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Category: topSource: bizjournalsJun 23rd, 2022

Live updates: Texas abortion clinic staff describe how patients "begged for help" after Roe v. Wade fell — report

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Olivia Rodrigo calls out SCOTUS justices who voted to overturn Roe v. Wade with a rendition of 'F--- You'Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Glastonbury Festival on Saturday.Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage via Getty ImagesPop star Olivia Rodrigo on Saturday sent a message to the Supreme Court justices responsible for overturning Roe v. Wade, calling them out during her set at the Glastonbury music festival. Rodrigo invited her guest, British singer Lily Allen, on stage and the pair performed Allen's 2009 song, "Fuck You" — but not before Rodrigo named all five SCOTUS justices who helped gut the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America."Today is a very, very special day. This is actually my first Glastonbury," Rodrigo said. "But I'm also equally as heartbroken over what happened in America yesterday." Rodrigo told the crowd that the SCOTUS decision infringed on a woman's ability to secure a safe abortion, which she called a basic human right. Read Full StoryAfter Roe fell, Steve Bannon called for an 'army of the awakened' to 'shatter' DemocratsIn a Gettr post, Steve Bannon urged "patriots" to take advantage of the "Roe momentum" to win the MAGA movement a "massive victory" at the midterm elections.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRight-wing figure Steve Bannon has called for an "army of the awakened" to "shatter" the Democratic party in post-Roe America. Bannon made a post on Gettr on Saturday lauding the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, a controversial decision that has led to abortion being halted in some states.In his post, Bannon called on "the army of the awakened" to rally and capitalize on the verdict. "This is the key take-away for MAGA … the pro-abortion movement is shattered and is now turning in on itself — because for 50 years they didn't have to work— the Courts and Regime Media covered for them — now The Abyss," Bannon wrote."That's the Democratic Party in November— we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shatter it into a million small pieces," Bannon added, referring to the upcoming midterm elections.Read Full StoryTexas abortion clinic staff describe how patients 'begged for help' when Roe v. Wade was overturned: reportA patient at the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services Clinic in San Antonio, Texas, is informed by a staff member on Friday that the clinic can no longer provide her with an abortion.Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesStaff at an abortion clinic in Texas said they had to turn away people seeking abortions away just minutes after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.Speaking to The 19th, an independent news organization, clinic administrator Andrea Gallegos described how she had to turn away a dozen patients waiting in the lobby of the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services clinic in San Antonio, Texas. Gallegos told The 19th that she and the clinic's staff had to tell the people gathered that, because of the ruling, "unfortunately, your geographical location affects your bodily autonomy." Per the outlet, Gallegos described the scene at the clinic as being one of "complete despair," with people screaming, crying, and begging for help.Read Full Story'Full House' star Jodie Sweetin was thrown to the ground by LAPD during freeway protest for abortion rightsJodie Sweetin told People that she was "proud" of those who showed up to protest.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty ImagesLos Angeles Police Department officers shoved Jodie Sweetin onto the ground of a freeway in Los Angeles on Saturday during an abortion rights protest, video shows.The "Full House" and "Fuller House" star, wearing all black with a black backpack, can be seen in a video of the incident with a megaphone in hand when a couple of LAPD officers shove her to the ground. Protesters can be heard yelling "Jodie, you good?" and  "What the f*** is wrong with you guys?"Sweetin is then picked up and the crowd immediately begins to chant "no justice, no peace."Read Full StorySince the Roe ruling a gynecology clinic in Texas has received increased requests for permanent sterilization: 'I sense that they're scared'Protesters march during an abortion-rights rally on June 25, 2022 in Austin, Texas.Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesA women's health clinic in Austin, Texas, has received dozens of requests for permanent sterilizations after Friday's decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that established a constitutional right to an abortion. After the Women's Health Domain closed on Friday evening for the weekend, it received 109 new patient requests, the majority of which were requesting tubal ligation, or permanent sterilization. Read Full StoryThe impact of Kavanaugh's confirmation on the 2018 elections may reveal how the reversal of Roe v. Wade could impact this year's midtermsU.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAs political analysts seek to understand the possible impact of Roe v. Wade being overturned on this year's midterm elections, some suggest that data from 2018 may reveal possible trends. In 2018, following the contentious confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh — who was accused of sexual assault by Christine Ford — 40 Republican US House seats flipped to Democratic candidates. GOP candidates led in polls taken prior to the hearings and went on to lose in November in 27 of those races, indicating increased mobilization among partisan voters following the hearings.  Read Full StoryLindsey Graham said Alito's abortion opinion was correct for distinguishing Roe from same-sex marriage and contraception rulingsRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham.J. Scott Applewhite/APRepublican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said Sunday that Justice Samuel Alito, unlike Justice Clarence Thomas, was correct for saying same-sex marriage and contraception would not be affected by the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In his concurring opinion on the ruling, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for cases regarding contraceptive access, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage.Read Full StoryAOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Live updates: Texas abortion clinic staff describe how patients "begged for help" when after Roe v. Wade fell — report

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Olivia Rodrigo calls out SCOTUS justices who voted to overturn Roe v. Wade with a rendition of 'F--- You'Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Glastonbury Festival on Saturday.Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage via Getty ImagesPop star Olivia Rodrigo on Saturday sent a message to the Supreme Court justices responsible for overturning Roe v. Wade, calling them out during her set at the Glastonbury music festival. Rodrigo invited her guest, British singer Lily Allen, on stage and the pair performed Allen's 2009 song, "Fuck You" — but not before Rodrigo named all five SCOTUS justices who helped gut the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America."Today is a very, very special day. This is actually my first Glastonbury," Rodrigo said. "But I'm also equally as heartbroken over what happened in America yesterday." Rodrigo told the crowd that the SCOTUS decision infringed on a woman's ability to secure a safe abortion, which she called a basic human right. Read Full StoryAfter Roe fell, Steve Bannon called for an 'army of the awakened' to 'shatter' DemocratsIn a Gettr post, Steve Bannon urged "patriots" to take advantage of the "Roe momentum" to win the MAGA movement a "massive victory" at the midterm elections.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRight-wing figure Steve Bannon has called for an "army of the awakened" to "shatter" the Democratic party in post-Roe America. Bannon made a post on Gettr on Saturday lauding the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, a controversial decision that has led to abortion being halted in some states.In his post, Bannon called on "the army of the awakened" to rally and capitalize on the verdict. "This is the key take-away for MAGA … the pro-abortion movement is shattered and is now turning in on itself — because for 50 years they didn't have to work— the Courts and Regime Media covered for them — now The Abyss," Bannon wrote."That's the Democratic Party in November— we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shatter it into a million small pieces," Bannon added, referring to the upcoming midterm elections.Read Full StoryTexas abortion clinic staff describe how patients 'begged for help' when Roe v. Wade was overturned: reportA patient at the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services Clinic in San Antonio, Texas, is informed by a staff member on Friday that the clinic can no longer provide her with an abortion.Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesStaff at an abortion clinic in Texas said they had to turn away people seeking abortions away just minutes after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.Speaking to The 19th, an independent news organization, clinic administrator Andrea Gallegos described how she had to turn away a dozen patients waiting in the lobby of the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services clinic in San Antonio, Texas. Gallegos told The 19th that she and the clinic's staff had to tell the people gathered that, because of the ruling, "unfortunately, your geographical location affects your bodily autonomy." Per the outlet, Gallegos described the scene at the clinic as being one of "complete despair," with people screaming, crying, and begging for help.Read Full Story'Full House' star Jodie Sweetin was thrown to the ground by LAPD during freeway protest for abortion rightsJodie Sweetin told People that she was "proud" of those who showed up to protest.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty ImagesLos Angeles Police Department officers shoved Jodie Sweetin onto the ground of a freeway in Los Angeles on Saturday during an abortion rights protest, video shows.The "Full House" and "Fuller House" star, wearing all black with a black backpack, can be seen in a video of the incident with a megaphone in hand when a couple of LAPD officers shove her to the ground. Protesters can be heard yelling "Jodie, you good?" and  "What the f*** is wrong with you guys?"Sweetin is then picked up and the crowd immediately begins to chant "no justice, no peace."Read Full StorySince the Roe ruling a gynecology clinic in Texas has received increased requests for permanent sterilization: 'I sense that they're scared'Protesters march during an abortion-rights rally on June 25, 2022 in Austin, Texas.Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesA women's health clinic in Austin, Texas, has received dozens of requests for permanent sterilizations after Friday's decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that established a constitutional right to an abortion. After the Women's Health Domain closed on Friday evening for the weekend, it received 109 new patient requests, the majority of which were requesting tubal ligation, or permanent sterilization. Read Full StoryThe impact of Kavanaugh's confirmation on the 2018 elections may reveal how the reversal of Roe v. Wade could impact this year's midtermsU.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAs political analysts seek to understand the possible impact of Roe v. Wade being overturned on this year's midterm elections, some suggest that data from 2018 may reveal possible trends. In 2018, following the contentious confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh — who was accused of sexual assault by Christine Ford — 40 Republican US House seats flipped to Democratic candidates. GOP candidates led in polls taken prior to the hearings and went on to lose in November in 27 of those races, indicating increased mobilization among partisan voters following the hearings.  Read Full StoryLindsey Graham said Alito's abortion opinion was correct for distinguishing Roe from same-sex marriage and contraception rulingsRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham.J. Scott Applewhite/APRepublican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said Sunday that Justice Samuel Alito, unlike Justice Clarence Thomas, was correct for saying same-sex marriage and contraception would not be affected by the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In his concurring opinion on the ruling, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for cases regarding contraceptive access, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage.Read Full StoryAOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Live updates: Democrats condemn a "crisis of legitimacy" for Supreme Court; Trump praises justices for "courage" amid Roe v. Wade reversal

