Advertisements


Biden Admin Evacuated Hundreds On US Watchlist From Afghanistan: Whistleblower

Biden Admin Evacuated Hundreds On US Watchlist From Afghanistan: Whistleblower Authored by Caden Pearson via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), Two GOP senators have urged the Department of Defense (DoD) to immediately investigate whistleblower allegations that hundreds of Afghan evacuees who appeared on official watchlists were not properly vetted before they were released into the United States. Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) speaks during a Senate Homeland Security Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Spending Oversight on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Aug. 3, 2022. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images) According to the DoD whistleblower, the Biden administration failed to properly vet 324 Afghan evacuees who appeared on the DoD’s Biometrically Enabled Watchlist (BEWL), which includes known suspected terrorists, said U.S. Sens. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) and Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) on Thursday. The BEWL identifies individuals whose biometrics have been collected and determined by analysts to be threats or potential threats to national security, including known suspected terrorists. A full flight of 265 people supported by members of the UK Armed Forces on board an evacuation flight out of Kabul airport (MoD) Hawley and Johnson said the whistleblower also alleges that White House and DoD officials instructed agency personnel to “cut corners” and not conduct full fingerprint tests on the evacuees at staging bases in Europe, “in order to promote the rushed evacuation from Afghanistan.” Further, the whistleblower alleges that Department of Homeland Security (DHS) staff were authorized to delete old biometric data at their discretion, said the senators, who went on to say that this is a “troubling development that could threaten national security and public safety.” Whistleblower Allegations Raised in Letter Hawley and Johnson raised the DoD whistleblower’s allegations with DoD Acting Inspector General Sean O’Donnell in a letter on Thursday (pdf). “We write to you with concern over new allegations raised by a Department of Defense (DoD) whistleblower. This information may show the Biden Administration’s failure to vet those evacuated from Afghanistan was even worse than the public was led to believe. The following allegations demand an immediate investigation by your office,” the senators wrote. The DoD has previously admitted in a report that the National Counter-Terrorism Center (NCTC) did not vet all Afghan evacuees “using all DoD data prior to arriving in” the United States. NEW whistleblower allegations - hundreds of Afghan evacuees who appeared on DOD terror watch list allowed to enter the U.S. ⁦@SenRonJohnson⁩ and I lay out what we’ve learned pic.twitter.com/zBHlVB0ujE — Josh Hawley (@HawleyMO) August 4, 2022 The DoD earlier this year said that it identified 50 Afghan individuals in the United States whose records indicate they might pose a significant security concern. Hawley and Johnson said they “understand that number has risen to at least 65,” and declared that the individuals “need to be immediately located, fully vetted, and, if appropriate, deported.” The senators noted that the 324 Afghan individuals allegedly on the watchlist are in addition to the 50 or 65 already identified. Answers Sought From DOD Hawley and Johnson asked O’Donnell to confirm how many BEWL matches were generated by biometric submissions from Afghan evacuees. Of these matches, if any, the senators asked the DoD acting inspector general to clarify if any were denied entry, admitted entry, or currently in the United States. The senators also sought information about the allegations that NSC or DoD staff instructed personnel to cut corners in processing the evacuees’ fingerprints, and asked for clarification on the circumstances under which agency personnel may delete biometric data. Hawley and Johnson also asked O’Donnell to clarify the number of BEWL matches generated by Afghan evacuees after they arrived; what steps have been taken toward identification, vetting, or deportation; and how many were known suspected terrorists. Additionally, the senators asked if the FBI or other law enforcement were investigating the individuals. Hawley Grills FBI Director At a Senate Judiciary Committee Oversight Hearing on Thursday, Hawley confronted FBI Director Christopher Wray about the whistleblower’s allegations. Wray wasn’t able to give a clear answer about the FBI’s efforts to track down and interview the 324 Afghan evacuees, but noted that “there are a number of individuals, through our joint terrorism task forces, that we are actively trying to investigate.” The FBI director noted that the agency had disrupted a number of actions related to the evacuees, but did not specify what they were. Read more here... Tyler Durden Fri, 08/05/2022 - 18:20.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytAug 5th, 2022

Reddit Allows Hate Speech to Flourish in Its Global Forums, Moderators Say

Reddit moderators around the world say that racism, xenophobia, homophobia, sexism, misinformation and personal threats are running rampant on the site When Reddit moderator asantos3 clicked on a thread inside the group r/Portugueses in December and found it full of racist comments, he wasn’t exactly surprised. The group is often home to nationalist and nativist rhetoric, and in this instance, users here were responding angrily to a new law that allowed increased freedom of movement between Portuguese-speaking countries including African nations like Mozambique and Angola. “Wonderful, more stupid Blacks to rob me in the street,” read one comment in Portuguese, which received 19 likes. “This Africanization of Portugal can only lead the country to a third-world backwardness,” read another. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] So, asantos3, who moderates the much larger and more mainstream group r/Portugal, quickly sent a report to Reddit staffers with a link to the thread. Within minutes, he received an automated response: “After investigating, we’ve found that the reported content doesn’t violate Reddit’s Content Policy.” The response was disappointing but predictable for asantos3, who has served as a volunteer content moderator for six years. As part of his duties, he deletes comments that contain racism, homophobia, sexism and other policy violations, and sends reports to Reddit about hate speech coming from smaller satellite groups like r/Portugeses. Asantos3 spoke on the condition that he would be identified only by his Reddit handle. He says his duties have led to him being doxxed—with personal details including his Instagram and LinkedIn profiles posted online— and threatened. And asantos3 says that the company itself has repeatedly ignored reports of harassment from him and other moderators. “We mostly stopped reporting stuff, because we don’t have feedback,” he says. “We have no idea if they read our reports, or if there are even Portuguese-speaking people in the company.” Reddit’s problem is a global one, say current and former moderators. Indian subreddits like r/chodi and r/DesiMeta include Islamophobic posts and calls for the genocide of Muslims. In subreddits about China like r/sino and r/genzedong, users attack Uyghurs and promote violence against them. And members of r/Portugueses regularly traffic in anti-Black, anti-Roma and anti-immigrant sentiment. READ MORE: The Subreddit /r/Collapse Has Become the Doomscrolling Capital of the Internet. Can Its Users Break Free? “Anything outside the anglosphere is pretty much ignored, to be honest,” 11th Dimension, a former moderator of r/Portugal who stepped down from his role due to burnout, says. “It’s hard to convey to the company what’s racist and what’s not when the admins are so far from the details and the cultural differences.” TIME spoke to 19 Reddit moderators around the world who shared similar stories and concerns about the San-Francisco-based company’s reluctance to control hate-speech in its non-English language forums. Nearly all of the moderators agreed to speak on the condition that their real names would not be published because they say they have received death threats and other attacks online for their work. This all-volunteer corps of moderators, of which there are at least tens of thousands, is only growing in importance for the company. Reddit announced in December that it intends to make an initial public offering of stock in 2022. The company was recently valued at $10 billion, is one of the 25 most visited websites in the world according to multiple trackers and has made its international expansion a key aspect of its post-IPO growth strategy. But some of its most devoted users—its unpaid moderators—argue that while the company aims to be the “front page of the internet,” it has not invested in the infrastructure to combat vile content that is rife on many of its non-English language pages. Reddit has acknowledged that its expansion to international markets makes policing its platform more difficult, and some moderators said the company has taken steps in recent months to correct the longstanding problems. “When we begin to open in non-English speaking countries, moderation does get more complex,” a Reddit spokesperson said in a statement to TIME. “We are investing now to build and hire for non-English capabilities and add support for more languages.” READ MORE: Facebook Let an Islamophobic Conspiracy Theory Flourish in India Despite Employees’ Warnings These problems are not unique to Reddit. Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have each struggled to contain hate speech and misinformation as they pushed into new markets around the world. Facebook groups and posts, for example, have been linked to real-world violence in India, the Philippines, Myanmar and other countries even as the platform spends billions of dollars a year on safety and security. This year, other Silicon Valley companies will be watching closely as Reddit embarks on a precarious balancing act: to gain legitimacy and generate revenue while retaining its freewheeling, decentralized structure. Can the company preserve free speech while protecting its users? And will its model of running a lean operation with few paid staffers allow it to adapt to the responsibilities of hosting growing, diverse communities around the world? More from TIME Many moderators and analysts are skeptical. “Reddit has very little incentive to do anything about problems [in subreddits] because they see them as a self-governing problem,” Adrienne Massanari, an associate professor at American University who has been studying Reddit for years and wrote a book on its communities, says. “They’re creating a very successful business model in pushing work to moderators and users, who have to be exposed to horrific stuff.” Using dog whistles to get around the rules Zach Gibson—Getty ImagesReddit Inc. co-founder and CEO Steve Huffman looks on during a hearing with the House Communications and Technology and House Commerce Subcommittees on Oct. 16, 2019 in Washington, DC. The hearing investigated measures to foster a healthier internet and protect consumers. Reddit, founded in 2005, is essentially a messaging board, but it could be compared to a high school extracurriculars fair. The site comprises hundreds of self-contained forums arranged by varied interests, from sports to makeup to art to pets. While many of these subreddits are innocuous, it’s no secret that Reddit has long been a haven for unseemly behavior. Reddit CEO, Steve Huffman, even explicitly stated in 2018 that racism was not against Reddit’s rules, elaborating that “on Reddit there will be people with beliefs different from your own, sometimes extremely so.” However, over the two years—following intense criticism rained down on the company over its hate speech and harassment policies, including in the wake of the murder of George Floyd—the company backed away from its original hands-off ethos and has been hard at work to clean up its communities and clamp down on noxious, racist behavior. Toxic communities like r/The_Donald have been banned; AI-powered tools aimed at curbing hate speech and abuse have been rolled out; backchannels between moderators and company employees have been established. READ MORE: Reddit Places a ‘Quarantine’ on The_Donald, Its Largest Community of Trump Supporters But many non-English moderators say that cleanup has not extended to the pages they monitor. R/India is one of the largest national subreddits, with 693,000 members. There, users will typically find a fairly tame mix of news links, memes and local photos. That’s partly down to the hard work of unpaid moderators to remove Islamophic content. A group of five r/India moderators, speaking to TIME over a Zoom call, say they can spend several hours a day actively responding to queries, removing hate speech and banning rogue accounts. (Old moderators approve the applications of new ones; the primary draws of the gig, according to moderators, are community-building and the ability to help shape a discourse.) One moderator for r/India has served in his role since 2011, when there was a more laissez-faire approach. Moderators soon realized that a hands-off moderation style “wasn’t working because it allowed the worst people to dominate the conversations,” he says. “There would be lots of people just saying things like ‘Muslims need to die.’” When moderators began to block these users, some would simply return with a new account and taunt them, creating an endless game of whack-a-mole. Moderators say they saw other users instead start or join offshoot groups that allowed more controversial posts. The largest of those r/India offshoots currently is r/Chodi, which was created in 2019 and has 90,000 members who create hundreds of posts a day. R/Chodi—which translates as a crude slang in Hindi—contains ample examples of far-right Hindu nationalism that often spills over into hate speech and sectarian bigotry. Dozens of posts a week denigrate Islam, often depicting Muslims as ignorant, violent or incestuous. “Poorer, dumber, breeding like rats. They’ve got it all,” one post says about Muslims in India, which is still online. “India needs to eliminate them before they rise up,” read another, which has since been deleted. (R/Chodi’s increased popularity has coincided with a steep rise in religious hate crimes in India.) As r/Chodi has faced criticism from communities like r/AgainstHateSpeech, the group’s own moderators have made efforts to halt the most overt examples of hate speech, including creating a list of banned words. But r/Chodi posters have simply turned to code words and increasingly slippery rhetoric, to get around the moderators and Reddit’s AI-driven natural language processing techniques, according to r/India moderators. Muslims are referred to using coded language such as “Abduls,” “Mull@s,” “K2as,” or, derisively, “Peace loving” people. Christians are referred to as “Xtians”; while Pakistan is called “Porkistan.” Reddit said in a statement that automation and machine learning “help moderators remove 99% of reported hateful content.” But, studies have shown that AI is far less powerful when working outside the language it was designed in. The moderators who spoke with TIME say they have tried to flag these alternative slurs to the Reddit administrators, paid employees who are largely based in the U.S., but have been mostly ignored. “I have tried to report these comments 20 or 30 times, easily,” a second r/India moderator says. “I’ve tried to collate these slurs and send them the translations, but it was never even replied to.” In a statement responding to the moderator’s claim, Reddit wrote that “harassment, bullying, and threats of violence or content that promotes hate based on identity or vulnerability” are prohibited on the platform and that they “review and work with communities that may engage in such behavior, including the subreddit in question.” Extremists around the world use code words in a way similar to the users of r/Chodi. The user DubTeeDub—who moderates r/AgainstHateSubreddits and wrote a widely shared open letter last year excoriating racism on the platform and demanding change—says that Reddit’s administrators have failed to keep up with racists’ constantly evolving dog whistles, such as Neo-Nazis putting Jewish names in triple parentheses to signal their identity. “It’s very clearly a white supremacist symbol, but the admins will just say, ‘that seems fine to me,’ and they’ll ignore it,” DubTeeDub, says. But the moderators of r/India feel that Reddit is not only allowing hate speech to spread on r/Chodi and other similar groups, but actively pushing users toward the group. They have found posts from r/Chodi within r/India itself, algorithmically suggested as “posts you may like” and giving the subreddit a veneer of tacit official approval. “These are very hateful subs, and we don’t want our subscribers going there,” a second r/India moderator says. “They can discover them on their own, but that should not be happening from inside our sub.” Reddit’s volunteer moderators face threats The fraught interplay between r/India and r/Chodi is emblematic of cat-and-mouse games playing out in subreddits in other parts of the world, especially as far-right political groups amass power in many countries and gain legions of followers. In Portugal, r/Portugueses (6,900 members) is filled with anti-Roma and anti-Semitic rhetoric, homophobia, and racist depictions of Africans. “How is it possible for someone to want to see a place like this full of Africans, Brazilians, Indians and I don’t know what else?” posted one commenter alongside an idyllic illustration of a Portuguese town. A screenshot from the Reddit community r/Portugueses, which often includes anti-Black, anti-Roma and anti-immigrant sentiment. “How is it possible for someone to want to see a place like this full of Africans, Brazilians, Indians, and I don’t know what else?,” the caption reads in Portuguese. Concerned moderators have attempted to report these posts and, in turn, become targets of abuse. One of the most common tactics is for zealous users to band together and report moderators for invented reasons in an effort to get them suspended or banned by unsuspecting admins. DubTeeDub says these types of tactics have led to his suspension at least seven times. But the attacks often turn much more personal and vicious, as trolls dig up moderators’ personal information. Asantos3, the r/Portugal moderator, says he’s been stalked across LinkedIn and Instagram. One user offered Bitcoin to anyone who could find out his address. “It’s so weird, but some of these actions are so common that we kind of ignore them now,” he says. In Brazil, a São Paulo-based student and r/Brasil moderator who gave his name as Tet said he was threatened and doxxed when he and other moderators tried to crack down on the hate speech on r/Brasilivre (176,000 members), on which users post transphobia, anti-Black racism and homophobic slurs. “Stay smart because we’re watching you. Don’t think I’m the only one,” wrote one commenter in Portuguese. “I will find each one of you and kill you slowly.” Another user posted Tet’s address and personal Facebook account, writing, “Just let the hate flow and f— with them… bring trouble to their lives.” Neither of those posters have active accounts anymore, and Tet has since stopped moderating the subreddit partly due to burnout. Perhaps it’s not surprising that there’s a high level of fatigue among moderators, who are often forced to see the worst aspects of Reddit on a daily basis. One r/India moderator tells TIME that women are especially vulnerable to harassment. “I know female mods are regularly hounded, targeted, not given space: it’s not a place to identify as a woman,” he says. How Reddit can move forward Many other social media platforms are struggling to balance free speech ideals with the aggressive spread of hate speech and misinformation on their platforms. This fall, documents released by the whistleblower Frances Haugen showed that Facebook deprioritized efforts to curtail misinformation. In July, Black soccer players for England’s national team received torrents of racist abuse on Facebook and Twitter following the Euro 2021 Championship final, provoking British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to demand “the urgent need for action” from social media companies. In India, Facebook allowed Hindu extremists to operate openly on its platform for months, despite being banned by the platform. Facebook, in response to criticism, has pledged to bolster its safety team and resources: it has 40,000 employees working on safety and security alone. Reddit, similarly, is pledging to ramp up its efforts, although its team is skeletal in comparison. Over the last year, the company has expanded its workforce from 700 to 1,300. A Reddit spokesperson said that the company opened offices in Canada, the U.K., Australia and Germany, and would “continue to expand to other countries” in an effort to get closer to their global communities. Reddit created a Mod Council to receive feedback from moderators last year. It is also testing a new feature to give users more advanced blocking capabilities to limit the mobilizing power of extremists, harassers and bigots. In October 2021, the company posted a statement laying out statistics about its efforts toward “internationalizing safety,” and wrote, “The data largely shows that our content moderation is scaling and that international communities show healthy levels of reporting and moderation.” Many Reddit moderators feel the site’s system of using volunteer moderators is less healthy than the company suggests. “There are a lot of people who just move on,” Jonathan Deans, a Scotland-based moderator of r/worldnews, says. “They’re like, ‘I’m sick of doing this. We just remove hateful comments all day, and what do we get out of it? Not really anything.” Massanari, the American University professor, argues that Reddit’s problems will continue to worsen without a concerted internal effort. “Reddit’s defense has been, ‘If you ignore these spaces, they’ll go away,’” she says. “But the scholars and experts who have researched extremism and hate speech for years have clearly said that the more you allow that stuff to continue, you get more and more extreme versions of it.” “We take safety extremely seriously and are committed to continuously enhancing our policies and processes to ensure the safety of users and moderators on our platform,” Reddit said in a statement. “We are seeing some improvements in the prevalence of hateful content as a result of our efforts, and we will continue to invest in our safety capabilities as well as moderator tools and resources.” Ellen Pao, the former interim chief executive of Reddit and current CEO of Project Include, agrees that the company’s unpaid moderation model has severe limits. When she led the company in between 2014 and 2015, Pao made it a priority to take down revenge porn and unauthorized nude photos and to ban toxic communities like the fat-shaming community r/fatpeoplehate, which spurred a huge backlash from many of Reddit’s most active users. Pao says that Silicon Valley has historically sidelined efforts like these in favor of their bottom lines. “You have these platforms that were founded by white men, who do not experience the same levels of toxicity, harassment and harm themselves, so they don’t see or understand these problems and let them fester,” she says. “It’s something they’ve been able to ignore for a long time.” Pao says that hiring more people whose jobs involve confronting these issues is the first step. “If you really care about your users, and if you really want to prevent harassment and harm, then why wouldn’t you take on those roles yourself?” she says. Back in Portugal, the moderator asantos3 is still spending his free time trying to clean up Portuguese-language subreddits. After receiving the automated message about the racist thread, he sent a frustrated note with more details to the Reddit’s staff administrators. This time, an admin wrote back—a rare occurrence in itself. But the note only reinforced the gap between him and the company: “I think some things may be getting lost in the translations here but am happy to take another look,” the admin wrote. “It would also help if you were able to explain a bit more directly how the linked article promotes hate.” Asantos3 responded with some details, and reported a few more comments in the thread, which asserted that the influx of Portuguese-speaking Africans would lead to “population replacement and genocide,” “kidnap and rape,” and “violent possessive monkey rage.” But he received the same automated brush-off and never heard back from a human. The whole thread, as of publication, is still online. “I’m feeling frustrated,” he said. “I guess it doesn’t matter at all.”.....»»

