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Baker Hughes data show U.S. weekly active oil-rig count up 11 to 492

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Category: topSource: marketwatchJan 14th, 2022

Baker Hughes data show U.S. total weekly active drilling-rig count up 13 at 601

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Category: topSource: marketwatchJan 14th, 2022

Baker Hughes reports biggest weekly rise in U.S. oil-drilling rigs since October

Baker Hughes on Friday reported that the number of active U.S. rigs drilling for oil was up by 11 to 492 this week. That followed a rise of just one oil rig the week before, and marked the biggest weekly climb since October, Baker Hughes data show. The total active U.S. rig count, which includes those drilling for natural gas, climbed by 13 to 601, according to Baker Hughes. Oil prices continued to trade higher in Friday dealings, finding support as worsening tensions between Russia and Ukraine raised concerns over a potential disruption to global crude supplies. February West Texas Intermediate crude was up $1.78, or 2.2%, at $83.90 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchJan 14th, 2022

Baker Hughes shows weekly active rig count for the U.S. unchanged, but oil rigs up 213 for the year

Baker Hughes data on Friday afternoon showed the U.S. weekly active oil-rig count standing pat at 586. Oil rigs were steady at 480 and those rigs drilling for natural gas held at 106, according to the companies data. For the year, rigs are up 235, with those drilling for oil increasing by 213 and gas rigs up by 23. West Texas Intermediate oil for February delivery held lower, down $1.58, or 2.1%, to trade at $75.25 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Crude values broadly are climbing, with WTI up 2.2%, rising by about 14% for the month and 56% in 2021, FactSet data show. Fading concerns about the demand impact from the omicron variant has supported recent gains, strategists said. Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchJan 1st, 2022

Baker Hughes reports a second straight weekly increase in U.S. oil-drilling rigs

Baker Hughes on Friday reported that the number of active U.S. rigs drilling for oil rose by four to 475 this week. The rig count was also up by four in the previous week, Baker Hughes data show. The total active U.S. rig count, which includes those drilling for natural gas, climbed by three to 579, according to Baker Hughes. Oil prices continued to trade lower in Friday dealings, with January West Texas Intermediate crude down $1.43, or 2%, at $70.95 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchDec 17th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. weekly active oil-rig count up 4 to 475

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Category: topSource: marketwatchDec 17th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. total weekly active drilling-rig count up 3 at 579

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Category: topSource: marketwatchDec 17th, 2021