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. AOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 26th, 2022

Live updates: Democrats call on Biden to declare "a public health emergency" after Roe v. Wade reversal

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights demonstrators hold signs outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., United States on June 24, 2022.Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after Friday's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 25th, 2022

Live updates: Here are the states where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights demonstrators hold signs outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., United States on June 24, 2022.Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after Friday's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. This map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 24th, 2022

Pro-Abortion Group Protests With Fake Blood And Baby Dolls At Supreme Court Justice"s Home

Pro-Abortion Group Protests With Fake Blood And Baby Dolls At Supreme Court Justice's Home Authored by Naveen Athrappully via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights, a pro-abortion activist group, held a protest outside Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s home in Virginia on June 18, the latest in a series of demonstrations triggered by the leak of a Supreme Court draft opinion suggesting the court would overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion. Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the third day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington on Oct. 14, 2020. (Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/Getty Images) The protestors in front of Barrett’s house were holding baby dolls and had their hands tied together with tape. They were dressed in clothing that appeared to be soaked in fake blood. The group held signs that said “Not going back” and pushed slogans like “forced motherhood = forced enslavement.” The group has staged pro-abortion protests at several other locations, including Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles and outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. “We aren’t incubators! Youth procession delivered baby dolls to Amy Coney Barrett. We aren’t protesting to change the minds of women-hating fascists. We’re calling on the pro-choice majority, on YOU, to get in the streets to STOP #SCOTUS from overturning Roe,” Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights said in a June 19 tweet. Pro-abortion radicals have carried out nearly two dozen attacks against pregnancy centers and other pro-life institutions in recent weeks. Radical group Jane’s Revenge issued a threat stating that as long as pro-life groups continue their activities, “it’s open season and we know where your operations are.” By attacking these “violent institutions,” the group finds ‘joy” and “courage,” Jane’s Revenge said. On June 8, Federal authorities arrested a California man, Nicholas John Roske, for attempting to kill Supreme Court justice Brett Kavanaugh. The man told officers that he attempted the murder due to the leaked Supreme Court document. In an interview with NTD, Representative Markwayne Mullin (R-Okla.) blasted Democratic lawmakers and intelligence agencies for talking about rooting out domestic terrorism while only targeting far-right groups and turning a blind eye against cases like Roske’s attempt to kill Kavanaugh, Mullin said. “Well, if that same standard of domestic terrorism is going to apply, then why isn’t this being called out as domestic terrorism?” he said. Mullin said the alleged perpetrator put together an assassination kit and drove from California all the way to Maryland to Kavanaugh’s home, and that activists are trying to intimidate Kavanaugh because of his stance on Roe v. Wade. A recent Fox News poll found that a majority of registered voters find protesting outside the homes of Supreme Court justices inappropriate. While 70 percent of Republicans and 62 percent of independents agreed that such protests were improper, 58 percent of Democrats found such protests appropriate. Federal authorities have resisted charging the protestors, who legal experts say are in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1507, which prohibits picketing or parading near a judge’s residence “with the intent of influencing” the judge. Attorney General Merrick Garland, a Biden appointee, has ordered around-the-clock security for all nine justices’ homes. Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) has called for Garland’s resignation for his inaction in dealing with demonstrators. Just hours after Roske’s attempt to kill Kavanaugh, there were “left-wing street militias” announcing on the internet that they would be protesting in front of the justices’ homes, Cotton said to Fox News. “There’s an explicit federal law against protesting in front of the homes of judges or jurors,” Cotton said. “Yet again, the feckless and hapless Attorney General Merrick Garland did nothing, even though he had advanced knowledge.” Tyler Durden Wed, 06/22/2022 - 12:30.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 22nd, 2022

