compared to other parts of the country, these areas have fewer job opportunities, fewer services, and less support for people with disabilities. In the surrounding areas, most people depend on farming and menial labor. “Most of the world’s poorest live in rural areas,” writes Homi Kharas, Constanza Di Nucci, Kristofer Hamel, and Baldwin Tong for Brookings. A total of 400 million rural people live in extreme poverty, which is greater than the combined numbers of Americans and Canadians living in extreme poverty. Approximately half of that population (approximately 200 million) lives in cities. Urban poverty Usually, it occurs in metropolitan areas with a population of over 50,000. Among the major challenges facing the urban poor are: There is limited access to health care and education. A lack of adequate housing and services. Due to overcrowding, the environment is violent and unhealthy. There are few or no mechanisms for social protection. “According to the World Poverty Clock’s projections, rural poverty is expected to decline by 100 million (or 26 percent) from 395 million to 293 million over the next decade, largely due to economic growth and rural-urban migration that is reducing the absolute size of the rural population in many countries,” the authors adds. “Urban poverty, on the other hand, is not expected to decline very much (from 203 million today to 200 million), due to the expected increase in urbanization over the next decade, especially in Africa.” Generational Poverty: A Closer Look The phrase ‘extreme poverty’ is usually associated with generational poverty: poor parents, poor children, and poor grandchildren. Like genetics, poverty seems to be passed down from generation to generation in this situation. As a result, these families tend to be trapped in poverty until an external influence can help them escape poverty. A family that has lived in poverty for at least two generations is considered impoverished, according to Urban Ventures. In many cases, families facing generational poverty have lived in poverty for a much longer period of time. When a particular change in life results in a reduction of income and support, such as losing a job, getting divorced, or losing a parent, a person or family can experience situational poverty. Situational poverty can have a domino effect, but families tend to remain hopeful, knowing it will only last a short time. With generational poverty, this is typically not the case. Key Factors Associated with Generational Poverty Hopelessness Generally, poverty is defined as being unable to meet basic living needs, explains Urban Ventures. As a result of generational poverty, families are also challenged by three other types of poverty: Educational Poverty Parental Poverty Spiritual Poverty Generational poverty sometimes results in the most damaging outcome – a perpetual sense of hopelessness made worse by the cumulative effects of these different types of poverty. One generation follows another in a cycle of hopelessness. In the absence of hope and the belief that life can be better, motivation and energy are insufficient to break the cycle. Surviving vs. Planning Generational poverty traps people in the cycle of survival. Their attention is focused on today’s issue/challenge. A person may need money for food, a place to live, help with family issues, or unresolved health problems. Every day presents a new problem. However, there is an air of urgency surrounding all of this. Most individuals don’t plan, unfortunately, in part because they believe they have sufficient control over their lives. Values and Patterns In contrast to those who have grown up middle class, those caught in generational poverty have very different values. There will be a greater focus on survival and short-term outcomes in generational poverty. The values of the middle class are generally those of education and work. They are also regarded as productive citizens. As a result of generational poverty, counterproductive traditions like low educational emphasis may also be passed down. What Causes Generational Poverty? It is often assumed that poor people are responsible for their own circumstances. Their limited budget is spent on junk food, cigarettes, and alcohol. Perhaps they could dig themselves out of poverty and provide a better future for their children if they saved that money. Or maybe they just need to work harder. Then again, saving anything you can is a good idea, but it won’t help them pay for college or buy a house if they save twenty dollars every week. It is more difficult to accept reality, however, because it involves acknowledging the systemic policies that perpetuate generational poverty. It’s true that some of those systems have given some of us an edge, but they’ve also limited some options for others. A society that prizes rugged individualism can make it hard to acknowledge all the support that helped us succeed. Examples include tax breaks, parental support, or even not having to overcome unconscious biases regarding race and gender. In short, generational poverty is caused by a number of factors. It is a multifaceted issue that is influenced by everything from racism to financial policies. However, generational poverty is heavily influenced by the following three factors. Inadequate education. Education determines a household’s wealth and well-being. Therefore, a lack of appropriate knowledge and skills is the primary reason why so many families cannot escape poverty. As an example, literacy, an essential skill for higher-paying jobs, is still absent in many remote and challenging regions of the world. In fact, UNESCO states that “about 124 million children today do not go to primary and lower-secondary school. Almost 2 in 5 who do finish primary school have not learned how to read, write or do simple arithmetic.” Furthermore, chronic absenteeism, defined as missing more than 10% of the school year, is higher in low-income areas. “The most alarming part is that multiple studies across various states show kindergartners to have the highest rate of absenteeism outside of high school students,” Marc Cutillo writes in Education Week. “Educators and policymakers have known for years that falling behind before 3rd grade has a high correlation not just with high school dropout rates, but with incarceration rates as well.” “Children this young are not playing hooky or uninterested in learning—five minutes alone with any 1st grader yields more questions than you can answer without jumping on Wikipedia,” he adds. “The reasons these children stay home can all be traced to poverty.” As a child falls behind in school, they have a greater likelihood of dropping out of school, being incarcerated, earning less in the future, or living in poverty later in life. Resources are not available Generational poverty is often characterized by psychological issues related to finances. For parents to make ends meet, they often work multiple jobs. This behavior is also a part of “the scarcity mindset.” This is a mental shift due to the perception of scarce resources, which traps people in a cycle of insecure thinking and struggle to obtain short-term goals. As a result of perceptions of scarce resources, this behavior is associated with “the scarcity mindset,” which traps people in a cycle of fear and insecurity. Since they are focused on surviving for the next few days or weeks, people trapped in poverty are unable to think about the future. A mindset like this doesn’t allow adults or kids to think about college, careers, or higher achievements. Whatever dreams they do have, they often feel unreachable, and their lot in life is just to survive. Additionally, this mindset and environment lead to a shortage of resources. Those who live in underserved areas may encounter difficulties when it comes to generating income. In addition, living in constant worry about money can cause toxic stress, which can affect learning, behavior, and overall health. There is a lack of determination As opposed to the previous two factors, this last one refers to an internal characteristic that determines why poverty persists through generations. The majority of people afflicted by generational poverty lack determination and have a rather pessimistic and passive outlook on poverty. “Perhaps more damaging in the long term are the findings on how people feel about themselves when they’re in poverty,” Dawn Foster writes in The Guardian. “They are less confident in their ability to succeed, leading to decreased professional and educational attainment, depression, and anxiety.” They also reported a ‘negative self-stereotyping effect, whereby people living in poverty absorbed media stereotypes of those on benefits or unemployed as lacking warmth and competence. “Believing themselves to be fundamentally flawed, any achievement is tempered by a lack of confidence and subconscious self-loathing.” A child raised in such an environment is at risk of developing “a condition in which children feel as if they have no power to change or control their circumstances,” notes Matt Repka in the Chicago Policy Review. “Children growing up in poverty find themselves in surroundings characterized by chaos, an absence of structure, and a perceived lack of control. Helplessness is then conditioned by continued exposure to uncontrollable, unpredictable stimuli.” Even so, stress and external factors may push people into a state of hopelessness and devastation. As a result of poverty and financial concerns, a 2017 study proved that cognitive function can be affected by these concerns: poor financial management, insensitive parents, and less efficient employees are among the counterproductive behaviors caused by poverty and finance concerns. How to Break the Poverty Cycle Cultivate an abundance mindset Changing a scarcity mindset is perhaps the biggest hurdle to overcoming generational poverty. You experience drained brain activity in your prefrontal cortex (the area of the brain associated with decision-making), like a computer attempting to handle too many tasks simultaneously. Decision-making takes longer, and stress and low confidence are more common. Planning for the long term becomes too demanding as well. Similarly, scarcity on a larger scale can influence mindsets and decision-making. In recent years, the ability to make decisions quickly has been weakened by events such as the 2008 financial crisis. In addition, the Coronavirus pandemic and economic uncertainty may have exacerbated the situation. The solution? Cultivating an abundance mindset If we adopt the opposite mindset, a growth mindset, we will experience increased performance and more flexibility in the brain, among other benefits. As soon as we take risks and successfully complete them, our brains release dopamine. This primes us to seek out more dopamine by increasing those growth behaviors that initiated the release of dopamine. That’s all well and good. What are the best ways to accomplish this? Here are some strategies you might find useful. Acceptance When you do this, you stop fighting where you are now with your precious limited resources. Taking stock of where you’ve been will help you know where you’re going. Self-compassion Regardless of what you have done in life up to this point, you should be proud of yourself for making it this far. Every habit or mindset you have today that you want to change once had a purpose or reason for existing. In short, be kind to yourself. It’s all about finding that one thing Don’t have enough money? There may be a great deal of love in your life, whether it comes from a spouse, parent, or friend. Your life is likely to include at least one abundant thing, regardless of how small it may be. Set your own definition of abundance. Everyone has a different definition of abundance and an abundance mindset. Depending on your perspective, abundance might be perceived as scarcity by another. Without knowing what you’re aiming for, it’s hard to get into the mindset of abundance. Start small Change your mindset, thereby making small changes. Have you been feeling the pinch on your bank account lately? Identify areas where you can save money by creating a budget. Getting rid of your Netflix subscription could save you $10 a month. Even if it seems small, it adds up. Mindfulness The scarcity mindset gets ingrained in our minds for obvious reasons. To survive, they constantly analyze what needs to be done. This takes us out of the present. Mindfulness can help us think more clearly by slowing down our brains through meditation or simply paying attention to the present moment. Journaling The act of journaling may help you identify areas where you are abundant and areas where you would like to become more abundant if you are struggling with defining abundance. Make education a priority In order to overcome poverty, you need an education. Do your best to succeed in school, but do not feel responsible for doing it alone. If you have a teacher, a tutor, a guidance counselor, an administrator, a mentor, friends, or family members who are interested in helping you achieve your educational goals, you should accept their assistance. You can develop your note-taking, studying, and test-taking skills with the help of teachers and other supportive individuals. You may be able to get accommodations or extra assistance if you struggle in certain areas, such as reading or math. Make a commitment to completing your high school education The greater your education, and, especially your diploma — the more likely you are to rise out of generational poverty. It isn’t necessary to complete a high school diploma as your ultimate educational goal. But it is certainly a good place to start. There is a significant difference in average lifetime earnings between people with high school diplomas and those without. It may be a good idea to set another goal, such as earning a college scholarship, depending on your situation. Or, you might set a goal to enter a trade school or apprenticeship program. Identify your post-educational goals and set them in action Due to the struggles they’re facing today, people stuck in a cycle of poverty often find it difficult to plan for or even think about their future. You can, however, navigate yourself out of poverty by planning for the future and setting goals. Again, education is vital here, as it both encourages you to think about the future and allows you to explore it. Think about how you want your life to be in 5, 10, or 20 years. Next, list both the obstacles and what you will need to do to succeed. Describe your future goals to those who can help you, such as teachers, coaches, or community mentors. Increase your financial literacy “When there is a financial crisis, you should always stop the bleeding of money,” writes Deanna Ritchie in a previous Due article. Buying a cup of coffee every morning or not packing a lunch. When left unchecked, these little everyday expenses can add up. “Of course, there are also much bigger problems than enjoying a daily latte,” says Deanna. “And that’s because you may not have basic money management skills.” For instance, you may not know where your money goes or curb unnecessary expenditures. The good news is that there are many tools and resources available to help improve your financial literacy. The best part? The majority of these are free. A number of financial blogs, such as Due, offer expert advice on everything from debt management to retirement planning. Besides blogs, you can also connect with others in similar situations by joining financial forums. Visit your local library and read books like You’re So Money: Live Rich, Even When You’re Not by Farnoosh Torabi or The Index Card: Why Personal Finance Doesn’t Have to Be Complicated by Helaine Olen and Harold Pollack.” Podcasts such as Bad With Money With Gaby Dunn and DIY Money provide useful personal finance information. Subscribe to Debt Free Millennials on YouTube if you’re a visual learner. When you have the time, you can also enroll in a financial course. FYI, Khan Academy offers 100% free personal finance classes. In addition, you can try a number of free online budgeting tools. You can use these tools to track your spending, automate savings, and reach your financial goals. You can even have some devices make intelligent suggestions, find better utility rates, and cancel unnecessary expenses. Leverage community resources Shifting your mindset and educating yourself are both excellent starting points. Let’s be honest, though. You can only go so far with these. At some point, it’s all about the opportunity. As comedian Trevor Noah says in his book Born a Crime, “People love to say, ‘Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he’ll eat for a lifetime.’ What they don’t say is, ‘And it would be nice if you gave them a fishing rod.'” In order to achieve mindset change, you need tools and support. Fortunately, your local community has resources to help you in this situation. Are you looking for financial advice or more active assistance? Would you like to learn how to start investing or understand your taxes? Need assistance in another area of finance? Rather than struggling alone, take advantage of the resources available to you. Even though reading books or articles can be great, it can sometimes be helpful to interact with people in person. The following places offer free or low-cost help: Nonprofit organizations, such as United Way or Home of Hope. The IRS Tax Assistance Center provides tax assistance specifically. Public libraries or schools. Community centers and churches. A number of these organizations provide tax preparation services, financial literacy education, and help with finding legitimate financial products. Sometimes they even provide one-on-one coaching in addition to hosting financial speakers. You might also consider hiring a certified financial educator, counselor, or advisor, who could assist you in improving your financial situation. Invest without fear It’s no secret that many people are afraid to invest. However, some populations are more affected than others. Among African Americans, for example, Prudential’s African American Financial Experience study found most people focus on debt reduction and household management. In addition, they may not be comfortable discussing topics such as investing and wealth transfer. Unfortunately, much of what is offered in financial literacy training is focused on budgeting and debt relief. Obviously, having a good grasp of these topics is essential for financial success. To build wealth, however, and to pass it from generation to generation, investing is a crucial component. So, how can you get over your fear of investing? To start, make every effort to live within your means. You can then use the money you’re saving to pat down debt or build an emergency fund. After that? Invest it. “I know that investing can give some of you a panic attack,” says Jeff Rose, founder of Good Financial Cents. “But, there are plenty of low-risk investment options out there. Some of my favorites include;” High-yield savings account. In addition to being federally insured, these savings accounts pay higher interest rates than the average savings account. Short-term bonds. In a short-term bond fund, investments are made in securities that are due within one‌ ‌to‌ ‌three‌ ‌years. ‌A commercial paper, a certificate of deposit, or a government security can be included in this category. TIPs. This a type of U.S. Treasury bond ‌that protects against‌ ‌inflation. Dividend-paying stocks. ‌With dividend stocks, you can generate another income source and gradually build your wealth. Preferred stocks. A preferred stock protects shareholders and gives dividends priority. Annuities. Once you’ve maxed out your other retirement accounts, buying an annuity offers a guaranteed lifetime income. With a rider, you can pass any remaining assets to your beneficiaries. Online real estate. Real estate can be purchased on these platforms for commercial or residential use. “Also, you can use robo-advisors to automate investments, such as Betterment, M1 Finance, or Wealthfront,” adds Jeff. Stimulate your mind and body You might feel like wasting your time on hobbies when you’re struggling just to get by. Children, teens, and young adults benefit most from activities that stimulate their minds and improve their moods — especially those that make them think and improve their moods. Crossword puzzles or free or low-cost activities like cooking, photography, or foreign language classes offered after school or at local community centers might be a good idea. When you’re struggling with poverty, spending money on fresh fruit and vegetables or taking time out to run may seem wasteful. However, in order to change your circumstances, you will need to strengthen your physical, mental, and emotional health. Utilize any before- or after-school food programs and school lunches available to you as a student. Getting advice on healthy food options from cafeteria staff, school nurses, or nutritionists is never a bad idea. Your food budget should be spent on fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins first, then fewer healthy options if necessary. When possible, take advantage of food assistance programs and farmer’s markets to save money. You don’t need to spend a fortune on exercise. For instance, a 30-minute brisk walk five times a week can have a significant health impact. Steer clear of predatory payday lenders From the name alone, a payday loan sounds like a one-day loan, doesn’t it? Getting sucked into the cycle of payday loans, however, can lead to years of paying off those loans. Payday loans are used by 12 million American adults each year. Annually, borrowers take out eight $375 loans and spend $520 in interest. As far as I’m concerned, those math equations just don’t add up. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, payday loans can cost you $10 to $30 per $100 borrowed. To put that another way, a two-week payday loan at a fee of $15 per $100 borrowed would result in a 400% Annual Percentage Rate (APR). For a sense of perspective, credit card APRs range from 12-30%. But are there any alternatives to credit or credit cards if you do not have access to credit? Paycheck advance Employees are often given the opportunity to receive their earnings before their paychecks are due. It may be possible for a company to pay an employee for seven days of work if the next paycheck is five days away. This is not a loan. Rather, at the end of the month, it will be deducted from your next paycheck. Borrow from family or friends. To get yourself out of trouble, borrowing money from friends or family is often the fastest and least expensive option. If you are going to take out a business loan, you would expect to pay a lower interest rate and have a longer payback period than two weeks. However, make sure this is a business deal that benefits both parties. Make sure the loan terms are clearly spelled out in the agreement to avoid any bad blood. Credit counseling Various nonprofit agencies offer free advice on setting up a budget and chipping away at debt, including InCharge Debt Solutions. InCharge credit counselors can connect you with resources in your area that can help with food, clothing, rent, and utility bills. Debt management plans Credit counseling agencies, such as the previously mentioned InCharge, offer debt management plans to reduce credit card debt for a monthly fee. Depending on your agreement, the creditor may offer the agency a lower interest rate. As a result of the agency paying the creditors, you have more money to pay your bills and reduce the amount of debt you owe. Debt settlement As a debt-relief option, debt settlement can be helpful if you’re struggling to keep up with unsecured debt (credit cards, hospital bills, personal loans). If you settle your debt, you will pay less than you owe, but it will damage your credit report and score greatly. Local charities and churches The number of charities and churches that are willing to offer free assistance when you hit a bump in the road is surprising. If you need help with a few hundred dollars, organizations like the United Way, Salvation Army, and church-sponsored ministries such as the St. Vincent de Paul Society may be able to help. Community banks and credit unions Local banks and credit unions are allowed to make smaller loans on easier terms than large regional or national banks. Comparing interest rates could save you 10%-12% as opposed to 400%-500% on payday loans. Peer-to-Peer Lending Check out peer-to-peer lending websites if you’re still having trouble finding a lender. Interest rates might be closer to 35% than 6% for those with great credit. At the same time, 35% remains better than the 391% from payday lenders. Find a mentor Take steps to overcome generational poverty by seeking help from a mentor. After all, fixing your finances doesn’t have to be a one-man show. Having a mentor can be extremely beneficial in finding a job that pays better and setting you on a path that is more lucrative. In terms of your career and finances, it is not easy to take the next step. It is even harder to see yourself as a successful person. But mentors can assist you in moving forward. You can transform your own life with the help of a mentor who can provide you with educational and informational resources. One organization that aims to provide career training and mentorship is Management Leadership for Tomorrow. Mentorship can help you learn from those who have come before you and get a leg up. As you improve your finances and take the next steps to grow your wealth, it can greatly shorten the learning curve. Keep your credit score in mind “Credit scores and history play a critical role in an individual’s ability to achieve economic security and build wealth in the U.S., but that opportunity is not easily attainable for communities of color,” states a report by CFSI. In the long run, having bad credit can cost you a lot of money, no matter who you are. Why? Poor credit can increase interest rates, car insurance costs, and make it difficult for you to borrow money. Additionally, credit problems could cost you more than just money. It can even affect your ability to qualify for certain jobs in many states. Approximately 95% of companies check potential employees’ backgrounds, according to a 2018 HR.com report. Also, 16% of companies pull credit or financial checks on all job candidates, and almost one-third do so for some candidates. Therefore, building your credit responsibly is one of the best ways to break the cycle of poverty. Depending on your situation, you can establish or rebuild your credit in several ways, such as: Pay all of your bills on time. This includes rent, utilities, and credit cards. If you have a credit card, try to pay more than the minimum payment. Don’t use more than 30% of your credit. For example, if you have a card with a $1,000 credit limit, you should never carry a balance over $300. Don’t open more than one credit account at a time. Avoid applying for a new credit card if you don’t think you’ll be approved. Use your credit cards at least once a year to avoid your accounts being closed for inactivity. Don’t give up hope When you grow up in generational poverty, you develop a fatalistic attitude. In other words, this is a mindset of “that’s just how it is” and “it will never change.” In some cases, you may even believe that poverty is your fault — if only you had worked harder, tried harder, and so on. But, holding these beliefs limits your ability to see an escape from poverty unnecessarily. Many people blame poverty solely on themselves. However, others blame others, such as the wealthy or the government. Some people do both. But, it won’t help you overcome poverty if you decide who to blame. Accept the fact that poverty is the result of a wide range of social, economic, environmental, political, and individual factors rather than assigning blame. When we understand why poverty exists, we can recognize potential ways out. Frequently Asked Questions About Generational Poverty Why does poverty still exist? For those born into poverty, breaking free from the cycle is nearly impossible. Poverty still exists for a number of reasons. Economics, cost of living, education, wages, health insurance, housing, transportation, and mental health all have an impact. What is generational poverty? Worldwide, millions of families live in poverty due to generational poverty. In general, poverty affects multiple generations when it becomes a family pattern for at least two generations. Generational poverty is different from situational poverty, in which a family experiences poverty briefly due to a crisis. Because of its intergenerational nature, people affected by it lack any means to change their situation for themselves or their children. How is poverty defined? In many cases, poverty is used as a relative term. A low-income family in America may be considered a middle-class family by the standard of living in another country, depending on that country’s economic environment and minimum wage. But globally, the standard definition of poverty is earning less than $1.90 per day. Living on this wage is extremely difficult. Yet surviving below the $1.90 per day poverty line is a reality for hundreds of millions of people around the world. Poverty isn’t just about economics Income alone does not determine global poverty or generational poverty. There are three dimensions to poverty, according to the Oxford Department of International Development: Health. Education. Living standards. Poverty can be caused by a lack of access to health care, education opportunities, affordable housing, nutritious food, clean water, or social services such as food stamps or Medicaid. It is rare for someone to be affected by only one of these dimensions of poverty. It is especially difficult to escape generational poverty due to its multidimensional nature. After all, there are still many obstacles standing in the way of someone even if they can overcome one dimension. It is also possible for generational poverty to perpetuate itself. When the parent of a low-income family struggles to make ends meet, the child knows only hardship. Often, it seems impossible to imagine a different future, and hope is smothered. What causes generational poverty? Poverty does not occur overnight. Many factors contribute to its development over time. Resources or education are lacking Education is the process by which people acquire the skills they need to pursue a profession, as described by Horace Mann as “the great equalizer.” Individuals cannot obtain the knowledge and training required for a well-compensated and fulfilling occupation without access to high-quality educational resources. Geography Sub-Saharan Africa is home to 27 of the world’s poorest countries, where 30% or more of the population lives in poverty. Compared to high-income countries, living in a low-income country presents its own set of obstacles. Social safety nets may not be provided to families in low-income countries, for example. The challenges of growing up in a high-income country are also significant. A report from the National Center for Children in Poverty notes that among Americans who were low- to middle-income in their youth, 12% to 13% remain in poverty in their twenties. Being unable to earn a living wage When families earn a livable wage, they can afford basic, everyday living expenses without relying on government assistance. Family members are unable to take advantage of opportunities to improve their circumstances if a livable wage is hard to come by. Minimal or no capital The term capital refers to wealth or assets that can be invested, produced, or used to generate income. In order to make money, you must first have money. Income growth is prevented, and generational poverty is perpetuated when there is no capital to begin with. A vulnerability to natural disasters. Environmental catastrophes like earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, and flooding can strike anywhere in the world. The devastation of natural disasters is intensified in some regions due to poor government, bad infrastructure, high population density, and unequal living conditions. And the poor often pay the highest price. When families live in poverty, natural disasters rob them of what they have, making recovery difficult and advancement difficult. As a result, generational poverty is perpetuated. Are Americans who experience poverty now better off than a generation ago? “Material deprivation is not as widespread in the United States as it was 30 or 40 years ago,” write Nancy K. Cauthen and Sarah Fass for the NCCP. “For example, few Americans experience severe or chronic hunger due in large part to public food and nutrition programs, such as food stamps, school breakfast, and lunch programs, and WIC (the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children).” Over time, Social Security contributed significantly to the reduction of poverty and economic insecurity among the elderly. With increased wealth and technological advances, ordinary families can afford larger homes, televisions, computers, cell phones, stereo equipment, air conditioning, and multiple cars. There is some debate as to whether or not a family with air conditioning or a DVD player is poor. The majority of Americans, however, consider cars, computers, TVs, and other technologies to be normal rather than luxury items. You need a car to commute to work and a computer for your children to keep up with their education. Remember Hurricane Katrina’s devastating effects as well. “Prior to the hurricane, New Orleans had one of the highest child poverty rates in the country — 38 percent (and this figure would be much higher if it included families with incomes up to twice the official poverty level),” the authors add. “One in five households in New Orleans lacked a car, and eight percent had no phone service.” In addition to the widespread social and economic isolation, displaced families and children suffered devastating effects from the hurricane as well. Often, families ignore the other types of resources they need to provide their children with a decent life, such as safe homes, good schools, good jobs, basic services, and life skills. Article by John Rampton, Due About the Author John Rampton is an entrepreneur and connector. When he was 23 years old, while attending the University of Utah, he was hurt in a construction accident. His leg was snapped in half. He was told by 13 doctors he would never walk again. Over the next 12 months, he had several surgeries, stem cell injections and learned how to walk again. During this time, he studied and mastered how to make money work for you, not against you. He has since taught thousands through books, courses and written over 5000 articles online about finance, entrepreneurship and productivity. He has been recognized as the Top Online Influencers in the World by Entrepreneur Magazine and Finance Expert by Time. He is the Founder and CEO of Due......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkOct 11th, 2022