Category: topSource: timeJan 13th, 2022

Top GOP lawmaker on the House Foreign Affairs Committee says the US had "no plan" for the evacuation of Afghanistan

Michael McCaul's comments came as Republicans on his committee prepared to release a scathing report on how the withdrawal was handled. Michael McCaul speaks to the House Foreign Affairs Committee on September 13, 2021.Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images Rep. Michael McCaul accused the White House of failing to plan the withdrawal from Afghanistan. McCaul is the ranking GOP member in the House's Foreign Affairs Committee. His comments came as Republicans on the committee prepared a scathing report of the withdrawal. Texas Rep. Michael McCaul, the ranking Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, criticized the Biden administration and US State Department on Sunday for its "failure to plan" last year's withdrawal from Afghanistan.His comments came as Republican committee members prepared to release their report on the pullout, which the GOP has sought to serve as the basis for one of several probes into President Joe Biden and his inner circle. As of Sunday evening, it was unclear when the report will be published.In an interview with CBS' Margaret Brennan that was aired on Sunday, McCaul spoke of a "disconnect" between the intelligence that government agencies reported and the evacuation plans laid out by the White House for Afghanistan."In this report, it says it all, like: 'There's no way we're going to evacuate embassy personnel from helicopters like we did in Vietnam.' And of course, we know that happened," McCaul said.McCaul accused the White House of painting a "very rosy picture" of the situation in Afghanistan before Kabul's collapse, despite the intelligence community and military reporting that the Taliban's takeover was imminent.He cited how the US had stationed just 36 consular staff at Hamid Karzai International Airport to facilitate the evacuation of hundreds of thousands of people.—Face The Nation (@FaceTheNation) August 14, 2022"Even beforehand I think the State Department probably didn't have the resources that it needed to carry out an evacuation of this size," he told Brennan.McCaul: US leaders broke promise to Afghan allies"There are many sins, if you will. There was a complete lack and failure to plan. There was no plan, and there's no plan executed," McCaul said of the withdrawal.He said that one of the biggest mistakes made was when the US turned down the Taliban's offer for American forces to take over security for Kabul until the evacuation was complete."Think about what that would have changed," he said, noting that the US had instead relied on the Taliban to secure the perimeter of the Kabul Airport, which "led to chaos.""It also led to a suicide bomber that killed 13 service members, men and women, and injured over hundreds of people. And it could have been avoided," McCaul added.The withdrawal from Afghanistan saw around 120,000 people airlifted out of Kabul, which Biden called an "extraordinary success" in a statement after the evacuation came to an end.However, the mass evacuation was marred by reports of daily chaos at Kabul's airport. Amid the operation, a suicide attack killed nearly 200 Afghans and 13 US military members, and a US drone strike mistakenly targeted a humanitarian aid worker and killed 10 other civilians.Thousands of Afghans — many of who previously assisted the US — tried desperately to flee Taliban rule, with some filmed clinging to the hulls of planes as they took off.McCaul said the US had broken its promise to those who had helped its forces but weren't evacuated."One hundred thousand Afghan partners left behind — remember what we said, we will protect you. That was our promise to them, no one left behind," McCaul said. "And we left them behind to the mercy of the Taliban, and now they're being tortured and killed."The State Department estimated in July that around 74,000 Afghans who are still in Afghanistan have applied for special US visas, which are meant for those who once worked with American forces and organizations.A year after the Taliban retook control of Afghanistan, the militant group has increasingly been reported to be curbing women's rights and exacting revenge on those who acted against its regime, backtracking on its pledge not to do so.GOP signal deeper investigation if they win House majorityThe GOP report on the withdrawal accuses Biden of ignoring his military commanders' advice and of disregarding the fates of thousands of Afghans left behind, per The Washington Post, which obtained the document.The report also highlights that 3,000 members of Afghan security forces may have crossed into Iran, per The Post. If any of them had worked with the US military and were recruited by Iranian forces, it could pose a national security threat to the US, it adds.The Post noted that the report mentions how Republicans on the committee want to launch a deeper investigation into the withdrawal if the GOP wins the House majority this year. They plan to call in over 40 people, including Secretary of State Antony Blinken, for interviews — possibly setting the stage for an inquiry into Biden and his inner circle.Such an investigation has been floated numerous times by Republican lawmakers seeking to pin grievous wrongdoing on the Biden administration, over matters ranging from the origins of COVID-19 to the withdrawal of Afghanistan to the dealings of the president's son, Hunter Biden.In a statement responding to the report, National Security Council spokesperson Adrienne Watson called the findings a "partisan report" that is "riddled with inaccurate characterizations, cherry-picked information, and false claims.""When President Biden took office, he was faced with a choice: ramp up the war and put even more American troops at risk, or finally end the United States' longest war after two decades of American presidents sending US troops to fight and die in Afghanistan and $2 trillion spent," Watson wrote in a lengthy response.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytAug 15th, 2022

Biden To Sell Additional 20 Million Barrels Of Oil From Strategic Reserve Just Ahead Of The Midterms

Biden To Sell Additional 20 Million Barrels Of Oil From Strategic Reserve Just Ahead Of The Midterms Over the past three months, the Biden admin - desperate to lower the price of gasoline and avoid a crushing defeat for the Democrats in the midterms - has been selling roughly 1 million barrels a day from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which has been drained by 125 million barrels so far in 2022, with nearly 70 million barrels already delivered to purchasers including several million going to China, roughly two thirds on the way to the original stated goal of 180 million barrels in SPR release (it is still unclear how Biden getting crushed in the polls amounts to an "emergency"). But with oil still stubbornly sticky and the midterms looming, the White House found itself at a loss how to lower gas prices further - without of course actually increasing domestic US production as that would mean also losing the progressive/socialist/green-fanatic vote. Which is why on Tuesday morning, the Biden administration said it will sell an additional 20 million barrels of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve held in hollowed-out salt caverns on the coasts of Louisiana and Texas, as part of the previous plan to tap the facility to lower oil prices, and bringing total sales to 200 million. The sales will take place in September and October, and are set to conclude just days before the November midterm elections. It wasn't clear how much of the incremental barrels will go to China. A senior administration official told reporters that the SPR releases have been a "supply lifeline" to oil and refining companies as the industry continues efforts to get oil production back online after declines during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. What he meant is that the SPR releases have been the only thing that has prevented Biden's approval rating - already record low - from going negative. The official also said that replenishment of the SPR - which of course will have to buy a massive 200 million barrels after the Democrats are crushed in the midterms - will take place after fiscal 2023, which ends in Sept 2022, meaning that with traders anticipating what is about to be the biggest telegraphed oil purchase order in history, the US may well end up paying hundreds of dollars per barrel. One can only hope that China doesn't invade Taiwan when the SPR is at its current level, the lowest since 1984. Remarkably, the "energy experts" at the White House published some back of the envelope voodoo, according to which the 125 million barrel SPR drain has resulted in a 40 cent drop in gas prices. Well guess what happens when it comes time to replenish it. News of the additional SPR release sent the price of oil from session highs to session lows... ... while sending the spread between WTI and Brent to $9, the widest since April 2020. Tyler Durden Tue, 07/26/2022 - 12:12.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJul 26th, 2022

Lawsuits and Investigations Slam Struggling Mortgage Companies Amid Market Shift

There’s something to be said about the financial woes that several mortgage companies have suffered amid the shifting lending market. While experts forecasted tough times ahead for the sector, recent weeks have highlighted how bad things have gotten for several brands. That has been evident in the past month and a half as two lenders… The post Lawsuits and Investigations Slam Struggling Mortgage Companies Amid Market Shift appeared first on RISMedia. There’s something to be said about the financial woes that several mortgage companies have suffered amid the shifting lending market. While experts forecasted tough times ahead for the sector, recent weeks have highlighted how bad things have gotten for several brands. That has been evident in the past month and a half as two lenders that provided “non-qualified mortgages” crumbled as rising mortgage rates and changing tides strained their bottom lines. The most recent was Sprout Mortgage, which shut down abruptly earlier this month and left hundreds of its employees in the lurch following a virtual conference call. “This is just unbelievable what happened,” said a former Sprout employee, who asked that they remain anonymous so they could speak candidly about the event. “I had no idea that this was coming,” the former employee continues, adding that they were reassured in a meeting before the conference call that there was nothing to worry about. They tell RISMedia that employees were called to a mandatory “all-hands call meeting” where Sprout President Shea Pallante conducted the meeting to break the news to all staff. According to National Mortgage Professionals reports, Pallante informed the staff that the company would close up shop, including both its retail and wholesale divisions. “We got on there, and pretty much he said that, ‘with a heavy heart, I have to tell you that Sprout is closing their doors,’” they said, adding that the news came a day before payroll and without a severance package. “They left us hanging,” the former employee says. That wasn’t the end of Sprout’s troubles, however, as the company was swiftly sued by former employees looking for three weeks of back pay. The class action lawsuit, filed by former closing disclosure specialists Nathaniel Agudelo and Helen Owens, names Sprout, its parent company, Recovco Mortgage Management, and Sprout CEO Michael Strauss as its defendants and alleges that Sprout failed to provide the required advanced notice of the mass layoffs under the WARN Acts. Owens and Agudelo filed the suit on July 8 on behalf of themselves and all similarly impacted current and former employees. It also claims that Strauss instructed others at the company not to issue paychecks due to be sent out to employees on July 7 following the shutdown announcement the day before. Since the shutdown, the plaintiffs claimed they hadn’t been paid for work dating back to June 16, 2022. Sprout officials did not immediately reply to RISMedia’s attempts to gain comments for this story. In a statement featured in National Mortgage News, attorney Brenna Rabinowitz of New York-based Menken Simpson & Rozger, spoke on behalf of plaintiffs. “These employees are now left holding the bill for the company’s decision to take this drastic action without warning, which we believe violates federal and state law,” she said in the statement. “We hope the federal lawsuit we have filed on behalf of Sprout Mortgage’s employees secures justice for those affected.” The fallout at Sprout came mere weeks after First Guaranty Mortgage Corp (FGMC) implemented a massive labor cut and filed for bankruptcy amid tumbling profits from the volatile mortgage lending market. “While we have made considerable efforts to address our ongoing financial challenges related to the state of the mortgage market, we ultimately must do what is best for our borrowers and consumers,” said FGMC CEO Aaron Samples in a June 30 press release. The bankruptcy filing came less than a week after the Texas-based mortgage lender abruptly laid off nearly 80% of its workforce—428 of its 565 employees—during a 10-minute virtual meeting on Microsoft Teams. The woes of Sprout and FGMC are merely the most recent cases of mortgage lenders buckling under the pressure of shifting market conditions. Arguably the most notorious brand that has continued to make headlines has been Better.com, which has had to weather a storm of public scrutiny for several mishandled—and infamous—waves of layoffs and litigations.     The hits haven’t stopped for the online mortgage company, which now has U.S. Regulators investigating it, and Aurora Acquisition Corp., the special purpose acquisition company (SPAC) that Better agreed to merge with. According to a recent SEC filing, Better and Aurora received “voluntary requests” for documents to determine “if violations of the federal securities laws have occurred” as the online mortgage company pushed to go public. The requests cover aspects of Better’s operations, related-party transactions, and “certain matters relating to certain actions and circumstances” of Better CEO, Vishal Garg. “As the investigation is ongoing, neither Better nor Aurora are able to predict how long it will continue or whether, at its conclusion, the SEC will bring an enforcement action against either of them and, if it does, what remedies it may seek,” read an excerpt from the filing. Despite the uncertainty surrounding how the investigation will pan out, Aurora stated in the filing that the probe could impose a “significant cost” on the company. “Such costs, together with the outcome of the actions if resolved unfavorably, could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations,” Aurora stated in the filing. The company also acknowledged that the publicity surrounding the SEC probe and potential enforcement could harm the reputation and business of Better and Aurora. Part of the investigation will also focus on recent allegations made in a whistleblower lawsuit filed last month by Better’s former head of sales and operations, Sarah Pierce. Pierce, who parted ways with Better in February for undisclosed reasons, alleged in the suit that she was driven out of her role after she repeatedly raised concerns about Garg’s misleading statements regarding the company’s financial standing, market forecasts and its labor cuts. It also accused Garg and the company of duping investors and shareholders to keep the planned merger with Aurora afloat. The deal, which has yet to close, is valued at $7.7 billion between the two companies. According to TechCrunch reports, Better is still moving forward with its planned merger with Aurora despite recent hurdles. The SEC declined to comment on this story. The post Lawsuits and Investigations Slam Struggling Mortgage Companies Amid Market Shift appeared first on RISMedia......»»

Category: realestateSource: rismediaJul 23rd, 2022

Human Rights Groups Call on Facebook to Drop ‘Racist’ Attempt to Silence Whistleblower

Facebook’s parent company Meta is facing strong pushback from human rights groups over its handling of a whistleblower who alleges in a Kenyan court case that the company benefits from exploitative working conditions and has engaged in human trafficking, forced labor and union-busting. In an open letter published late Wednesday, more than 80 human rights… Facebook’s parent company Meta is facing strong pushback from human rights groups over its handling of a whistleblower who alleges in a Kenyan court case that the company benefits from exploitative working conditions and has engaged in human trafficking, forced labor and union-busting. In an open letter published late Wednesday, more than 80 human rights groups, activists, and tech industry luminaries called on Facebook to drop its attempt to impose a gag order against South African whistleblower Daniel Motaung. Lawyers for Facebook and Sama called for a gag order on Motaung at a court hearing in late June, arguing that he risked prejudicing the case by speaking to the press. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Facebook did not respond to requests for comment. Motaung was paid $2.20 per hour as a content moderator for Sama, an outsourcing firm contracted by Facebook to screen posts from across sub-Saharan Africa for harmful content. He was fired in 2019 after attempting to start a union. Motaung accuses both Sama and Meta of union-busting and human trafficking, among other charges. He’s now suing both companies in a Nairobi court. The open letter called on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Sama CEO Wendy Gonzalez to “respect Daniel’s right to speak his truth” and “immediately cease your attempts to impose a gag order.” It also calls on both Facebook and Sama to support unionization in their content moderation workforces. Facebook argues that it never employed Motaung and that it should therefore be struck as a defendant from the case. Sama denies mistreating workers and says it supports unionization. Mercy Mutemi, Motaung’s lawyer, argued in court that Motaung and his legal team were already complying with Kenya’s rules about discussing ongoing court cases. She said that any gag order would be a violation of Motaung’s right to freedom of expression. Read More: Facebook Asks Judge to ‘Crack the Whip’ in Attempt to Silence a Black Whistleblower The open letter’s signatories hail from the U.S., Africa, Asia, and Europe. They include the rights groups Global Witness, the Kenya Human Rights Commission, Free Press, and SumOfUs. Individuals who signed the letter include professor Shoshana Zuboff, author of The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, the author and internet freedom activist Cory Doctorow, and Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen. “Meta and Sama publicly claim to champion freedom of expression, and to support global movements fighting for equality and racial justice,” the letter says. “It is impossible to square such statements with your actions in Kenya and with your treatment of content moderation workers globally.” “It appears Meta and Sama would rather shut Daniel up than meaningfully address his allegations,” the letter says. The letter also argues that there is a discrepancy between how Facebook has treated Motaung, who is Black, and how it has treated white people seeking accountability in the past. It notes that Haugen, who leaked thousands of pages of company documents last year, and who is white, has been left to speak freely. “It appears to us that [Facebook] is making a racist calculation that it can safely seek to silence Daniel without causing itself a PR crisis,” the letter says. The letter adds that Sama, which calls itself an “ethical AI” company and claims to have lifted more than 50,000 people out of poverty, “professes to champion dignified work for all but has instead treated its own workers with callous disdain. […] It couldn’t be clearer that both Facebook and Sama view Daniel, and workers like him, as expendable.” Motaung first blew the whistle in a TIME investigation in February where he described how he was fired after leading an effort to unionize his colleagues, some of whom earned as little as $1.50 per hour. Their jobs include watching videos of murders, rapes, and child abuse. Motaung has been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a result of his work. Read More: Inside Facebook’s African Sweatshop “Daniel and the hundreds of colleagues who he is standing up for are an integral part of Facebook’s global workforce,” the letter says. “Their relentless work sifting through the most toxic and harmful content on the platform, including beheadings and child abuse, hour after hour, day upon day, is what keeps the company in business. Their experiences should be taken seriously and they should be encouraged and supported to speak up—not fired from their jobs and gagged.” The next hearing in Motaung’s case is scheduled for July 27. At the last hearing, the judge told lawyers for Facebook and Sama to bring contempt of court proceedings against Motaung and his lawyers if they believed they had evidence to support them. Facebook did not respond to a question asking whether they plan to bring such proceedings. At the next hearing, the judge is expected to rule on whether Facebook should be struck from the case or remain as a defendant. He may also decide whether four other content moderators, who are seeking permission to testify anonymously in support of Motaung, should be allowed to do so......»»