Family Of Murdered Uber Driver In San Francisco Issues Demands

Last month, an Afghan refugee named Ahmad Fawad Yusufi was murdered in San Francisco while driving for Uber. He leaves behind his wife and three children, one of whom is 4 months old. Ahmad lived in Sacramento, and was only in San Francisco to drive for Uber. Ahmad commuted weekly to SF for several days […] Last month, an Afghan refugee named Ahmad Fawad Yusufi was murdered in San Francisco while driving for Uber. He leaves behind his wife and three children, one of whom is 4 months old. Ahmad lived in Sacramento, and was only in San Francisco to drive for Uber. Ahmad commuted weekly to SF for several days in search of rides, sleeping in his car because his wages from driving couldn’t afford him a hotel room. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get Our Activist Investing Case Study! Get the entire 10-part series on our in-depth study on activist investing in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or print it out to read anywhere! Sign up below! (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q3 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Uber told local press he wasn’t working at the time, shirking responsibility to Ahmad’s surviving family. They are now reliant solely on GoFundMe to raise three children and take care of Ahmad’s surviving wife. Here’s a statement from Cherri Murphy, an organizer with Gig Workers Rising, a Bay Area organization supporting the family: “No worker should have to sleep in their car to make ends meet. For years Uber and Lyft drivers have commuted from all around the Bay to work in the city, sleeping in car parking lots wherever they can. Ahmad was one of those drivers. Uber knows this is happening. When they learned about Ahmad’s killing, Uber washed their hands of him. That’s simply unacceptable. We stand in strong solidarity with Ahmad’s family and for workers everywhere who are endangered or killed on the job.”  How Uber Drivers Are Murdered On The Job Here is some background on how Uber drivers are murdered on the job: It is incredibly important not to accept the false reality Uber contorts: We’ve spoken with countless drivers in our network who’ve driven 40+ hours a week––but when they show us their Uber app, the app would only report “8 hours of active drive time”. It is imperative that reporters don’t listen to this distorted reality. When a driver leaves his family in Sacramento on a Friday to drive all weekend for Uber in San Francisco, he is there to drive, not to take a vacation. When a driver stops during a 12-hour work day for an hour to get food, or 10 minutes to use the bathroom, they are still on the job for Uber. These are basic understandings of work that were accepted decades ago. Ahmad is not the first Uber driver killed on the job. This is a systemic issue. Below we’ve listed a small subset of Uber drivers killed on the job in recent years. These murders are just the tip of the iceberg. Andre Jamal Bayyan, an Uber driver killed in Inglewood, California in March, 2016. Beaudovin Tchakounte, an Uber driver killed in Oxon Hill, Maryland in August, 2019. Ceyonne Riley, an UberEats driver killed in New Orleans, Louisiana in July, 2021. Cherno “Che” Ceesay, an Uber driver killed King in County, WA in December, 2020. David Rosenthal, an Uber driver killed in Denver, Colorado in February, 2019. Dhulfiqar Kareem Mseer, an Uber driver killed in Portland, Oregon in December, 2020. Filip Kirilov, an Uber driver killed in Okaloosa Island Florida in June, 2018. Ganiou Gandonou, an Uber driver killed in the Bronx, NY in March, 2019. Grant Nelson, an Uber driver killed in Skokie, Illinois in September, 2017. Javier Ramos, an Uber driver killed in Chicago, Illinois in March, 2021. Timothy Perkins, an Uber driver killed in Detroit, Michigan in January, 2021. Uber knows workers are murdered on the job, yet the corporation fails to support surviving families when a worker is killed making money for the corporation. (Uber will deny this, but reporters should ask the families for the truth). Letter To Uber See attached a letter from Ilyas, the brother of murdered Ahmad, to the executives at Uber. Ilyas sent this to Uber this morning over email. December 16, 2021 From: Mohammad Dawood Mommand To: Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, Uber Chief Legal Officer Tony West, and Uber SVP of Marketing and Public Affairs Jill Hazelbaker Subject: Uber killed my brother. Here’s what my family demands. Dear Dara Khosrowshahi, Tony West, and Jill Hazelbaker, My name is Mohammed. My community calls me Ilyas. Three years ago, our family fled war in Afghanistan, pursuing a safer, happier life for our children. Since we arrived in America, my brother and I have been working for Uber. On weekends we’d leave our families in Sacramento and work in San Francisco for three or four days straight, sleeping in our cars because we couldn’t afford a room. As you know, hundreds of other Afghan drivers do the same thing every weekend. On November 28th, my brother Ahmad was killed while driving for your company. You lied when you told the press that he wasn’t working for Uber at the time he was killed. He was in San Francisco to work for Uber. It was 5am on a Monday morning. He’d stopped for a break after working for Uber that night. Uber pledged to support Afghan refugees, yet your company pays wages so low and sustains such precarious working conditions that hundreds of Afghan drivers drive from Sacramento to San Francisco each week and sleep in their cars in unsafe environments – just to earn enough each week to provide for their families. My brother and I did the same. And now after all the work we did for your company, you are turning your backs on us in our time of need. Now that Uber has stolen his life from us, our family has three demands: Access to my brother’s Uber account. We have been trying to access his account since he was killed, but the account has been disabled. Please provide access to our family so that we can gather more information about his work for Uber and the conditions surrounding his death. $4 million in immediate aid for our family. Ahmad was the sole provider for his family. He left behind him a wife and three children. His wife, who doesn’t speak English, now has to raise these children on her own. One of his children is four months old. They can’t make next month's rent and will lose their home. You have an ethical obligation to support our family because Ahmad was murdered while working for your company. Better pay for all Uber drivers. When my brother and I drove to San Francisco every weekend, we could never afford a hotel room after delivering your customers around the city all night. We drop people like you off to your multi-million dollar homes every day. We deserve a safe, hospitable place to sleep at night afterwards. I will not rest until my brother’s children are taken care of. We trust that you will do the right thing. Ilyas, on behalf of our family Updated on Dec 16, 2021, 12:33 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkDec 17th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. weekly active oil-rig count up 4 to 471