Still Another Lethal Injection Execution Halted Unnecessarily

Still Another Lethal Injection Execution Halted Unnecessarily; A Simple Alternative Would End Them; Meet Supreme Court Test Another Lethal Injection Execution Halted WASHINGTON, D.C. (September 24, 2022) – Still another scheduled execution of a multiple murderer – this one just approved by Supreme Court by a narrow 5-4 vote – did not take place because […] Still Another Lethal Injection Execution Halted Unnecessarily; A Simple Alternative Would End Them; Meet Supreme Court Test Another Lethal Injection Execution Halted WASHINGTON, D.C. (September 24, 2022) – Still another scheduled execution of a multiple murderer – this one just approved by Supreme Court by a narrow 5-4 vote – did not take place because of still another problem with using lethal injections to try to cause a death without unnecessary pain. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Henry Singleton Series in PDF Get the entire 4-part series on Henry Singleton in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q2 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more   Alan Eugene Miller escaped justice because those in charge of carrying out the death sentence could not find a vein to inject him. His was only the latest in a long string of bungled lethal injection executions. But there's a simple alternative to avoid all the problems with meeting the new legal standard for executions, says public interest law professor John Banzhaf. The Supreme Court just held in June 2022 that murderers on death row can challenge their method of execution. Since the legal standard for challenging an execution is easily met with a well-recognized and generally accepted method for painlessly ending a life, the public should expect many more challenges to scheduled executions; including challenges, like many successful ones in the past, which significantly delay the imposition of justice, warns Banzhaf. As Justice Elena Kagan explained in NANCE v. WARD, "In several recent decisions, this Court has set out rules for challenging a State’s proposed method of execution under the Eighth Amendment. To prevail on such a claim, a prisoner must identify a readily available alternative method of execution that would significantly reduce the risk of severe pain. In doing so, the prisoner is not confined to proposing a method authorized by the executing State’s law; he may instead ask for a method used in other States." Although this initial language might seem to suggest that a murderer challenging his execution may point only to an alternative measure already in use or authorized in a different state, other language strongly suggest that this other-state language is not a necessary requirement. For example, Kagan writes: "To succeed on that claim, the Court held in Glossip, he must satisfy two requirements. First, he must establish that the State’s method of execution presents a 'substantial risk of serious harm'—severe pain over and above death itself. Second, and more relevant here, he 'must identify an alternative [method] that is feasible, readily implemented, and in fact significantly reduce[s]' the risk of harm involved." An Alternative Method She goes on to write that "In identifying an alternative method, the Court in Bucklew held, an inmate is “'not limited to choosing among those presently authorized by a particular State’s law.' The prisoner MAY, for example, 'point to a well-established protocol in another State as a potentially viable option.'" [emphasis added]The use of the word "may" clearly suggests that it is not a legal requirement for a challenge. Thus, if there is an alternative method of causing death which "reduce[s]” the risk of harm involved." the prisoner apparently may raise it to challenge his own execution, even if it is not authorized in a different state, argues Banzhaf. If, in fact, it is authorized to cause a painless death in one or more other states, that would simply make his argument and challenge stronger and more likely to be successful. The opinion went on to stress that the prisoner may challenge his execution even if it means a significant delay while the state, if it wishes and is able to do so, adopts by statute a new method of carrying out the death penalty; a step which gives death penalty opponents an additional opportunity to end executions. Thus the opinion states: "That remains true even where, as here, the proposed alternative is one unauthorized by present state law. Nance’s requested relief still places his execution in Georgia’s control. If Georgia wants to carry out the death sentence, it can enact legislation approving what a court has found to be a fairly easy-to-employ method of execution. Although that may take more time and effort than changing an agency protocol, Hill explained that the 'incidental delay' involved in changing a procedure is irrelevant to the vehicle question—which focuses on whether the requested relief would 'necessarily' invalidate the death sentence." Banzhaf notes that there is - and has long existed - a "readily available alternative method of execution" which would "significantly reduce the risk of severe pain," and one which is used in several states to cause legally sanctioned death. The simple alternative, Banzhaf notes, and an alternative to using injectable drugs for executions generally - with the many legal and other challenges this method has faced, and will continue to face - is putting the condemned on the pill. Barbiturate Pills "Providing a condemned man with barbiturate pills to cause a quick and painless death - as in 'death with dignity' jurisdictions - is well tested, established, and accepted, does not require any trained personnel. And could avoid the many medical, legal, and other problems with lethal injections and other current methods of execution, including unexpected adverse reactions and possible pain," suggests Professor Banzhaf, who takes no position on the fundamental issue of capital punishment. Interestingly, Arizona has approved the use of barbiturates for executions, but oddly only if they are injected. Moreover, and more importantly, in at least eight states (California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington) and in the District of Columbia, physicians are permitted to prescribe barbiturate pills so that terminally ill (and often old and frail) patients can achieve death with dignity without any pain or other suffering. The pills for this purpose are readily available, do not expire quickly, do not require refrigeration as injectable drugs often do, nor do they cause adverse reactions to the elderly even though they are typically frail, and may also suffer from a wide variety of pre-existing medical conditions. "If this method of ending life is safe and appropriate for totally innocent and often frail elderly people with a wide variety of medical conditions who are seeking a quick and painless death with dignity, it should be more than good enough for murderers about to be executed for their crimes," Banzhaf argues. Since only a few grams of certain barbiturates are necessary to cause death, and pills are apparently much harder for drug companies to restrict than liquid injectable drugs, the amount necessary to cause a quick and painless death might be administered in the form of several easy-to-obtain pills offered by jailers to the murderer in the death chamber. Using these well-known, more readily available pills rather than injections or other methods for executions would probably mute most legal objections, avoid the major problems with injections highlighted by death penalty opponents, eliminate the need for medically trained personnel (who often refuse on ethical and/or professional grounds to give injections, or even to insert needles) to participate in executions, and have many other advantages, suggests Banzhaf. If the prisoner refuses to take the pills and/or cannot be forced to, or if he only pretends to swallow them, he can hardly complain about unconstitutional "cruel and unusual punishment," and/or about “a substantial risk of severe pain," if the government thereafter has no choice but to use lethal injections, or other arguably cruel or painful execution protocols, with all the possible risks involved. To paraphrase an old legal saying, the condemned had the key to his own freedom from pain in his own hands, says Banzhaf. Likewise, since oral administration of pills takes longer for the drugs to reach the murderer's system than injections, and works far more slowly. This method of capital punishment is much less likely to trigger the sudden and sometimes violent reactions lethal injections have sometimes been said to cause, and which death penalty opponents always cite - often with great success in courts - to stop executions. If state governments don't take advantage of this simple and proven method to cause death without any pain, they can only expect further legal challenges by death penalty opponents who can probably then show, according to the existing legal standard, that current execution methods create substantial risks of harm relative to a viable alternative; that viable alternative being painless barbiturate pills, Banzhaf predicts......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkSep 26th, 2022

Ending Oklahoma’s New “Grotesque Execution-Spree”