Assassination Attempt and Illegal Intimidation – Blame Virginia

Assassination Attempt and Illegal Intimidation – Blame Virginia; VA Law, Unlike the Federal One, Doesn’t Require Intent and is Constitutional An Assassination Attempt WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 15, 2022) – An armed gunman intent on assassinating a Supreme Court justice, angry mobs outside the justices’ homes with chants that warn of riots if they don’t get […] Assassination Attempt and Illegal Intimidation – Blame Virginia; VA Law, Unlike the Federal One, Doesn’t Require Intent and is Constitutional An Assassination Attempt WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 15, 2022) – An armed gunman intent on assassinating a Supreme Court justice, angry mobs outside the justices’ homes with chants that warn of riots if they don’t get their way, frightened and intimidated family members and neighbors – all of this grows out of or is tied to the refusal by authorities in Virginia to enforce a law which makes picketing any home a crime, even without the illusive requirement of “intent” required by the federal statute, and without the statute raising constitutional problems, says public interest law professor John Banzhaf. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get Our Activist Investing Case Study! Get the entire 10-part series on our in-depth study on activist investing in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or print it out to read anywhere! Sign up below! (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q1 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more With the "pro-abortion terrorist group" which claimed responsibility for May 8th fire bombing of the Wisconsin Family Action office issuing a "Night of Rage" message, urging followers to carry “anger out into the world” by “expressing it physically” on the night when the Supreme Court hands down an expected decision ending constitutional protection for abortions, things could get very violent if authorities continue to defiantly refuse to enforce existing law, he warns. While most of the discussion - and attempts to pin blame - for permitting the intimidation outside the homes of justices to continue unabated has been directed towards Attorney General Merrick Garland, the much cited federal statute under which he or other federal officials might seek to make arrests has a major impediment and a possible constitutional problem, argues Banzhaf, who notes that the corresponding state statute under which Virginia law enforcement authorities clearly could make arrests has no such problems or limitations. The relevant federal statute, § 18 U.S.C. 1507, makes picketing or parading in or near a building or residence occupied or used by a judge a federal crime, but only if it is done "with the intent . . . of influencing any judge . . ., in the discharge of his duty." So, for example, if people who support overturning Roe v. Wade marched outside the homes of the anti-Roe justices in order to congratulate them or to simply show support, the statute would not be violated, any more than it would be if supporters of Roe picketed outside the homes of pro-Roe justices in support and appreciation of their views. Thus, to make a valid arrest, and especially to be able to even initiate a prosecution (much less obtain a conviction), authorities must have specific evidence that the intent of each protestor arrested and charged was to influence a justice. But many of the individuals picketing claim that their intent is and was to simply share their outrage at what they believe is already a done deal, and not to try to influence a justice to change his or her vote. While some people might well doubt the sincerity of such self-serving claims, there may be no (or at least insufficient) evidence of the key element of any protestor "intent" of "influencing any judge . . ., in the discharge of his duty" to warrant an arrest, much less a prosecution. The same limitation - that picketing near the home of a judge is illegal only if done with the specific intent spelled out in the statute - could also create serious constitutional problems, say many experts. Picketing is clearly "speech" protected by the First Amendment, so punishing only a specific and narrow category of this type of speech based solely upon the intended message - e.g., permitting picketing congratulating or supporting justices, but criminalizing speech criticizing and/or intimidating justices to change their vote - might make the law unconstitutional, or at least raise serious constitutional problems. Indeed, as some experts have pointed out, other parts of the same federal statute, which purport to punish as a criminal any person who "pickets or parades in or near a building housing a court of the United States" "with the intent of influencing any judge . . in the discharge of his duty," could well make criminals of hundreds picketing in front of the Court every year regarding cases being decided at the time by the justices. Virginia's Picketing Law In stark contrast, the corresponding picketing law in Virginia is crystal clear and without any such problems. Because it does not require any specific intent, Virginia law enforcement authorities may - and, under applicable Virginia criminal law and procedure, should - arrest any persons picketing any residence. Virginia's § 18.2-419 mandates that: "Any person who shall engage in picketing before or about the residence or dwelling place of any individual, or who shall assemble with another person or persons in a manner which disrupts or threatens to disrupt any individual's right to tranquility in his home, shall be guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor." Unlike the federal statute, the Virginia law is also clearly constitutional since picketing is prohibited only in a certain place (near a residence), rather than because of the message the "speech" communicates. In other words, it constitutes what judges call "time, place and manner restrictions" which are government limits imposed on expressive activity, but are nevertheless constitutional because they apply regardless of what is being said; i.e., are content neutral. As Prof Banzhaf - whose legal complaint triggered the criminal investigation of former President Donald Trump in Georgia - explained in putting Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin on formal notice of this legal requirement and requesting enforcement: "Please note that the statute does not criminalize only picketing done with a specific intent, but rather makes criminal any and all picketing, as well as any activity which disrupts "tranquility," at any "residence or dwelling place of any individual" in Virginia. This is important because the corresponding federal statute, § 18 U.S.C. 1507, only makes picketing or parading in or near a building or residence occupied or used by a judge criminal if it is done "with the intent . . . of influencing any judge . . ., in the discharge of his duty. Thus it is not clear that any federal officers [e.g.. U.S. Marshals, member of the Secret Service, Supreme Court police, etc.] who might be on scene would - or even legally could - arrest persons who picket or protest near a justice's residence in Virginia without direct evidence in their possession of the specific intent which the federal statute requires. It is even more doubtful that they would or even legally could arrest protestors for violating Virginia's criminal statute." The law professor reminded Youngkin of how strongly Virginia's legislators feel about the statute, and about its need for enforcement, especially before violence breaks out. More specifically, he wrote to Youngkin: "The legislature of Virginia, in its declaration of policy for this statute [ §18.2-418], has made it abundantly clear that it regards such demonstrations as serious crimes which must be met with arrests: "protection and preservation of the home is the keystone of democratic government"; "good order of the community require that members of the community enjoy in their homes a feeling of well-being, tranquility, and privacy"; "picketing before or about residences and dwelling places causes emotional disturbance and distress"; "its object [is] the harassing of such occupants";and enforcing the provisions of the statute"are necessary in the public interest, to avoid the detrimental results herein set forth." Virginia Attorney General Jason Miyares agrees, conceding that: “Section 18.2-419 of the Code of Virginia states that protesting in front of an individual’s private residence is a class 3 misdemeanor." The law professor has pointed out that it seems clear that the legislators wrote the criminal statute, prohibiting demonstrations at private residences, to permit police to act when any such criminal activity begins, rather than waiting until it becomes violent. That's because, once such a demonstration becomes violent, it may be difficult to bring it under control, with arrests or otherwise, without causing injury to demonstrators, police, and perhaps even innocent bystanders. In other words, an ounce of prevention (before) may be worth a pound of cure (later). That, of course, is a major concern when a pro-Roe terrorist organization, which has already admitted to engaging in criminal violence, has publicly announced that it is planning a "Night of Rage" when the Court's abortion decision is released. Protests at the homes of influential people can easily become violent and even terrifying, says Banzhaf, citing this example, which also supports the applicability of the Virginia statute to the current situation. As described just last year by Senator Josh Hawley: "Tonight while I was in Missouri, Antifa scumbags came to our place in DC and threatened my wife and newborn daughter, who can´t travel. They screamed threats, vandalized, and tried to pound open our door." The Senator confessed that, as a result, his family was "terrorized." Fortunately, a local magistrate did find probable cause under Virginia's § 18.2-419 and issued a legal summons. Of course Virginia's clear and clearly constitutional statute prohibiting picketing at a residence does not directly apply to the assassination plot and picketing of Justice Brett Kavanaugh in Maryland. But seeing, virtually on a daily basis, the images of angry protestors marching just outside justices' homes - including those of Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, and Amy Coney Barrett in Virginia - could well encourage a mentally unbalanced individual to believe that he would be able to get very close to the home of any justice, whether they live in Maryland or Virginia, suggests Banzhaf. To deter other mentally unbalanced individuals who might want to assassinate a justice (or at least die trying in the attempt), as well as those planning to engage in a "Night of Rage" near the homes of anti-Roe justices once a decision is released, Virginia law enforcement authorities would do well to announce that they will begin following and enforcing § 18.2-419 by making arrests, even in the absence of other criminal activity such as blocking streets, etc. If not, and authorities wait for violence to break out before even trying to make arrests, many protestors, police, and even neighbors and other bystanders may well be injured, and there will be charges and counter-charges of overreacting and of triggering violence issued by both sides involved in this controversy, warns Banzhaf. Updated on Jun 15, 2022, 10:26 am (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkJun 15th, 2022

Sri Lanka says it will default on its foreign debt as the cost of food and food imports spirals, report says

Sri Lanka appointed a new central bank governor last week who on Tuesday said the country had suspended its foreign debt payments. Newly appointed governor of Sri Lankan Central Bank Nandalal Weerasinghe speaks during a media briefing in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Friday, April 8, 2022.Eranga Jayawardena/ AP Sri Lanka's central bank said on Tuesday it would be suspend foreign debt payments. The nation's economy suffered from COVID restrictions which decimated its foreign exchange reserves. The country has been hit especially hard by the rising cost of fuel, leading to shortages and protests. Sri Lanka has said it will default on its foreign bonds, as it scrambles to save its dwindling reserves to pay for essential imports, according to media reports on Tuesday.Last Friday the Central Bank of Sri Lanka appointed its seventeenth governor, P. Nandalal Weerasinghe, and on Tuesday he made the decision to suspend payments on foreign bonds. "We need to focus on essential imports and not have to worry about servicing external debt," Weerasinghe said, according to a Reuters report.The FT said a $1 billion bond that matures in July is trading for just 46 cents on the dollar and the country's foreign exchange reserves have dropped below $2 billion, roughly half of where they were a year ago.Sri Lanka's tourism revenues plummeted due to COVID 19 restrictionsTrading Economics/ Central Bank of Sri LankaWar in Ukraine has wreaked havoc on the price of key foodstuffs like rice, sunflower oil and wheat and the weakness in Sri Lanka's currency, which has fallen by 60% against the dollar this year, is adding to the cost of its import bill. People have taken to the streets to protest against the dwindling supply of medicine, food and fuel needed to power homes. "It has come to a point that making debt payments are challenging and impossible." Weerasinghe said.He went on to clarify that the suspension will be in place until the South Asian country meets with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on Monday to begin formal discussions for emergency loans from the global lender. Read more: Robo-advisors offer a quick, cheap route into passive investing. Here are 6 of the best, according to a new reportRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderApr 13th, 2022

How China turned a Tiananmen Square memorial into one of the most sought-after sculptures in the world