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchDec 10th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. total weekly active drilling-rig count up 7 at 576

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchDec 10th, 2021

Baker Hughes reports a weekly increase in U.S. oil-drilling rigs

Baker Hughes on Friday reported that the number of active U.S. rigs drilling for oil rose by four to 471 this week. The rig count was unchanged in the previous week, Baker Hughes data show. The total active U.S. rig count, which includes those drilling for natural gas, also climbed by seven to 576, according to Baker Hughes. Oil prices continued to trade higher in Friday dealings, with January West Texas Intermediate crude up 54 cents, or 0.8%, at $71.48 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchDec 10th, 2021

A Guide To Professional Budget Management

Professional Budget Management from Beginning to End Effective budget management is necessary for your business to keep operating successfully year after year. Q3 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Budgeting ensures that your sales cover your costs and that resources are effectively utilized to meet strategic goals. Companies need funds for standard business operations […] Professional Budget Management from Beginning to End Effective budget management is necessary for your business to keep operating successfully year after year. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Series in PDF Get the entire 10-part series on Charlie Munger in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues. (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q3 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Budgeting ensures that your sales cover your costs and that resources are effectively utilized to meet strategic goals. Companies need funds for standard business operations such as incorporating a new business as well as for projects to improve products or services — all of which need to be budgeted for. Over 50% of projects run over budget, which significantly impacts their ability to deliver benefits for the organization. In this article, we’ll look at exactly what budget management is and why it’s so important. Plus, we’ll walk you through a six-step process to effectively manage your budget from beginning to end. What Is Budget Management? A budget is a financial plan created to help you achieve your organization's strategic and operational goals. Strategic goals are things like increasing your customer conversion rate or becoming an industry leader. Operational goals are related to routine tasks that are needed to keep the business running. One example would be implementing a new filing system that allows administrative employees to perform their jobs faster and more efficiently. Budget management is the effective planning, execution, and control of your budget. It's mainly done through a process of tracking and managing your income and expenses. After all, your budget is only useful if you actually stick to it. So, somebody needs to constantly manage the budget and make sure that the company is still on track to meet its goals. Budget management is different from financial management because of the time frame that it covers. A budget tends to only look out to a year into the future, at most. It focuses on immediate money issues. In contrast, financial management tends to take a more long-term approach and may look at the company's overall position in five or ten years. Why is effective budget management important? Managing a budget is a lot of work. So if you have to do it, you’d better have a good reason for doing so. The truth is, there are many benefits of creating and managing a budget. So it’s well worth the time you’ll invest. Let’s explore the various benefits of creating, executing, and controlling a budget that makes effective budget management so important. Benefits Of Creating A Budget Budget planning forces you to analyze what money you have (or expect to have in the future) and plan costs against it. You have to think ahead strategically for better investments. You’re less likely to be surprised by forgotten expenses. It prevents you from taking on projects that you don’t have the cash for. Employees become more cost-conscious and try to conserve resources. Avoid having to repair your credit score due to bad financial decisions. Benefits Of Executing A Budget Sharing the plan with the rest of your organization helps everybody to know where the focus is. It gets managers all on the same page. It lets everyone know what should be a priority and helps to keep the team on track. This leads to better planning and coordination of business activities. It also ensures short and long-term profitability. Profit margins increase from effective cost management. Benefits Of Controlling The Budget You can see early when overspending occurs. That way, you have more time to react. You’ll see when unexpected revenue comes in, so you can more quickly decide what to do with it. You can pinpoint any “cash leaks” or issues and work to reduce or resolve them. It allows the company to review its organizational plans (and change them when necessary) to maximize its financial resources. 6 Steps To Successfully Manage A Budget Now that you understand the importance of a well-managed budget, it’s time to learn the six key steps to building an effective budget management process. Determine The Scope Of Your Budget You can use a budget at nearly every level of your organization. So the first step needs to be figuring out what the scope of your budget is. What level of the organization are you budgeting at? This might be at a department level or budgeting for a specific item or product. You also need to figure out what period you’re budgeting for. Are you planning things out on a weekly, monthly, quarterly, or annual basis? You can be managing a budget related to the number of snacks in an office vending machine each month. Or you could be managing a budget for the entire marketing department for the year. Create Your Budget If you’re starting from scratch, then you’ll need to create a budget before you can begin managing it. If your company already has budgeting software, you can make use of that. Otherwise, you can find a template online to use. You’ll want to pull in all of the previous historical data that you’ve got about income and expenses (if you’ve got it). Include all of the revenue related to your budget as well as both fixed and variable costs. Fixed costs remain the same irrespective of how much volume you produce, e.g., factory lease. Variable costs fluctuate depending on production volume, e.g., labor costs. (Image Source) Be sure to adjust for any cyclical or seasonal changes that may affect your business. If you’re running a landscaping