Ending Oklahoma’s New “Grotesque Execution-Spree” – How Pills Can Stop “Botched Excruciatingly Painful Executions” Oklahoma’s State-Sponsored Execution Spree WASHINGTON, D.C. (September 9, 2022) – The Washington Post reports that Oklahoma is about to begin a “state-sponsored killing spree” by resuming “botched and excruciatingly painful executions” – “ordeals that have left condemned people writhing and moaning” […] Ending Oklahoma’s New “Grotesque Execution-Spree” – How Pills Can Stop “Botched Excruciatingly Painful Executions” Oklahoma’s State-Sponsored Execution Spree WASHINGTON, D.C. (September 9, 2022) – The Washington Post reports that Oklahoma is about to begin a “state-sponsored killing spree” by resuming “botched and excruciatingly painful executions” – “ordeals that have left condemned people writhing and moaning” – by using lethal injections to execute 25 murderers in the coming 28 months. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get Our Activist Investing Case Study! Get the entire 10-part series on our in-depth study on activist investing in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or print it out to read anywhere! Sign up below! (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q2 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more   CNN also noted this plan to resume, despite "the state's recent history of botched lethal injections." This new plan was triggered by a federal judge who recently rejected arguments that the lethal injection "drug cocktail" Oklahoma uses is unconstitutional because it constitutes "cruel and unusual punishment" since it leaves inmates able to feel pain during executions. The judge noted a 2018 Supreme Court case ruling that the Eighth Amendment doesn't guarantee a murderer a painless death. But the Supreme Court just held in June 2022 that murderers on death row can now challenge their method of execution - in this case by legal injection - even if success would require significant delay because the state would have to pass a new law authorizing a different method for ending his life. A ruling opening the door to new challenges likely to delay if not stop some executions by lethal injection, notes public interest law professor John Banzhaf, who suggests a simple solution. Since the legal standard for challenging an execution is easily met with a well-recognized and generally accepted method for painlessly ending a life, the public should expect many more challenges to scheduled executions; including challenges, like many successful ones in the past, which significantly delay the imposition of justice, warns Banzhaf. As Justice Elena Kagan explained in NANCE v. WARD, "In several recent decisions, this Court has set out rules for challenging a State’s proposed method of execution under the Eighth Amendment. To prevail on such a claim, a prisoner must identify a readily available alternative method of execution that would significantly reduce the risk of severe pain. In doing so, the prisoner is not confined to proposing a method authorized by the executing State’s law; he may instead ask for a method used in other States." Although this initial language might seem to suggest that a murderer challenging his execution may point only to an alternative measure already in use or authorized in a different state, other language strongly suggest that this other-state language is not a necessary requirement. For example, Kagan writes: "To succeed on that claim, the Court held in Glossip, he must satisfy two requirements. First, he must establish that the State’s method of execution presents a 'substantial risk of serious harm'—severe pain over and above death itself. Identifying An Alternative Method Second, and more relevant here, he 'must identify an alternative [method] that is feasible, readily implemented, and in fact significantly reduce[s]' the risk of harm involved." She goes on to write that "In identifying an alternative method, the Court in Bucklew held, an inmate is “'not limited to choosing among those presently authorized by a particular State’s law.' The prisoner MAY, for example, 'point to a well-established protocol in another State as a potentially viable option.'" [emphasis added] The use of the word "may" clearly suggests that it is not a legal requirement for a challenge. Thus, if there is an alternative method of causing death which "reduce[s]” the risk of harm involved." the prisoner apparently may raise it to challenge his own execution, even if it is not authorized in a different state, argues Banzhaf. If, in fact, it is authorized to cause a painless death in one or more other states, that would simply make his argument and challenge stronger and more likely to be successful. The opinion went on to stress that the prisoner may challenge his execution even if it means a significant delay while the state, if it wishes and is able to do so, adopts by statute a new method of carrying out the death penalty; a step which gives death penalty opponents an additional opportunity to end executions. Thus the opinion states: "That remains true even where, as here, the proposed alternative is one unauthorized by present state law. Nance’s requested relief still places his execution in Georgia’s control. If Georgia wants to carry out the death sentence, it can enact legislation approving what a court has found to be a fairly easy-to-employ method of execution. Although that may take more time and effort than changing an agency protocol, Hill explained that the 'incidental delay' involved in changing a procedure is irrelevant to the vehicle question—which focuses on whether the requested relief would 'necessarily' invalidate the death sentence." Banzhaf notes that there is - and has long existed - a "readily available alternative method of execution" which would "significantly reduce the risk of severe pain," and one which is used in several states to cause legally sanctioned death. Injectable Drugs The simple alternative, Banzhaf notes, and an alternative to using injectable drugs for executions generally - with the many legal and other challenges this method has faced, and will continue to face - is putting the condemned on the pill. "Providing a condemned man with barbiturate pills to cause a quick and painless death - as in 'death with dignity' jurisdictions - is well tested, established, and accepted, does not require any trained personnel. And could avoid the many medical, legal, and other problems with lethal injections and other current methods of execution, including unexpected adverse reactions and possible pain," suggests Professor Banzhaf, who takes no position on the fundamental issue of capital punishment. Interestingly, Arizona has approved the use of barbiturates for executions, but oddly only if they are injected. Moreover, and more importantly, in at least eight states (California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington) and in the District of Columbia, physicians are permitted to prescribe barbiturate pills so that terminally ill (and often old and frail) patients can achieve death with dignity without any pain or other suffering. The pills for this purpose are readily available, do not expire quickly, do not require refrigeration as injectable drugs often do, nor do they cause adverse reactions to the elderly even though they are typically frail, and may also suffer from a wide variety of pre-existing medical conditions. "If this method of ending life is safe and appropriate for totally innocent and often frail elderly people with a wide variety of medical conditions who are seeking a quick and painless death with dignity, it should be more than good enough for murderers about to be executed for their crimes," Banzhaf argues. Since only a few grams of certain barbiturates are necessary to cause death, and pills are apparently much harder for drug companies to restrict than liquid injectable drugs. The amount necessary to cause a quick and painless death might be administered in the form of several easy-to-obtain pills offered by jailers to the murderer in the death chamber. Using these well-known, more readily available pills rather than injections or other methods for executions would probably mute most legal objections, avoid the major problems with injections highlighted by death penalty opponents. Eliminate the need for medically trained personnel (who often refuse on ethical and/or professional grounds to give injections, or even to insert needles) to participate in executions, and have many other advantages, suggests Banzhaf. If the prisoner refuses to take the pills and/or cannot be forced to, or if he only pretends to swallow them, he can hardly complain about unconstitutional "cruel and unusual punishment," and/or about “a substantial risk of severe pain," if the government thereafter has no choice but to use lethal injections, or other arguably cruel or painful execution protocols, with all the possible risks involved. To paraphrase an old legal saying, the condemned had the key to his own freedom from pain in his own hands, says Banzhaf. Likewise, since oral administration of pills takes longer for the drugs to reach the murderer's system than injections, and works far more slowly, this method of capital punishment is much less likely to trigger the sudden and sometimes violent reactions lethal injections have sometimes been said to cause, and which death penalty opponents always cite - often with great success in courts - to stop executions. If state governments don't take advantage of this simple and proven method to cause death without any pain, they can only expect further legal challenges by death penalty opponents. Who can probably then show, according to the existing legal standard, that current execution methods - including lethal injections and the electric chair - create substantial risks of harm relative to a viable alternative; that viable alternative being painless barbiturate pills, Banzhaf predicts......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkSep 9th, 2022

15 Of The Most Common Money Wasters

Despite most people’s efforts to avoid debt and exceed their budget, it can be easy to overspend. Many common money wasters, however, lurk in the shadows, waiting to steal your money. So, let’s bring these money wasters into the light so that you banish them for good. Don’t be discouraged if you check every box […] Despite most people’s efforts to avoid debt and exceed their budget, it can be easy to overspend. Many common money wasters, however, lurk in the shadows, waiting to steal your money. So, let’s bring these money wasters into the light so that you banish them for good. Don’t be discouraged if you check every box on this list. After all, the average American wastes approximately $18,000 per year. In any case, it’s an opportunity to take stock of your expenses and identify where you may be wasting money. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Henry Singleton Series in PDF Get the entire 4-part series on Henry Singleton in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q2 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more   Bank Fees In the long run, even small fees, such as those for withdrawals from out-of-network ATMs or service charges for keeping a checking account, can add up. In fact, according to a Bankrate survey, non-interest checking accounts, excluding free checking accounts, had an average monthly fee of just over $5. What’s more, interest-bearing checking accounts had a fee of more than $16 for those who did not qualify for a waiver. So, the answer here is pretty straightforward. Change banks. It seems unlikely, but Bankrate reports that nearly half of checking accounts don’t charge monthly fees. And, unless you can avoid monthly fees with your current bank, you are likely paying more in fees than interest. Late Fees Late charges on credit cards typically range from $15 to $35. Ouch. Fees are also typically assessed for late payments on mortgages, utilities, and rent. Even returning Redbox movies a day late or not returning library books on time will result in pricey fees. In addition to costing you money, being late with your payments can hurt your credit too. Most lenders, however, do not report a late payment until it has been 30 days. Furthermore, credit cards often impose penalty APRs for late payments, which can dramatically increase your interest rate. Setting up autopay will help you pay the minimum balance by the due date if you have trouble getting payments out on time. Also, apps such as Mint can remind you when bills are due. Or, you can use your trusty calendar to notify you of upcoming payments. One more thing. A late payment may also be waived or removed from your credit report if you accidentally paid it late. If you have made one careless error and have a good track record of being on time, most companies won’t penalize you. Insurance You Don’t Need “This is one that often goes overlooked because many often think the more insurance, the better,” says Leslie Tayne, a debt-relief attorney at Tayne Law Group. “But certain forms of insurance are just not necessary for most people and can lead you to spend unnecessarily.” Tayne argues these insurance products are wasteful: Identity theft insurance is available if your credit card comes with fraud protection. This is true for most credit cards, such as the Citi® Double Cash Card. Children’s life insurance, since children rarely have assets to protect. A child life insurance policy often comes with a savings component called “cash value” that can be used for college or for a down payment on a new house. Still, the fees outweigh the rates of return, so as a parent, it is better to invest your money somewhere else. It’s more important to start a 529 savings plan or to create a fund to cover your child’s costs in case of an emergency. Rental car insurance is available if your traditional car insurance extends to rental cars. Collision insurance for older, low-value cars. Collision coverage might not be necessary, depending on your deductible and damage. Travel insurance is provided by your credit card if you book your travel on that card. You should contact your card issuer to see if your card covers trip cancellations and lost luggage, such as the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card and Chase Sapphire Reserve®. Ghost Subscriptions There is no doubt that subscriptions are easy to obtain online. But they are equally easy to forget to cancel. In fact, Chase found in an April 2021 survey that nearly two-thirds of consumers forgot at least one recurring payment.​ In addition to avoiding late fees, automatic payments can be convenient, such as those for utility bills. However, others can cost you a lot of money in the long run. For example, a subscription to investment-information service Morningstar runs $34.95 monthly and $249 annually. Keeping that subscription should be a no-brainer if you are an inactive user. However, for any unused subscription, you should cancel it ASAP. After all, you don’t want to get hit with a costly auto-renew. To make this less of a hassle, sign up for a service like Truebill or Trim. These tools monitor your bank or credit card statement to see which subscriptions can be cut. Credit Card Interest According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Americans pay an average of $1,000 per year in high-interest debt and credit card fees. The use of credit cards can be beneficial, like improving your credit score and earning discounts and cashback. In spite of this, carrying a balance can put a strain on your finances. In other words, if you are in debt, focus on paying down your existing balance and put your cards on hold. If you do make a purchase, make sure that you’re able to pay off the balance. For example, only buy a pair of concert tickets for $150 if you can pay that off in full. Energy Vampires A device that consumes energy even after it has been turned off is called an energy vampire, explains Duke Energy. Your home is full of them, including phone chargers, cable boxes, and coffee makers. It’s estimated that 20% of your monthly electricity bill is accounted for by these phantom energy suckers. Typical energy vampires include “bricks” and “wall warts”: Devices that have a large plug, such as cellphone chargers, are called wall warts. Even when not in use, it consumes energy. The brick is a small black box found on laptop computers, televisions, and some cable TV equipment cords. These bricks continuously consume energy if left plugged in. How can you control energy vampires? Well, for starters, you can unplug devices that you don’t use often. Plugging wall warts and bricks into power strips and turning them off when not in use is another suggestion. Not Adjusting Your Thermostat Obviously, you want your home to be set at a comfortable temperature. However, do you really need the house to be 72 degrees when you’re away for the whole day? The U.S. Department of Energy says you can save up to 10 percent a year by simply adjusting your thermostat 7 to 10 degrees from its normal setting for eight hours a day. The house can be heated (or cooled) to the temperature you prefer before you get home with a programmable thermostat. To avoid ghost readings – unnecessarily high or low temperatures – locate the thermostat properly. Ideally, the thermostat should be installed on an interior wall away from direct sunlight, drafts, and windows. ​ Plumbing Issues Leaking faucets and toilets can keep you awake at night as well as cost you money. Take the example of a bathroom faucet that drips at the rate of 10 drops every minute. The U.S. Geological Survey’s drip calculator calculates that three leaking faucets would drip 43,200 gallons of water per day at that rate. Despite the fact that water is relatively cheap, that’s still a lot of water. In most cases, 1,042 gallons would cost approximately $1.50. ​Running toilets, however, can be a real water guzzler. In the average household, leaky toilets waste about 200 gallons of water per day, or approximately 6,000 gallons per month, or $108 a year. Repairing a leaky toilet costs, on average, $18.55 per toilet, with a range of $17.36 to $19.75. On the flip side, labor and materials result in a total of $223.63 per toilet, ranging from $202.77 to $244.49. Food Waste According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, 40% of food produced in the United States is never consumed. Sometimes, that happens. We all have bad apples that need to be tossed. However, you can reduce food waste by doing the following courtesy of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: Buy only what you need. Prepare your meals in advance. And, ensure you stick to your grocery list and avoid impulse purchases. Pick ugly fruit and vegetables. Often, fruits and vegetables with odd shapes or bruises are thrown away since they don’t meet arbitrary aesthetic standards. However, they still taste the same. Store food wisely. Your cupboard or fridge should be organized so that older products are at the front and new ones at the back. Make sure open food is stored in airtight containers in the fridge and that packets are closed to prevent insects from getting into them. Love your leftovers. You can freeze leftovers or use them in another meal if you don’t eat everything you make. Start small. Share large dishes at restaurants or take smaller portions at home. Unclaimed 401(k) Matches You can add significant value to your nest egg by contributing to a 401(k) or similar employer-sponsored retirement plan, notes FINRA. For example, if you earn $40,000 and contribute $1200 to your 401(k), you are 30 years old, earn $40,000, and contribute 3 percent of your salary to your 401(k). If you make the same salary and contribute the same amount each year until 65, let’s assume you make the same contribution. In 35 years, your 401(k) will have earned you $42,000. Consider what would happen if your employer offered you a match. Typically, the match is dollar-for-dollar up to 3 percent of the employee’s salary. Even if your investment value does not increase, you will have set aside $84,000 by the time you retire, which is a doubled savings amount. Take a look at it this way: you can contribute 100 percent more at no cost. Sadly, a 2015 study found that one in four employees don’t invest enough in 401(k)s to earn a full employer match. Employees who failed to earn the match ended up wasting $1,336 of their own money. Missing out on this money will leave you with no financial security in the future. Talk to your company’s human resources or accounting to find out what the employer match is, and then increase your automated investments in your 401(k) to get at least the full match. Mutual Fund Fees An expense ratio, or percentage, represents your overall investment in a mutual fund, explains NextAdvisor. For actively managed funds, they typically range from .5% to 1.5%, and for passively managed funds, they typically range from .2% to .4%. Generally speaking, any fee greater than 1% should be avoided. A mutual fund with a 1% expense ratio, for instance, will cost you $10 for $1,000 invested. Despite its small size, it adds up over time. In general, experts recommend fees under .2%, and anything over 1% can eat into your long-term investment earnings. Fees that are over 1.5%, and certainly over 2%, are not worth the hassle. The low fees of passively managed funds are one of the reasons experts recommend them, as many have fees under .2%. Not Using Available Discount Code or Coupon “One of the biggest ways people waste money is by paying full price instead of looking for discounts or ways to lower the price of an item before purchasing,” said Rebecca Gramuglia, consumer expert at TopCashback. “By skipping this step, you may be spending more money than needed, and that extra money could have gone towards another purchase or your savings fund.” Extended Warranties Almost everything from televisions to appliances to vehicles comes with an extended warranty. Despite the fact that you may think you are being financially responsible by purchasing an extended warranty, the truth is that extended warranties are usually not worth the money. In general, extended warranties exclude the most common problems in their fine print. In addition to extended warranties, manufacturers also provide free coverage as part of their warranty plans. As a result, the FTC warns that many extended warranties aren’t worthwhile. A better option? If your possessions break, you would be better off saving for the cost of repairs or replacements instead of buying an extended warranty. Gas Hogs Be honest. Does your vehicle really need premium gas? It’s unlikely unless your car’s maker tells you otherwise. Most major gasoline brands have additives to keep your engine sparkling, so the occasional tank of premium won’t do the trick. Typically, turbochargers and high-compression engines are common reasons why certain cars need premium gas.​ ​Other ways to save fuel and money: ​ Make sure your tires are properly inflated. Make sure your tires are properly inflated to improve your gas mileage by up to 3 percent. ​Take it easy on the gas and brakes. According to the Department of Energy, gas mileage rapidly declines when you drive over 50 mph, costing you approximately $0.23 extra per gallon. ​Get your engine tuned. It has been reported that fixing a serious problem, such as a broken oxygen sensor, can increase your mileage by as much as 40 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. ​ Unclaimed Tax Deductions According to IRS data, about 20% of taxpayers qualify for earned income tax credits but fail to claim them. Not only this, but other tax credits go unclaimed as well. In addition to choosing the wrong filing status, taxpayers make all kinds of tax mistakes, such as itemizing their deductions or claiming the standard deduction. You can use online tax programs to help you catch deductions and credits that you should be eligible for. In complex tax situations, such as when itemizing for the first time or starting a business, hiring a tax professional may help you maximize your tax savings. Frequently Asked Questions Do I need this? To live on a budget, save money, and achieve your goals, you must distinguish between a want and a need. A “need” is a necessity. In budgeting, necessities include rent, mortgage, utilities, food, and transportation. The term ‘Want’ more accurately describes something that you would like to splurge on. More specifically, it’s something you save up for and anticipate buying. Is there a way I can save money by buying this somewhere else? Be persistent in your search for a better price. Take out your smartphone, tablet, or laptop and compare prices. Be sure to take into account rebate/cashback programs and store loyalty rewards. I personally get money back through cashback programs every time I shop. In addition, I still earn rewards from the store and use them for savings in the future. Using your resources together will save you the most money. For seasonal products, be sure to research. You can save hundreds of dollars by searching “Best time to buy” on Google. Do I have the money to cover this? Despite common sense, some people are unaware of their account balance. After all, you cannot buy it if you lack the money. And, if you don’t have the funds to cover the purchase, you probably don’t have enough to pay off your credit card balance if you charge it. In short, don’t make purchases unless it’s in your budget. If you don’t save the money until you do. Is there anything else I could do with this money? What monthly bills do you have to pay, such as utilities, rent, mortgage, and insurance? Be sure to include the latest bills in your budget as well. Your bank statement may just contain something you forgot you committed to every month. Are you fully funded for an emergency? Are you debt-free? Article by John Rampton, Due About the Author John Rampton is an entrepreneur and connector. When he was 23 years old, while attending the University of Utah, he was hurt in a construction accident. His leg was snapped in half. He was told by 13 doctors he would never walk again. Over the next 12 months, he had several surgeries, stem cell injections and learned how to walk again. During this time, he studied and mastered how to make money work for you, not against you. He has since taught thousands through books, courses and written over 5000 articles online about finance, entrepreneurship and productivity. He has been recognized as the Top Online Influencers in the World by Entrepreneur Magazine and Finance Expert by Time. He is the Founder and CEO of Due......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkAug 25th, 2022