Category: topSource: timeJul 21st, 2022

US military leaders followed the January 6 attack through news reports and journalists’ tweets, according to new Pentagon emails released to Insider under the Freedom of Information Act

Insider obtained 48 pages of emails from the Department of Defense that detail how the Pentagon monitored and responded to the January 6 attacks. Pro-Trump protesters march toward the US Capitol Building on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. A pro-Trump mob later stormed the Capitol, breaking windows and clashing with police officers.Brent Stirton/Getty Image Insider obtained 48 pages of internal emails from the Department of Defense. The emails detail how the Pentagon monitored the January 6 attack. Initially, the military relied on journalists' tweets and news reports. As an armed mob rushed toward the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, an aide sent Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley an urgent update about congressional office building evacuations and "escalating protests."The sources of this information: journalists' tweets."Sir, For awareness … CNN's Jake Tapper reports that the Cannon and Madison congressional office buildings are being evacuated due to suspicious packages. Included below are tweets from Jake Tapper and Andrew Egger of the Dispatch on the intensifying situation at the Capitol," read the email sent at 1:50 p.m. Eastern Time, which also referenced CNN reporters Manu Raju and Phil Mattingly.The message is one among 48 pages of emails released this month by the Department of Defense as part of Insider's ongoing Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the agency in pursuit of January 6-related government records.Together, this initial release of emails provides dramatic, if decidedly incomplete insight into Trump administration activities in the hours immediately before, during, and after a mob of President Donald Trump's supporters attacked the US Capitol on January 6. One email includes a highly redacted exchange — subject: "fencing" — between Kash Patel, chief of staff to then-Acting Secretary of Defense Christopher Miller, and Anthony Ornato, Trump's deputy White House chief of staff for operations, who drew national attention earlier this month after Trump aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified before the US House's January 6 select committee about him.  Hutchinson testified that Ornato told her Trump "lunged" at a Secret Service agent in a failed attempt to personally join his rioting supporters at the US Capitol. She also said Ornato told her that Trump attempted to grab the wheel of his presidential vehicle as his detail drove him back to the White House from the National Mall, where he had just urged thousands of supporters to "fight like hell," minutes before they attacked the Capitol.Patel was one of the Trump loyalists installed at the Pentagon after the president fired his defense secretary in the days after Biden's victory, an unprecedented move in the lame duck period that added to concerns that Trump may resist the peaceful transfer of power, to which he'd declined to commit as a candidate.Trump himself is the focus of the House's January 6 select committee investigation. Committee members have accused the president of refusing to call off the attackers, some of whom say they attempted to stop Congress' certification of the 2020 presidential electoral votes at Trump's behest.Underscoring the chaotic nature of the Capitol attack, many of the newly released emails contain a moment-by-moment mash-up of direct government intelligence, debunked rumors, and "open source" reports curated from media outlets and social media. Combined with what is already known about text messages sent to Trump's chief of staff and a high-level Homeland Security official who visited the Capitol in person, the new disclosures highlight a lack of preparation to secure the counting of the electoral votes and a disorganized, ad hoc response to the violent attempt to disrupt that process. The emails also include situation reports from military operations cells about the Pentagon's slow response to back up law enforcement being beaten and overrun at the Capitol.Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as they storm the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2021.Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images'One civilian shot ...'Emails containing intelligence from the morning of January 6 strike a cautionary but non-alarmist tone as Trump supporters began to gather on the National Mall for a "Stop the Steal" rally that Trump headlined.US Park Police "believe they can handle the POTUS event at the ellipse and National Mall," reads one update.US Secret Service "estimates the crowd in and around the Ellipse at 1000 hours in excess of 20K. There are no reported incidents at this time," read another.With at least one law enforcement agency apparently believing that the crowd could be managed, a roster of Trump's most high-profile supporters — among them, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, Rep. Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina, conservative lawyer John Eastman, Trump's sons Eric Trump and Donald Trump Jr. — began to speak to the assembled crowd. Trump himself spoke last."We fight like hell. And if you don't fight like hell, you're not going to have a country anymore," Trump said at one point while urging them to march down Pennsylvania Avenue to the US Capitol on the National Mall's eastern end. Trump supporters did exactly that. As they did, reports of trouble emerged quickly, according to the newly released emails."Vehicle with rifle on the back seat in plain view under police control while attempting to contact the owner," read an update at 1:30 p.m. attributed to the Department of Homeland Security's National Operations Center."… drone was detected east of the Washington Monument; [US Secret Service] has taken possession of the drone, unable to locate the operator."Soon, dispatches — often labeled "civil unrest update" — grew even darker. 2 p.m.: "Crowds continue to gather at the Capitol … US Capitol is reportedly locked down due to multiple attempts to cross police barriers and police injuries."2:23 p.m.: "VPOTUS [Mike Pence] has been ushered from the US Capitol as protestors breach the Capitol Building. Additional open source reports indicate the US Senate is in recess due to a warning of an external threat."2:35 p.m.: "Mayor Muriel Bowser (Mayor, DC) ordered a citywide curfew for the District of Columbia … Additionally, Acting Deputy Secretary of DHS has authorized federal law enforcement to assist Capitol Police immediately."3 p.m.: "… one civilian shot in the chest inside of the US Capitol — UNCONFIRMED. DC Fire is performing CPR. DHS is working confirmation."3:52 p.m.: "US Capitol being evacuated; Members of Congress and Senators being evacuated …"4 p.m.: "House Minority Leader confirms shots fired inside US Capitol Building … Six people hospitalized, including one LE officer, in connection with protests at the Capitol … Explosive device discovered at RNC HQ in DC was safely detonated … DNC HQ evacuated after explosive device discovered at RNC HQ."The emails, which contained some redactions, also provided real-time fact-checking on rumors, such as when the FBI reported that a "threat to fly a plane into the Capitol building during inauguration deemed not credible …"One dispatch concluded that a report of the Proud Boys "threatening to shut down the water system in the downtown area" was "not a credible threat."Emails exchanged between Patel and Ornato during the evening of January 6 include the subject line "fencing" — although it's unclear from the highly redacted email whether it's a reference to fencing for the White House, US Capitol, the Pentagon, or a different location. The emails show the military's situation planners were closely following the pro-Trump mob's moves that day. Two days prior, Trump's acting defense secretary had imposed further restrictions on the deployment of the DC National Guard, the closest force to back up Capitol Police, ordering they could not be equipped or interact with protesters without his approval.The then-Capitol Police chief requested Defense Department forces at 1:49 p.m. after rioters breached the perimeter, but the acting defense secretary doesn't approve that request until 3 p.m., delaying their response time; the first National Guardsmen at the Capitol arrived around 5:40 p.m.The DC National Guard commander at the time said his forces were ready to respond much sooner, and a top official with the DC Guard accused the Army of covering up its response, claims the US Army has repeatedly denied.Following the January 6 insurrection, fencing for months ringed the US Capitol complex grounds with National Guard members also defending it.Ornato first emailed Patel at 11:36 p.m., indicating that Secret Service Deputy Assistant Director Mark Habersaat "can assist with vendor. Let me know if you need anything else. Thanks, Tony." Most of the message's other contents have been redacted."Rgr, thanks much," Patel replied five minutes later.Patel, who has since written a Trump-themed children's book entitled, "The Plot Against the King," is among the hundreds of people the US House's January 6 select committee has interviewed as part of its ongoing investigation into the US Capitol attack and Trump's role in it.More records promisedShortly after the January 6 attack, an Insider reporter requested that the Department of Defense release a variety of records, including communications among members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, National Security Council, and Executive Office of the President. Months later, when the Department of Defense had not yet provided the requested records in compliance with the federal Freedom of Information Act, Insider sued the agency in US District Court for the District of Columbia, where the case is still pending.In a July 7 letter to Insider, Department of Defense Associate Deputy General Counsel Stuart Sparker wrote that the agency expects to make more records public."Additional productions will be made as we continue to coordinate the review of the remaining responsive documents DoD has in its possession," Sparker wrote.A Department of Defense spokesperson acknowledged, but did not respond to, several questions sent by Insider about the emails.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJul 19th, 2022