The "Pillar of Shame" was meant to spread all around the world. It didn't — until now, thanks to its removal in Hong Kong. Danish sculptor Jens Galschiøt (right) with a Pillar of Shame.Mikkel Møller for Insider Last December, Hong Kong removed the Pillar of Shame, a memorial to the Tiananmen Square massacre. The removal only increased the monument's fame – and brought a flood of requests for replicas.  Creator Jens Galschiøt gave up his copyright to the sculpture, enabling 3D printers to make copies. HONG KONG – In the 1990s, a Danish sculptor launched an audacious project to pepper the earth with copies of a grotesque sculpture that depicted human bodies wreathed together in pain. The monument, known as the "Pillar of Shame," is constructed out of bronze, copper or concrete and stands atop a square plinth. It rises about 8 meters, or 26 feet, in all. Its creator, Jens Galschiøt, envisioned it as a "Nobel Prize of Injustice" and vowed to place replicas of the pillar all over the world to mark acts of genocide and murder. For a time, Galschiøt's effort was something of a success. He installed a copy of the pillar in Hong Kong in 1997 to commemorate the Tiananmen Square massacre, in which Chinese troops killed hundreds if not thousands of peaceful pro-democracy protesters. He landed a second copy in Mexico in 1999 to commemorate the slaughter of Indigenous people and a third in Brazil in 2000 to honor landless peasants killed by military police. But then the project stalled. For over two decades, it seemed no one was interested in getting a Pillar of Shame — that is, until now.These days, the 67-year-old sculptor is so inundated with requests for copies of his signature artwork that he needs a full-time apprentice just to manage the endless stream of emails and phone calls. He's being sought out for art exhibitions, speeches, interviews, and new Pillar of Shame installations around the world. At Galschiøt's foundry, about two hours outside of Copenhagen, Denmark, his team is working overtime to cast replicas of various sizes. He has also invited artists everywhere to help meet the demand for replicas by using 3D-printing technologies and a free blueprint of the sculpture."The Pillar of Shame in miniature.Mikkel Møller for InsiderThe spark that led to an explosion of interest in Galschiøt's project came in October, when Hong Kong University  ordered that the Pillar of Shame be removed from its longtime home on the school's campus — part of a larger effort to erase any public commemoration of the Tiananmen Square massacre.The sculpture's removal, carried out in the dead of night two days before Christmas, accomplished its goal of eliminating the controversial monument from public view. But it also unleashed something unexpected: China and Hong Kong authorities gave Galschiøt's struggling art project the sort of publicity that no amount of money and PR firms could buy. Galschiøt's Pillar of Shame was suddenly being discussed in The Washington Post and The New York Times and in outlets in Thailand, Iceland, Brazil, Turkey, Nigeria, Norway, Ireland, Germany, and Indonesia, to name just a few."They have made a big mistake," Galschiøt said in an interview. "Now, instead of one, they're getting hundreds of Pillars of Shame."A group of former US government officials is working to erect a full-size replica in front of the Chinese Embassy in Washington, DC. In Norway, there's a request to display a replica near the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo. In Taiwan, a pro-democracy group plans to unveil a 3D-printed model by June 4 to mark the 33rd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre. An artists collective is planning to organize a worldwide tour with Galschiøt's pillar to raise awareness of Hong Kong's struggle for democracy.Makerwiz 3D-printing studio in Richmond Hill, Ontario. Source: Makerwiz.Galschiøt is also making smaller, 8.5-foot replicas in copper that he aims to hoist on top of plinths with plates dedicated to Tiananmen victims and Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement, installing them at universities. For everyone else — volunteers at his workshop and ordinary people who are inspired by Galschiøt's vision, or perhaps his tenacity — he has finished a batch of 60 bronze copies that are about a foot tall. He's working on another 40. "There's a lot of people who ask for a copy of that sculpture now," Galschiøt said.The nascent efforts are a cautionary tale of what happens when regimes try to censor art. "The rulers, tyrants know the power of art. That's why artists, poets, and musicians are the first ones they persecute and even kill," said Rose Tang, a Tiananmen survivor and artist. But, as one 3D printer who recently replicated Galschiøt's sculpture put it, "ideas can never be suppressed." Galschiøt's Pillar of Shame is finally an idea whose time has come. Except, rather than commemorating atrocities in spots across the globe, the monument now seems poised to become synonymous with one event above all others: the Tiananmen Square massacre and China's efforts to erase it from memory. A witness For more than two decades, anyone who visited the western edge of Hong Kong University's winding Pok Fu Lam campus would inevitably bump into Galschiøt's Pillar of Shame. It was situated off a major campus walkway, boxed inside a narrow atrium next to a popular student canteen. (Disclosure: The author teaches at Hong Kong University's journalism program.) As you looked up from your meal, your eyes would fall upon the Eiffel Tower-like heap of some 50 twisted bodies screaming in pain. Many of the faces looked like cadavers that had already breathed their last while others appeared to be in the act of dying; a man clutching a baby looked as if he was running away from some danger. Layers of thick orange paint flowed from the top down, turning yellow and peeling in places, giving the whole mass the hellish appearance of a pile of burning human flesh. The inscription "THE TIANANMEN MASSACRE" was etched in thick, blood-red letters on one side of the square base, above the date June 4, 1989. Directly to the left was another inscription that read, "the old cannot kill the young forever."Students gather around Galschiøt's Pillar of Shame sculpture in Hong Kong on October 12, 2021.Cezary Podkul for InsiderFor students who came to study here from mainland China, the pillar might be their first introduction to the Tiananmen massacre. On one side of the pillar's base, a plaque provided "A Brief History of the 1989 Beijing Pro-Democracy Movement." It recounted how the death of pro-reform Communist Party leader Hu Yaobang in April 1989 sparked mass demonstrations in favor of democratic reforms. Beijing's Tiananmen Square became a central gathering spot for students who waged a hunger strike to try to prompt a dialogue with Communist Party leaders. The government refused, declared martial law, and ultimately sent in military convoys to clear the square. On June 3 and 4, 1989, "several thousand soldiers forced their way via various routes into Beijing City, using guns and bullets to shoot unarmed citizens and students. Tanks were deployed to recover the Square," the plaque read. An official death toll was never confirmed. A 1990 report on the massacre by Amnesty International noted that Chinese authorities tallied some 200 civilian casualties, while Amnesty itself concluded that at least 1,000 people had been killed. Another more recent estimate based on a diplomatic cable declassified in 2017 pinned the number of civilian casualties at more than 10,000.Whatever the ultimate toll, there was no doubt in Rose Tang's mind that it had been a bloody day. Rose Tang in Tiananmen Square on May 21, 1989. At the time, she was a 20-year-old freshman in college.Rose Tang/HandoutTang was a freshman studying English at what was then known as the Beijing Second Foreign Languages Institute. She ditched classes in the spring of 1989 to join her classmates in Tiananmen Square to chant pro-democracy slogans, even though, she now says, she had very little idea of what democracy even meant. Her memoir of the events of June 4 describes bullets whizzing overhead, a stampede trampling over dead bodies, and the deafening noise of tanks moving in and crushing tents set up in the square. But there's one detail of the aftermath that helps explain why Galschiøt's sculpture found a loyal following in Hong Kong, which was a British colony until 1997. When Tang revisited Tiananmen Square some seven months after the massacre, she found no trace of what had happened there that day. There were no signs of blood stains or bullet holes from June 4, 1989, let alone any memorial. She walked around, trying to find proof to back up her memories. There were only a few armed soldiers patrolling the square as water trucks sprinkled water on the ground. "All I could see was the clean wet concrete ground glittering in street lights," she recalled in her memoir.Tang turned to a life of art and activism to help her cope with the events of that day. She has written poetry and music inspired by June 4, 1989, and toured with a band that performed songs that student protesters sang at Tiananmen Square. "Making music and using music to heal and mobilize people is my way of carrying on the true legacy of Tiananmen. Art is power. Performance is protest," she said.Tang eschewed making sculptures, though. "I just personally found it really hard to convey the experience of Tiananmen through visual art," she said. She admires Galschiøt for trying. Rose Tang at a Tiananmen Square massacre memorial in New York City on June 4, 2020.Thirdblade PhotographyBut something about Galschiøt's sculpture always puzzled Tang. On close inspection, the figures assembled on Galschiøt's pillar appeared to span the races. One could be excused for wondering whether this was all a mistake: A white man from Denmark created a sculpture to commemorate the killings of Chinese civilians, and he filled it with people from all over the world?'My Inner Beast'The international nature of the sculpture was precisely what Galschiøt had in mind when he began to sketch out the vision for his Pillar of Shame in the early 1990s. Galschiøt had turned to making sculptures in the 1980s after a career as a blacksmith at a Danish shipyard and a rebellious youth filled with drugs, travel, and a desire to distance himself from his father's communist sympathies. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, he grew hopeful for a more egalitarian future but was soon dismayed by Serbian militias' mass rape of Muslim women in Bosnia and other atrocities. He became convinced that civilization is only a thin veneer that can crumble at any time and unleash an inner barbarism laid bare in such episodes. In 1993 he installed concrete sculptures of a pig dressed in a gentleman's overcoat in 20 cities across Europe. Titled "My Inner Beast," the project aimed to call attention to Europeans' mistreatment of ethnic minorities. The sculptures proved an unwelcome sight to governments that never asked for them. Most were torn down, and only a few remain standing today. Galschiøt's middle son, Kasper Galschiøt Markus, recalled eating "significantly more porridge" in the months that followed since Galschiøt nearly went broke paying for the project out of pocket. But profit wasn't the goal. The reaction to the sculpture became part of the story the art sought to tell, summarized by the motto, "It is not the foreigners but our reaction to the foreigners that threatens our civilization." Galschiøt preparing a Pillar of Shame replica.Mikkel Møller for InsiderGalschiøt began to make small models of the Pillar of Shame that same year. As the idea took shape, he assembled 7 tons of clay to create the casting mold for the sculpture.He included faces of people that represented a wide variety of races and ethnicities, hoping to create a universal symbol. Once he finished his prototype in 1996, he went looking for contacts who could help him install it in various places around the world. The Tiananmen Square massacre quickly came to mind, but he knew it would be impossible to install a pillar in Beijing. 'They made a good fight for freedom'Hong Kong offered the tantalizing possibility of a work-around. After years of negotiations, the UK was due to hand control of Hong Kong back to China on July 1, 1997.  If Galschiøt could get the pillar to Hong Kong while the city was still in British hands, China would take the sculpture with it. "At that time, we had good reason to believe that this statue would not be allowed to enter after the transition," Albert Ho, who helped Galschiøt get the pillar to Hong Kong, recalled in a later interview.Ho was a leader of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China, a group founded in 1989 just before the massacre. One of the alliance's signature projects was an annual candlelight vigil commemorating Tiananmen victims. Galschiøt reached out to see whether the group would help him install a replica of the sculpture and soon he had a partner: On May 2, 1997, he packed up a copy of the pillar in a shipping container and sent it off to Hong Kong. The sculpture arrived at a Hong Kong container terminal nine days before the alliance's annual candlelight vigil in the city's sprawling Victoria Park. The alliance displayed it prominently at the June 4 vigil, which happened to coincide with Galschiøt's birthday. Afterward, the pillar was loaded onto a truck headed for Hong Kong University, where student leaders hoped to install it near their student union. Tang joined part of the march to campus, walking alongside Galschiøt. Galschiøt grew concerned as scuffles broke out between students and security guards who wouldn't let the truck through to campus. Security guards eventually relented, and the sculpture was dropped off as onlookers applauded, according to Associated Press archival footage from the night. "They made a good fight for freedom," Galschiøt told an AP reporter at the time.The pillar made the rounds to several schools around the city before the Hong Kong University student union voted in 1998 to permanently host it on its campus. Galschiøt, meanwhile, wrote a manifesto for his artwork. "My name is Jens Galschiøt. I'm a Danish artist born 1954. My new art happening the Pillar of Shame has just been launched, as the sculpture was displayed 4th June '97 in Hong Kong," began the lengthy December 1997 missive, which predicted that "over the next ten years the happening will spread over the Planet." Galschiøt listed Auschwitz, the site of the infamous Nazi death camp, and Rwanda, where a 1994 genocide had just killed an estimated 800,000 people, as two possible candidates for Pillars of Shame.Galschiøt outside his studio in Denmark.Mikkel Møller for InsiderSoon he managed to install a "Columna de la infamia" in Mexico to commemorate the 1997 killings of 45 Indigenous people in Chiapas state and a "Coluna da infâmia" in Brazil to mark the 1996 murder of 19 landless Brazilian peasants. Both sculptures made brief appearances near parliament buildings in their respective countries, elevating their visibility in Mexico and Brazil. In 1999 he outlined a grand vision to install a pillar in Berlin atop a platform covered with bronze plates notched with 10 million lines representing the victims of Nazi-era persecution (the project was too costly, and he gave up on it in late 2002). In 2012, he traveled to Iraq to explore the possibility of placing a pillar there to commemorate the victims of Saddam Hussein's mass murders of Iraqi Kurds in the 1980s (installing a sculpture in a war zone was too dangerous, though Galschiøt hopes to try again someday).Galschiøt openly mused that Hong Kong's Pillar of Shame might someday move to Beijing if political circumstances allowed it. But he acknowledged that it might just as well be removed or destroyed: "The Pillar of Shame will be a test of the validity of the new authorities' guarantees for human rights and freedom of expression in Hong Kong," he wrote in a post on his website.'The old cannot kill the young forever'Galschiøt was right about the possibility of his sculpture being removed from Hong Kong.The early signs of trouble came in April 2008, when Galschiøt flew to the city only to be denied entry. He was there to paint the pillar orange as part of a campaign to raise awareness of China's alleged human-rights abuses ahead of the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing. In Galschiøt's absence, members of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China carried out the paint job. News reports at the time described the ordeal as a test of the freedoms China had granted to Hong Kong when it took over.Hong Kongers would experience many more such tests in the years that followed. In 2014, protests erupted when China insisted on vetting any candidates for the territory's chief executive before allowing the post to be elected directly by the people. The tense 79-day standoff with pro-democracy protesters became known as the Umbrella Movement after demonstrators used umbrellas to shield themselves from the pepper spray police used to try to disperse them. The sense of togetherness and community among the protesters felt like a repeat of the 1989 Tiananmen Square movement to Tang, who flew from the US to Hong Kong to camp out with the protesters and speak up for their cause. Even larger protests shook the city in 2019 after Hong Kong leaders proposed amending the territory's extradition laws to allow criminal suspects to be sent to mainland China to stand trial. The protests grew into a broader movement against Beijing's encroachments on the freedoms guaranteed to Hong Kong under the terms of its handover from the UK. Meanwhile, Beijing readied a national-security law that would give China broad authority to stamp out dissent in Hong Kong. Even before the law took effect, in June 2020, authorities had already taken aim at Hong Kong's long tradition of commemorating the Tiananmen victims. They refused to let the alliance organize its annual June 4 vigil in 2020, citing COVID-19 restrictions. Thousands showed up anyway. In 2021, Hong Kong blocked the June 4 vigil again and put up a massive police presence to deter Hong Kongers from defying the ban. The same month, the alliance's museum commemorating the massacre was forced to shut down. Police raided the museum in September and confiscated its exhibits just a day after arresting the alliance's leaders under the guise of the national-security law. The alliance disbanded on September 25, and days later reports surfaced that the digital version of its Tiananmen Square massacre museum had been blocked in Hong Kong.  By early October, the pillar's time had come. Galschiøt wasn't formally notified that the Pillar of Shame would be removed. Mayer Brown, an American law firm representing Hong Kong University, sent a letter demanding its removal to the liquidators of the alliance (the alliance didn't actually own the sculpture; Galschiøt had always retained ownership). The October 7 letter gave the now-defunct pro-democracy group six days to remove the sculpture from the university, a publicly funded institution, or consider the pillar abandoned property that would be dealt with "at such time and in such manner" as the university saw fit. Galschiøt tried to intervene but said he couldn't get a reply to his lawyer's pleas to let him come to Hong Kong to retrieve the artwork.The sudden deadline was sandwiched between two typhoons that pummeled Hong Kong with heavy rains and winds. As the storms moved through the city, the October 13 removal deadline held firm. Hong Kongers flocked to the sculpture to bid their farewells to what many saw as one of the last vestiges of freedom of expression in the Chinese territory. "Say goodbye to freedom," one man said as he snapped a photo of the sculpture one day before the deadline. Steps away, a father took a selfie in front of the pillar with his 9-year-old daughter. Afterward, the little girl grabbed her father's phone and snapped some photos of it herself. On their way out, he pointed to the inscription "the old cannot kill the young forever" as she looked on attentively. Shortly after, it started to rain again. But the crowds kept coming.A father introduces his daughter to Galschiøt's Pillar of Shame sculpture in Hong Kong on October 12, 2021.Cezary Podkul for InsiderThe university hit a snag when Mayer Brown bowed out of the legal matter amid public outrage that an American law firm would be helping Chinese authorities stifle freedom of expression in Hong Kong. (Mayer Brown's decision prompted a former Hong Kong chief executive to call for a China-wide boycott of the law firm. Spokespeople for Mayer Brown did not respond to comment requests.) Several weeks followed when the sculpture's fate stood in a strange state of limbo; it wasn't clear when exactly it would disappear, but there was no doubt the end was near. An artists' collective known as Lady Liberty Hong Kong made use of the delay to take detailed photos of the pillar and create a three-dimensional model that could be used as a basis for 3D printing. Galschiøt, meanwhile, dusted off old molds that he had used to create smaller replicas of the Pillar of Shame in the 1990s so that he would be ready if his sculpture were removed. The limbo ended on December 22. Galschiøt had just told the workers in his workshop in Odense, Denmark, to go home early and enjoy the holiday when he got a call from a reporter seeking comment on the sculpture's removal.  