Justices Give Murderers More Rights To Stop Executions 

Justices Give Murderers More Rights To Stop Executions; Many Challenges Already Have Been Successful, But There’s a Simple Remedy Murderers Can Now Challenge Their Method Of Execution WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 23, 2022) – The Supreme Court has just held, 5-4, that murderers on death row can now challenge their method of execution – in this case […] Justices Give Murderers More Rights To Stop Executions; Many Challenges Already Have Been Successful, But There’s a Simple Remedy Murderers Can Now Challenge Their Method Of Execution WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 23, 2022) – The Supreme Court has just held, 5-4, that murderers on death row can now challenge their method of execution – in this case by legal injection – even if success would require significant delay because the state would have to pass a new law authorizing a different method for ending his life. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get Our Activist Investing Case Study! Get the entire 10-part series on our in-depth study on activist investing in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or print it out to read anywhere! Sign up below! (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q1 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Since the legal standard for challenging an execution is easily met with a well-recognized and generally accepted method for painlessly ending a life, the public should expect many more challenges to scheduled executions; including challenges, like many successful ones in the past, which significantly delay the imposition of justice, warns public interest law professor John Banzhaf. As Justice Elena Kagan explained in NANCE v. WARD, "In several recent decisions, this Court has set out rules for challenging a State’s proposed method of execution under the Eighth Amendment. To prevail on such a claim, a prisoner must identify a readily available alternative method of execution that would significantly reduce the risk of severe pain. In doing so, the prisoner is not confined to proposing a method authorized by the executing State’s law; he may instead ask for a method used in other States." Although this initial language might seem to suggest that a murderer challenging his execution may point only to an alternative measure already in use or authorized in a different state, other language strongly suggest that this other-state language is not a necessary requirement. For example, Kagan writes: "To succeed on that claim, the Court held in Glossip, he must satisfy two requirements. First, he must establish that the State’s method of execution presents a 'substantial risk of serious harm'—severe pain over and above death itself. Second, and more relevant here, he 'must identify an alternative [method] that is feasible, readily implemented, and in fact significantly reduce[s]' the risk of harm involved." She goes on to write that "In identifying an alternative method, the Court in Bucklew held, an inmate is “'not limited to choosing among those presently authorized by a particular State’s law.' The prisoner MAY, for example, 'point to a well-established protocol in another State as a potentially viable option.'" [emphasis added] The use of the word "may" clearly suggests that it is not a legal requirement for a challenge. Thus, if there is an alternative method of causing death which "reduce[s]” the risk of harm involved." the prisoner apparently may raise it to challenge his own execution, even if it is not authorized in a different state, argues Banzhaf. If, in fact, it is authorized to cause a painless death in one or more other states, that would simply make his argument and challenge stronger and more likely to be successful. A New Method Of Carrying Out The Death Penalty The opinion went on to stress that the prisoner may challenge his execution even if it means a significant delay while the state, if it wishes and is able to do so, adopts by statute a new method of carrying out the death penalty; a step which gives death penalty opponents an additional opportunity to end executions. Thus the opinion states: "That remains true even where, as here, the proposed alternative is one unauthorized by present state law. Nance’s requested relief still places his execution in Georgia’s control. If Georgia wants to carry out the death sentence, it can enact legislation approving what a court has found to be a fairly easy-to-employ method of execution. Although that may take more time and effort than changing an agency protocol, Hill explained that the 'incidental delay' involved in changing a procedure is irrelevant to the vehicle question—which focuses on whether the requested relief would 'necessarily' invalidate the death sentence." Banzhaf notes that there is - and has long existed - a "readily available alternative method of execution" which would "significantly reduce the risk of severe pain," and one which is used in several states to cause legally sanctioned death. The simple alternative, Banzhaf notes, and an alternative to using injectable drugs for executions generally - with the many legal and other challenges this method has faced, and will continue to face - is putting the condemned on the pill. "Providing a condemned man with barbiturate pills to cause a quick and painless death - as in 'death with dignity' jurisdictions - is well tested, established, and accepted, does not require any trained personnel, and could avoid the many medical, legal, and other problems with lethal injections and other current methods of execution, including unexpected adverse reactions and possible pain," suggests Professor Banzhaf, who takes no position on the fundamental issue of capital punishment. Interestingly, Arizona has approved the use of barbiturates for executions, but oddly only if they are injected. Moreover, and more importantly, in at least eight states (California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington) and in the District of Columbia, physicians are permitted to prescribe barbiturate pills so that terminally ill (and often old and frail) patients can achieve death with dignity without any pain or other suffering. The pills for this purpose are readily available, do not expire quickly, do not require refrigeration as injectable drugs often do, nor do they cause adverse reactions to the elderly even though they are typically frail, and may also suffer from a wide variety of pre-existing medical conditions. "If this method of ending life is safe and appropriate for totally innocent and often frail elderly people with a wide variety of medical conditions who are seeking a quick and painless death with dignity, it should be more than good enough for murderers about to be executed for their crimes," Banzhaf argues. Since only a few grams of certain barbiturates are necessary to cause death, and pills are apparently much harder for drug companies to restrict than liquid injectable drugs, the amount necessary to cause a quick and painless death might be administered in the form of several easy-to-obtain pills offered by jailers to the murderer in the death chamber. Using these well-known, more readily available pills rather than injections or other methods for executions would probably mute most legal objections, avoid the major problems with injections highlighted by death penalty opponents, eliminate the need for medically trained personnel (who often refuse on ethical and/or professional grounds to give injections, or even to insert needles) to participate in executions, and have many other advantages, suggests Banzhaf. If the prisoner refuses to take the pills and/or cannot be forced to, or if he only pretends to swallow them, he can hardly complain about unconstitutional "cruel and unusual punishment," and/or about “a substantial risk of severe pain," if the government thereafter has no choice but to use lethal injections, or other arguably cruel or painful execution protocols, with all the possible risks involved. To paraphrase an old legal saying, the condemned had the key to his own freedom from pain in his own hands, says Banzhaf. Likewise, since oral administration of pills takes longer for the drugs to reach the murderer's system than injections, and works far more slowly, this method of capital punishment is much less likely to trigger the sudden and sometimes violent reactions lethal injections have sometimes been said to cause, and which death penalty opponents always cite - often with great success - to stop executions. If state governments don't take advantage of this simple and proven method to cause death without any pain, they can only expect further legal challenges by death penalty opponents who can probably then show, according to the existing legal standard, that current execution methods - including lethal injections and the electric chair - create substantial risks of harm relative to a viable alternative; that viable alternative being painless barbiturate pills, Banzhaf predicts. Updated on Jun 23, 2022, 2:53 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkJun 24th, 2022

Impossible Foods CEO Peter McGuinness Has Beef With How the Media Portrays Plant-Based Meat

He took out a full-page ad in the New York Times to bust myths about plant-based meat. In 2023, TIME will once again recognize 100 businesses making an extraordinary impact around the world. Applications for the TIME100 Most Influential Companies of 2023 are open, now through March 1, 2023. Apply here. Peter McGuinness is hopping mad. After a recent BusinessWeek cover story slammed plant-based meat as an unappealing fad that’s losing its sizzle, McGuinness, CEO of Impossible Foods, says it took him “a New Jersey minute” before he decided to come out fighting. Just days after the story was published, McGuinness took the extraordinary step of buying a full-page ad in the New York Times, poking fun at the naysayers. And that was just the beginning. “There are a lot of myths and misconceptions out there. But the fact is, we are growing,” says the Garden State native who joined Impossible last April. “We’re in a category that is in first gear. It hasn’t even been created yet, and people are trying to say that it’s the death of it, or it’s a fad. In the beginning, the internet was a fad. In the beginning, cars were a fad and horses were going to stay. Electric cars were a fad. I just don’t like the implication, nor do I think it’s accurate.” [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] As soon as I saw the dust-up last week, I wanted to talk to McGuinness and give him a chance to air his grievances. He and the Oakland, Calif.-based company have claimed for years that plant-based meat is healthier for people and better for the planet. But plant-based meats are also more expensive than their animal meat competition—and that was true even before the recent surge of inflation we’ve all endured. Perhaps owing to that pressure on household food budgets, meat alternatives, as a category, have seen slower growth lately. Even so, McGuinness and Impossible deserve some credit for expanding its reach amid the pandemic and other challenges. The company’s retail sales jumped 50% in 2022. And by volume, its flagship Impossible Beef outpaced all other plant-based meat brands in the U.S. Its brand recognition among consumers is increasing as well, despite a lack of sustained advertising or marketing. One reason for that, perhaps: Its burgers, sausage links, meatballs, and chicken patties are on the menu at Burger King, Starbucks, and on Delta and United Airlines flights. McGuinness shared his thoughts with me last week, opining on his battle with skeptics, the high price of plant-based meat (which he says will come down soon), and his favorite way to eat Impossible meatballs. (For coverage of the future of work, visit TIME.com/charter and sign up for the free Charter newsletter.) This conversation has been condensed and edited for clarity. Most people in your position simply ignore bad press. Why did you feel you had to respond publicly to the BusinessWeek piece? Look, as a leader in the category, I think we’re there to defend, support and try and build the category. I thought it was relatively one-sided. There are two sides to every story. What we did in the New York Times was just telling the other side of the story, and there are people with other points of view. We made a decision to carry the torch for the category. We’re a very mission-oriented, conscious company. So when the category gets piled on, I do want to tell the other side of that. You have a $7 to $8 billion global category of plant-based meat that’s been around for 20 years, and it’s a fad? I mean, 90% of the people who eat our plant-based meat, eat animal meat. So we’re not a vegan company. We’re not a vegetarian company. We’re making products that stand up against the animal products that taste great, that are better for you and better for the planet. I believe it’s yet to be built and created. Despite Impossible’s sales growth, data shows the plant-based meat category has been plateauing lately. What’s happening there? Couple problems with that. One, what is the category of plant-based meat? What are you putting in there? We don’t believe that we are in that Nielsen defined category with veggie burgers and mushroom burgers. We don’t have a problem with them, but that’s not what we’re trying to do. We want to displace the animal analog. And in doing so, we want to save water, trees and avoid [greenhouse gasses]. And in doing so, we want people to have an animal meat-like experience, but have 33% less saturated fat and zero cholesterol. And so that’s a different category. So, you want to throw Impossible in that category? I object to that. If you’re trying to convince a hardcore, meat-loving friend to try out Impossible, what would be your main approach? You’ve got to start with taste. Taste, texture, flavor. And what do we hear from every animal lover? ‘That tastes much better than I thought. That’s a pretty good burger.’ It’s the same reaction we get every time. And by the way, that’s how we do our taste tests. We taste everything against the animal equivalent, not a plant-based equivalent. And our aspiration is not to be the best plant based. I want a great burger. I don’t want a great plant-based burger. And then you get into the nutritional profile. It is zero trans fat, zero cholesterol. So you’re eating zero-cholesterol beef. No matter who you are—you’re crazy educated, you’re less educated, you’re rich, you’re less rich, you’re in the middle of the country, you’re on the coast—I don’t think people love cholesterol. So cholesterol-free meat that tastes damn good? Sounds pretty good to me. And then look, depending on the people, you can then talk about the planet. And it’s undeniable. And that’s why I get frustrated about, “Hey, the category is dead.” Right now, we have 17% awareness. So 83% of the country’s never even heard of us. We have 5% household penetration; 95% of the country hasn’t even tried us yet, and we’re still growing at those growth rates. We’re not even in second gear yet. One in two repeat because they have a positive experience. And those are animal eaters. Those are not vegetarians and vegans. (To receive weekly emails of conversations with the world’s top CEOs and business decisionmakers, click here.) In preparation for this interview, my wife and I went out to our local supermarket but had a hard time finding the product. We looked first in the veggie burger area. It wasn’t with those products. Then we looked in the meat section. It wasn’t there. Turns out, it had its own refrigeration case at the back of the store. Are you hearing that people are having trouble finding your products in stores? It’s a challenge. Listen, it gets merchandised in different places with different banners. ShopRite does it differently, Stop & Shop, Kroger, Walmart, depending on where you are. Our preference, and we push grocery stores to do it, is put it right next to the animal. Yes, tertiarily, you can put it in vegan or vegetarian. But if we’re going after someone who eats animal protein, they’re not going to be in the vegan set. So they’re not going to see us. We’re working on that and it’s getting better. It’s a bit of a treasure hunt to find it, which we’re working on aggressively. Impossible hasn’t done any sustained advertising or marketing to grow awareness, to entice new customers. Is that a strategy you’re rethinking? Will it change going forward? Yes, it’s very much in the plan for ’23 and ’24, to do sustained, compelling advertising and marketing. So we just hired our first ever chief demand officer. Basically, all demand functions—from corporate communications to product commercialization, to packaging, to marketing, to advertising, to pricing, category management, retail execution—it’s all under one demand leader. One budget, no fiefdoms. So those are big pieces and we’ve allocated dollars to invest. We’ll spend more in ’23 than we’ve ever spent in marketing and advertising. And we’ll spend more in ’24 than in ’23. It’s a very big part of our plan. When you have low household penetration—5%—you’ve got to get it more available, more accessible, more approachable. I think the category’s done a lousy job of explaining and marketing itself. It’s been bi-coastal or it’s been upper income. This has to be mass. Have it at a ballpark, have it on a July 4th on the grill. Inflation is a huge issue for consumers and plant-based meat was already more expensive than real meat. Has inflation hurt the growth of your products? Do you think the prices might come down to compete with real meat? It’s a great question. I think inflation affects every category because so many manufacturers have increased prices because their input costs have gone up. We haven’t. If you look over the past two and a half years, as we’ve scaled, we’ve come down 23% in price in two and a half years. The animal has gone up 22% in price because it’s inefficient protein. Animals drink a ton of water. They eat a ton of food, which, by the way, grain and feed is way up. Then you have to slaughter them. That’s heavy labor factories, and then you have to ship it everywhere, with fuel costs up. We’re way more efficient. This is another myth: Plant-based meat is killing farmers. I was in Decatur two months ago, in Illinois, where all of our soy is grown. We are pro-farming. That soy goes to three factories in the U.S. And we turn that soy into ground beef. It’s a simple, efficient process. And so to answer your question, I predict we’ll continue to come down as volume grows. And then the other misconception is that we’re more expensive than everything. It’s not the case on chicken nuggets. It’s not the case if you look at our ground beef. We’re, in many cases, less expensive than organic ground beef and we’re less expensive than grass fed ground beef. What do you say to critics who claim you’re trying to take away their burgers—trying to take away their beef? We’re not taking away anything. We’re just adding an option. If you want to try the option, great. People want better options. People want choice. We’re not marketing against or trying to take anything away. And we’re going to continually improve our products. We’re on beef 2.5. We’ve only been around for five years and we think our food stacks up quite well. But what I will tell you is we’re working aggressively on 3.0 versions of our products. We love our current products, but we can even get them better in terms of taste, texture, flavor, nutrition. We’re a restless, fanatical product company. We love our products and always think there’s room to improve them. That’s a lot of research and development spending, though. Is that going to hurt efforts to bring the price down? No. And when you say it’s a lot of R&D, it’s improving our existing products. So that’s easier than coming up with brand new, frontier stuff. And in doing so, we’re going to make the taste, texture, flavor, and nutrition profile better. We also want that to come in more economically where we can pass that on to the consumer as well. What’s your favorite Impossible product, and what’s your favorite way to prepare it? We make a meatball—it’s 50% “pork” and 50% “beef.” It’s a home style meatball, and I love it with spaghetti and sauce, but my favorite way to eat it is a beautiful, fresh hoagie sub. Put about four meatballs on there, smother it in tomato sauce, maybe sprinkle a tiny bit of parmesan on it, just a wee bit. I promise you it’s delicious, and you 100% will not be able to tell the difference. Finally, can you give me one song or album, one book, and one movie that gives us some insight into who you are and what inspires you? Album: Working on a Dream by Bruce Springsteen Book: A Movable Feast by Earnest Hemingway Movie: A River Runs Through It (To receive weekly emails of conversations with the world’s top CEOs and business decisionmakers, click here.) Share The Leadership Brief by clicking here......»»