Deborah Birx"s Guide To Destroying A Country From Within

Deborah Birx's Guide To Destroying A Country From Within Authored by Michael Senger via 'The New Normal' Substack, Part of the fun of reading Snake Oil: How Xi Jinping Shut Down the World is that you get to put yourself in the dictator’s shoes. In the book, Xi is an allegory for the Chinese Communist Party in the 21st century. Xi’s “lines” break up the writing with dark humor, a satirical jab at western elites’ blasé attitude toward an advanced, totalitarian regime with overtly-manipulative goals. The book invites you to see through the bad guy’s eyes and imagine just how easy it was to subvert the free world into totalitarianism using the response to a perfectly banal virus. Alas, to that end, my book has been upstaged by the work of Deborah Birx, White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator, one of the “Trifecta” of three leading officials behind Covid lockdowns in the United States. Virtually every page of Birx’s monstrosity of a book, Silent Invasion, reads like a how-to guide in subverting a democratic superpower from within, as could only be told through the personal account of someone who was on the front lines doing just that. Notably, though Birx’s memoir has earned relatively few reviews on Amazon, it’s earned rave reviews from Chinese state media, a feat not shared even by far-more-popular pro-lockdown books such as those by Michael Lewis and Lawrence Wright. The glowing response from Chinese state media should come as no surprise, however, because every sentence of Birx’s book reads like it was written by the CCP itself. Chapter 1 opens with what she claims was her first impression of the virus. I can still see the words splashed across my computer screen in the early morning hours of January 3. Though we were barely into 2020, I was stuck in an old routine, waking well before dawn and scanning news headlines online. On the BBC’s site, one caught my attention: “China Pneumonia Outbreak: Mystery Virus Probed in Wuhan.” Indeed, as recounted in Snake Oil, that BBC article, which was posted at approximately 9:00 AM EST on January 3, 2020, was the first in a western news organization to discuss the outbreak of a new virus in Wuhan. Apparently, Birx was scanning British news headlines just as it appeared. What are the odds! Birx wastes no time in telling us where she got her philosophy of disease mitigation, recalling how she immediately thought Chinese citizens “knew what had worked” against SARS-1: Masks and distancing. Government officials and citizens across Asia knew both the pervasive fear and the personal response that had worked before to mitigate the loss of life and the economic damage wrought by SARS and MERS. They wore masks. They decreased the frequency and size of social gatherings.Crucially, based on their recent experience, the entire citizenry and local doctors were ringing alarm bells loudly and early. Lives were on the line—lots of them. They knew what had worked before, and they would do it again. Birx spends countless pages tut-tutting the CCP for its “cover-up” of the virus (though Chinese state media apparently didn’t mind, as they gushed about her book anyway), which is funny because then she tells us: On January 3, the same day the BBC piece ran, the Chinese government officially notified the United States of the outbreak. Bob Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was contacted by his Chinese counterpart, George F. Gao. Note, January 3 is also the same day the hero whistleblower Li Wenliang was supposedly admonished by authorities for sending a WeChat message about a “cover-up” of the outbreak. So on the same day Li was “admonished,” the head of China’s CDC literally called US CDC Director Robert Redfield to share the exact same information Li supposedly shared. Off to a strong start. But from here, Birx’s abomination of book only gets worse. Much worse. A page later, she tells us how traumatized she still is at seeing all those videos of Wuhan residents collapsing and falling dead in January 2020, and praises the “courageous doctor” who shared them online. The video showed a hallway crowded with patients slumped in chairs. Some of the masked people leaned against the wall for support. The camera didn’t pan so much as zigzag while the Chinese doctor maneuvered her smartphone up the narrow corridor. My eye was drawn to two bodies wrapped in sheets lying on the floor amid the cluster of patients and staff. The doctor’s colleagues, their face shields and other personal protective equipment in place, barely glanced at the lens as she captured the scene. They looked past her, as if at a harrowing future they could all see and hoped to survive. I tried to increase the volume, but there was no sound. My mind seamlessly filled that void, inserting the sounds from my past, sounds from other wards, other places of great sorrow. I had been here before. I had witnessed scenes like this across the globe, in HIV ravaged communities— when hospitals were full of people dying of AIDS before we had treatment or before we ensured treatment to those who needed it. I had lived this, and it was etched permanently in my brain: the unimaginable, devastating loss of mothers, fathers, children, grandparents, brothers, sisters. Staring at my computer screen, I was horrified by the images from Wuhan, the suffering they portrayed, but also because they confirmed what I’d suspected for the last three weeks: Not only was the Chinese government underreporting the real numbers of the infected and dying in Wuhan and elsewhere, but the situation was definitely far more dire than most people outside that city realized. Up until now, I’d been only reading or hearing about the virus. Now it had been made visible by a courageous doctor sharing this video online. As a reminder, Birx’s book was published in April 2022. The videos Birx is recalling were all proven fake by the spring of 2020. In the next paragraph, Birx tells us how she grew even more determined after seeing that the Chinese had built a hospital in 10 days to fight the virus. Dotting it were various pieces of earth-moving equipment, enough of them in various shapes and sizes that I briefly wondered if the photograph was of a manufacturing plant where the newly assembled machines were on display. Quickly, I learned that the machines were in Wuhan and that they were handling the first phase of preparatory work for the construction of a one-thousand-bed hospital to be completed in just ten days’ time… The Chinese may not have been giving accurate data about the numbers of cases and deaths, but the rapid spread of this disease could be counted in other ways—including in how many Chinese workers were being employed to build new facilities to relieve the pressure on the existing, and impressive, Wuhan health service centers. You build a thousand-bed hospital in ten days only if you are experiencing unrelenting community spread of a highly contagious virus that has eluded your containment measures and is now causing serious illness on a massive scale. This hospital construction, again, was proven fake literally days after Chinese state media posted it. So just to recap, here we have Deborah Birx—the woman who did more than almost any other person in the United States to promote and prolong Covid lockdowns, silencing anyone who disagreed with her, to the incessant praise of mainstream media outlets—telling us she’d been inspired by all those images of Wuhan residents falling dead and constructing a hospital in 10 days, and still didn’t realize they were fake two years after they’d been proven fake. And that’s just Chapter 1. Birx then spends hundreds of pages recounting her clandestine political maneuvers—from the day she stepped foot in the White House—to get as much of America as possible to stay in lockdown for as long as possible, without making it look like a “lockdown.” At this point, I wasn’t about to use the words lockdown or shutdown.If I had uttered either of those in early March, after being at the White House only one week, the political, nonmedical members of the task force would have dismissed me as too alarmist, too doom-and-gloom, too reliant on feelings and not facts. They would have campaigned to lock me down and shut me up. Birx proudly recalls using “flatten-the-curve guidance” to manipulate the President’s administration into consenting to lockdowns that were stricter than they realized. On Monday and Tuesday, while sorting through the CDC data issues, we worked simultaneously to develop the flatten-the-curve guidance I hoped to present to the vice president at week’s end. Getting buy-in on the simple mitigation measures every American could take was just the first step leading to longer and more aggressive interventions. We had to make these palatable to the administration by avoiding the obvious appearance of a full Italian lockdown. At the same time, we needed the measures to be effective at slowing the spread, which meant matching as closely as possible what Italy had done—a tall order. We were playing a game of chess in which the success of each move was predicated on the one before it. Never mind that this kind of manipulation by a presidential advisor is probably not legal. Birx doubles down, inadvertently admitting where that arbitrary number “ten” came from for her guidance as to the size of social gatherings, while admitting her real goal was “zero”—no social contact of any kind, anywhere. I had settled on ten knowing that even that was too many, but I figured that ten would at least be palatable for most Americans—high enough to allow for most gatherings of immediate family but not enough for large dinner parties and, critically, large weddings, birthday parties, and other mass social events.… Similarly, if I pushed for zero (which was actually what I wanted and what was required), this would have been interpreted as a “lockdown”—the perception we were all working so hard to avoid. Birx divulges her strategy of using federal advisories to give cover to state governors to impose mandates and restrictions. The White House would “encourage,” but the states could “recommend” or, if needed, “mandate.” In short, we were handing governors and their public health officials a template, a state-level permission slip they could use to enact a specific response that was appropriate for the people under their jurisdiction. The fact that the guidelines would be coming from a Republican White House gave political cover to any Republican governors skeptical of federal overreach Then, Birx recalls with delight as her strategy led the states to shut down one by one. [T]he recommendations served as the basis for governors to mandate the flattening-the-curve shutdowns. The White House had handed down guidance, and the governors took that ball and ran with it…With the White House’s “this is serious” message, governors now had “permission” to mount a proportionate response and, one by one, other states followed suit. California was first, doing so on March 18. New York followed on March 20. Illinois, which had declared its own state of emergency on March 9, issued shelter-in-place orders on March 21. Louisiana did so on the twenty-second. In relatively short order by the end of March and the first week of April, there were few holdouts. The circuit-breaking, flattening-the-curve shutdown had begun. All that’s missing is the maniacal laugh. In what may be the most damning quote of the entire US response to Covid, in one paragraph, Birx tells us that she’d always intended “two weeks to slow the spread” as a lie and immediately wanted those two weeks extended, despite having no data to show why that was necessary. No sooner had we convinced the Trump administration to implement our version of a two-week shutdown than I was trying to figure out how to extend it. Fifteen Days to Slow the Spread was a start, but I knew it would be just that. I didn’t have the numbers in front of me yet to make the case for extending it longer, but I had two weeks to get them. However hard it had been to get the fifteen-day shutdown approved, getting another one would be more difficult by many orders of magnitude. This is one of several quotes in which Birx refers to “our version” of a lockdown, though she never makes it clear what the original “version” of a lockdown is. As a matter of fact, though Birx spends hundreds of pages boasting about her scorched-earth crusade for lockdowns across America, she never once explains why she wanted this or why she felt it was a good idea, other than some brief asides about China’s supposed success using social distancing during SARS-1. Birx’s apparent plan to almost singlehandedly destroy the world’s primary democratic superpower is going swimmingly until she meets the book’s leading antagonist: Dr. Scott Atlas. To Birx’s disgust, Atlas takes a strong stand for all the things she loathes most—things like human rights, democratic governance, and, most of all, freedom. Birx lists Atlas’s “dangerous assertions”: That schools could open everywhere without any precautions (neither masking nor testing), regardless of the status of the spread in the community. That children did not transmit the virus. That children didn’t get ill. That there was no risk to anyone young. That long Covid-19 was being overplayed. That heart-damage findings were incidental. That comorbidities did not play a critical role in communities, especially among teachers. That merely employing some physical distance overcame the virus’s ill effects. That masks were overrated and not needed. That the Coronavirus Task Force had gotten the country into this situation by promoting testing. That testing falsely increased case counts in the United States in comparison with other countries. That targeted testing and isolation constituted a lockdown, plain and simple, and weren’t needed. That every word of Atlas’s assertions was obviously 100% true only made them all the more dangerous. As Alexandr Solzhenitsyn said, “One word of truth shall outweigh the whole world,” and nothing would derail the world’s communist destiny faster than letting these self-evident truths spread freely. In particular, CNN’s Sanjay Gupta was a key component of my strategy… He specifically spoke about a mild disease—another way to describe silent spread. I saw this as a sign that he got it. As a doctor himself, he could see what I was seeing. He could serve as a very good outside-government spokesperson, echoing my message that family members and others they were in close contact with could unknowingly bring the virus home, resulting in a catastrophic and deadly event. Birx frequently emphasizes her fixation with the concept of “asymptomatic spread.” In her mind, the less sick a person is, the more “insidious” they are: Asymptomatic, presymptomatic, and even mildly symptomatic spread are particularly insidious because, with these, many people don’t know they are infected. They may not take precautions or may not practice good hygiene, and they don’t isolate. As Scott Atlas recalls in his own book, A Plague Upon Our House: Birx commented on the importance of testing asymptomatic people. She argued that the only way to figure out who was sick was to test them. She memorably exclaimed, “That’s why it’s so dangerous—people don’t even know they’re sick!” I felt myself looking around the room, wondering if I was the only one who had heard this. Birx spends roughly the next 150 pages of her book recalling her anguish as Atlas thwarted her plans to keep America in a near-permanent state of lockdown. As Atlas recalls: She threw a fit, right there, in front of everyone, as we stood near the door before leaving the Oval Office. She was furious, screaming at me, “NEVER DO THAT AGAIN!! AND IN THE OVAL!!” I felt pretty bad, because she was so angry. I had absolutely no desire for conflict. But did she actually expect me to lie to the president, just to cover up for her? I responded, “Sorry, but he asked me a question, so I answered it.” Indeed, Birx’s memoir corroborates the testimony in Atlas’s book of the outsized role he played in bringing lockdowns in the United States to an end. More than anything, this involved standing up to Birx who, contrary to popular belief, did more than even Fauci to promote and prolong lockdowns across the United States. As Atlas explains: Dr. Fauci held court in the public eye on a daily basis, so frequently that many misconstrue his role as being in charge. However, it was really Dr. Birx who articulated Task Force policy. All the advice from the Task Force to the states came from Dr. Birx. All written recommendations about their on-the-ground policies were from Dr. Birx. Dr. Birx conducted almost all the visits to states on behalf of the Task Force. Unlike the vast majority of our leaders and institutions, Atlas did not shrug this responsibility, and for that, our entire nation owes him a special thanks. I vividly recall reading Atlas’s articles in early 2020, correctly predicting that “The COVID-19 shutdown will cost Americans millions of years of life,” a rare light in that dark, dystopian period. Still, I don’t want to give anyone in this story too much credit. How is it possible that the woman who did more than any other person to shut down the United States doesn’t know that all those videos from Wuhan were fake, two years after FBI Director Christopher Wray publicly stated, on July 7, 2020: We have heard from federal, state, and even local officials that Chinese diplomats are aggressively urging support for China’s handling of the COVID-19 crisis. Yes, this is happening at both the federal and state levels. Not that long ago, we had a state senator who was recently even asked to introduce a resolution supporting China’s response to the pandemic. What has the FBI been doing this whole time? As Atlas recalls: Seema laughingly related that she was frantically looking around as the usual outlandish nonsense was being put forth, knowing that I would have been the one to push back. Then she got to the point. “Scott, we need to get rid of Birx. She is a disaster! She keeps saying the same things over and over; she’s incredibly insecure; she doesn’t understand what’s going on. We need to eliminate her moving forward.” Well no wonder Birx was “insecure.” She’d just spent the better part of a year in the White House orchestrating unprecedented crimes against humanity on her own people. These lockdowns ultimately killed tens of thousands of young Americans while failing to meaningfully slow the spread of the coronavirus everywhere they were tried. Whether she did so wittingly or unwittingly, it’s absolutely unseemly that no one around her put a stop to it. Atlas recalls being baffled as to why Birx had ever been appointed to her role in the first place: I also asked how she had been appointed—that seemed to be a bit of a mystery to everyone. I was told by Jared, more than once, “Dr. Birx is 100 percent MAGA!”—as if that should make all the other issues somehow less important. Secretary Azar denied appointing her during his stint running the Task Force. I was told by the VP’s chief of staff, Marc Short, that Pence “inherited her” when he took over as chair of the Task Force. No one seemed to know. Jared Kushner’s reaction is ironic, given Birx’s later admission that she “had a pact with medical bureaucrats—Anthony Fauci, Robert Redfield, Stephen Hahn and perhaps others—that all would resign if even one were removed by then-President Donald Trump.” Democrats in Congress are now defending Birx from scrutiny for the role she played in lockdowns in the United States. As it turns out, Birx was not “100% MAGA.” She wasn’t even 10% MAGA. Now, I’m not saying Deborah Birx is a CCP agent. I’m just saying that if she was an agent for Xi Jinping’s stated goal of gradually stripping the world of “independent judiciaries,” “human rights,” “western freedom,” “civil society,” and “freedom of the press,” then every word of her book would read like that of Silent Invasion. If she did do it, this is how it would have happened. But in researching this topic for over two years, few things have made my hair stand on end more than the clues Birx gives about the man who did appoint her to her role. This man, who will be the subject of my next deep dive, is a little-known, clean-cut, Mandarin-fluent intelligence operative who arguably played a greater role than even Fauci or Birx in bringing China’s totalitarian virus response to the United States, acting as a direct liaison between Chinese scientists and the White House on key items of pseudoscience including asymptomatic spread, universal masking, and remdesivir: Matthew Pottinger. Tyler Durden Fri, 07/15/2022 - 23:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJul 16th, 2022

White House Is Quietly Modeling For $200 Oil "Shock"

White House Is Quietly Modeling For $200 Oil "Shock" While the Biden administration is hoping and praying that someone - anyone - will watch the comical "Jan 6" kangaroo hearsay court taking place in Congress and meant to somehow block Trump from running for president in 2024 while also making hundreds of millions of Americans forget that the current administration could very well be the worst in US history, it is quietly preparing for the worst. As none other than pro-Biden propaganda spinmaster CNN reports, when it comes to what really matters (at least according to Gallup), namely the economy, and specifically galloping gasoline prices, the White House is in a historic shambles. For an administration that ended last year forecasting a leveling off of 40-year high inflation and eager to tout a historically rapid recovery from the pandemic-driven economic crisis, there is a level of frustration that comes with an acutely perilous moment. Asked by CNN about progress on a seemingly intractable challenge, another senior White House official responded flatly: "Which one?" The suspects behind the historic implosion are well known: "soaring prices, teetering poll numbers and congressional majorities that appear to be on the brink have created no shortage of reasons for unease. Gas prices are hovering at or around $5 per gallon, plastered on signs and billboards across the country as a symbolic daily reminder of the reality -- one in which White House officials are extremely aware -- that the country's view of the economy is growing darker and taking Biden's political future with it." "You don't have to be a very sophisticated person to know how lines of presidential approval and gas prices go historically in the United States," a senior White House official told CNN. A CNN Poll of Polls average of ratings for Biden's handling of the presidency finds that 39% of Americans approve of the job he's doing. His numbers on the economy, gas prices and inflation specifically are even worse in recent polls. What CNN won't tell you is that Biden is now polling well below Trump at this time in his tenure. The CNN article then goes into a lengthy analysis of what is behind the current gasoline crisis (those with lots of time to kill can read it here) and also tries to explains, without actually saying it, that the only thing that can fix the problem is more supply, but - as we first explained - this can't and won't happen because green fanatics and socialist environmentalists will never agree to boosting output. Which brings us to the punchline: as CNN's Phil Mattingly writes, "instead of managing an economy in the midst of a natural rotation away from recovery and into a stable period of growth, economic officials are analyzing and modeling worst-case scenarios like what the shock of gas prices hitting $200 per barrel may mean for the economy." Well, in an article titled "Give us a plan or give us someone to blame", this seems like both a plan, and someone to blame. But unfortunately for Biden - and CNN which is hoping to reset expectations - it's only going to get worse, because as we noted moments ago, while nobody was paying attention, Cushing inventories dropped to just 1 million away from operational bottoms at roughly 20MM barrels. This means that the US is officially looking at tank bottoms. But wait, there's more... or rather, it's even worse, because as even Bloomberg's chief energy guru Javier Blas notes, over the last 2 weeks, the US gov has drained 13.7 million barrels from the SPR, "and yet, commercial oil stockpiles still fell 3 million barrels over the period." Just imagine, Blas asks rhetorically, "if the SPR wasn't there. Or what would happen post-Oct when sales end." OIL MARKET: Over the last 2 weeks, the US gov has injected 13.7 million barrels from the SPR into the market. And yet, commercial oil stockpiles still fell 3 million barrels over the period. Just imagine if the SPR wasn't there. Or what would happen post-Oct when sales end #OOTT — Javier Blas (@JavierBlas) June 29, 2022 And here is the punchline: at the current record pace of SPR drainage, one way or another the Biden admin will have to end its artificial attempts to keep the price of oil lower some time in October (or risk entering a war with China over Taiwan with virtually no oil reserve). This means that unless Putin ends his war some time in the next 5 months, there is a non-trivial chance that oil will hit a record price around $200 - precisely the price the White House is bracing for - a few days before the midterms. While translates into $10+ gasoline. And while one can speculate how much longer Democrats can continue the "Jan 6" dog and pony show as the entire economy implodes around them, how America will vote in November when gas is double digits should not be a mystery to anyone. Tyler Durden Wed, 06/29/2022 - 13:05.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 29th, 2022

Live updates: Texas abortion clinic staff describe how patients "begged for help" after Roe v. Wade fell — report

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Olivia Rodrigo calls out SCOTUS justices who voted to overturn Roe v. Wade with a rendition of 'F--- You'Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Glastonbury Festival on Saturday.Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage via Getty ImagesPop star Olivia Rodrigo on Saturday sent a message to the Supreme Court justices responsible for overturning Roe v. Wade, calling them out during her set at the Glastonbury music festival. Rodrigo invited her guest, British singer Lily Allen, on stage and the pair performed Allen's 2009 song, "Fuck You" — but not before Rodrigo named all five SCOTUS justices who helped gut the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America."Today is a very, very special day. This is actually my first Glastonbury," Rodrigo said. "But I'm also equally as heartbroken over what happened in America yesterday." Rodrigo told the crowd that the SCOTUS decision infringed on a woman's ability to secure a safe abortion, which she called a basic human right. Read Full StoryAfter Roe fell, Steve Bannon called for an 'army of the awakened' to 'shatter' DemocratsIn a Gettr post, Steve Bannon urged "patriots" to take advantage of the "Roe momentum" to win the MAGA movement a "massive victory" at the midterm elections.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRight-wing figure Steve Bannon has called for an "army of the awakened" to "shatter" the Democratic party in post-Roe America. Bannon made a post on Gettr on Saturday lauding the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, a controversial decision that has led to abortion being halted in some states.In his post, Bannon called on "the army of the awakened" to rally and capitalize on the verdict. "This is the key take-away for MAGA … the pro-abortion movement is shattered and is now turning in on itself — because for 50 years they didn't have to work— the Courts and Regime Media covered for them — now The Abyss," Bannon wrote."That's the Democratic Party in November— we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shatter it into a million small pieces," Bannon added, referring to the upcoming midterm elections.Read Full StoryTexas abortion clinic staff describe how patients 'begged for help' when Roe v. Wade was overturned: reportA patient at the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services Clinic in San Antonio, Texas, is informed by a staff member on Friday that the clinic can no longer provide her with an abortion.Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesStaff at an abortion clinic in Texas said they had to turn away people seeking abortions away just minutes after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.Speaking to The 19th, an independent news organization, clinic administrator Andrea Gallegos described how she had to turn away a dozen patients waiting in the lobby of the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services clinic in San Antonio, Texas. Gallegos told The 19th that she and the clinic's staff had to tell the people gathered that, because of the ruling, "unfortunately, your geographical location affects your bodily autonomy." Per the outlet, Gallegos described the scene at the clinic as being one of "complete despair," with people screaming, crying, and begging for help.Read Full Story'Full House' star Jodie Sweetin was thrown to the ground by LAPD during freeway protest for abortion rightsJodie Sweetin told People that she was "proud" of those who showed up to protest.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty ImagesLos Angeles Police Department officers shoved Jodie Sweetin onto the ground of a freeway in Los Angeles on Saturday during an abortion rights protest, video shows.The "Full House" and "Fuller House" star, wearing all black with a black backpack, can be seen in a video of the incident with a megaphone in hand when a couple of LAPD officers shove her to the ground. Protesters can be heard yelling "Jodie, you good?" and  "What the f*** is wrong with you guys?"Sweetin is then picked up and the crowd immediately begins to chant "no justice, no peace."Read Full StorySince the Roe ruling a gynecology clinic in Texas has received increased requests for permanent sterilization: 'I sense that they're scared'Protesters march during an abortion-rights rally on June 25, 2022 in Austin, Texas.Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesA women's health clinic in Austin, Texas, has received dozens of requests for permanent sterilizations after Friday's decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that established a constitutional right to an abortion. After the Women's Health Domain closed on Friday evening for the weekend, it received 109 new patient requests, the majority of which were requesting tubal ligation, or permanent sterilization. Read Full StoryThe impact of Kavanaugh's confirmation on the 2018 elections may reveal how the reversal of Roe v. Wade could impact this year's midtermsU.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAs political analysts seek to understand the possible impact of Roe v. Wade being overturned on this year's midterm elections, some suggest that data from 2018 may reveal possible trends. In 2018, following the contentious confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh — who was accused of sexual assault by Christine Ford — 40 Republican US House seats flipped to Democratic candidates. GOP candidates led in polls taken prior to the hearings and went on to lose in November in 27 of those races, indicating increased mobilization among partisan voters following the hearings.  Read Full StoryLindsey Graham said Alito's abortion opinion was correct for distinguishing Roe from same-sex marriage and contraception rulingsRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham.J. Scott Applewhite/APRepublican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said Sunday that Justice Samuel Alito, unlike Justice Clarence Thomas, was correct for saying same-sex marriage and contraception would not be affected by the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In his concurring opinion on the ruling, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for cases regarding contraceptive access, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage.Read Full StoryAOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Live updates: Texas abortion clinic staff describe how patients "begged for help" when after Roe v. Wade fell — report