The energy drained from his body; he looked like a parent who had just learned about the loss of his child, recalled his apprentice, Lauge Jakobsen. Social media lit up with footage of workers fencing off the area around the pillar so no one would witness its removal. Reporters still managed to document parts of the ordeal, which ended with a human-like fragment of the sculpture being loaded into a shipping container by a group of workers in hard hats resembling pallbearers at a funeral.The former site of the Pillar of Shame at Hong Kong University as seen the day after the monument was removed.Cezary Podkul for Insider As Galschiøt watched from a distance, all he could do was decry the university's actions. He issued a statement calling the sculpture's removal an unreasonable act of "self-immolation against private property in Hong Kong." Hong Kong University said in a statement that "no party has ever obtained any approval from the university to display the statue on campus," and the statue would be placed in storage pending legal advice on what to do with it. Galschiøt said the university has now responded to his lawyer, and he is sorting out the details of how to return the sculpture from Hong Kong. A spokeswoman for the university did not provide further details. 'Jens' biggest supporter has been the Chinese government'The sculpture's dramatic removal gave Galschiøt the kind of worldwide attention he had long hoped to bring to his international art project. "Suddenly, all the world's eyes were turned on this Pillar of Shame," recalled Jakobsen, his apprentice. "From 7 a.m. to 3 a.m. at night the phone was calling all the time, and our email was looking like a celebrity's fan email because every 10 seconds there were coming new emails."Jakobsen switched from working in Galschiøt's workshop to assisting him in the office as he juggled media requests and inquiries about how to acquire a Pillar of Shame. "Jens' biggest supporter last year has been the Chinese government," Jakobsen said during a phone interview. Galschiøt could be heard laughing beside him.Jessica Chiu was one of those requesters. The native Hong Konger, who's 32 and lives in Norway, first learned about Tiananmen Square from her high school math teacher, who would abandon his usual lesson every June and instead teach about the massacre. Later, as a student at Hong Kong University, Chiu would occasionally pass by Galschiøt's sculpture. Chiu leads a Norwegian nonprofit focused on supporting human rights in Hong Kong. The group had been interested in exhibiting Galschiøt's pillar in Norway since 2020; its removal in Hong Kong reinforced those plans. "It makes us more motivated to do it, and it just makes the impact bigger," Chiu said. Her nonprofit has already applied for permits to display the sculpture at two locations in Oslo, including a plaza near the Nobel Peace Center.Galschiøt at his gallery in Odense, Denmark.Mikkel Møller for InsiderA similar effort is taking shape to bring a copy of the pillar in the US. The most provocative spot under consideration includes a park directly across from the Chinese Embassy in Washington DC. A group of former US government officials, outraged by Mayer Brown's involvement, is spearheading the initiative, which is still in its initial planning stages, according to a person familiar with the effort. Getting a 2-ton sculpture cast and transported abroad — let alone securing a spot for it — is no easy feat, so it's unclear how many of such installations will ultimately succeed. Galschiøt estimated that making the sculpture in a full-size bronze cast costs about $800,000. To make it more affordable and easier to handle, he has started making the smaller, 8.5-foot replicas in copper using an old mold he created in the 1990s. He hopes to distribute the smaller pillars to universities around the world (and requests that schools interested in a copy contact him). He scored his first win in Budapest, Hungary, on March 2, when one of the copper replicas was installed on the site of a future Budapest campus of Fudan University. Hungary lawmakers had voted in 2021 to donate four plots of land toward the planned campus of the Shanghai-based university, which ranks as one of China's most elite schools. The move sparked criticism of Chinese influence-buying and prompted Budapest's mayor to rename streets near the proposed site after various alleged human-rights abuses committed by China. Galschiøt traveled to Budapest to personally dedicate his "a szégyen oszlopa" (Hungarian for "Pillar of Shame") near the corner of Free Hong Kong Road and Uyghur Martyrs Road.Galschiøt applies paint to a pillar, which will soon be shipped aboard.Mikkel Møller for InsiderThe use of the artwork to make political statements about China's alleged human-rights abuses could get easier thanks to the rise of 3D printing. Lady Liberty Hong Kong's three-dimensional model of the sculpture has enabled anyone with access to a 3D printer to create a copy of the sculpture without bothering with the cost and logistics of transporting it from Denmark. To make the process even more hassle-free, Galschiøt surrendered his copyright to the sculpture, writing in an open letter on Christmas Day that anyone is free to 3D print or mass-produce replicas of the pillar as long as profits go to benefit pro-democracy causes in China and Hong Kong.  A 2-foot-tall replica created using Lady Liberty's model recently showed up at a Hong Kong pro-democracy rally in Manchester, England. An even bigger version — 10 feet or taller — is set to be 3D-printed in Taiwan in time for the June 4 anniversary of the massacre. The New School for Democracy Association Taiwan, a pro-democracy group, is spearheading that effort, which is in the planning and fundraising stages, according to the project's manager.Lady Liberty itself is hoping to organize an international art tour with Galschiøt that would feature the pillar as well as the group's own signature artwork,  a symbol of the 2019 protest movement in Hong Kong known as Lady Liberty Hong Kong. The 3.5-meter-tall, crowdfunded sculpture of a woman wearing a helmet, goggles, and a respirator made the rounds to various sites across Hong Kong in 2019, including a famous summit known as Lion Rock, before being vandalized and thrown off the cliff (most likely by pro-government activists). Lady Liberty is preparing to sell small replicas of the Pillar of Shame to help fund the art tour, which would also invite other artists to participate, a spokesperson said.Galschiøt's team with a copy of the Pillar of Shame.Mikkel Møller for InsiderTang is raising her hand for the effort. She said she'd like to reunite her Tiananmen band and perform under Galschiøt's Pillar of Shame if a replica makes its way for a tour in the US. In Canada, a scrappy group of expatriate Hong Kongers created a supply chain that allows them to 3D print and ship copies of the pillar anywhere in the world. Their website, CanHKer.ca, sells a variety of Hong Kong-themed merchandise — including 3D prints of Lady Liberty Hong Kong — to fund pro-democracy causes. Proceeds from the 3D-printed pillar replicas are earmarked for organizations that help young Hong Kong refugees resettle in Canada and seek asylum, said Eric Li, who cofounded one of the groups and helped launch the merchandise website. Many of the refugees are youths who faced persecution for their pro-democracy activities, Li said. Some are depressed and feel guilty, even suicidal, for having left Hong Kong behind, he said. Others are traumatized after their violent clashes with police. "They feel they betrayed their friends because they ran away from the action," said Li, who helps arrange counseling for the youths as part of his work for one of the groups that will receive proceeds from the pillars'  sales. Art 'without interruption'There isn't much action left when it comes to protests in Hong Kong. The Beijing-imposed national-security law has succeeded in ending the mass demonstrations that gripped the city in 2019. You might find an occasional pro-democracy slogan or poster here or there, but any public artwork the government could deem subversive to Beijing is likely to quickly vanish from public view. A day after Galschiøt's pillar disappeared in December, two other Tiananmen-themed monuments were removed by universities in Hong Kong. The "Goddess of Democracy," an imitation of a sculpture created by Tiananmen Square protesters in 1989, was hauled away from the Chinese University of Hong Kong on December 24. A relief depicting the Tiananmen Square massacre was removed from the campus of Lingnan University the same day. Both artworks were created by Chen Weiming, an exiled Chinese sculptor who lives in California. Chen is now trying to repatriate the monuments from the universities and is planning to house them at a Tiananmen Square museum that he hopes to build at his sculpture park in Yermo, California. "In America, I can do anything I want to do. In China, I can't do it," Chen said.In late January, Hong Kong University covered up the last public tribute to Tiananmen victims on its campus — a hand-painted slogan on a bridge outside a dormitory. It read, "The souls of the martyrs shall forever linger despite the cold-blooded massacre. The spark of democracy shall forever glow for the demise of evil." Every year, students would touch up the paint on the 32-year-old inscription and wash the Pillar of Shame.The former site of the Pillar of Shame at Hong Kong University has been replaced with an outdoor seating area.Cezary Podkul for InsiderThe former site of the pillar is now a seating area with movable plastic furniture atop wooden planks. The area stood empty on a recent Monday evening as the clean, wet planks glittered in overhead lights. With the usual churn of a university, it won't take more than a few years for future generations of students to sit in the area without any idea of what stood here previously, or why. But nearby, another sculpture remains intact. It's a commemoration of Dr. Sun Yat-sen, widely regarded as the father of modern China, who sits calmly in a chair surrounded by a placid fishpond topped with water lilies. Sun is a rare figure in recent Chinese history, revered on both sides of the Taiwan Strait for helping to end feudal imperial monarchy in China and briefly serving as the first president of the Republic of China in 1912. Even as Hong Kong stamps out dissent, posters honoring him as a "great outlaw" invite visitors to a museum of Sun's life and legacy. The university installed Sun's statue in 2003 so students could follow his historic footprint, according to a dedication issued at the time. A sculpture of Sun Yat-sen, the father of modern China, adorns a lily pond on the Hong Kong University campus.Cezary Podkul for InsiderIt is impossible to know what Sun might say about the removal of the Pillar of Shame and other artworks in Hong Kong if he were alive today. But a speech that he gave nearly 100 years ago on Hong Kong University's campus gives a clue. In his remarks, Sun called Hong Kong and the university his "intellectual birthplace" and explained why he got his revolutionary ideas there: "Hong Kong impressed me a great deal, because there was orderly calm and because there was artistic work being done without interruption."Cezary Podkul is an award-winning investigative reporter who has written for ProPublica, The Wall Street Journal and Reuters. He teaches at Hong Kong University's Journalism and Media Studies Centre.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMar 18th, 2022