Category: topSource: timeJan 29th, 2023

I prescribe the popular weight-loss drug semaglutide to my patients. I hesitate to call it a magic bullet.

Dr. Paul Kolodzik prescribed Ozempic to his diabetic patients for years. As soon as the drug became a weight-loss tool, there was a shortage. Dr. Paul Kolodzik thinks semaglutide may be the most widely prescribed medicine in the history of the world sometime in the next five to 10 years.Courtesy of Paul Kolodzik Dr. Paul Kolodzik has been prescribing semaglutide to his diabetic patients since 2017. Semaglutide's popularity as a weight-loss drug has created supply issues; similar drugs may become available in 2023. The one regret he hears from patients on the drug is they can't enjoy food as much. This as-told-to essay is based on a conversation with Dr. Paul Kolodzik, a 64-year-old metabolic-health specialist and physician from Vandalia, Ohio, about the weight-loss drug semaglutide. It's been edited for length and clarity.Six years ago, I decided to switch from a reactive to a proactive style of care and open my metabolic-health practice. Before that, I was an emergency physician for about 25 years, caring for patients with strokes, heart attacks, and diabetic emergencies. I saw how metabolic-health problems, whether it be obesity, diabetes, or hypertension, resulted in people presenting to the emergency room. My initial focus in my practice was to help patients keep a low-carbohydrate lifestyle. It helps patients lose weight, reverse pre-diabetes, and improve blood pressure and cholesterol. I started prescribing semaglutide under the label Ozempic to my diabetic patients in 2017Novo Nordisk, a global pharmaceutical company, developed Ozempic as a medication for diabetics to control their blood sugar. In the trials, researchers noticed that diabetics using the drug were also losing weight. So Novo Nordisk went back and did studies on non-diabetics related to weight loss. They found that patients who used this medicine in conjunction with a diet and exercise plan lost 12 to 15% of their body weight. Novo Nordisk then marketed it as Wegovy, and I've integrated it into my practice over the last 18 months.One of my patients came to me because his wife said she was scared she'd lose him. At 53 years old, he was 267 pounds with chronic back pain and a family history of diabetes and heart disease. He even had difficulty taking his dog for a walk. After seven months, that patient went down to 222 pounds, and we've since reset his goal from 230 to 200 pounds. His program included semaglutide injections, a low-carb diet guided by a continuous glucose monitor, intermittent fasting, and strength training. He's decreased his blood-pressure medication and can now enjoy long walks with his wife and dog.It's very effective with my patients, but some regret not being able to enjoy food as muchSemaglutide has three mechanisms of action. One, it lowers blood sugar. Two, it decreases gastric emptying, so food stays in the stomach longer. Three, it acts on the hypothalamus in the brain to decrease hunger.It's taken as a weekly injection, and the dosage ramps up slowly over time. Otherwise, the medicine can cause significant nausea, constipation, and other gastrointestinal side effects. My patients have some transient nausea for a day or two, and we treat that with nausea medicines. By the second or third injection at that dose, they aren't having any problems.The only regret I hear from patients is that they can't enjoy food quite as much. There's also an apprehension that when they stop the medicine, they'll regain weight. Some patients, after being thrilled with the initial results, enter that stage of apprehension.There are criteria for using Ozempic and WegovyPeople who aren't overweight or diabetic are pressuring clinicians to prescribe them the drugs, but it's not appropriate for those individuals.To qualify for treatment, a patient needs to have a body-mass index of 27 or higher with a metabolic-health problem like high cholesterol or hypertension, or a BMI of 30 with no associated metabolic-health problems. I've had people come to me with a BMI of 24 who want to have a BMI of 18. There's pressure out there from people who aren't overweight, and I don't know if other clinicians are prescribing it, but that's an issue.Wegovy isn't covered by many insurance plans, including Medicare and Medicaid, because of the $1,200 out-of-pocket monthly cost. On the other hand, Ozempic is just as pricey as Wegovy, but it's much more likely that insurance will cover it.Semaglutide's popularity has created major supply shortages, and some diabetics are suffering the lossWegovy came out and was immediately in short supply. So, physicians started prescribing some patients who weren't diabetic Ozempic off-label since Ozempic is not approved for weight loss — even though it's the same generic medicine. That caused supply issues to the point where some diabetics had difficulty getting the medicine at all. In early 2022, a non-diabetic could get Ozempic, and it might've been covered by their insurance, but that's increasingly rare. In the last few months, insurance companies have cracked down on Ozempic being prescribed to non-diabetics so it can be more available for diabetics. Supply-chain issues have caused shortages, but really the drugs have become overly popularized — especially with celebrities like Elon Musk promoting them. Despite shortages, I think semaglutide and drugs like it will be more available in 2023.Novo Nordisk is gearing up their supply chains for medicines that are already available and the development of new medicines. I believe that access, starting with access for diabetics, is going to be much better as early as springtime.I'm hopeful that over time, there'll be several of these medicines, called GLP-1 agonists, available and the competition will allow prices to come down. In fact, Eli Lilly is already doing studies to fast-track Mounjaro — its version of Ozempic — through the FDA for weight loss. These medications are going to be very helpful to a lot of people, and not only to those trying to lose weight or manage diabetesI think these medicines may be the most widely prescribed medicine in the history of the world sometime in the next five to 10 years. There are a few studies that suggest a person who takes this medicine in their mid-20s for weight loss might decrease their likelihood of becoming a diabetic or the likelihood of acquiring cardiovascular disease.  Again, people should use these medicines with an appropriate diet and exercise plan, so I hesitate to suggest it's a magic bullet, but I think in the long term, these medicines are going to be very accepted — not only for weight loss, but for improved health.Have you used or prescribed semaglutide and would like to share your story? Email mlogan@insider.com.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 18th, 2023

"Normalization" Of Emergency Use Authorizations Concerns Health Experts

'Normalization' Of Emergency Use Authorizations Concerns Health Experts Authored by Marina Zhang via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved an unprecedented number of emergency use authorizations (EUAs) for drugs, tests, and medical devices since the beginning of the pandemic. Medical syringes and FDA logo displayed in the background are seen in this illustration photo taken in Krakow, Poland on December 2, 2021. (Photo by Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Between March 2020 and June 2021, more than 600 EUAs were authorized, according to Fortune. This has caused concern among healthcare professionals, with some studies claiming that overreaction by regulators may have led to a decline in industry standards (1, 2). As clarified in the journal Yale Medicine, “An EUA can only be granted when no adequate, approved, available alternatives exist, and when the known and potential benefits outweigh the potential risks. A EUA also only lasts as long as the public health emergency for which it was declared.” Prior to 2020, the public health emergency that allowed the highest number of EUAs was the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, with 22 EUAs overall for personal protective equipment (PPE), antivirals, and diagnostic tests. The only emergency-authorized vaccine prior to the 2020 pandemic was the anthrax vaccine. Given the drastic increase in EUAs, experts worry that this time, the FDA has gone too far. The Normalization of EUA Drugs and Lack of Informed Consent Cardiologist Dr. Jack Askins has pointed out that the unprecedented onslaught of emergency authorizations in drugs, vaccinations, medical devices, COVID tests, and PPE has normalized EUA drugs and products as being fully FDA-approved rather than being investigational. Prof. Linda Wastila from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, whose expertise is in pharmacotherapy and drug policy, told The Epoch Times that the torrent of 600 EUAs makes it very difficult for healthcare professionals to remain informed of the approval statuses of new drugs. For example, Askins previously told The Epoch Times that he noticed some of his colleagues who prescribe Paxlovid lacked adequate awareness of the many interactions and contraindications Paxlovid has with other drugs. Paxlovid can interact with 43 different drug classes and over 550 active drug ingredients. Even before the pandemic, it was hard for clinicians and pharmacists to keep up, given that around 40 novel therapeutics are approved by the FDA yearly, not counting generic drugs. Wastila said that compared to traditional FDA-approved products, there has been less informed consent with the EUA products during the pandemic. Informed consent is defined as “the process in which a health care provider educates a patient about the risks, benefits, and alternatives of a given procedure or intervention,” and patients must make their own voluntary decision. Informed consent is especially important with EUA products as they are investigational products. Articles on EUAs have compared taking these products to participating in experimental trials (1, 2). Signage is seen outside of the Food and Drug Administration headquarters in White Oak, Maryland, on Aug. 29, 2020. (Andrew Kelly/Reuters) Part of informed consent is letting patients know that what they are taking is experimental and that they have the right to refuse. But Askins highlighted that very few patients were provided informed consent when they took EUA products such as the vaccine. He said that three patients, each of whom received the bivalent booster as a fourth shot, were admitted to his clinic. He asked all three if they were given information on the potential risks and the emerging data on concerns and problems with it. “All three said no,” he said, “I do not think they understand emergency use authorization versus full FDA approval.” It also should be noted that EUAs do not come with long-term safety data. While drugs fully approved by the FDA come with a densely written package insert on side effects and drug mechanisms, for many EUA products, such as the COVID-19 vaccines, these sections are left blank. A Johnson & Johnson spokesperson said this was intentional, leaving it to consumers to search online for the most up-to-date information on safety and effectiveness as the data is published. However, Wastila sees this lack of information as potentially dangerous. “To me at least, [it] conveys the fact that they don’t really know whether a product is safe and effective when it’s an EUA product.” The Erosion of Drug Safety Standards Dr. David Bell, formerly a medical officer with the World Health Organization, said that the overuse of EUAs during the pandemic has lowered drug safety standards put in place to protect patients. EUA products are very different from FDA-approved drugs. However, public health agencies’ encouragement to use EUAs has blurred the separation between EUAs and FDA-approved drugs. Wastila fears that EUA is replacing FDA approval as the norm. “[EUAs] have lost all meaning,” said board-certified internist and nephrologist Dr. Richard Amerling. “People don’t hear ‘emergency use;’ they only hear ‘authorized.’” Askins argued that there has been intentional public messaging from the FDA to make EUA appear just as safe and equivalent to a fully tested and licensed product. In August 2021, the FDA approved the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine under the label of Comirnaty. Having an FDA-approved vaccine should have nullified the EUA for other COVID-19 vaccines, or at the very least, the Pfizer EUA vaccine. Yet, the Pfizer EUA vaccine remains on the U.S. market. The FDA also wrote that for the Pfizer vaccine, “doses distributed under the EUA are interchangeable with the licensed doses.” COVID-19 vaccine vials marked Comirnaty in Berlin, Germany, in a file image. (Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images) An order issued in November 2021 by Judge Allen Windsor of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida rejected this claim, stating that while the two versions may be medically interchangeable, they are not legally interchangeable. Judge Windsor’s order also mentioned that FDA officials could not prove that Comirnaty vaccines even exist in the United States. Nevertheless, the full FDA approval of Comirnaty has led many health providers to assume that the Pfizer injections being administered are the licensed versions. Wastila recounted an experience at her former local pharmacy. She was picking up some antibiotics and, while chatting with the pharmacist, she asked about the uptake of Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. “[The pharmacist] goes, ‘Oh, they’re great. Everyone’s so happy that they’re FDA approved,’” Wastila recounted. “That’s literally a quote from the pharmacist’s mouth.” “I said, ‘They’re not FDA approved, though.’ She goes, ‘Oh, Pfizer is.’” So Wastila asked to see an unopened package of the vaccine, and the pharmacist showed the doctor a vial. The pharmacist presented an EUA vaccine; it did not have the Comirnaty label, which would be printed according to labeling requirements. Wastila told the pharmacist that the pharmacy was still using the EUA vaccines. “[The pharmacist] was just like kind of amazed,” said Wastila, “But there’s no informed consent if even your dispensers aren’t aware that it is EUA or FDA approved.” More Emergency Declarations and EUAs Likely To Come Health experts argue that COVID-19 pandemic management has already lowered the standards for future emergency declarations and EUAs. Dr. Robert Malone, biochemist and one of the inventors of the mRNA drug platform, said that monkeypox, which was declared a public health emergency in August 2022 with no deaths in the U.S. at the time, is a good example of this reduced standard. Given that the disease almost exclusively affects men who have sex with men, a specific population demographic, and has led to 20 deaths in the United States thus far, Bell and Wastila both said that it was ludicrous that it was deemed a public health emergency. “Now the cat’s out the bag, [public health emergency declarations] can be used really easily now because there are precedents [such as] COVID-19 and monkeypox that were not very severe,” Bell said. The smallpox vaccine, commercially labeled as JYNNEOS, was also rapidly given EUA approval in a matter of days. The FDA wrote that it was “inferred” that a smallpox vaccine would be effective against monkeypox, given that both viruses are from the same family. However, according to a statement made by the CDC on Oct. 19, 2022, there was no data on the effectiveness of JYNNEOS or ACAM2000, an alternative to JYNNEOS, for monkeypox. A sign announcing monkeypox vaccination is set up in Tropical Park by Miami-Dade County and Nomi Health in Miami, Fla., on Aug. 15, 2022. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) The vaccine also has cardiological side effects. Pooled data across 22 studies showed that of the more than 7,800 people vaccinated, six developed cardiac-related adverse events that were determined to be causally related to vaccination. Concerns have been raised about the respiratory syncytial virus, known as RSV, in children. Though the virus has not been declared a national public health emergency, declarations have been made in Oregon and Colorado, and some health experts have urged a national declaration. “We’ve had RSV and the flu every year, and all of a sudden, it’s become a big issue again, and it’s because we’re afraid of every viral infection, [we’re] normalizing being fearful of every contagion,” said Wastila. Loss of Trust in Public Health As a pharmacotherapy professor who is in contact with pharmacists and staff working with the FDA, Wastila confessed that the pandemic has been a “rude awakening” for her. “Physicians, dispensers, and pharmacists just blindly follow the safety and effectiveness of a product just because it has the FDA seal of approval, even if that ‘approval’ is an EUA.” Though financial backdoor dealings have been suspected and discussed for decades, Malone argues that the pandemic has brought “corruption” to the surface. Financially, 65 percent of the FDA’s budget comes from pharmaceutical companies, with a large proportion of this money coming through sponsorship for drug approval applications. Comparing major drug regulators on conflicts of interest, according to data by Maryanne Demasi (The Epoch Times) The 1992 Prescription Drug User Fee Act, also known as the PDUFA, requires pharmaceutical companies to pay the FDA for drug approvals. Wastila said that after speaking to colleagues and students who work in the FDA, she senses that the PDFUA may have established “a culture of entitlement” from the drug companies to have their drugs approved and marketed. “The sponsors feel like, hey, we’ve paid for this,” she said, “It’s like a pay-for-play situation.” Many members of drug evaluation boards also receive financial payments from drug companies. When evaluating a drug, there needs to be “zero conflict of interest,” said Amerling. “Declaring that you have a financial conflict of interest doesn’t make it go away.” Bell said that the low uptake of vaccines in children under five years of age is a sign that people no longer trust public health agencies. “They [The FDA] were unable to produce any solid data showing that there’s an all-cause benefit to those children,” said Bell. For healthcare professionals and members of the public who once trusted the FDA, some feel that they no longer have a place to go for advice on treatments. Amerling said this would force clinicians to be very conservative with their treatment. As the Chief Academic Officer at The Wellness Company, Amerling educates doctors to prescribe only medications with a safety record of at least several years. “Don’t be that person to jump on the bandwagon with a new product,” he said, “Post-marketing experience can reveal unanticipated adverse events, and you’re not going to see them even with the initial studies, even if they’re well done.” “When medium and long-term risk is unknown, it’s best to err on the side of caution, especially if benefits are small.” Wastila added that there has been a considerable information gap on drug safety since the pandemic, with little scrutiny from drug regulators. Read more here... Tyler Durden Fri, 01/13/2023 - 21:00.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJan 13th, 2023