business, your budget is going to look a lot different in the summer than in the winter. Try to anticipate any new upcoming expenses or changes that might impact your budget. For example, a new hire or a new project will increase your costs. Projected growth will mean more revenue coming in. Don’t forget to account for any irregular costs like annual fees or licenses. Involve Other Decision-Makers Depending on your position within the company, you may need to get your budget reviewed and approved before you can start managing it. Even if you’re the only person who needs to approve it, it’s good to get feedback from other employees before finalizing your plans. They may be able to point out some unexpected expenses or other items that you’ve missed. As your budget influences your business planning for the coming year, it’s worth gathering a team of subject matter experts or other managers together to review your budget and discuss it. Getting the team more involved helps with any concerns they may have about how the budget may impact their department. Anybody who’ll be bound to the budget should get a chance to give their feedback before it’s finalized. People will quickly let you know if they feel like anything is missing or the numbers aren’t realistic. Once you receive feedback, you can adjust and revise your numbers to develop a final approved budget. After the budget is finalized, encourage buy-in from anyone who has to stick to it. For example, have the marketing department “own” the marketing budget. Execute Your Budget A budget doesn’t do any good if you just toss it in a drawer until the end of the year until it’s time to take it out and review how you’ve done. Budget monitoring needs to be done on an ongoing basis and needs to be communicated effectively to your team. You need to share and publish the budget where the team and cost owners can see it. That might mean printing it and putting it on a prominent notice board where people can refer to it at any time. You can also make an electronic copy available on an internal company website. Once your budget is out there, you also need a way to track costs against it. This is usually done using project management software in larger companies. However, smaller companies may be able to do it with just an Excel spreadsheet. Having a way to track costs will only work if there’s data coming in. You also need some way to get the information into your system. That could involve employees submitting an expense report each week. Or you may be able to provide them online access to log in and update their own expenses if your software allows for it. The closer to real-time that you’re able to track your expenses, the more effective the whole process will be. You don’t want a one-month lag between a significant spike in spending and when you’re able to identify it. Someone needs to be assigned as a budget manager to track and manage all of this. If you aren’t doing it yourself, then be sure that someone is responsible for managing the budget and keeping information up-to-date. The person managing your budget will be an invaluable resource for the company. They can raise the alert if costs exceed what’s been approved, help adjust the budget when necessary, and keep things on track. Review Your Budget Whoever is in charge of managing the budget should be providing reports or having meetings with the decision-makers in the company who are affected by the budgets on a regular basis. The frequency of these regular reviews will depend on the period of the budget. But generally, an annual budget will need to be broken down into monthly and quarterly forecasting. The person responsible for managing the budget will also be responsible for preparing reports that show actual numbers against forecasted numbers. That way, it’s easy for everyone involved to see which areas are performing well and where some adjustments might be needed. Besides regularly reviewing the budget, it’s essential to have certain controls in place that are performed continuously. These additional parts of the budget review process include: Reviewing and approving purchase orders Signing off on invoices Approving overtime requests against the budget Lastly, you need to have processes in place for what to do if actual numbers end up being far off what has been budgeted for. Repeat The Process A budget isn’t something that you just do once. It’s a constantly ongoing process of anticipating and forecasting the operations of your business. Before the period from your first budget is done, it’ll be time to review the data and create a new budget for the next period. Adjust your next budget based on actual numbers, ongoing market trends, current events, seasonality, and other changes. Additional Budget Management Tips The steps above will get you started on the right foot when managing your budget. Here are three further tips to have you manage your budget like a pro. Use Budgets As An Opportunity To Improve, Not To Punish It’s easy for a team member (or even a manager) to let costs get out of hand and exceed a budget without realizing it. Particularly if they’re new to managing a budget or if your company is only starting to get serious about budgeting. It’s important to understand why targets are getting missed and find a way to correct that next time instead of just casting blame. Set Realistic Budget Goals A budget is about where your company or department will realistically be at the end of a time period or specific project, not where you wish you would be. Setting overly-ambitious goals that people can’t realistically meet will only serve to demoralize your team. Put Your Plan Into Action Effective budget management isn’t a passive activity. You need to take an active role and use your budget to guide the decisions in your department or organization. For example, if you receive extra income above what your budget expected, you don’t want to let it sit. You need to decide how the extra money will be spent to further your organization's goals and update the budget. Effective Budget Management Is Essential To Financial Success In this article, we’ve looked at why good budget management is so important to the success of your business and staying profitable in the short and long term. You also learned six vital steps to creating and managing a budget and how to work with other colleagues in your organization to get feedback and keep financial information up to date. The ability to read financial statements is an important first step in understanding a company’s financial health. And it’s crucial for effective forecasting and accurate budget formation. Updated on Dec 8, 2021, 3:27 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkDec 8th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. weekly active oil-rig count unchanged at 467