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Olivia Rodrigo calls out SCOTUS justices who voted to overturn Roe v. Wade with a rendition of 'F--- You'Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Glastonbury Festival on Saturday.Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage via Getty ImagesPop star Olivia Rodrigo on Saturday sent a message to the Supreme Court justices responsible for overturning Roe v. Wade, calling them out during her set at the Glastonbury music festival. Rodrigo invited her guest, British singer Lily Allen, on stage and the pair performed Allen's 2009 song, "Fuck You" — but not before Rodrigo named all five SCOTUS justices who helped gut the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America."Today is a very, very special day. This is actually my first Glastonbury," Rodrigo said. "But I'm also equally as heartbroken over what happened in America yesterday." Rodrigo told the crowd that the SCOTUS decision infringed on a woman's ability to secure a safe abortion, which she called a basic human right. Read Full StoryAfter Roe fell, Steve Bannon called for an 'army of the awakened' to 'shatter' DemocratsIn a Gettr post, Steve Bannon urged "patriots" to take advantage of the "Roe momentum" to win the MAGA movement a "massive victory" at the midterm elections.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRight-wing figure Steve Bannon has called for an "army of the awakened" to "shatter" the Democratic party in post-Roe America. Bannon made a post on Gettr on Saturday lauding the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, a controversial decision that has led to abortion being halted in some states.In his post, Bannon called on "the army of the awakened" to rally and capitalize on the verdict. "This is the key take-away for MAGA … the pro-abortion movement is shattered and is now turning in on itself — because for 50 years they didn't have to work— the Courts and Regime Media covered for them — now The Abyss," Bannon wrote."That's the Democratic Party in November— we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shatter it into a million small pieces," Bannon added, referring to the upcoming midterm elections.Read Full StoryTexas abortion clinic staff describe how patients 'begged for help' when Roe v. Wade was overturned: reportA patient at the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services Clinic in San Antonio, Texas, is informed by a staff member on Friday that the clinic can no longer provide her with an abortion.Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesStaff at an abortion clinic in Texas said they had to turn away people seeking abortions away just minutes after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.Speaking to The 19th, an independent news organization, clinic administrator Andrea Gallegos described how she had to turn away a dozen patients waiting in the lobby of the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services clinic in San Antonio, Texas. Gallegos told The 19th that she and the clinic's staff had to tell the people gathered that, because of the ruling, "unfortunately, your geographical location affects your bodily autonomy." Per the outlet, Gallegos described the scene at the clinic as being one of "complete despair," with people screaming, crying, and begging for help.Read Full Story'Full House' star Jodie Sweetin was thrown to the ground by LAPD during freeway protest for abortion rightsJodie Sweetin told People that she was "proud" of those who showed up to protest.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty ImagesLos Angeles Police Department officers shoved Jodie Sweetin onto the ground of a freeway in Los Angeles on Saturday during an abortion rights protest, video shows.The "Full House" and "Fuller House" star, wearing all black with a black backpack, can be seen in a video of the incident with a megaphone in hand when a couple of LAPD officers shove her to the ground. Protesters can be heard yelling "Jodie, you good?" and  "What the f*** is wrong with you guys?"Sweetin is then picked up and the crowd immediately begins to chant "no justice, no peace."Read Full StorySince the Roe ruling a gynecology clinic in Texas has received increased requests for permanent sterilization: 'I sense that they're scared'Protesters march during an abortion-rights rally on June 25, 2022 in Austin, Texas.Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesA women's health clinic in Austin, Texas, has received dozens of requests for permanent sterilizations after Friday's decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that established a constitutional right to an abortion. After the Women's Health Domain closed on Friday evening for the weekend, it received 109 new patient requests, the majority of which were requesting tubal ligation, or permanent sterilization. Read Full StoryThe impact of Kavanaugh's confirmation on the 2018 elections may reveal how the reversal of Roe v. Wade could impact this year's midtermsU.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAs political analysts seek to understand the possible impact of Roe v. Wade being overturned on this year's midterm elections, some suggest that data from 2018 may reveal possible trends. In 2018, following the contentious confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh — who was accused of sexual assault by Christine Ford — 40 Republican US House seats flipped to Democratic candidates. GOP candidates led in polls taken prior to the hearings and went on to lose in November in 27 of those races, indicating increased mobilization among partisan voters following the hearings.  Read Full StoryLindsey Graham said Alito's abortion opinion was correct for distinguishing Roe from same-sex marriage and contraception rulingsRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham.J. Scott Applewhite/APRepublican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said Sunday that Justice Samuel Alito, unlike Justice Clarence Thomas, was correct for saying same-sex marriage and contraception would not be affected by the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In his concurring opinion on the ruling, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for cases regarding contraceptive access, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage.Read Full StoryAOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Live updates: Democrats condemn a "crisis of legitimacy" for Supreme Court; Trump praises justices for "courage" amid Roe v. Wade reversal

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. AOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 26th, 2022

Live updates: Democrats call on Biden to declare "a public health emergency" after Roe v. Wade reversal

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights demonstrators hold signs outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., United States on June 24, 2022.Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after Friday's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 25th, 2022

The Federal Bureau Of Tweets: Twitter Is Hiring An Alarming Number Of FBI Agents

The Federal Bureau Of Tweets: Twitter Is Hiring An Alarming Number Of FBI Agents Authored by Alan MacLeod via Mint Press News, Twitter has been on a recruitment drive of late, hiring a host of former feds and spies. Studying a number of employment and recruitment websites, MintPress has ascertained that the social media giant has, in recent years, recruited dozens of individuals from the national security state to work in the fields of security, trust, safety and content. Chief amongst these is the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The FBI is generally known as a domestic security and intelligence force. However, it has recently expanded its remit into cyberspace. “The FBI’s investigative authority is the broadest of all federal law enforcement agencies,” the “About” section of its website informs readers. “The FBI has divided its investigations into a number of programs, such as domestic and international terrorism, foreign counterintelligence [and] cyber crime,” it adds. For example, in 2019, Dawn Burton (the former director of Washington operations for Lockheed Martin) was poached from her job as senior innovation advisor to the director at the FBI to become senior director of strategy and operations for legal, public policy, trust and safety at Twitter. The following year, Karen Walsh went straight from 21 years at the bureau to become director of corporate resilience at the silicon valley giant. Twitter’s deputy general counsel and vice president of legal, Jim Baker, also spent four years at the FBI between 2014 and 2018, where his resumé notes he rose to the role of senior strategic advisor. Meanwhile, Mark Jaroszewski ended his 21-year posting as a supervisory special agent in the Bay Area to take up a position at Twitter, rising to become director of corporate security and risk. And Douglas Turner spent 14 years as a senior special agent and SWAT Team leader before being recruited to serve in Twitter’s corporate and executive security services. Previously, Turner had also spent seven years as a secret service special agent with the Department of Homeland Security. When asked to comment by MintPress, former FBI agent and whistleblower Coleen Rowley said that she was “not surprised at all” to see FBI agents now working for the very tech companies the agency polices, stating that there now exists a “revolving door” between the FBI and the areas they are trying to regulate. This created a serious conflict of interests in her mind, as many agents have one eye on post-retirement jobs. “The truth is that at the FBI 50% of all the normal conversations that people had were about how you were going to make money after retirement,” she said. Many former FBI officials hold influential roles within Twitter. For instance, in 2020, Matthew W. left a 15-year career as an intelligence program manager at the FBI to take up the post of senior director of product trust at Twitter. Patrick G., a 23-year FBI supervisory special agent, is now head of corporate security. And Twitter’s director of insider risk and security investigations, Bruce A., was headhunted from his role as a supervisory special agent at the bureau. His resumé notes that at the FBI he held “[v]arious intelligence and law enforcement roles in the US, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East” and was a “human intelligence and counterintelligence regional specialist.” (On employment sites such as LinkedIn, many users choose not to reveal their full names.) Meanwhile, between 2007 and 2021 Jeff Carlton built up a distinguished career in the United States Marine Corps, rising to become a senior intelligence analyst. Between 2014 and 2017, his LinkedIn profile notes, he worked for both the CIA and FBI, authored dozens of official reports, some of which were read by President Barack Obama. Carlton describes his role as a “problem-solver” and claims to have worked in many “dynamic, high-pressure environments” such as Iraq and Korea. In May 2021, he left official service to become a senior program manager at Twitter, responsible for dealing with the company’s “highest-profile trust and safety escalations.” Other former FBI staff are employed by Twitter, such as Cherrelle Y. as a policy domain specialist and Laura D. as a senior analyst in global risk intelligence. Many of those listed above were active in the FBI’s public outreach programs, a practice sold as a community trust-building initiative. According to Rowley, however, these also function as “ways for officials to meet the important people that would give them jobs after retirement.” “It basically inserts a huge conflict of interest,” she told MintPress. “It warps and perverts the criminal investigative work that agents do when they are still working as agents because they anticipate getting lucrative jobs after retiring or leaving the FBI.” Rowley – who in 2002 was named, along with two other whistleblowers, as Time magazine’s Person of the Year – was skeptical that there was anything seriously nefarious about the hiring of so many FBI agents, suggesting that Twitter could be using them as sources of information and intelligence. She stated: Retired agents often maintained good relationships and networks with current agents. So they can call up their old buddy and find out stuff… There were certainly instances of retired agents for example trying to find out if there was an investigation of so and so. And if you are working for a company, that company is going to like that influence.” Rowley also suggested that hiring people from various three-letter agencies gave them a credibility boost. “These [tech] companies are using the mythical aura of the FBI. They can point to somebody and say ‘oh, you can trust us; our CEO or CFO is FBI,’” she explained. Twitter certainly has endorsed the FBI as a credible actor, allowing the organization to play a part in regulating the global dissemination of information on its platform. In September 2020, it put out a statement thanking the federal agency. “We wish to express our gratitude to the FBI’s Foreign Influence Task Force for their close collaboration and continued support of our work to protect the public conversation at this critical time,” the statement read. One month later, the company announced that the FBI was feeding it intelligence and that it was complying with their requests for deletion of accounts. “Based on intel provided by the FBI, last night we removed approximately 130 accounts that appeared to originate in Iran. They were attempting to disrupt the public conversation during the first 2020 U.S. Presidential Debate,” Twitter’s safety team wrote. Yet the evidence they supplied of this supposed threat to American democracy was notably weak. All four of the messages from this Iranian operation that Twitter itself shared showed that none of them garnered any likes or retweets whatsoever, meaning that essentially nobody saw them. This was, in other words, a completely routine cleanup operation of insignificant troll accounts. Yet the announcement allowed Twitter to present the FBI as on the side of democracy and place the idea into the public psyche that the election was under threat from foreign actors. Based on intel provided by the @FBI, last night we removed approximately 130 accounts that appeared to originate in Iran. They were attempting to disrupt the public conversation during the first 2020 US Presidential Debate. — Twitter Safety (@TwitterSafety) October 1, 2020 Iran has been a favorite Twitter target in the past. In 2009, at the behest of the U.S. government, it postponed routine maintenance of the site, which would have required taking it offline. This was because an anti-government protest movement in Tehran was using the app to communicate and the U.S. did not want the demonstrations’ regime-change potential to be stymied. A carnival of spooks The FBI is far from the only state security agency filling Twitter’s ranks. Shortly after leaving a 10-year career as a CIA analyst, Michael Scott Robinson was hired to become a senior policy manager for site integrity, trust and safety. The California-based app has also recruited heavily from the Atlantic Council, a NATO cutout organization that serves as the military alliance’s think tank. The council is sponsored by NATO, led by senior NATO generals and regularly plays out regime-change scenarios in enemy states, such as China. The Atlantic Council has been associated with many of the most egregious fake news plants of the last few years. It published a series of lurid reports alleging that virtually every political group in Europe challenging the status quo – from the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn and UKIP in Great Britain to PODEMOS and Vox in Spain and Syriza and Golden Dawn in Greece – were all secretly “the Kremlin’s Trojan Horses.” Atlantic Council employee Michael Weiss was also very likely the creator of the shadowy organization PropOrNot, a group that anonymously published a list of fake-news websites that regularly peddled Kremlin disinformation. Included in this list was virtually every anti-war alternative media outlet one could think of – from MintPress to Truthout, TruthDig and The Black Agenda Report. Also included were pro-Trump websites like The Drudge Report, and liberatarian ventures like Antiwar.com and The Ron Paul Institute. PropOrNot’s list was immediately heralded in the corporate press, and was the basis for a wholescale algorithm shift at Google and other big tech platforms, a shift that saw traffic to alternative media sites crash overnight, never to recover. Thus, the allegation of a huge (Russian) state-sponsored attempt to influence the media was itself an intelligence op by the U.S. national security state. In 2020, Kanishk Karan left his job as a research associate at the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensics Research (DFR) Lab to join Twitter as information integrity and safety specialist – essentially helping to control what Twitter sees as legitimate information and nefarious disinformation. Another DFR Lab graduate turned Twitter employee is Daniel Weimert, who is now a senior public policy associate for Russia – a key target of the Atlantic Council. Meanwhile, Sarah Oh is simultaneously an Atlantic Council DFR Lab non-resident senior fellow and a Twitter advisor, her social media bio noting she works on “high risk trust and safety issues.” In 2019, Twitter also hired Greg Andersen straight from NATO to work on cybercrime policy. There is sparse information on what Andersen did at NATO, but, alarmingly, his own LinkedIn profile stated simply that he worked on “psychological operations” for the military alliance. After MintPress highlighted this fact in an article in April, he removed all mention of “psychological operations” from his profile, claiming now to have merely worked as a NATO “researcher.” Andersen left Twitter in the summer of last year to work as a product policy manager for the popular video platform TikTok. Twitter also directly employs active army officers. In 2019, Gordon Macmillan, the head of editorial for the entire Europe, Middle East and Africa region was revealed to be an officer in the British Army’s notorious 77th Brigade – a unit dedicated to online warfare and psychological operations. This bombshell news was steadfastly ignored across the media. Positions of power and control With nearly 400 million global users, there is no doubt that Twitter has grown to become a platform large and influential enough to necessitate extensive security measures, as actors of all stripes attempt to use the service to influence public opinion and political actions. There is also no doubt that there is a limited pool of people qualified in these sorts of fields. But recruiting largely from the U.S. national security state fundamentally undermines claims Twitter makes about its neutrality. The U.S. government is the source of some of the largest and most extensive influence operations in the world. As far back as 2011, The Guardian reported on the existence of a massive, worldwide U.S. military online influence campaign in which it had designed software that allowed its personnel to “secretly manipulate social media sites by using fake online personas to influence internet conversations and spread pro-American propaganda.” The program boasts that the background of these personas is so convincing that psychological operations soldiers can be sure to work “without fear of being discovered by sophisticated adversaries.” Yet Twitter appears to be recruiting from the source of the problem. These former national security state officials are not being employed in politically neutral departments such as sales or customer service, but in security, trust and content, meaning that some hold considerable sway over what messages and information are promoted, and what is suppressed, demoted or deleted. It could be said that poachers-turned-gamekeepers often play a crucial role in safety and protection, as they know how bad actors think and operate. But there exists little evidence that any of these national security state operatives have changed their stances. Twitter is not hiring whistleblowers or dissidents. It appears, then, that some of these people are essentially doing the same job they were doing before, but now in the private sector. And few are even acknowledging that there is anything wrong with moving from big government to big tech, as if the U.S. national security state and the fourth estate are allies, rather than adversaries. That Twitter is already working so closely with the FBI and other agencies makes it easy for them to recruit from the federal pool. As Rowley said, “over a period of time these people will be totally in sync with the mindset of Twitter and other social media platforms. So from the company’s standpoint, they are not hiring somebody new. They already know this person. They know where they stand on things.” Is there a problem? Some might ask “What is the problem with Twitter actively recruiting from the FBI, CIA and other three-letter agencies?” They, after all, are experts in studying online disinformation and propaganda. One is optical. If a Russian-owned social media app’s trust, security and content moderation was run by former KGB or FSB agents and still insisted it was a politically neutral platform, the entire world would laugh. But apart from this, the huge influx of security state personnel into Twitter’s decision-making ranks means that the company will start to view every problem in the same manner as the U.S. government does – and act accordingly. “In terms of their outlooks on the world and on the question of misinformation and internet security, you couldn’t get a better field of professionals who are almost inherently going to be more in tune with the government’s perspective,” Rowley said. Thus, when policing the platform for disinformation and influence campaigns, the former FBI and CIA agents and Atlantic Council fellows only ever seem to find them emanating from enemy states and never from the U.S. government itself. This is because their backgrounds and outlooks condition them to consider Washington to be a unique force for good. This one-sided view of disinformation can be seen by studying the reports Twitter has published on state-linked information operations. The entire list of countries it has identified as engaging in these campaigns are as follows: Russia (in 7 reports), Iran (in 5 reports), China (4 reports), Saudi Arabia (4 reports), Venezuela (3 reports), Egypt (2 reports), Cuba, Serbia, Bangladesh, the UAE, Ecuador, Ghana, Nigeria, Honduras, Indonesia, Turkey, Thailand, Armenia, Spain, Tanzania, Mexico and Uganda. One cannot help noticing that this list correlates quite closely to a hit list of U.S. government adversaries. All countries carry out disinfo campaigns to a certain extent. But these “former” spooks and feds are unlikely to point the finger at their former colleagues or sister organizations or investigate their operations. The Cold (cyber)war Twitter has mirrored U.S. hostility towards states like Russia, China, Iran and Cuba, attempting to suppress the reach and influence of their state media by adding warning messages to the tweets of journalists and accounts affiliated with those governments. “State-affiliated media is defined as outlets where the state exercises control over editorial content through financial resources, direct or indirect political pressures, and/or control over production and distribution,” it noted. In a rather bizarre addendum, it explained that it would not be doing the same to state-affiliated media or personalities from other countries, least of all the U.S. “State-financed media organizations with editorial independence, like the BBC in the U.K. or NPR in the U.S. for example, are not defined as state-affiliated media for the purposes of this policy,” it wrote. It did not explain how it decided that Cuban, Russian, Chinese or Iranian journalists did not have editorial independence, but British and American ones did – this was taken for granted. The effect of the action has been a throttling of ideas and narratives from enemy states and an amplification of those coming from Western state media. As the U.S. ramps up tensions with Beijing, so too has Twitter aggressively shut down pro-China voices on its platform. In 2020, it banned 170,000 accounts it said were “spreading geopolitical narratives favorable to the Communist Party of China,” such as praising its handling of the Covid-19 pandemic or expressing opposition to the Hong Kong protests, both of which are majority views in China. Importantly, the Silicon Valley company did not claim that these accounts were controlled by the government; merely sharing these opinions was grounds enough for deletion. The group behind Twitter’s decision to ban those Chinese accounts was the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI), a deeply controversial think tank funded by the Pentagon, the State Department and a host of weapons manufacturers. ASPI has constantly peddled conspiracy theories about China and called for ramping up tensions with the Asian nation. ASPI - The Gov’t-Funded Conspiracist Think Tank Now Controlling Your Social Media Feed Perhaps most notable, however, was Twitter’s announcement last year that it was deleting dozens of accounts for the new violation of “undermining faith in the NATO alliance.” The statement was widely ridiculed online by users. But few noted that the decision was based upon a partnership with the Stanford Internet Observatory, a counter-disinformation think tank filled with former spooks and state officials and headed by an individual who is on the advisory board of NATO’s Collective Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. That Twitter is working so closely with organizations that are clearly intelligence industry catspaws should concern all users. Not just Twitter While some might be alarmed that Twitter is cultivating such an intimate relationship with the FBI and other groups belonging to the secret state, it is perhaps unfair to single it out, as many social media platforms are doing the same. Facebook, for example, has entered into a formal partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Digital Forensics Research Lab, whereby the latter holds significant influence over 2.9 billion users’ news feeds, helping to decide what content to promote and what content to suppress. The NATO cutout organization now serves as Facebook’s “eyes and ears,” according to a Facebook press release. Anti-war and anti-establishment voices across the world have reported massive drops in traffic on the platform. The social media giant also hired former NATO Press Secretary Ben Nimmo to be its head of intelligence. Nimmo subsequently used his power to attempt to swing the election in Nicaragua away from the leftist Sandinista Party and towards the far-right, pro-U.S. candidate, deleting hundreds of left-wing voices in the week of the election, claiming they were engaging in “inauthentic behavior.” When these individuals (including some well-known personalities) poured onto Twitter, recording video messages proving they were not bots, Twitter deleted those accounts too, in what one commentator called a Silicon Valley “double tap strike.” An April MintPress study revealed how TikTok, too, has been filling its organization with alumni of the Atlantic Council, NATO, the CIA and the State Department. As with Twitter, these new TikTok employees largely work in highly politically sensitive fields such as trust, safety, security and content moderation, meaning these state operatives hold influence over the direction of the company and what content is promoted and what is demoted. Likewise, in 2017, content aggregation site Reddit plucked Jessica Ashooh from the Atlantic Council’s Middle East Strategy Task Force to become its new director of policy, despite the fact that she had few relevant qualifications or experience in the field. Jessica Ashooh: The Taming of Reddit and the National Security State Plant Tabbed to Do It In corporate media too, we have seen a widespread infiltration of former security officials into the upper echelons of news organizations. So normalized is the penetration of the national security state into the media that is supposed to be holding it to account, that few reacted in 2015 when Dawn Scalici left her job as national intelligence manager for the Western hemisphere at the Director of National Intelligence to become the global business director of international news conglomerate Thomson Reuters. Scalici, a 33-year CIA veteran who had worked her way up to become a director in the organization, was open about what her role was. In a blog post on the Reuters website, she wrote that she was there to “meet the disparate needs of the U.S. Government” – a statement that is at odds with even the most basic journalistic concepts of impartiality and holding the powerful to account. Meanwhile, cable news outlets routinely employ a wide range of “former” agents and mandarins as trusted personalities and experts. These include former CIA Directors John Brennan (NBC, MSNBC) and Michael Hayden (CNN), ex-Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (CNN), and former Homeland Security Advisor Frances Townsend (CBS). And news for so many Americans comes delivered through ex-CIA interns like Anderson Cooper (CNN), CIA-applicants like Tucker Carlson (Fox), or by Mika Brzezinski (MSNBC), the daughter of a powerful national security advisor. The FBI has its own former agents on TV as well, with talking heads such as James Gagliano (Fox), Asha Rangappa (CNN) and Frank Figliuzzi (NBC, MSNBC) becoming household names. In short, then, the national security state once used to infiltrate the media. Today, however, the national security state is the media. Social media holds enormous influence in today’s society. While this article is not alleging that anyone mentioned is a bad actor or does not genuinely care about the spread of disinformation, it is highlighting a glaring conflict of interest. Through its agencies, the U.S. government regularly plants fake news and false information. Therefore, social media hiring individuals straight from the FBI, CIA, NATO and other groups to work on regulating disinformation is a fundamentally flawed practice. One of media’s primary functions is to serve as a fourth estate; a force that works to hold the government and its agencies to account. Yet instead of doing that, increasingly it is collaborating with them. Such are these increasing interlocking connections that it is becoming increasingly difficult to see where big government ends and big media begins. Tyler Durden Thu, 06/23/2022 - 22:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 23rd, 2022