: Southwest Airlines promotes network planning executive to broader role

Southwest Airlines Co. LUV late Monday announced a slew of promotions and re-arrangements, including the promotion of its vice president of network planning, Adam Decaire, to senior VP of network planning and network operations control. Decaire will continue to report to Chief Operating Officer Andrew Watterson. Southwest said Monday’s changes are part of a broader reorganization that started last year, but also added that Decaire and a subordinate will work to create “a tighter feedback loop between schedule design and schedule execution while adding resiliency and reliability to the network.” Southwest canceled thousands of flights in late December, and late last week warned that it expects a surprise quarterly loss because of the costs associated with the cancelations and other operational problems. Shares of Southwest edged higher in after-hours trading Monday after ending the regular trading day up 2%. Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchJan 9th, 2023

Elon Musk"s Twitter chaos has investors asking Tesla to act like a basic automaker

Tesla has real problems to address this year, and investors are worried CEO Elon Musk is too distracted by Twitter to handle them. Tesla investors want Elon Musk to return focus to the EV company instead of "focusing on his new golden child Twitter."Getty Images Tesla investors think Elon Musk's Twitter controversies are hurting the automaker's value. Musk has bristled at criticisms that running Twitter keeps him from focusing on Tesla. Tesla shares dropped 65% in 2022, and are still sliding. As Elon Musk bounces from controversy to controversy at Twitter, some Tesla investors are hoping the electric car company will start acting like a more mature company.Once mired in the "production hell" that kept it scrambling to meet rampant demand, the EV pioneer is now navigating waters more familiar to its established rivals. Tesla recently reported disappointing fourth quarter sales after offering hefty discounts on its most popular vehicles in the US and China, a worrying sign of over-building. While Tesla deals with these time-worn industry problems, Musk has courted controversy at Twitter, and Tesla investors are tiring of the potential effect on Tesla's value."The Cinderella ride is over for Tesla," Wedbush analyst Dan Ives wrote in a recent note. "Musk now needs to navigate the company through this Category 5 dark macro storm instead of focusing on his new golden child Twitter, which remains a distraction and overhang for the Tesla story/stock in our opinion."Musk has said he's not missing any important Tesla meetings or ignoring important business decisions since taking over at Twitter, and that he "literally can't think of anything" he could have done to help Tesla's execution in the last two months of 2022.Shares of Tesla dropped 65% last year, and continue to slideBut investors have reason to worry. Shares of Tesla dropped 65% in 2022, with much of that slide happening after Musk took over Twitter in October. After reaching a historic $1 trillion market cap in October 2021, the electric car company's market value now sits around $349 billion.Meanwhile, Tesla on Friday again slashed prices on the Model 3 and Model Y in China, the world's largest auto market. In the US, Tesla is fresh off an end-of-year cash-back deal for the same popular models, which offered an unprecedented $7,500 discount. Investors have said they expect more price cuts in response to softer demand this year.Musk has also spent much of the year selling off shares of Tesla, in part to help to fund his $44 billion purchase of Twitter. Musk promised to stop selling Tesla shares for "probably two years" in a Twitter Spaces conversation with investors at the end of last year.In the same Spaces conversation, one participant raised concerns about Musk's controversial political views and decisions to allow some previously banned far-right voices back onto Twitter is hurting Tesla's brand. Musk bristled, responding: "I'm not going to suppress my views just to boost the stock price."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 8th, 2023

Money Mistakes Many People Make Before Refinancing Their Home

Just as deciding when to take advantage of 4th and goal, refinancing a home has many opportunities and pitfalls. The reason you might consider a refinance is that you want to pay less interest. Or, if you need to put some money towards another expense, you can take some money out of your house. It’s […] Just as deciding when to take advantage of 4th and goal, refinancing a home has many opportunities and pitfalls. The reason you might consider a refinance is that you want to pay less interest. Or, if you need to put some money towards another expense, you can take some money out of your house. It’s even possible you want to shorten your term. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Walter Schloss Series in PDF Get the entire 10-part series on Walter Schloss in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues. (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q4 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more iFrameResize({ log: false, checkOrigin: false }, '#icb_widget') Find A Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn't have to be hard. SmartAsset's free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you're ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. These are all good reasons to refinance. However, if you want to maximize these benefits, as well as take advantage of the current market, which favors refinancers since mortgage rates are at record lows, you could make a hasty decision that’s not right for you. Considering a home refinance now? Here are twelve costly mistakes you should avoid so you can score a touchdown with a refi. Taking only interest rates into account. Whenever interest rates drop, many people think about refinancing. A lower interest rate might lower your monthly mortgage payment, but there are other things that will affect it. For example, there might be a drop in interest rates, but are they below what you financed your home at? Did your credit score drop since you first financed your house? Can you cover closing costs with your savings? Remember, getting a refinance is like getting a new loan. That means you’ll have to pay closing costs and your lender will look at your credit score. Therefore, before you refinance, make sure you compare your current interest rate with today’s rates, review your credit score, and make sure you can afford closing costs. Not shopping around. When you need a home loan or a refinance, you might be tempted to go right to your regular bank. Or maybe you just check a few lenders and pick the cheapest one. And, plenty of people think they have to refinance with their current lender. Here’s the thing though. When you’re refinancing your mortgage, you need to research your options. You can save tens of thousands of dollars over the life of your mortgage with a difference of just one-eighth or one-quarter percent. Mortgage pricing can also be tricky, with many factors affecting the actual cost, so compare rates, terms, and fees from different lenders carefully. You’ll also want to use a refinance calculator to help you determine what your new monthly payment will be. In short, don’t rush when it comes to refinancing your home so that you’ll find the best idea available. Restarting the clock for another 30 years. Whenever you refinance your mortgage, you should avoid restarting the clock to another 30 years on your new mortgage, advises Alvin Carlos of District Capital. “This means that if you’re already five years into your mortgage, you don’t want to extend your mortgage and pay over a period of 30 years when you would have just paid over a remaining period of 25 years,” Carlos explains. Another 30 years may seem appealing since it will lower your current monthly payment and may seem like immediate savings. However, if you reset the clock to 30 years instead of 30, you’ll pay significantly more interest than you would have had you kept the original 30-year mortgage. “To avoid this, you can request that your lender amortize the newly refinanced mortgage over 25 years rather than 30,” suggests Carlos. “Alternatively, you could do the math and figure out how much more monthly you need to pay on the loan to pay it off in 25 years rather than 30, and then set that up to automatically pay each month.” Choosing a mortgage with no closing costs. Again, refinancing your mortgage is basically getting a new loan to replace the old one. So you’ll have to pay closing costs to finalize the deal. Typically, closing costs range from 2% to 5% of the loan amount. If you’re getting a $200,000 loan, for example, you can expect to pay between $4,000 and $10,000. Luckily, there are no closing-cost mortgages out there. But, as with most things in life, there’s a catch. In order to make up for the money they lost upfront, the lender may charge you a little more interest. It can make refinancing much more expensive over time. To show how the cost breaks down, here’s an example. Imagine you have a choice between a $200,000 loan at 4% with closing costs of $6,000 or a $200,000 loan with no closing costs at 4.5%. Not much difference, right? Well, if you opt for the second option, you’ll end up paying thousands more over 30 years. Don’t refinance at the wrong time. When is the best time to refinance? Preferably, it’s when you’ve got your finances in order. At the minimum, this means you’ve been making payments on time and are a valuable customer. In addition, you should consider what you hope to accomplish when determining when the time is right. As an example, you might do better to wait until the fixed-rate loan has ended before starting a new term, rather than refinancing and incurring break costs if your fixed-rate loan is nearing its end. Before refinancing, take into account your future plans (renovation, investment, starting a family). You should be able to meet your future needs. Consolidating debt is a valid reason to refinance. As an example, if you consolidate $40,000 in credit card debt into your $250,000 home loan, your revised loan amount will be $29,000. However, a shorter loan term is available for the $40,000 portion. Even if the rate of interest on your short-term debt is lower, you will end up paying more in interest if you extend the term over which you pay it to the full term of your mortgage. Over-estimating the value of the home. “Just because your home was worth $300,000 seven years ago doesn’t mean it’s still worth that,” Ilyce R. Glink writes for CBS News. “Nationally, home prices have fallen more than 30 percent, with some markets (Las Vegas, Phoenix, and Miami come to mind), falling much more.” In other words, if you don’t have enough equity, your refinance offer will be higher than you expected. Saving too little. Getting a small reduction in your interest rate, such as half a percentage point, will take you a long time to recoup your closing costs. This is called the break-even point. More specifically, this is the point when you save enough from refinancing to pay for refinancing. As an example, you may have paid $5,000 in closing costs and saved $100 a month by refinancing. You will reach break-even in 50 months, or just over four years. However, if you save only $50 a month, you’ll have to wait eight years to break even. What’s more, you might already have sold your home by then as well. A refinance is worthwhile if you can lower your rate by at least three-quarters or a full percent. In high-end homes, lower rates can be justified because savings are considerably higher than in modestly priced homes. In addition, if you plan to live in the home for a long time, a small reduction can be worthwhile. Refinancing a home with less than 20% equity. If you don’t have enough equity in your home, refinancing can increase your mortgage costs. If your equity value is less than 20%, your lender is likely to require you to pay private mortgage insurance (PMI). In the event of a default, this insurance protects the lender. Conventional mortgages typically cost between 0.3% and 1.5% in PMI premiums. Payment for the premiums is added directly to your monthly bill. With that extra money added into your payment, you’ll lose out on any savings you might have obtained by locking in a low-interest rate. Taking out too much equity at once. Refinancing your mortgage allows you to borrow against the equity in your home. These funds can be used for home repairs, investments, or other significant purchases. Often, mortgage interest is tax-deductible on income-producing properties. Because of this, it makes them an attractive option for borrowing money. However, the risk of taking out too much equity increases when homeowners take out too much equity. The value of your property might decrease and your mortgage repayments may increase to such an extent that you have little wiggle room if financial problems arise in the future. Overall, if you want to cash out your home equity, be cautious when refinancing. Don’t ignore your credit score. There are usually minimum credit score guidelines set by lenders. Credit agencies such as Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian can provide you with your credit score. Your credit score could affect your ability to refinance or your interest rate if you’ve changed it since you got your first mortgage. It’s great if your credit score has improved! However, if it went down by 100 points, it could affect your interest rate by half a point or more. Alternatively, it could prevent you from refinancing your home. Keeping your bills current and reducing your outstanding debt will help you improve your credit score. Eventually, your credit score could qualify you for a better interest rate or a refi. Buying a large item before your refinance closes. While awaiting their refinance to close, many people purchase a car or furniture via credit while waiting to close on their refinance. It can result in a lower credit score or a higher debt-to-income ratio, which may make it difficult for you to qualify for the loan you want. In other words, you could lose the loan if anything changes on your credit right before closing, as lenders typically pull your credit right before closing. If you’re waiting to close on your mortgage, avoid completing any credit transactions. It is possible to jeopardize your mortgage even if you pay off debt if your available cash is less than the amount the loan depends on. Between applying for a refinance and closing, you have to tread lightly. Having to pay junk fees. In addition to the regular closing costs, borrowers need to watch out for “junk fees” added to their mortgages. Sure, the cost of loan origination, application, and title fees is unavoidable and legitimate. But some lenders overcharge for things such as “document preparation” or credit reports. As a general rule, junk fees are those that could be done by you or someone else for less. FAQs Is it a good time to refinance my current mortgage? Refinancing for a lower rate is great, but it’s just one piece of the puzzle. As an example, it wouldn’t make financial sense to refinance if it will take three years to recoup the costs after refinancing and you plan to move in two years. You should also consider the loan term, as refinancing to a shorter term will help you build equity more quickly. Let’s say that you refinance your 30-year fixed-rate mortgage into a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage with 20 years left on it. In this case, you’re essentially extending the loan term by 10 years and paying more interest. By dividing the total refinance cost by your monthly savings, you can determine whether refinancing is financially viable for you. Am I required to refinance with my current lender? Refinancing your mortgage can be done through your existing lender or through a new one. Regardless, you should compare loan estimates from multiple lenders to ensure your interest rate is as low as possible. Can I refinance for free? Refinancing your mortgage is similar to applying for a new home loan. As such, expect closing costs should be included. These costs depend on your location and the amount of the loan. But, they should be about the same as what you paid at closing on your original loan. In the event that you are unsure of your ability to pay for the costs of refinancing, ask your lender if they can cover some of the fees for you. A no-closing-cost refinance option may be available from your lender, which includes your closing costs in the total loan amount. In this case, you may have to make a slightly higher mortgage payment each month. To gain a better understanding of all upfront costs, talk to your lender. You can also learn about different options for paying closing costs from a housing counselor. There are many programs offered by state and local housing commissions to assist buyers with closing costs. There might even be a grant available to help offset the cost of refinancing. Freddie Mac offers a refinancing cost calculator that can help you estimate how much refinancing could cost. Is it possible to refinance without 20% equity? Short answer? Yes. Refinancing may be feasible if you own your home for less than 20% and have a good credit score. In addition to the monthly mortgage payments, your lender will require that you pay private mortgage insurance (PMI). How many times can I refinance my mortgage? You can refinance your mortgage as many times as you like. In the case of conventional mortgages, you may be able to refinance immediately after your previous refinance closes. You should keep in mind that refinancing isn’t free and that multiple credit inquiries can negatively impact your credit score. Take the time to weigh the cost of refinancing against the potential savings if you intend to refinance at a lower rate. Article by John Rampton, Due About the Author John Rampton is an entrepreneur and connector. When he was 23 years old, while attending the University of Utah, he was hurt in a construction accident. His leg was snapped in half. He was told by 13 doctors he would never walk again. Over the next 12 months, he had several surgeries, stem cell injections and learned how to walk again. During this time, he studied and mastered how to make money work for you, not against you. He has since taught thousands through books, courses and written over 5000 articles online about finance, entrepreneurship and productivity. He has been recognized as the Top Online Influencers in the World by Entrepreneur Magazine and Finance Expert by Time. He is the Founder and CEO of Due......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkJan 5th, 2023