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchDec 3rd, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. total weekly active drilling-rig count also flat at 569

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchDec 3rd, 2021

Baker Hughes reports a 4th weekly rise in a row for U.S. oil-drilling rigs

Baker Hughes on Friday reported that the number of active U.S. rigs drilling for oil rose by seven to 461 this week. That followed increases in each of the previous three weeks, including a climb of four oil rigs last week, Baker Hughes data show. The total active U.S. rig count, which includes those drilling for natural gas, also climbed by seven to stand at 563, according to Baker Hughes. Oil prices continued to trade sharply lower on concerns that Europe's rise in COVID cases will hurt energy demand. December West Texas Intermediate crude was down $2.77, or 3.5%, at $76.24 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchNov 19th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. weekly active oil-rig count up 7 to 461

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchNov 19th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. total weekly active drilling-rig count up 7 at 563

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchNov 19th, 2021

Baker Hughes reports a third-straight weekly rise in U.S. oil-drilling rigs

Baker Hughes on Friday reported that the number of active U.S. rigs drilling for oil rose by four to 454 this week. That followed increases in each of the previous two weeks, including a climb of six oil rigs last week, Baker Hughes data show. The total active U.S. rig count, which includes those drilling for natural gas, climbed by six to stand at 556, according to Baker Hughes. December West Texas Intermediate crude continued to trade lower, down 89 cents, or 1.1%, at $80.70 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchNov 12th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. weekly active oil-rig count up 4 to 454

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchNov 12th, 2021

Baker Hughes data show U.S. total weekly active drilling-rig count up 6 at 556

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchNov 12th, 2021

Baker Hughes reports the biggest weekly rise in U.S. oil-drilling rigs since mid-October

Baker Hughes on Friday reported that the number of active U.S. rigs drilling for oil rose by six to 450 this week. That was the biggest increase since the week ended Oct. 15, Baker Hughes data show, though the latest weekly climb followed a slight rise of just one oil rig last week. The total active U.S. rig count, which includes those drilling for natural gas, also climbed by six to stand at 550, according to Baker Hughes. December West Texas Intermediate crude continued to trade sharply higher, up $2.40, or 3.1%, at $81.21 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange.Market Pulse Stories are Rapid-fire, short news bursts on stocks and markets as they move. Visit MarketWatch.com for more information on this news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchNov 5th, 2021