State Farm Remains A "Creepy Neighbor" After Transgender Book Backlash

State Farm Remains A 'Creepy Neighbor' After Transgender Book Backlash Authored by Bill Pan via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), In light of a public backlash, State Farm has swiftly distanced itself from a collaborative book donation program that promotes transgender ideology among young children. The watchdog group that exposed the insurance giant’s involvement, however, said this is far from over. “They continue to not be a good neighbor, but a creepy neighbor,” said Will Hild, the executive director of Consumers’ Research, a nonprofit organization working to expose large companies that put “woke politics” ahead of their customers. Will Hild, executive director with Consumers’ Research, speaks with NTD in March 2022. (NTD News) In late May, Consumers’ Research brought national attention to State Farm’s partnership with transgender youth advocacy group The GenderCool Project, which sought to “increase representation of LGBTQ+ books” intended for readers as young as 5 years old. According to an internal email leaked to and publicized by Consumers’ Research, hundreds of State Farm insurance agents have been encouraged to participate in the program by donating a bundle of three GenderCool books to “their local teacher, community center or library of their choice.” Hild described these GenderCool titles—”A Kids Book About Being Transgender,” “A Kids Book About Being Non-Binary,” and “A Kids Book About Being Inclusive”—as “transgender-in-training books.” “They explain it in terms that would lead to confusion among your average 5-year-old,” Hild told NTD News. “For example, it’s implied that if you are a boy who likes playing with dolls, or playing dress-up, or a girl who likes playing sports—stereotypically something from the other gender, then you might be transgender.” “It even explicitly says that the doctor may have assigned you the wrong gender at birth, and that you need to question the doctor’s assessment of your sex,” he continued. “State Farm was asking their agents to give out these books without parents’ knowledge.” The exposure of the State Farm-GenderCool partnership has thrown the insurance company into “full panic,” Hild said. According to Hild, just four hours after being called out by Consumers’ Research on Twitter, State Farm sent out an internal email alleging a “misunderstanding” about the book donations. This was followed by another email, which announced that the partnership had ended, that the company’s top executives were unaware of the partnership, which they found inappropriate, and that they had only donated $40,000 to GenderCool. Even if this is true, it still means that GenderCool books worth a total of $40,000 might have made it into libraries, community centers, and schools across the country. “These books could be being read by students to deck in schools and libraries,” Hild said. “State Farm refuses to lift a finger to undo any of that.” In fact, a private school in Washington state received a donation of GenderCool books in April and posted a thank you message to State Farm on Facebook, according to the Washington Examiner, which first reported on the matter. Hild also rejected the claim that the higher-ups at State Farm didn’t know about the book donations, noting that he also obtained numerous email complaints that were sent to top executives by concerned employees. “There were emails of multiple agents, walking up the chain, complaining to higher-level executives that this is wrong,” he said, noting that he’s unable to publicize them without compromising the whistleblower’s anonymity. Hild said his organization will not end its “creepy neighbor” ad campaign against State Farm until the company takes action to undo the damage it has caused. Specifically, he demanded that State Farm hire a third-party auditor to examine “every program they have that targets children,” retrieve every one of these books that have been donated to a school, library, and community center, and have conversations with parents whose children have been exposed to such material. “Parents need to know if their kids were exposed to these materials by State Farm agents, and they can have a conversation to walk them out of the bizarre propaganda they were exposed to,” Hild said. Tyler Durden Thu, 06/09/2022 - 19:40.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 9th, 2022

How Fake Is Twitter"s User Data?

How Fake Is Twitter's User Data? Authored by Jeffrey A. Tucker via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), Over the last several weeks, the perception has grown that Elon Musk will not be the emancipator of Twitter, freeing it finally from its mysterious algorithms that throttle, block, and ban perfectly wonderful accounts solely based on the political vendetta of employees and management. The Twitter application is seen on a digital device in San Diego on April 25, 2022. (Gregory Bull/AP Photo) It’s said that he has cold feet, as if Elon’s demand for better data is purely a cover for emotional doubt. That’s simply not true. What he has intuited—that Twitter underreports the sheer fake accounts and bot armies that use its platform—could in fact become another scandal for our age. Twitter says it’s only 5 percent. Elon has crowd-sourced the question and suspects it is closer to 20 percent. The truth is out there, but Twitter is not forthcoming. Why might this be? Here is where we get to the core of the issue: the reach data provided by these companies—this pertains not only to Twitter but to hundreds of thousands of sites—form the basis of its pricing structure for advertisers and therefore drive the fundamentals of the business model. [ZH: According to WaPo, Twitter execs have agreed to deliver the 'firehose' of all their data to Musk (a service they already provide to several clients). Of course what we do not know is how accurate that 'firehose' is...] The business model is that these companies sell your content—which you provide because you want your views known—to advertisers so that they can sell to you. Advertisers are charged for access to your brain based on an overall estimate of how many users are on the platform and how broad is the reach. Accuracy is of huge importance here. But accuracy has not exactly defined the way these companies have long operated. The data are subject to manipulation in the extreme. For example, Twitter has proven to be absolutely awful at policing the number of fake accounts that pretend to be some famous person with large followers. One might suspect that getting rid of such accounts should be part of Twitter’s main focus. I’ve dealt with it for years and spent far too much time getting rid of them. Who has such time? It’s ridiculous. But have a look at this problem which has been going on for many weeks now. Brownstone’s Martin Kulldorff has a famous Twitter account but I can easily search his name which turns up many fake accounts. Notice the slightly different spellings. This isn’t rocket science! Does Twitter do anything about it? Not in many weeks. If this is any indication of the underlying realities, Twitter has a very big problem. Instead of focusing its energies on censoring good accounts, it might have applied its energies to solving a problem that affects all users. And yet there is more at stake. Consider that Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has initiated an investigation into Twitter. If the company has falsely reported its real user base, that stands in violation of the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act. Paxton has given the company until June 27, 2022, to produce evidence for how it calculates the numbers it has routinely touted to advertisers. We’ll see. It will probably end up in court. Twitter’s reluctance to comply with Elon’s demand, and seeming lack of transparency here, is hardly unusual in this industry. It affects the whole of the digital world. The data is easily manipulated. Users are not necessarily users. People have learned to game the system to manufacture influence. Companies count as a user people who have created accounts and forgotten about them, not having logged in for years. I’ve been working hard recently to clean up my accounts out there, and discovered for myself just how tricky this can be. I once thought Snapchat would be a thing, so I got an account (don’t judge me). Then it bored me. I found the app the other day and decided to delete my account. After 30 minutes of trying, having completely forgotten my logins and so on, and then searching forever for the way out, I finally gave up. Yes, I could have solved the issue but doing so is too arduous. Same goes probably for another dozen or two such accounts. Meanwhile, I’m sure these companies list me as a user. In other words, it’s a racket. Years ago, I had begun to watch the behavior of a certain media team that was using YouTube and I noticed that there was something not quite right about the wild claims they were making. One day I did a deep drill down into this alleged traffic. It turned out that 95 percent were views of only a few seconds, and most of those came from strange and far-flung places in the world. It turned out that the production company was paying pennies on views that were not actual views. But to know that, you have to look very carefully and very deeply. It’s there but buried. The problem is systematic and gigantic. Facebook faced a similar problem. The overcharges in this realm are legion. The ability to generate fake users, views, and traffic is rather easy to achieve. It proves too tempting for these outlets, especially because investors and advertisers are so easily bamboozled. I’ve long been on the admin side and see the realities, and they are nothing like what these companies report. If Elon can manage to get to the bottom of this, he will have had an amazing impact on the whole social media industry. Even if he never becomes the owner of Twitter, he will force new levels of transparency and truth. There could be huge scandals lurking out there, not only at Twitter and YouTube, but also at Facebook, TikTok, and many more. These revelations could prompt yet another deep correction in company valuations. There is a larger point here. Think about the use of the energies of these companies. They have their staff working long hours with deep focus to find reasons to ban anyone with right-of-center views. They have deleted thousands and even millions of legitimate accounts of people who have said truthful things, all at the behest of their government masters. Bans continue unabated, daily, hourly. And while they have been doing this, they have allowed bot armies to run uncontrolled in ways that radically diminish user experience. In other words, they are not doing their actual jobs and instead are using the platform to push an agenda. This is obviously unsustainable. But these are times of truth. It’s all going to come out. These are the days of the great reckoning. What is happening to Twitter now is happening to the entire economic environment. A new poll reveals a dramatic loss in economic optimism. A Wall Street Journal poll says that 83 percent of those surveyed rate the economy as not good or poor. The dissatisfaction is intensifying. Frothy social media companies, platforms that won big from lockdowns that they pushed and championed on behalf of governments around the world, could see a serious cleaning of their clocks in this environment. With or without Elon’s proposed takeover of Twitter, the privileged censors who have relied on inflated numbers for years are not going to fare well. Tyler Durden Wed, 06/08/2022 - 19:40.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 8th, 2022

Decades of sexual abuse of students at Rosemead High has left teens and parents feeling pain, anger and disgust