GSK"s New Drugs and Pipeline Hold the Key to Growth in 2023

GSK's specialty products like Dovato, Nucala, Trelegy Ellipta and Shingrix are likely to drive sales, making up for the lower sales of established drugs due to generic erosion. GSK GSK boasts a diversified base and presence in different geographical areas. The company has made significant progress in expanding its presence in emerging markets by acquiring product portfolios from companies like Bristol-Myers and UCB.The company changed its name to GSK plc from GlaxoSmithKline plc in mid-May 2022. In July 2022, GSK de-merged its Consumer Healthcare (CHC) segment into a standalone company. The independent Consumer Healthcare company has been named Haleon HLN. GSK shareholders own a 54.5% stake in Haleon, while 6% is held by GSK. Certain Scottish limited partnerships (SLPs) hold a 7.5% stake in Haleon. GSK’s CHC joint venture partner, Pfizer, holds a 32% stake in Haleon but plans to sell it soon.GSK’s relatively newer specialty products like Nucala (severe eosinophilic asthma), Bexsero (meningitis vaccine), Shingrix (shingles vaccines), Trelegy Ellipta (three medicines in a single inhaler to treat COPD) and Juluca (dolutegravir+ rilpivirine once-daily, single pill for HIV) have witnessed considerable success and have become key drivers of top-line growth with the trend expected to continue in 2023. Sales of these products are making up for a decline in Established Pharmaceuticals due to generic erosion. GSK expects its new medicines and vaccines (approved between 2017 and 2021) to contribute around 60% of the new GSK’s (after CHC demerger) sales growth for the period 2022-2026. The spin-off of the Consumer unit has also allowed it to focus on drug development.GSK’s stock has declined 35.8% in the past year compared with a decline of 21% for the industry.Image Source: Zacks Investment Research2023 is expected to be a pivotal year as far as GSK’s pipeline is concerned. Several pipeline readouts and regulatory events are expected in 2023. GSK expects FDA decisions on regulatory applications filed for three key pipeline candidates, Duvroq/daprodustat for anemia associated with chronic renal disease in February, RSV vaccines for older adults in May and momelotinib for myelofibrosis with anemia in June. Regulatory applications seeking approvals for all three candidates are also under review in Europe and some other countries. GSK also expects to file a new drug application for gepotidacin for uncomplicated urinary tract infection, while another candidate, bepirovirsen for chronic hepatitis B, is expected to enter late-stage development in the first half of the year. GSK plans to launch more than 20 new products/line extensions by 2026 with more than 10 having blockbuster potential.Key new drug approvals in the past couple of years were Rukobia/fostemsavir for heavily pre-treated HIV, Blenrep/belantamab mafatotin for fourth-line multiple myeloma; Cabenuva, a long-acting injectable HIV treatment; Jemperli (dostarlimab) for second-line endometrial cancer and mismatch repair-deficient (dMMR) recurrent or advanced solid tumors and Apretude, a long-acting injectable form of cabotegravir drug for the prevention of HIV infection, also called pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP. These new products should contribute meaningfully to revenue growth in 2023 and thereafter.GSK’s vaccine sales recovered in 2022 after being hurt by COVID-related disruptions in several markets in 2021.Importantly sales of its shingles vaccine, Shingrix, recovered due to strong commercial execution in Europe and International markets, post-pandemic rebound and the growing impact of new launches. Presently, the vaccine is available across 25 countries. Sales of Shingrix and the overall vaccine segment are expected to continue the positive trend in 2023.GSK has its share of problems. Generic competition for key drug, Advair is hampering sales of GSK’s respiratory products, which we believe may not be compensated by new respiratory drugs. Competitive pressure on HIV drugs has risen.Nonetheless, strong sales of specialty medicines, regular pipeline success and accretive M&A deals should keep the stock afloat going forward.Zacks Rank & Stocks to ConsiderGSK has a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold) currently. Some better-ranked stocks worth considering are Syndax Pharmaceuticals SNDX and Anika Therapeutics ANIK, both with a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy).Syndax Pharmaceuticals’ loss per share estimates for 2022 have narrowed from $2.68 per share to $2.52, while that for 2023 has improved from $3.10 per share to $2.65 per share in the past 60 days. Syndax’s stock is up 14.9% in the past year.Syndax beat earnings expectations in three of the trailing four quarters. The company delivered a four-quarter earnings surprise of 95.39%, on average.In the past 60 days, estimates for Anika Therapeutics’ 2022 loss per share have narrowed from 76 cents to 69 cents. During the same period, loss estimates per share for 2023 have narrowed from 70 cents to 47 cents. Shares of Anika Therapeutics have declined 19% in the past year.Earnings of Anika Therapeutics beat estimates in two of the last three quarters and missed the mark once, delivering a three-quarter earnings surprise of 12.58%, on average. Zacks Top 10 Stocks for 2023 In addition to the investment ideas discussed above, would you like to know about our 10 top picks for the entirety of 2023? From inception in 2012 through November, the Zacks Top 10 Stocks portfolio has tripled the market, gaining an impressive +884.5% versus the S&P 500’s +287.4%. Now our Director of Research is combing through 4,000 companies covered by the Zacks Rank to handpick the best 10 tickers to buy and hold. Don’t miss your chance to get in on these stocks when they’re released on January 3.Be First to New Top 10 Stocks >>Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report GSK PLC Sponsored ADR (GSK): Free Stock Analysis Report Anika Therapeutics Inc. (ANIK): Free Stock Analysis Report Syndax Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (SNDX): Free Stock Analysis Report Haleon PLC Sponsored ADR (HLN): Free Stock Analysis ReportTo read this article on Zacks.com click here.Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksJan 4th, 2023

Venture debt will be big for startups in 2023 — and could break the bad habits of the boom years

More startups are likely to turn to venture debt instead of venture capital. Investors say that means they can focus more on building products. Raising money via venture debt — rather than giving away equity for venture capital — will be key for many startups in 2023. It could help some startups thrive.PM Images/Getty Images Startups running out of cash but can't raise capital are increasingly taking on debt. Investors say venture debt encourages founders to build rather than grow — and that's a good thing. Less cash means startups can focus on building innovative products that stand the test of time. Startups are facing a problem in 2023: Nobody wants to give them money — at least not in the way they're used to.Fundraising from venture capital is expected to slow in 2023 as the tech slowdown continues. From the third quarter of 2021 to the third quarter of 2022, startup funding from venture capital fell by 54%, to $74.5 billion from $164 billion, according to PitchBook.Without more traditional venture-capital funding, startups are increasingly turning toward venture debt, taking out three-year loans to raise capital.While some worry that the trend toward debt will stifle innovation, a growing number of VC investors and startup founders think it will encourage new ways of thinking. In their view, venture debt will break the bad habits of a generation of free-spending startups and create a new breed of companies focused on execution and market fit over blitzscaling or promising to change the world.Rakefet Russak Aminoach, a managing partner at Team8, suggested that the pressure of debt and less capital overall forces companies to home in on things that matter."When you have a lot of money, you are less cautious of how you spend it," she said. "But when there is not a lot of it, it sharpens the mind, and you become more accurate on where to put it."In the funding crunch of mid-2022, VCs told portfolio companies to focus their products and get disciplined about spending. This was markedly different from 2021, when it seemed as if every startup raised money at record valuations.Anna Barber, a partner at M13, argued that that environment was detrimental to new companies because they immediately needed to try to live up to those inflated valuations."Without the artificial pressure of valuations disconnected from performance, we'll see founders who are really focused on finding product-market fit at the earliest stage and solving problems for actual customers," Barber said.Barber added that some startups benefit from being unable to increase headcount immediately. A startup still looking for market fit can be more nimble with a smaller team and quicker communication.Other investors believe that a funding crunch will create fewer startups but that those startups will be forced to be more innovative.Aminoach said there's a higher bar for startups now to prove they're worthy of getting money. Both equity investors and venture-debt lenders are demanding more before giving money to startups, forcing founders to clarify how they plan to beat the competition and find profit margins.Aminoach added that the boom times of 2020 and 2021, with record numbers of venture investments, could've also stifled true innovation.She pointed to digital banking as an example of an industry that over the past few years became filled with companies that catered to different niches but had little differentiation in their business models, making it difficult to see what was truly innovative."When we look at the last few years, everyone had FOMO and wanted to invest in the next big company," Aminoach said. "But that made a lot of copycat companies because money was so easy to get. And that's not innovation — that's noise."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 3rd, 2023

Venture debt be big for startups in 2023 — and could break the bad habits of the boom years

More startups are likely to turn to venture debt instead of venture capital. Investors say that means they can focus more on building products. Raising capital via venture debt will be key for many startups in 2023PM Images Startups running out of cash but can't raise capital are increasingly taking on debt. Investors say venture debt encourages founders to build rather than grow — and that's a good thing. Less cash means startups can focus on building innovative products that stand the test of time. Startups are facing a problem in 2023: Nobody wants to give them money — at least not in the way they're used to.Fundraising from venture capital is expected to slow in 2023 as the tech slowdown continues. From the third quarter of 2021 to the third quarter of 2022, startup funding from venture capital fell by 54%, to $74.5 billion from $164 billion, according to PitchBook.Without more traditional venture-capital funding, startups are increasingly turning toward venture debt, taking out three-year loans to raise capital.While some worry that the trend toward debt will stifle innovation, a growing number of VC investors and startup founders think it will encourage new ways of thinking. In their view, venture debt will break the bad habits of a generation of free-spending startups and create a new breed of companies focused on execution and market fit over blitzscaling or promising to change the world.Rakefet Russak Aminoach, a managing partner at Team8, suggested that the pressure of debt and less capital overall forces companies to home in on things that matter."When you have a lot of money, you are less cautious of how you spend it," she said. "But when there is not a lot of it, it sharpens the mind, and you become more accurate on where to put it."In the funding crunch of mid-2022, VCs told portfolio companies to focus their products and get disciplined about spending. This was markedly different from 2021, when it seemed as if every startup raised money at record valuations.Anna Barber, a partner at M13, argued that that environment was detrimental to new companies because they immediately needed to try to live up to those inflated valuations."Without the artificial pressure of valuations disconnected from performance, we'll see founders who are really focused on finding product-market fit at the earliest stage and solving problems for actual customers," Barber said.Barber added that some startups benefit from being unable to increase headcount immediately. A startup still looking for market fit can be more nimble with a smaller team and quicker communication.Other investors believe that a funding crunch will create fewer startups but that those startups will be forced to be more innovative.Aminoach said there's a higher bar for startups now to prove they're worthy of getting money. Both equity investors and venture-debt lenders are demanding more before giving money to startups, forcing founders to clarify how they plan to beat the competition and find profit margins.Aminoach added that the boom times of 2020 and 2021, with record numbers of venture investments, could've also stifled true innovation.She pointed to digital banking as an example of an industry that over the past few years became filled with companies that catered to different niches but had little differentiation in their business models, making it difficult to see what was truly innovative."When we look at the last few years, everyone had FOMO and wanted to invest in the next big company," Aminoach said. "But that made a lot of copycat companies because money was so easy to get. And that's not innovation — that's noise."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 3rd, 2023

15 reasons why you aren"t hearing back during your job search, based on where you are in the process

Maybe you're applying and never hearing back. Or maybe you make it all the way to the final round only to get ghosted. Here's what's going wrong. Your application could be getting trapped in applicant tracking system (ATS) limbo and never actually getting read by a human being.Westend61/Getty Images If you're applying and not hearing anything, then your applications could be stuck in ATS limbo. Using keywords and standard formatting on your resume can help you bypass ATS and reach a recruiter. If you're getting first-round interviews and not moving forward, you probably need more preparation. Job searching is a grind. And the longer you're at it, the worse it seems to get. It can be so discouraging to put yourself out there and get rejected over and over again or be met with radio silence.But rather than keeping your head down and sending out another flurry of applications, you may benefit from taking a step back and considering why you're not getting the results you want. What's the real issue keeping you from landing your next gig? Accurately diagnosing the problem now will save you time in the long run.Here are 15 reasons you might not be getting hired and how you can fix them — broken down by when in the job search you're running into trouble.If you're not getting callbacks or interviews1. Your resume and/or cover letter isn't tailored to the jobIf you've submitted a whole slew of applications and haven't heard back from more than a handful, a likely culprit could be that you're sending out the same generic resume and cover letter each time without changing how you present your experience to match the job.Employers are looking for someone who matches their job description — and since they're probably getting hundreds of applicants for each open job, they're not going to do the extra work to figure out how you measure up.You have to be sure to tell anyone reading your application how you're suited for the role by tailoring your resume and cover letter. That means figuring out what skills and experience they want and then highlighting them in the form of accomplishments in your materials.You don't necessarily have to do this for every single role. But at the very least you should tailor your application for every type of role — for example, you might have a software-engineering resume and cover letter and a different product-management resume and cover letter — as well as individual roles you're especially interested in.2. Your resume isn't formatted correctly for an ATSMaybe you're doing plenty to tailor your resume and still hearing crickets. Your application could be getting trapped in applicant tracking system (ATS) limbo and never actually getting read by a human being.If you're applying for jobs through online applications, your resume is probably being sent through an ATS — a computer program that scans applications, tracks applicants, and generally helps recruiters and hiring managers manage the search on their side. Hiring professionals can also use ATSs to search for resumes that contain keywords that are relevant to a given job.To make sure your resume is being read correctly by the ATS:Don't try to get too fancy with your formatting: Avoid tables, graphics, and columns.Include keywords in the right context: Recruiters and managers are likely to use terms directly from the job description to search for relevant applicants, so scan the job description for the skills and experiences they're looking for, then pick out the ones that you have and include them in your resume — using the same language.Use standard section headings: Go with headings like "Experience" and "Education."3. You're applying to the wrong jobsLook at the job description and honestly ask yourself if you have the skills you'll need to do the job — or get up to speed quickly — to ensure you're not underqualified for the roles you're targeting.That being said, job seekers usually do a fairly good job of making sure they're qualified before applying to a role. One thing they are less great at is being honest about whether they are in fact overqualified.Hiring managers obviously won't hire someone who doesn't have the skills or experience to do the job, but they're also hesitant to hire someone who has gobs of experience for an entry-level role. How will they keep you interested and challenged? Won't you just leave once something more suitable comes along? The last thing a company wants is to have to fill the role again after you've gotten bored and quit. Make sure you're targeting the right jobs for your background. (And if you genuinely do want that job that might seem too junior for you on paper, follow this advice.)Need to find more of the right jobs to apply to? You can search thousands of openings on The Muse.4. You're not applying to enough jobsAs a career coach, I'll occasionally work with a client who only applies to dream jobs or dream companies and then gets frustrated when their search drags. It's fine to be extra picky about what roles you're considering, but if you're only applying to a job here and there, then understand that your job hunt will absolutely take longer.If your situation doesn't allow for that, then you may need to be more open to "stepping stone" roles — jobs that are not exactly what you're looking for but could get you there someday. For example, you might apply for jobs that will help you gain the skills you'll need to be a more attractive applicant for your dream role.5. You're not telling people about your job searchYou probably already know you're supposed to be networking when you're job searching. Some of what networking entails might be obvious. For example, if you know someone at a company that you'd like to work for, try to apply with a referral or at least use any additional insight you may have gleaned from your conversations in your application.What's less obvious is that you should really be broadcasting your search as widely as possible, even to people who have no obvious way of helping you.Talk about your job hunt at non-work events or make a post about it on a private non-LinkedIn social media account.You probably don't know everyone another person knows. First-degree networking — a.k.a., getting help from those you know directly — is great, but second-degree networking can be really powerful, too! A fellow career coach once witnessed a student who groused loudly about her job search in class and found out that the classmate next to her had a close relative who could help. Networking!If you're getting phone screens or first-round interviews but not moving forward6. You're not fully prepared for phone screensPhone screens can feel pretty informal. Some recruiters even tell you they just want to schedule a "quick chat," but don't be fooled. A phone screen is an interview and you need to be preparing like you would for a formal phone interview.Even though phone screens can be quite short and cover just the basics, do your homework. Research the company. Prepare your pitch. Know how much you want to get paid. Be as ready as possible. I say "as possible" because sometimes recruiters don't even bother to schedule phone screens ahead of time. They just call. In this case, at least having your pitch and salary expectations ready to go at all times will get you most of the way.7. You don't know enough about the companyYou might dismiss the common advice to research a company before an interview, because really why would a recruiter care if you know who their CEO is if you can do the job?Well, one thing employers evaluate before they extend an offer is your likelihood of accepting it. And a good way to show that you're likely to accept is to show interest in the company. How do you show interest beyond simply saying you're excited about the opportunity? By knowing a lot about them.Research a company's products and services. Prepare to talk about how you've used them or similar ones in the past. Read up on their values and check to see if you have any contacts at the company via LinkedIn. If you want to go above and beyond, schedule an informational interview with an employee at the organization to learn more about what it's like working there.8. You haven't prepped interview answers to common interview questionsJob searches tend to occupy a lot of head space — even more so after you get an interview invite. But be careful you're not spending all your time just thinking about the interview (or worrying about it!). You need to really prepare.You should be looking at common interview questions and practicing how to answer them out loud. The aloud part kind of trips people up, but saying the actual words before the interview is essential and will improve your performance quickly and significantly. If you can find someone to do a mock interview with you and give you some feedback on where you could've been stronger or when they started losing interest in what you were saying, even better.Don't try to memorize your answers — you don't want to sound robotic. Plus, your answers could change depending on the company and what they're looking for. So practice answering the questions out loud each time you're invited to interview with a new company. You need to prepare for each interview, not just interviews in general.9. You've focused too much on prepping interview answers and neglected other interview skillsYou don't want to be the person who doesn't greet the receptionist and only responds in single words to small talk with the recruiter. That person rarely gets hired.You need to think about interview skills like storytelling, active listening, eye contact and other body language, empathy, and small talk. Most of these abilities can be improved by just being aware that you need to be mindful about them and practicing. So by reading this, you could already be halfway there.10. You're not passing the technical screenI'm using the term "technical screen" kind of loosely here. A technical screen could be a more formal technical interview, a copywriting test, or a coding question thrown in during a first-round interview — among other evaluations. In other words, anything that assesses your technical ability to do the job.Failing the technical screen usually means an automatic rejection, so it's absolutely critical that you do well enough to move forward. Luckily, a skills test typically doesn't require flawless execution, but if you're struggling with technical assessments every time you interview with a new company, then you probably need to spend some time buckling down.There's no shortcut here. Find a relevant book or course and get to studying. And be sure you're not making common mistakes you can easily fix — like not following directions.If you're still falling short, then you may need to evaluate whether you're applying for the wrong jobs. Maybe you need to get more practical experience with these skills in a lower-level position first, for example.If you're getting multiple interviews but not getting offers11. You have the skills but not the storyYou have all the right skills, you're applying for the right jobs, you're passing the screens and early interviews — and yet, no offers. What's going on?You might not have the right story. The "right story" is kind of a fuzzy concept, but basically you don't want the hiring manager to walk out of the interview thinking, "Yes, they can do the job, but why do they even want it?"In interviews, you need to make the case for why a job makes sense as the next step in your career. Are you looking for a managerial role or are you hoping to be more in the weeds dealing with technical problems rather than people problems? In other words, how does this job fit into the story of your professional development? You can cover this straight on in your response to "Tell me about yourself" or "Why this role?" and weave it in throughout the interview.12. You're coming off a little … strongIt's good to be excited about a job opportunity, but it's another thing to come off as overly excited. The latter can sometimes (unfairly) trigger red flags for interviewers.So do show off your interest by having a lot of knowledge about the company and sharing it. Don't show up an hour early to the interview, wait awkwardly in the lobby, and make everyone feel bad that they're not ready for you yet.Do write a thank you note to your interviewers and include details from the conversation. Don't call every day to see if there's an update on the role. Do check out your interviewers on LinkedIn to prepare for the interview. Don't friend them on Facebook or other social media. You get the idea.13. You don't stand out enoughYou don't want to be memorable for the wrong reasons, but you do want to be memorable. When the hiring committee meets to discuss candidates, it's not a good sign if no one really remembers much about you.To stand out in the right way, be ready to show that you're passionate about something related to the job. You can also showcase an unrelated — but just kind of interesting — passion, like bread-making or biking.Find things you can talk about with gusto and then do! For example, when you get a more open-ended question like, "What's the accomplishment you're most proud of?" answer with a work-appropriate response and then briefly add in your latest sourdough triumph at the end!14. You were too negativeIn general, hiring managers favor candidates who are positive and don't always see the worst in everything — it's human nature to not want to work with someone who's overly negative.So, for example, when you get to later interview rounds, you may get asked what kind of suggestions you have for the company to improve a product or make a team more efficient. In these instances, be careful how you word things. It's easy to accidentally get a little too negative and point out all the problems you see. You want to answer the question, but also be mindful that you're not offending anyone. Be solution-oriented instead of only focusing on the issues.The no-negativity rule also applies to questions you may get about previous employers. No badmouthing former workplaces, managers, or colleagues. Even if their behavior was egregious, you won't look good if you speak poorly of them.15. You didn't prep your referencesIf your references are saying completely different things than what you said in the interview, that can be a huge red flag for hiring managers. To avoid having a reference accidentally contradict you, make sure you're giving them adequate heads up that a call may be coming.Ideally, you should also let them know what role you've applied for and why you think you're a good fit. Sending over your tailored resume and cover letter can be really helpful, too. In short, you want to make sure that their story and your story align.All this being said, sometimes you really can be doing everything right in your job search and the reasons you haven't landed a position yet are entirely outside your control. Maybe you were competing with an internal candidate the hiring manager had in mind from the get-go or maybe they just defaulted to interviewing people with more years of experience to narrow down the applicants.Focus on the aspects of your applications that you can control and keep moving forward. Job searches take time, and it will be worth the effort once you land the right job.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 30th, 2022