Anti-War Protests Break Out In Russian Cities As Many Shocked At Scale Of Ukraine Invasion

Anti-War Protests Break Out In Russian Cities As Many Shocked At Scale Of Ukraine Invasion Authored by Dave DeCamp via AntiWar.com, As Russian missiles rained down on Ukraine, thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in cities across Russia to protest their government’s offensive on Thursday, and many were detained by police. According to the Russian rights monitoring group OVD-Info, at least 1,758 people were detained at antiwar protests in 55 Russian cities. Of that number, 967 were arrested in Moscow, and 431 were detained in Saint Petersburg. Look at the size of anti-war protestors in St Petersburg, Russia. Wow pic.twitter.com/dHg9Uwt9RQ — Ragıp Soylu (@ragipsoylu) February 24, 2022 In Moscow, protesters gathered at Pushkinskaya Square, in the center of the city. Demonstrators carried signs with antiwar slogans that read: "Stop the war", "Ukraine is not our enemy,", "No one needs this war." According to RT, the Moscow police said they "temporarily detained" 600 people. OVD-Info published a list on its website of the names of the people that have been arrested in each city. You will find more infographics at Statista And according to Fox News, individuals in some prominent political families have spoken out, as the large-scale scope of the war has become unpopular among some segments of society:  Even the daughter of oligarch and Chelsea F.C. owner Roman Abramovich has spoken out, posting on Instagram that "The biggest and most successful lie of Kremlin’s propaganda is that most Russians stand with Putin." Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov’s daughter also posted "No to war" on Instagram. Москва.Людям всё же удалось собраться у метро Пушкинская в Москве. pic.twitter.com/4bZc6Eu1Fb — Встречный Ветер (@headwind512) February 24, 2022 Some prominent Russians have spoken out against President Vladimir Putin’s decision to attack Ukraine, including journalists and other public figures. Yelena Kovalskaya, the director of a state-funded theater in Moscow, quit her job and wrote on Facebook that it’s "impossible to work for a killer and get paid by him." Tyler Durden Fri, 02/25/2022 - 23:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeFeb 25th, 2022