A law enforcement investigation, a student walkout, and alumni up in arms: Turmoil at a southern California high school after Insider's investigation of decades of sexual abuse at the hands of former teacher Eric Burgess. Rosemead High in southern California has been in a state of turmoil since Insider revealed decades of sexual abuse at the hands of former teacher Eric Burgess.(Christopher Vu for Insider)Rosemead High senior Xitlalic Palacios knew that she had to speak up. It had been two days since Insider published a story about Eric Burgess, her former journalism teacher, and she'd barely slept.For the past three years, Palacios had served as editor-in-chief of the student newspaper, which Burgess oversaw before school officials removed him from the classroom and investigated his sexual relationships with teenage girls. As Palacios prepared for what would be her final meeting as the sole student representative of the school board, she grappled with what to say. Many on campus were seething at the superintendent's response to the revelations, saying that the school was "dedicated to creating a safe, secure environment" for students. But Palacios wasn't sure if what she wanted to say – that she could relate to the survivors Burgess had abused because she could have become one herself – was what her peers or the adults charged with ensuring their safety at school needed to hear in this moment of crisis. So she kept that part to herself, just as she'd done so many times before.That didn't mean Palacios would stay silent, though. Far from it."My job has always been to serve the students. My job was never to correct the wrongs of grown adults," Palacios said at the May 18 meeting, filling a moment when school district officials expected her to thank them. "But I'm not sure I have much of a choice as I sit here with you today."Read more: He was my high school journalism teacher. Then I investigated his relationships with teenage girls.The tension in the room was palpable even through the meeting's livestream. Palacios thought of the 8,000 students she was speaking for in the El Monte Union High School District. She thought of her parents, who worried about the consequences that could meet their daughter for speaking out. And of her brother, who assured her that yes, she had to say what others were too afraid to acknowledge.Rosemead Senior Xitlalic Palacios delivers a searing statement during an emotional school board meeting in the wake of Insider's reporting.El Monte Union High School District/YouTube"I think the public is owed an explanation or an apology," Palacios said to the five adult school board members who sat beside her, silent. "I hope our district and my school campus – and any school campus at that – makes an effort to adequately combat these issues. I hope they genuinely work to create safety protocols. I hope our students' firsthand accounts are valued. I hope, I hope, I hope. But it shouldn't come down to hope. Because hope and luck isn't a saving grace. Hope and luck isn't what I or any student should be betting on. Our students deserve better, and I demand that you all do better. Because if this is your best, your best efforts haven't been good enough."Rosemead High's community has been in a state of turmoil since Insider detailed how former English teacher and one-time "Golden Boy" Eric Burgess groomed students for sex for decades. Despite student complaints and obvious red flags, school and district officials missed repeated opportunities to put a stop to Burgess' behavior. Rosemead's reckoning has taken a toll on students and faculty, interviews with 57 people connected to the school show, with a tense distrust dominating the final days of the school year.The Los Angeles Sheriff's Department has opened an investigation into Burgess' relationships with former students as well as possible abuse by other Rosemead High teachers, Sgt. Robert Leyba said. Leyba and another deputy assigned to Rosemead told Insider that the department was surprised to learn of Burgess' departure from the school by reading Insider's reporting, rather than hearing from school officials.Leyba said that district officials first contacted the sheriff's department in April 2019, when they opened their investigation of Burgess' sexual relationships with former students. At the time, district officials had no cooperating victims, so deputies instructed them to keep the department apprised of what they found.The Sheriff's Department never heard back from the district, Leyba said."For us to move forward with our special victims bureau, we have to have a victim," Leyba said. If former students come forward to the department now, he said, it could "open a lot of other things," including the possibility of criminal charges or civil suits being filed. In 2019, California extended the statute of limitations for cases of sexual abuse involving minors. Survivors now have until the age of 40 to file a civil lawsuit, or five years after the discovery of the abuse, whichever is later. The amended law also opened a three-year window for adults to file civil claims that were previously barred by the statute of limitations; that window closes December 31, 2022.Rosemead High School is in a state of turmoil.(Christopher Vu for Insider)Community members and alumni have called for Rosemead High School and district officials to resign in recent days. Back on campus, hundreds of Rosemead students walked out of class in protest, demanding that school officials take steps to ensure their safety. Anger among students boiled over last week, when two allegedly vandalized the Rosemead High campus—including the classroom door where Burgess was once caught having sex with a student who had graduated just weeks prior. Many students expected an apology from school officials in response to Insider's reporting, and were dismayed when they were told that staff had done all they could to address abusive behavior by teachers."They need to recognize what happened and not just send out these pathetic excuses," said junior Zachery Larson, who led the May 20 student walkout. "This is a problem and it can no longer be ignored. I hope they can at least acknowledge that by the end of the school year."The door to the classroom where Eric Burgess was once caught having sex with a student who'd graduated just weeks before was recently vandalized.(Insider)Larson and other students are scheduled to meet with Rosemead principal Brian Bristol on Friday to discuss allegations of misconduct against other teachers. The dark mood on campus has been punctuated in recent days with fresh allegations regarding a current Rosemead High teacher who has been absent from school; Bristol declined to comment.School staff, meanwhile, are openly questioning whether the school is doing enough to prevent the predatory grooming behavior that Burgess excelled at for so long. "We aren't doing enough to protect our kids," Rosemead High psychologist Alexi Adams told Insider, calling for more education and training of staff and students alike. "Kids can't protect themselves if they don't know what to look for. The groomers are so charismatic and charming that the kids do not know what is happening; they are easy victims."Rosemead High School sits just east of Los Angeles in the San Gabriel Valley.(Christopher Vu for Insider)As the campus community continues to search for answers, questions have intensified around Bristol's initial handling of an explosive whistleblower memo about Burgess' behavior.The document, which the principal received in April 2018, documented in stark detail sexual relationships that Burgess had had with female students going back 20 years. The memo included dates, ID numbers of students who were aware of Burgess' inappropriate behavior, and the names of five former students with whom he'd allegedly had sexual relationships.Bristol sat on the information for a year.It wasn't until the following spring, when screenshots of sexually explicit messages Burgess had exchanged with a former student were posted to social media, that Bristol took action and removed Burgess from the classroom. District officials then notified the Sheriff's Department.Felipe Ibarra, a former assistant superintendent who oversaw the district's investigation of Burgess, told Insider that Bristol initially "insisted he had provided me the memo via e-mail, however from a search of our email trails, it was clearly evident that he had not. He subsequently apologized and explained why he thought he had sent the memo."Ibarra said that the district's outside law firm, Olivarez Madruga Lemieux O'Neill, selected the private investigative firm that used the memo as a jumping off point for the district's probe. District officials were unaware of the numerous complaints that parents and staff in neighboring school districts had made regarding other investigations involving the firm, Nicole Miller & Associates, Ibarra said.Ibarra said investigators interviewed many of the students named in the memo, including Burgess' ex-wife, and that "none gave him up." Those closest to Burgess, Ibarra said, "protected him well."As Insider previously reported, it was Burgess's documented efforts to obstruct the district's investigation of his relationship with a former student, rather than the relationship itself, that cost him his job.Former Rosemead High English teacher Eric Burgess.(Insider)Neither Bristol nor Zuniga responded to detailed questions for this story, including why Zuniga claimed recently that school officials "promptly removed" Burgess from the classroom upon learning of his relationships with teenage girls.After he was forced out of Rosemead High in December 2019, Burgess went on to do recruiting work, ultimately landing a job with Meta (formerly known as Facebook), Insider has learned. The day after Insider's investigation was published, Burgess lost his job at Meta, multiple company employees confirmed; spokesman Joe Osborne declined to comment. Burgess didn't respond to requests for comment.The time it took for school officials to act on credible tips about Burgess — as well as the numerous other red flags about the teacher's behavior that were either ignored or not thoroughly investigated during his 20-year career — became a focal point of a student walk-out at Rosemead High last month.Rosemead High students walk out of class in a protest sparked by Insider's reporting.(Insider)"Enough is enough," a flier advertising the protest read. "Why did it take 20 years?" read one sign. "Sexual misconduct between students & teachers should NOT be normalized or ignored," read another.The week of the walkout, district officials diverted psychological services from other schools in the district to Rosemead High, internal emails reviewed by Insider show. Many longtime school employees said they'd never seen anything like it."These kids are tired of being dismissed," one longtime employee said, recalling how in the past when students have come forward with allegations of abuse, they were disregarded by administrators. "We need to heal as a school. So many kids are broken." A group of concerned alumni, meanwhile, are demanding that the district take steps to ensure more students aren't abused. They are drafting a petition to send to district officials, said Cynthia Amezcua, an alum who is organizing the effort."We are owed a meeting with Rosemead High administrators," said Amezcua, who urged officials to address Rosemead's culture of secrecy during an emotional public comment at the recent school board meeting. After listening to her and others call for accountability, a lawyer for the district ignored the remarks and read a prepared statement."It's nonsense for them to hide behind these legal counsel statements," Amezcua said. "They think that will get us to calm down, and that's not going to happen."Many at Rosemead High are seething at the response from school officials, who have not apologized or acknowledged any role in failing to put a stop to predatory behavior by former teachers.(Christopher Vu for Insider)Xitlalic Palacios was desperate to find community when she arrived at Rosemead High as a freshman in the fall of 2018. Most of her friends had gone to nearby El Monte High; the only people she knew at Rosemead were her older brother and Burgess, whom she'd met in summer school.Typically, freshmen aren't allowed to enroll in the student newspaper. But Burgess made an exception for Palacios, telling her to let her counselor know he'd given permission for her to join the staff, emails between Burgess and Palacios show.Palacios loved to write. In Burgess, she thought she'd found a mentor, both for journalism and for the academic decathlon team she hoped to join, which he'd led to numerous state competitions. Palacios remembers her first day in Burgess' classroom, her eyes scanning the trophies that lined his desk.Palacios pictured her name on one of them and claimed a seat in the front row, directly in front of her teacher's desk."He made me feel like I had a place where I belonged," Palacios told me.Even though she was the youngest member of the newspaper staff, Palacios recalled, Burgess would tell other students that she was the "best journalist here" and would be his editor-in-chief someday. Palacios remembers eavesdropping on a conversation Burgess had with the leader of the academic decathlon team.Palacios recalled that when he finished, Burgess fist-bumped the student and walked over to her desk, where he kneeled down — "uncomfortably close," she said — and explained that she would be spending a lot of time in his class over the next four years and she would need to make it a priority. Burgess urged her to consider dropping her other extracurricular activities, including the Associated Student Body and volunteer work, to make time for the newspaper and the academic decathlon team. When Palacios told him that her other activities were also important to her, Burgess said that his classes would help her "more.""His personality shifted based on who you were," Palacios said. "He could be really hard on students. But with me, I never got that experience. He never asked me questions that I couldn't answer."Like other students who grew close to Burgess, Palacios befriended his son, a child Burgess raised with a former student and who was a senior during Palacios' freshman year. When Burgess was pulled from the classroom the following spring, his son told Palacios what school officials still have never publicly acknowledged: Burgess became sexually involved with a female student weeks after she'd graduated."My first reaction was denial," Palacios said. "I thought, 'There's no way. This is someone I trust.'"The truth didn't register with Palacios until a classmate on the academic decathlon team told her that he'd personally seen the sexually explicit messages from Burgess to his student that kids had been gossiping about. The rumors about their teacher, he told Palacios, were true. "We were both at a loss," Palacios said. "We both looked up to him." Palacios downplayed what was going on at school with her parents. "I was scared to admit there was something weird happening," she told me. "I felt kind of foolish and embarrassed." The first time she told her parents how close she'd grown to Burgess was the day Insider published its investigation. Reading the story made Palacios feel ill; she stayed home from school the next day."My dad kept saying, 'It could have been you,'" Palacios told Insider. "'It could have been you.'"The class of 2022 graduates from Rosemead High school this Friday, June 3.(Christopher Vu for Insider)Palacios graduates from Rosemead High this week, leaving behind a school in crisis. She's spent her final days on campus encouraging her peers to demand action to ensure their safety. She heads to UCLA this fall to study political science.Looking back on the months she spent in Burgess' classroom, Palacios is reminded of all that she had going for her. She benefited from the presence of other adults who looked out for her and celebrated her success."If I wasn't able to get the protection when I had all these connections, all these people who claimed they cared about me, I can only imagine how these girls who didn't have that support felt," Palacios said, her mind going back to the students who came before her whom she now knows Burgess abused. "If they couldn't protect me, how could they protect anyone?"Palacios feels manipulated and used by Burgess, echoing what many other former Burgess students have told Insider in recent days. She also feels guilty for unwittingly being a part of the image Burgess cultivated on campus for so long. But more than anything else, Palacios is grateful that the incoming class of freshmen will never know her former teacher."I feel like the last one who has any connection to Eric Burgess on this campus. And that's comforting to me," Palacios said. "I can only imagine if there were more students who felt the damage that I feel."Read more: How a southern California high-school shielded a beloved teacher who groomed students for sexMatt Drange graduated from Rosemead High in 2007. If you have a tip, contact Matt by email, at mdrange[at]insider[dot]com, or by phone, at 626-233-1063.The LA Sheriff's Department team investigating sexual abuse at Rosemead High can be reached through Sgt. Robert Leyba at the Temple City station by calling 626-285-7171 ext. 3361.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJun 2nd, 2022

Pain, anger, and disgust: Inside Rosemead High"s reckoning with decades of sexual abuse of students