Everything Is Fine... Until It Isn"t

Everything Is Fine... Until It Isn't Via SchiffGold.com, For months, Peter Schiff, me, and a few others have been saying the economy is teetering on the brink of a collapse. But nothing has happened. Are we just wrong? It would be easy to conclude that we’re crying wolf. But before you write us off, I think you should consider another factor. Predicting the exact timing of an event is much harder than generally recognizing that an event is on the horizon. It’s a little bit like forecasting weather. A meteorologist might know that a cold front is coming next week. She can see the changes in the atmosphere. But knowing a cold front is looming and saying it will come through at precisely 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday are two different matters. I’m certain an economic downturn is imminent because I can see it brewing in the economic atmosphere. But I can’t tell you exactly when the crash will occur. Nor can I predict exactly what will precipitate it. There is plenty of data out there suggesting that the US economy is already in the midst of a downturn. There are also some tremors under the surface signaling the underlying rot in the economy. For instance, some analysts have already said the volatility in the bond market could force the Federal Reserve to abandon balance sheet reduction. But there is still enough momentum in the economy to allow people to plausibly deny the problems. Arguments about data aside, as I said when the Fed cranked up interest rates another 50 basis points at its December meeting, my pessimism is rooted in more fundamental dynamics. In a nutshell, this economy is not built to operate in a high-interest-rate environment. And the Fed has now raised interest rates to the highest level since 2007. Quite simply, the US economy is addicted to easy money. It is addicted to artificially low interest rates and quantitative easing. You can’t take an addict’s drug away without sending him into withdrawal. In the aftermath of 9/11 and the dot-com bubble bursting, the Fed dropped rates to 1%, at the time, a historically low level. That blew up the housing bubble. In 2004, the Fed began normalizing rates. They peaked at 5.25% in 2006. That precipitated the housing bust and ultimately the financial crisis in 2008. Today, the Fed has pushed rates within 1% of that level. But there is a major difference between then and now. The bubbles are bigger. There is more debt. There is more malinvestment. If the extent of the bust is commensurate with the extent of the boom, we’re due for a doozy. To be fair, Peter Schiff and I aren’t the only people worried about a recession. There are a lot of people in the mainstream saying the Fed needs to stop raising rates or it is going to cause an economic downturn. These folks are only half right. It’s not the rate hikes that will cause a recession. The Fed set that stage when it cut rates in the first place. Economist Daniel Lacalle summed it up perfectly. In a recent Bloomberg article, a group of economists voiced their fears that the Federal Reserve’s inflation fight may create an unnecessarily deep downturn. However, the Federal Reserve does not create a downturn due to rate hikes; it creates the foundations of a crisis by unnecessarily lowering rates to negative territory and aggressively increasing its balance sheet. It is the malinvestment and excessive risk-taking fueled by cheap money that lead to a recession.” When you understand these economic fundamentals, it becomes clear that the US economy is heading toward a cliff. But I still can’t tell you exactly when it will plunge over. A few days ago, I was revisiting the timeline before the 2008 financial crisis and the ensuing Great Recession, and I realized the dynamics were much the same in 2006 and 2007 as they are today. Peter Schiff, Ron Paul and a few others were warning of a housing bust and financial crisis as the mainstream insisted everything was fine. In fact, up until the point Lehman Brothers went under in the fall of 2008, some people were still insisting everything was fine. Of course, in retrospect, everything was far from fine as far back as 2006. And the Fed knew everything wasn’t fine. That’s why it started cutting interest rates in September 2007 — while still insisting everything was fine. My point here is that everything is fine. Until it isn’t. The Fed (the drug pusher) has been slowly cranking down the amount of drug it’s giving to the addict. The addict is already feeling the pain but hoping against hope he will get a bigger fix soon. That’s why the markets react with glee every time we get bad economic news or good news on the inflation front. The addict thinks that means the Fed will go back to the status quo – pushing the drugs. But at its December meeting, the Fed cranked down the drug level even lower. Jerome Powell keeps saying the Fed can still manage a “soft landing.” But no matter what the pusher says, you can’t take away an addict’s drugs without causing pain. And at some point, the addict is going to go into full-blown withdrawal. That’s why I’m convinced that at some point in the relatively near future, something big will break. There will be another Lehman-type event that sets off a crash nobody can deny. But when that happens, I can’t say. It could be next week, next month, or even a year from now. Regardless I believe the die has already been cast. It was cast the moment the Fed started running the printing press. The question is what does the Fed do when this happens? How will it respond when it can no longer plausibly deny the economic chaos? Does go back to giving the addict his drug? Or does it let the addict die? If history is any indication, the Fed will go back to drugging up the economy. That means inflation wins. And if it doesn’t, you can expect a financial crisis that will make 2008 look like good times. As Peter Schiff said in a recent tweet, “A pivot will send inflation soaring, which will compound the problem. But if they don’t pivot, we don’t just get a severe recession, we get a worse financial crisis than the one we had in 2008.” Tyler Durden Tue, 12/20/2022 - 08:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeDec 20th, 2022

HPE"s Aruba Powers Walt Disney Resort"s Star Wars Adventure

Hewlett Packard's (HPE) Aruba advanced infrastructure to power Walt Disney World Resort's first ever Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser vacation experience. Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s HPE Aruba Networks recently announced that Walt Disney Company’s DIS entertainment resort complex, Walt Disney World Resort, is using the company’s advanced infrastructure to offer guests a first-of-its-kind vacation experience with Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser.Disney’s Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser is a unique and immersive two-night adventure that makes guests the heroes of their own stories, where they see, feel, and live Star Wars engaging in missions, sampling exotic cuisine, and taking a planet excursion to Batuu. Opened in March 2022, the Star Wars: Galactic Starcruiser adventure provides guests a customizable experience.Hewlett Packard’s fast-growing networking business arm, Aruba’s advanced infrastructure with location-ready indoor and outdoor wireless access points, switches and ClearPass delivers a realistic, secure and connected experience to the guests, enabling them delve intensely into the two-night Disney adventure. Aruba’s User Experience Insight (UXI) incident detection and machine learning solution will aid the DIS resort operators to identify problems and resolve issues quickly. UXI enhance end-user experience on a network by proactively monitoring, troubleshooting, and addressing application and network performance issues. Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company Price and Consensus Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company price-consensus-chart | Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company QuoteEarlier in 2019, Walt Disney Resort had leveraged Aruba’s Wi-Fi infrastructure for 29 of its resort properties to offer improved hotel experiences to resort guests. This enhanced operational efficiency of the resort in guest services, housekeeping and maintenance management.Hewlett Packard’s strategic plan of investing $4 billion through 2022 in artificial intelligence, industrial internet of things and distributed computing will continue to boost revenues in the long run. The company has linked these businesses to Aruba Networks to diversify its business from server and hardware storage markets.HPE has been benefiting from strong executions in clearing backlogs, improved supply chain and increased customer acceptance. The company’s efforts to shift focus to higher-margin offerings like Intelligent Edge and Aruba Central Hyperconverged Infrastructure are aiding its bottom-line results. However, execution challenges faced by the company in Intelligent Edge segment around Aruba sales are hurting its top-line growth.Zacks Rank & Key PicksCurrently, Hewlett Packard and Walt Disney Company both carry a Zacks Rank #5 (Strong Sell). Shares of HPE have gained 12.3% while that of DIS plunged 36.5% in the past year.Some better-ranked stocks from the broader Computer and Technology sector are Celestica CLS and Fabrinet FN. While Celestica sports a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy), Fabrinet has a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy). You can see the complete list of today's Zacks #1 Rank stocks here.The Zacks Consensus Estimate for Celestica’s fourth-quarter 2022 earnings has increased by 9 cents to 53 cents per share over the past 60 days. For 2022, earnings estimates have risen 16 cents to $1.86 per share in the past 60 days.CLS' earnings beat the Zacks Consensus Estimate in all the preceding four quarters, the average surprise being 11.8%. Shares of the company have increased 5% in the past year.The Zacks Consensus Estimate for Fabrinet's second-quarter fiscal 2023 earnings has been revised 16 cents northward to $1.89 per share over the past 60 days. For fiscal 2023, earnings estimates have improved by 7.6% to $7.48 per share in the past 60 days.FN’s earnings beat the Zacks Consensus Estimate in three of the preceding four quarters and missed the same once, the average surprise being 5.4%. Shares of the company have risen 11.4% in the past year. Free Report Reveals How You Could Profit from the Growing Electric Vehicle Industry Globally, electric car sales continue their remarkable growth even after breaking records in 2021. High gas prices have fueled his demand, but so has evolving EV comfort, features and technology. So, the fervor for EVs will be around long after gas prices normalize. Not only are manufacturers seeing record-high profits, but producers of EV-related technology are raking in the dough as well. Do you know how to cash in?  If not, we have the perfect report for you – and it’s FREE! Today, don't miss your chance to download Zacks' top 5 stocks for the electric vehicle revolution at no cost and with no obligation.>>Send me my free report on the top 5 EV stocksWant the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report The Walt Disney Company (DIS): Free Stock Analysis Report Celestica, Inc. (CLS): Free Stock Analysis Report Fabrinet (FN): Free Stock Analysis Report Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company (HPE): Free Stock Analysis ReportTo read this article on Zacks.com click here.Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksDec 13th, 2022

Will Healthy Top-Line Growth Buoy Jabil (JBL) Q1 Earnings?

Backed by solid demand in key end markets, diligent execution of operational plans and skillful management of supply chain dynamics, Jabil (JBL) is likely to record healthy fiscal first-quarter revenues. Jabil Inc. JBL is scheduled to report first-quarter fiscal 2023 (ended Nov 30, 2022) results on Dec 15, before the opening bell. In the last reported quarter, the company delivered an earnings surprise of 9.4%. It pulled off a trailing four-quarter earnings surprise of 9.3%, on average.The St. Petersburg, FL-based company is expected to have recorded year-over-year higher revenues, driven by solid demand in key end markets, diligent execution of operational plans and skillful management of supply chain dynamics.Factors at PlayDuring the quarter, Jabil announced the production rollout of its Badger Technologies multipurpose autonomous robots that were deployed across the retail chain outlets of Busy Beaver Building Centers to automate operations and improve shopping experiences. While automating inventory shelf scans significantly reduces product and price checks from 80 hours weekly to 40 minutes daily, the robots help keep shelves of the home improvement centers fully stocked with the right mix of products at the right prices without overburdening employees. Such innovative products are likely to have aided its quarterly performance.In the fiscal first quarter, Jabil collaborated with BRdata Software Solutions to collate actionable data and key analytics for grocers in order to improve store profitability, operational efficiencies and shopping experiences. Data pertaining to real-time inventory, pricing and shopping trends are collected by Badger Technologies’ multipurpose autonomous robots, which are then analyzed by BRdata’s cloud-based retail software to identify discrepancies and resolve on-shelf product and pricing problems with increased agility and accuracy. This is likely to have aided top-line growth in the quarter.During the to-be-reported quarter, Jabil announced the availability and customer testing of its CFP2 DCO ECO Coherent Transceiver, which is designed and developed by its photonics business unit. The module is based on Nokia’s CSTAR200+ silicon photonics optical engine and is designed to deliver the best-in-class optical performance while adhering to current communications standards requirements. This is likely to have generated incremental revenues for Jabil in the quarter.For the to-be-reported quarter, management expects total revenues to be between $9 billion and $9.6 billion. The Zacks Consensus Estimate for revenues is pegged at $9,281 million, which indicates growth from the year-ago quarter’s reported figure of $8,567 million. The consensus estimate for earnings is pegged at $2.21. It reported adjusted earnings of $1.92 per share.Earnings WhispersOur proven model does not predict an earnings beat for Jabil for the fiscal first quarter. The combination of a positive Earnings ESP and a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy), 2 (Buy) or 3 (Hold) increases the chances of an earnings beat. This is not the case here.Earnings ESP: Earnings ESP, which represents the difference between the Most Accurate Estimate and the Zacks Consensus Estimate, is 0.00%, with both pegged at $2.21. You can uncover the best stocks to buy or sell before they’re reported with our Earnings ESP Filter.Jabil, Inc. Price and EPS Surprise Jabil, Inc. price-eps-surprise | Jabil, Inc. QuoteZacks Rank: Jabil has a Zacks Rank #3.Stocks to ConsiderHere are some companies you may want to consider, as our model shows that these have the right combination of elements to post earnings beat this season:Carnival Corporation & plc CCL is set to release quarterly numbers on Dec 19. It has an Earnings ESP of +3.90% and a Zacks Rank #3. You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank stocks here.The Earnings ESP for Calavo Growers, Inc. CVGW is +9.59% and it carries a Zacks Rank of 3. The company is set to report quarterly numbers on Dec 20.The Earnings ESP for Neogen Corporation NEOG is +366.67% and it carries a Zacks Rank of 2. The company is scheduled to report quarterly numbers on Dec 20.Stay on top of upcoming earnings announcements with the Zacks Earnings Calendar. Free Report Reveals How You Could Profit from the Growing Electric Vehicle Industry Globally, electric car sales continue their remarkable growth even after breaking records in 2021. High gas prices have fueled his demand, but so has evolving EV comfort, features and technology. So, the fervor for EVs will be around long after gas prices normalize. Not only are manufacturers seeing record-high profits, but producers of EV-related technology are raking in the dough as well. Do you know how to cash in?  If not, we have the perfect report for you – and it’s FREE! Today, don't miss your chance to download Zacks' top 5 stocks for the electric vehicle revolution at no cost and with no obligation.>>Send me my free report on the top 5 EV stocksWant the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report Carnival Corporation (CCL): Free Stock Analysis Report Jabil, Inc. (JBL): Free Stock Analysis Report Neogen Corporation (NEOG): Free Stock Analysis Report Calavo Growers, Inc. (CVGW): Free Stock Analysis ReportTo read this article on Zacks.com click here.Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksDec 13th, 2022