Rosemead High in southern California has been in a state of turmoil since Insider revealed decades of sexual abuse at the hands of former teacher Eric Burgess.(Christopher Vu for Insider)Rosemead High senior Xitlalic Palacios knew that she had to speak up. It had been two days since Insider published a story about Eric Burgess, her former journalism teacher, and she'd barely slept.For the past three years, Palacios had served as editor-in-chief of the student newspaper, which Burgess oversaw before school officials removed him from the classroom and investigated his sexual relationships with teenage girls. As Palacios prepared for what would be her final meeting as the sole student representative of the school board, she grappled with what to say. Many on campus were seething at the superintendent's response to the revelations, saying that the school was "dedicated to creating a safe, secure environment" for students. But Palacios wasn't sure if what she wanted to say – that she could relate to the survivors Burgess had abused because she could have become one herself – was what her peers or the adults charged with ensuring their safety at school needed to hear in this moment of crisis. So she kept that part to herself, just as she'd done so many times before.That didn't mean Palacios would stay silent, though. Far from it."My job has always been to serve the students. My job was never to correct the wrongs of grown adults," Palacios said at the May 18 meeting, filling a moment when school district officials expected her to thank them. "But I'm not sure I have much of a choice as I sit here with you today."Read more: He was my high school journalism teacher. Then I investigated his relationships with teenage girls.The tension in the room was palpable even through the meeting's livestream. Palacios thought of the 8,000 students she was speaking for in the El Monte Union High School District. She thought of her parents, who worried about the consequences that could meet their daughter for speaking out. And of her brother, who assured her that yes, she had to say what others were too afraid to acknowledge.Rosemead Senior Xitlalic Palacios delivers a searing statement during an emotional school board meeting in the wake of Insider's reporting.El Monte Union High School District/YouTube"I think the public is owed an explanation or an apology," Palacios said to the five adult school board members who sat beside her, silent. "I hope our district and my school campus – and any school campus at that – makes an effort to adequately combat these issues. I hope they genuinely work to create safety protocols. I hope our students' firsthand accounts are valued. I hope, I hope, I hope. But it shouldn't come down to hope. Because hope and luck isn't a saving grace. Hope and luck isn't what I or any student should be betting on. Our students deserve better, and I demand that you all do better. Because if this is your best, your best efforts haven't been good enough."Rosemead High's community has been in a state of turmoil since Insider detailed how former English teacher and one-time "Golden Boy" Eric Burgess groomed students for sex for decades. Despite student complaints and obvious red flags, school and district officials missed repeated opportunities to put a stop to Burgess' behavior. Rosemead's reckoning has taken a toll on students and faculty, interviews with 57 people connected to the school show, with a tense distrust dominating the final days of the school year.The Los Angeles Sheriff's Department has opened an investigation into Burgess' relationships with former students as well as possible abuse by other Rosemead High teachers, Sgt. Robert Leyba said. Leyba and another deputy assigned to Rosemead told Insider that the department was surprised to learn of Burgess' departure from the school by reading Insider's reporting, rather than hearing from school officials.Leyba said that district officials first contacted the sheriff's department in April 2019, when they opened their investigation of Burgess' sexual relationships with former students. At the time, district officials had no cooperating victims, so deputies instructed them to keep the department apprised of what they found.The Sheriff's Department never heard back from the district, Leyba said."For us to move forward with our special victims bureau, we have to have a victim," Leyba said. If former students come forward to the department now, he said, it could "open a lot of other things," including the possibility of criminal charges or civil suits being filed. In 2019, California extended the statute of limitations for cases of sexual abuse involving minors. Survivors now have until the age of 40 to file a civil lawsuit, or five years after the discovery of the abuse, whichever is later. The amended law also opened a three-year window for adults to file civil claims that were previously barred by the statute of limitations; that window closes December 31, 2022.Rosemead High School is in a state of turmoil.(Christopher Vu for Insider)Community members and alumni have called for Rosemead High School and district officials to resign in recent days. Back on campus, hundreds of Rosemead students walked out of class in protest, demanding that school officials take steps to ensure their safety. Anger among students boiled over last week, when two allegedly vandalized the Rosemead High campus—including the classroom door where Burgess was once caught having sex with a student who had graduated just weeks prior. Many students expected an apology from school officials in response to Insider's reporting, and were dismayed when they were told that staff had done all they could to address abusive behavior by teachers."They need to recognize what happened and not just send out these pathetic excuses," said junior Zachery Larson, who led the May 20 student walkout. "This is a problem and it can no longer be ignored. I hope they can at least acknowledge that by the end of the school year."The door to the classroom where Eric Burgess was once caught having sex with a student who'd graduated just weeks before was recently vandalized.(Insider)Larson and other students are scheduled to meet with Rosemead principal Brian Bristol on Friday to discuss allegations of misconduct against other teachers. The dark mood on campus has been punctuated in recent days with fresh allegations regarding a current Rosemead High teacher who has been absent from school; Bristol declined to comment.School staff, meanwhile, are openly questioning whether the school is doing enough to prevent the predatory grooming behavior that Burgess excelled at for so long. "We aren't doing enough to protect our kids," Rosemead High psychologist Alexi Adams told Insider, calling for more education and training of staff and students alike. "Kids can't protect themselves if they don't know what to look for. The groomers are so charismatic and charming that the kids do not know what is happening; they are easy victims."Rosemead High School sits just east of Los Angeles in the San Gabriel Valley.(Christopher Vu for Insider)As the campus community continues to search for answers, questions have intensified around Bristol's initial handling of an explosive whistleblower memo about Burgess' behavior.The document, which the principal received in April 2018, documented in stark detail sexual relationships that Burgess had had with female students going back 20 years. The memo included dates, ID numbers of students who were aware of Burgess' inappropriate behavior, and the names of five former students with whom he'd allegedly had sexual relationships.Bristol sat on the information for a year.It wasn't until the following spring, when screenshots of sexually explicit messages Burgess had exchanged with a former student were posted to social media, that Bristol took action and removed Burgess from the classroom. District officials then notified the Sheriff's Department.Felipe Ibarra, a former assistant superintendent who oversaw the district's investigation of Burgess, told Insider that Bristol initially "insisted he had provided me the memo via e-mail, however from a search of our email trails, it was clearly evident that he had not. He subsequently apologized and explained why he thought he had sent the memo."Ibarra said that the district's outside law firm, Olivarez Madruga Lemieux O'Neill, selected the private investigative firm that used the memo as a jumping off point for the district's probe. District officials were unaware of the numerous complaints that parents and staff in neighboring school districts had made regarding other investigations involving the firm, Nicole Miller & Associates, Ibarra said.Ibarra said investigators interviewed many of the students named in the memo, including Burgess' ex-wife, and that "none gave him up." Those closest to Burgess, Ibarra said, "protected him well."As Insider previously reported, it was Burgess's documented efforts to obstruct the district's investigation of his relationship with a former student, rather than the relationship itself, that cost him his job.Former Rosemead High English teacher Eric Burgess.(Insider)Neither Bristol nor Zuniga responded to detailed questions for this story, including why Zuniga claimed recently that school officials "promptly removed" Burgess from the classroom upon learning of his relationships with teenage girls.After he was forced out of Rosemead High in December 2019, Burgess went on to do recruiting work, ultimately landing a job with Meta (formerly known as Facebook), Insider has learned. The day after Insider's investigation was published, Burgess lost his job at Meta, multiple company employees confirmed; spokesman Joe Osborne declined to comment. Burgess didn't respond to requests for comment.The time it took for school officials to act on credible tips about Burgess — as well as the numerous other red flags about the teacher's behavior that were either ignored or not thoroughly investigated during his 20-year career — became a focal point of a student walk-out at Rosemead High last month.Rosemead High students walk out of class in a protest sparked by Insider's reporting.(Insider)"Enough is enough," a flier advertising the protest read. "Why did it take 20 years?" read one sign. "Sexual misconduct between students & teachers should NOT be normalized or ignored," read another.The week of the walkout, district officials diverted psychological services from other schools in the district to Rosemead High, internal emails reviewed by Insider show. Many longtime school employees said they'd never seen anything like it."These kids are tired of being dismissed," one longtime employee said, recalling how in the past when students have come forward with allegations of abuse, they were disregarded by administrators. "We need to heal as a school. So many kids are broken." A group of concerned alumni, meanwhile, are demanding that the district take steps to ensure more students aren't abused. They are drafting a petition to send to district officials, said Cynthia Amezcua, an alum who is organizing the effort."We are owed a meeting with Rosemead High administrators," said Amezcua, who urged officials to address Rosemead's culture of secrecy during an emotional public comment at the recent school board meeting. After listening to her and others call for accountability, a lawyer for the district ignored the remarks and read a prepared statement."It's nonsense for them to hide behind these legal counsel statements," Amezcua said. "They think that will get us to calm down, and that's not going to happen."Many at Rosemead High are seething at the response from school officials, who have not apologized or acknowledged any role in failing to put a stop to predatory behavior by former teachers.(Christopher Vu for Insider)Xitlalic Palacios was desperate to find community when she arrived at Rosemead High as a freshman in the fall of 2018. Most of her friends had gone to nearby El Monte High; the only people she knew at Rosemead were her older brother and Burgess, whom she'd met in summer school.Typically, freshmen aren't allowed to enroll in the student newspaper. But Burgess made an exception for Palacios, telling her to let her counselor know he'd given permission for her to join the staff, emails between Burgess and Palacios show.Palacios loved to write. In Burgess, she thought she'd found a mentor, both for journalism and for the academic decathlon team she hoped to join, which he'd led to numerous state competitions. Palacios remembers her first day in Burgess' classroom, her eyes scanning the trophies that lined his desk.Palacios pictured her name on one of them and claimed a seat in the front row, directly in front of her teacher's desk."He made me feel like I had a place where I belonged," Palacios told me.Even though she was the youngest member of the newspaper staff, Palacios recalled, Burgess would tell other students that she was the "best journalist here" and would be his editor-in-chief someday. Palacios remembers eavesdropping on a conversation Burgess had with the leader of the academic decathlon team.Palacios recalled that when he finished, Burgess fist-bumped the student and walked over to her desk, where he kneeled down — "uncomfortably close," she said — and explained that she would be spending a lot of time in his class over the next four years and she would need to make it a priority. Burgess urged her to consider dropping her other extracurricular activities, including the Associated Student Body and volunteer work, to make time for the newspaper and the academic decathlon team. When Palacios told him that her other activities were also important to her, Burgess said that his classes would help her "more.""His personality shifted based on who you were," Palacios said. "He could be really hard on students. But with me, I never got that experience. He never asked me questions that I couldn't answer."Like other students who grew close to Burgess, Palacios befriended his son, a child Burgess raised with a former student and who was a senior during Palacios' freshman year. When Burgess was pulled from the classroom the following spring, his son told Palacios what school officials still have never publicly acknowledged: Burgess became sexually involved with a female student weeks after she'd graduated."My first reaction was denial," Palacios said. "I thought, 'There's no way. This is someone I trust.'"The truth didn't register with Palacios until a classmate on the academic decathlon team told her that he'd personally seen the sexually explicit messages from Burgess to his student that kids had been gossiping about. The rumors about their teacher, he told Palacios, were true. "We were both at a loss," Palacios said. "We both looked up to him." Palacios downplayed what was going on at school with her parents. "I was scared to admit there was something weird happening," she told me. "I felt kind of foolish and embarrassed." The first time she told her parents how close she'd grown to Burgess was the day Insider published its investigation. Reading the story made Palacios feel ill; she stayed home from school the next day."My dad kept saying, 'It could have been you,'" Palacios told Insider. "'It could have been you.'"The class of 2022 graduates from Rosemead High school this Friday, June 3.(Christopher Vu for Insider)Palacios graduates from Rosemead High this week, leaving behind a school in crisis. She's spent her final days on campus encouraging her peers to demand action to ensure their safety. She heads to UCLA this fall to study political science.Looking back on the months she spent in Burgess' classroom, Palacios is reminded of all that she had going for her. She benefited from the presence of other adults who looked out for her and celebrated her success."If I wasn't able to get the protection when I had all these connections, all these people who claimed they cared about me, I can only imagine how these girls who didn't have that support felt," Palacios said, her mind going back to the students who came before her whom she now knows Burgess abused. "If they couldn't protect me, how could they protect anyone?"Palacios feels manipulated and used by Burgess, echoing what many other former Burgess students have told Insider in recent days. She also feels guilty for unwittingly being a part of the image Burgess cultivated on campus for so long. But more than anything else, Palacios is grateful that the incoming class of freshmen will never know her former teacher."I feel like the last one who has any connection to Eric Burgess on this campus. And that's comforting to me," Palacios said. "I can only imagine if there were more students who felt the damage that I feel."Read more: How a southern California high-school shielded a beloved teacher who groomed students for sexMatt Drange graduated from Rosemead High in 2007. If you have a tip, contact Matt by email, at mdrange[at]insider[dot]com, or by phone, at 626-233-1063.The LA Sheriff's Department team investigating sexual abuse at Rosemead High can be reached through Sgt. Robert Leyba at the Temple City station by calling 626-285-7171 ext. 3361.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 2nd, 2022

Elizabeth Holmes pleaded with a judge to overturn her Theranos convictions, citing "insufficient evidence"

Theranos founder's lawyers challenged evidence submitted by prosecutors and said there is no proof she conspired to commit fraud with "Sunny" Balwani. Elizabeth Holmes founded Theranos after dropping out of college at the age of 19.AP Elizabeth Holmes has asked a judge to overturn her convictions on wire fraud charges. Holmes, depicted in "The Dropout," was convicted on four fraud-related charges in January.   Her lawyers said "no rational juror" could convict beyond reasonable doubt based on the evidence. Elizabeth Holmes has pleaded with a judge to overturn her conviction for wire fraud, with her attorney saying there is "insufficient evidence" for any "rational juror" to proceed with the conviction, according to court documents filed on Friday.In a 24-page filing, lawyers for the Theranos founder targeted her conviction of wire fraud, arguing the evidence provided did not amount to a guilty verdict."Because no rational juror could have found the elements of wire fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud beyond a reasonable doubt on this record, the Court should grant Ms. Holmes' motion for judgment of acquittal," they said in the filing, which was first reported by Bloomberg. Holmes was convicted on four fraud-related charges in January linked to investments made by hedge fund manager Brian Grossman, the DeVos family, and the former Cravath attorney Daniel Mosley.She was acquitted on four other counts of wire fraud, while jurors couldn't reach a verdict on three other counts.Holmes is due to be sentenced on September 26, with each of the charges carrying a maximum prison term of 20 years and a $250,000 fine. She was charged alongside former Theranos president Ramesh "Sunny" Balwani, whose trial is ongoing.In the latest filing, lawyers for Holmes said there was no evidence of Holmes and Balwani conspiring to commit fraud against investors. They wrote: "Even if Ms Holmes committed wire fraud against an investor (she did not) and even if Mr Balwani committed wire fraud against an investor, that does not prove a conspiratorial agreement between them, nor does it prove that Ms Holmes willfully joined any agreement."The attorneys claimed that only one of the hundreds of texts shown to jurors was linked to representations of an investor: Rupert Murdoch."But, again, that message, offered through an authenticating witness unable to provide context, provides no inkling that Mr Balwani and Ms Holmes were conspiring to defraud Mr Murdoch," they said.Holmes dropped out of college at 19 to start Theranos, which attracted a $9 billion valuation at its peak. Her journey was depicted on the Hulu drama "The Dropout" that starred Amanda Seyfried.Theranos' technology was found to be flawed, with a 2015 Wall Street Journal investigation by John Carreyrou triggering the company's downfall and lawsuits from her biggest backers. Holmes' lawyers argued the investor fraud counts "relies heavily" on the testimony of whistleblower Erica Cheung, but that Cheung testified about failures of Theranos' results before Holmes promoted a later version of its analyzers, the miniLab, to investors."Investors with whom Theranos partnered were focused on the long-term goals of the company and its ability to impact health care in the future," they said.A judge will hear Holmes' appeal in July, before the September sentencing.The Attorney's Office of San Francisco could not immediately be reached for comment outside normal working hours.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytMay 29th, 2022

Before and after photos show how Russia"s assault turned Mariupol from an industrial port city into rubble

Before Putin's war, Mariupol was home to over 430,000 people. Months of bombardment has left the southern Ukrainian port city in ruins. Before and after photos show residential buildings in Mariupol.Jasteri/Shutterstock and AP Photo/Alexei Alexandrov Ukraine's southern port city of Mariupol was once an industrial hub, home to hundreds of thousands of people. It faced a Russian bombing campaign that killed scores and became a symbol of Ukrainian resistance.  Photos show what the city looked like before Russia's deadly assault, and after it was reduced to rubble.  Before: Located along the Sea of Azov, Mariupol is Ukraine's tenth-largest city.Ukraine. Mariupol. View of the coast of the Azov Sea, the village, and the seaport.Liudmila Ermolenko/ShutterstockUkraine's southern port city of Mariupol was home to over 430,000 people before Russia's February 24 invasion of the eastern European country.The city has historically been a major trading and industrial hub — a center for metallurgy, engineering, steel production, and iron production.After: In April, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said approximately 100,000 civilians remained in the city as Russian troops attacked.Civilians trapped in Mariupol city under Russian attacks, are evacuated in groups under the control of pro-Russian separatists, through other cities, in Mariupol, Ukraine on March 20, 2022.Stringer/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesDuring Russian President Vladimir Putin's ongoing war, Mariupol became the center of a devastating assault by Russian troops who wanted to capture the strategic city to build a land corridor from occupied Crimea to the eastern Donbas region.Russian forces leveled the city with indiscriminate bombardment — targeting a school, maternity hospital, theater, and other civilian structures. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said in April that tens of thousands of Ukrainians were likely killed in attacks on Mariupol.Source: Business InsiderBefore: A rail vehicle is seen loaded with coal, a key Ukrainian export along with steel.Mariupol, Ukraine - winter 2022: Powerful diesel locomotive TEM7 pulls wagons loaded with anthracite along a large coal mine station.Zahnoi Alex/ShutterstockAfter: While some residents escaped Mariupol by train, others became trapped — many without food, medical care, water, electricity, and heat.A damaged tram is seen in a depot near the Azovstal plant amid Russian attacks in Mariupol, Ukraine on May 21, 2022.Photo by Leon Klein/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesSource: Business InsiderBefore: Residential buildings in Mariupol before Russian troops bombarded the city.Mariupol, Donetsk region, Ukraine, urban landscape with a multi-story residential building.Jasteri/ShutterstockSource: Business InsiderAfter: An analyst told Insider that Russia mismanaged its capture of Mariupol, causing the takeover to run longer than expected.An explosion is seen in an apartment building after Russian's army tank fires in Mariupol, Ukraine, Friday, March 11, 2022.Evgeniy Maloletka/AP PhotoSource: Business InsiderBefore: This January 27 photo shows the Donetsk Academic Regional Drama Theater, in the center of Mariupol, prior to the Russian bombing on March 16.Mariupol, Ukraine - Jan 27 2022: The center of Mariupol before the war began. Mariupol Theatre before the bombing.Hakuna77/ShutterstockAfter: An Associated Press investigation found that nearly 600 people were killed in the Mariupol Theatre bombing.Russian Emergencies personnel clear debris in the partially destroyed Mariupol drama theatre in the city of Mariupol on May 10, 2022, amid the ongoing Russian military action in Ukraine.STRINGER/AFP via Getty ImagesInsider previously reported that more than 1,000 civilians had been sheltering at the theater when Russian forces bombed the building.Satellite images taken prior to the bombing showed the word "CHILDREN" had been written in Russian, possibly in an attempt to warn Russian forces that civilians were inside.The Associated Press spoke to nearly two dozen survivors, rescuers and people familiar with the incident, and reported that nearly 600 people likely died in the bombing.City council officials accused Russia of "purposefully and cynically" bombing the theater.Before: Mariupol's Azovstal steel plant supported 10,000 jobs and was responsible for the production of steel, iron, and rolled metal.Mariupol, Ukraine - May 1, 2018: Panorama of the Azovstal metallurgical plant.Oleksandr Popenko/ShutterstockSources: Al Jazeera. Business InsiderAfter: With the final Ukrainian troops surrendering, Russia claimed to have captured Azovstal on Friday, and with it, Mariupol.A view shows the Azovstal steel plant in the city of Mariupol on May 10, 2022, amid the ongoing Russian military action in Ukraine.Photo by STRINGER/AFP via Getty ImagesA Russian defense ministry spokesperson told the state-owned news agency TASS that Azovstal was "completely liberated" on Friday with the surrender of 531 Ukrainian fighters.The capture marked the end of a months-long siege of the southern port city.Moscow-backed separatists hope to turn the city into a resort town after the war, a move that Mariupol city council said was intended to erase the city's history. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytMay 23rd, 2022

Ukrainian forces completed a "combat mission" in Mariupol after hundreds were evacuated

"Defenders of Mariupol are the heroes of our time. They are forever in history," Ukrainian forces said in a statement. A wounded service member of Ukrainian forces from the besieged Azovstal steel mill in Mariupol is transported on a stretcher out of a bus, which arrived under escort of the pro-Russian military in the course of Ukraine-Russia conflict in Novoazovsk, Ukraine May 16, 2022Alexander Ermochenko/REUTERS Ukrainian forces said they "fulfilled their combat mission" in Mariupol on Tuesday. They have begun to evacuate to "save the lives of their personnel." 53 soldiers were transported to a hospital and another 211 were evacuated via humanitarian corridor. The General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine said Tuesday that a garrison stationed in Mariupol has "fulfilled its combat mission" and began to evacuate.This likely signals the end of a mission to defend the Azovstal steel plant, which served as a stronghold for Ukrainian troops in the besieged city of Mariupol."The Supreme Military Command ordered the commanders of the units stationed at Azovstal to save the lives of their personnel," according to a statement.According to defense officials, 53 wounded troops were transported to a hospital in Novoazovsk, while another 211 were evacuated through a humanitarian corridor to Olenivka. They may be subject to a prisoner exchange between Russian troops, the statement said.Ukrainian forces had recently begun evacuations of civilians at the Azovstal steel plant, where hundreds of Ukrainian civilians and troops bunkered down for months. "Defenders of Mariupol are the heroes of our time," the statement said. "They are forever in history."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytMay 16th, 2022