What do you do when your country tortures you? Syrian refugees are finding a landmark pathway to justice in German courts.

Former Syrian intelligence officers were convicted in a landmark war-crimes case in Germany. Former detainees told Insider it's just the beginning. Eyad al-Gharib, a Syrian defendant, arriving to hear his verdict in a courtroom in Koblenz, Germany, on February 24.Thomas Lohnes/ APWafa Ali Mustafa was 10 years old when her father, Ali, hoisted her onto his shoulders at her first protest in 2000.Every Thursday, when protests would flow through Damascus' jasmine-lined streets and Mustafa's school administered exams, they enjoyed a cheeky ritual. Ali would say Wafa, his eldest of three daughters, was sick, and they would drive close to three hours from their hometown, Masyaf, to the capital.Overlooking crowds, Mustafa absorbed the political education her father was instilling in her.In 2011, when Syrians took to the streets en masse to demand basic human and democratic rights and the fall of President Bashar Assad's dictatorship, Mustafa faced a choice.With her father's background as an activist in Syria, she knew those choosing to publicly defy the government faced death or disappearance. But on March 25, 2011, while studying at Damascus University, Mustafa rejected her friends' concerns and joined the protests."My dad told me, 'OK, if this is what you want to do, then do it,'" Mustafa told Insider. "At some point, I even asked my dad: 'Why aren't you just like all other fathers? I mean, aren't you scared for me?'"Mustafa spent months with other Syrians her age attending protests, calling for the end of Assad's government."I would call him, and I would say, 'I went to this wedding today,'" Mustafa said. "He would understand that the wedding is a protest. I would say: 'Yeah, it's very nice. I was very excited. We danced a lot. The music was very nice.'"As the Syrian army began to answer protests with gunfire, Mustafa stayed politically engaged by talking to her father. He had moved to Damascus to be closer to her, having himself been arrested just over 100 miles north in Hama, the province where Masyaf is located. Throughout Mustafa's youth, she said, her father had been arrested for organizing politically in Hama and was known to the country's security apparatus.Mustafa's mother remained in Masyaf with her youngest sister, and Mustafa lived in Damascus with her other sister, fearing that the entire family's presence together in the capital would bring more attention to Ali."My father told me: 'Your participation is not my decision. If you think that you want to do this, you better know the consequences, and you better take responsibility,'" Mustafa said. "So I did. He also did."In July 2013, after years apart — and as the uprising metastasized into civil war — Mustafa's parents were set for a reunion.Mustafa's mother traveled to Damascus from Masyaf with her youngest sister. The three-hour journey from their hometown had become a seven-hour ordeal with government checkpoints."She cooked his favorite food, my sisters and I were laughing at them, thinking mom and my dad are having a honeymoon again," Mustafa said. Before her mother arrived, Ali called saying everything was perfect and ready.But on that day, the worst fear held by her family and many others in Syria came true. Assad's security forces arrested Ali and his best friend before Mustafa's mother arrived in Damascus. Mustafa hasn't heard from her father in over 3,100 days.The Syrian activist Wafa Mustafa holding a picture of her father during a protest outside the trial in Koblenz in June 2020.Thomas Lohnes/Getty ImagesA 10-year civil and proxy war has raged in Syria, killing at least 350,000 people, leaving 6.7 million more internally displaced, and sending over 6.6 million Syrians abroad as refugees.At least half of the country's population is displaced.Mustafa, who was detained in Syria in 2011, is now a refugee. She lives in Berlin, where she has spent her time studying, writing, and advocating on behalf of the hundreds of thousands of people who, like her father, are believed to have been detained, tortured, or disappeared by forces loyal to Assad.According to the UN, as of last year, tens of thousands of people were missing in Assad's prisons.Her advocacy no longer involves protests in the streets of Syria, but her father is still at the center of her work.She is now part of a network of lawyers, advocates, European partners, and refugees in Germany, France, and Sweden pursuing a novel form of justice whose targets are outside Syria's borders — including former Syrian officials accused of working as intelligence officials in notorious prisons.A long, uncertain road to justiceIn the city of Koblenz, Germany, a roughly seven-hour drive from Berlin, two former Syrian officials stood accused of war crimes in a first-of-its-kind trial.The trial, which began in April 2020, was different from one in an American court: Two people were listed as defendants, and five judges heard evidence from more than 30 witness accounts and 17 joint plaintiffs.Anwar Raslan, one of the two men charged by German officials in October 2019, defected from Syria in 2012 and resettled in Germany in 2014 as a refugee. The other man charged, Eyad al-Gharib, was granted asylum in Germany in 2018.The effort to bring them to trial was led by a prominent Syrian human-rights lawyer named Anwar al-Bunni, whose 2014 chance encounter in a Turkish supermarket near a Berlin refugee camp may have changed the course of Syria's justice efforts.Al-Bunni told The Guardian he couldn't believe his eyes when he saw Raslan at a market. Al-Bunni says he recognized Raslan because he played a part in his own imprisonment and torture in the Adra prison in Damascus. The trial first resulted in the conviction of al-Gharib, a former low-ranking intelligence official, who was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in prison on February 24, 2021, after being found guilty of "aiding and abetting 30 cases of crimes against humanity."On Thursday, Raslan, a former higher-ranking intelligence official, was sentenced to life imprisonment. He was found guilty of being the co-perpetrator of torture and overseeing the killings of 27 people, along with charges related to rape and sexual assault of detainees.Thursday's ruling makes him the most senior member of the Syrian government apparatus to face repercussions.The former Syrian intelligence officer Anwar Raslan on Thursday ahead of his guilty verdict.Thomas Frey/Getty ImagesProsecutors say Raslan helped run Branch 251, a notorious prison unit near Damascus also deemed the al-Khatib Branch, or "hell on Earth," where the UN Human Rights Council says thousands have been tortured, killed, and disappeared.What happened behind closed doors at Branch 251 was the focus of the evidence and testimonies from dozens of Syrian torture survivors in the trial.Raslan pleaded not guilty. His attorneys said it was "very clear" that torture was committed in Branch 251 but maintained throughout the trial that no crimes against humanity occurred under Raslan's authority or volition.Hana al Hatimi, a court reporter at the trial, explained on the podcast "Branch 251" that on December 16, during the last session for Raslan before the verdict, Raslan and his defense painted a picture that he had no personal decision-making power over any instances of torture or violence in Branch 251 — and that his defection, and attempts to expose other officials harming prisoners, were based on a principled rejection of such practices.In a prepared statement that his lawyers read to the court, Raslan wrote, "I left my job, I left 26 years in office behind, because I didn't want to be the reason that prisoners were hurt, or that their blood was spilled," adding that he "rejected being an instrument to abuse and killing."He said that without his efforts many more would have been brutalized, and he quoted a Quran verse that says "if you kill someone, it is like killing all of mankind, and if you give life to someone it is like giving life to all of mankind."Raslan argued that he and his family were also victims of terror from the Syrian state.In the verdict, the judges seemed to reject those claims. After hearing from more than 80 witnesses, many of whom had interacted with Raslan in prison, judges said Raslan was responsible for the torture of at least 4,000 people from 2011 to 2012.Reuters/ Annegret HilseThe Assad government has, to this point, largely enjoyed impunity for actions the UN describes as stamping out dissent and waging a war against its citizens that has included chemical attacks, torture, and forced disappearances.There has been no serious international effort to remove Assad from power, nor have any current members of Assad's government been prosecuted, with Russia and China using their UN Security Council vetoes to block any referral to the International Criminal Court. Russian military intervention in 2015 has served to bolster Assad's government, and varying military campaigns by Iran, the US, Israel, and Turkey have preserved the status quo of war.None of this is due to a lack of evidence that Assad's government has engaged in a campaign of indiscriminate killing against its own people; the UN has described a state policy of "extermination."A report from the Syrian Center for Human Rights detailed 72 types of torture employed in Syrian prisons, including the use of electric shocks and boiling water, as well as a method of abuse in which detainees' hands are tied behind their back and they are raised by the same rope, which itself is tied to rings fixed to the ceiling — "leaving their body suspended from the ground so the full weight is hanging from the wrists."Landmark cases, but a 3rd-best optionBarred from pursuing those at the top, legal groups like the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights, Syrian groups like the Violations Documentation Center and the Syrian Center for Media and Freedom of Expression, and open-source researchers have collaborated and built cases around a central legal premise: universal jurisdiction.Universal jurisdiction is an international legal mechanism whereby Syrians living in countries such as Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Sweden can submit complaints to the state's investigative war-crimes units for crimes they say Assad loyalists, or others in Syria, committed."As one of the victims, as one of the players in this movement, we don't think or believe that this is true justice," Mazen al-Darwish, a lead lawyer in the Koblenz trial who is the head of the Syrian Center for Media and Freedom of Expression, told Insider.Al-Darwish, formerly a journalist and lawyer in Syria, was imprisoned in 2012 and held without charge for three years. He says he was tortured. And, ultimately, he would like to see a new government in Syria."This is just an alternative" to action by the UN or the International Criminal Court, he said, welcoming the guilty verdicts as a positive first step.Following the start of the Koblenz trial, the Netherlands became the first country to take an official diplomatic position holding the Syrian government responsible for state torture. "The first best option obviously would be fair trials in Syria," Fritz Streiff, a consultant and lawyer working with al-Darwish's organization, told Insider. "People commit crimes, you put them on trial in your own country. If that's not possible, then you go for international justice. If that's not possible, then you go for national justice in foreign nations."This process of universal jurisdiction led to al-Gharib's and Raslan's convictions and a host of other criminal complaints against Syria's rulers."And now we can say that torture — it's happened not because we said that, not because of a story of the victim, this is legally by an independent court, by an professional judge, finding that, 'Yes, the security services use torture in systematic way,'" al-Darwish told Insider.Al-Darwish's group, alongside the Open Society Foundations' Justice Initiative and the Syrian Archive, has also submitted a joint criminal complaint in France charging the Syrian government with the 2013 sarin-gas attack in Eastern Ghouta, Syria, which killed 1,400 people, per the UN and the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.The Syrian lawyer and human-rights activist Mazen Darwish talking to journalists on Thursday outside the courthouse where Raslan stood on trial in Koblenz.Berndt Reuter/Getty ImagesAnother criminal investigation underway in Sweden follows the French complaint, charging the government with responsibility in the 2013 attack as well as the 2017 Khan Sheikhoun chemical attacks. The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has accused the Syrian army of masterminding sarin and chlorine gas attacks in 2017 and 2018, calling them the "most serious breach" possible of the Convention Weapons Convention, accusations the Syrian government denies.In one of history's most documented conflicts, preservation of evidence is keyThe legal fight against the Syrian government is detailed in the documentary "Bringing Assad to Justice." The filmmakers Ronan Tynan and Anne Daly splice harrowing footage of death (photos of 11,000 corpses were leaked by a whistleblower known only by a pseudonym, "Caesar") with the testimony of survivors of places such as Sadnaya, the military prison where thousands of others have disappeared.Firsthand testimony not only preserves the historical record, but the film shows how it's being used to seek justice, even in the face of disinformation.Since before the trial, Syria and its chief ally, Russia, have flooded social media with disinformation designed to muddle questions over who is responsible for war crimes. That made it important to gather as much authentic evidence as possible to convict the two former intel officers.The whistleblower Caesar's photos, for example, include not just dead bodies but individual detainee numbers; the branch of the security forces that arrested them; and the number assigned to their corpse. The Caesar file, which contains photographic evidence of thousands of people tortured or killed in Syrian prisons, was used as evidence at the Koblenz trial."The amount of evidence, especially the amount of documents that CIJA has collected to date, is unprecedented," Nerma Jelacic, the Commission for International Justice and Accountability's director for management and external relations, said in the documentary. "We've got a treasure of indisputable material produced by the perpetrating party itself.""The threats will increase for people like Mazen, for people like Anwar al-Bunni, for their researchers on the ground, for victim-support groups," Kristyan Benedict, a crisis-response manager for Amnesty International, told Insider."Certainly, when Eyad al-Gharib was sent to prison, you started to see an increase in intimidation of witnesses," he added. Benedict added that throughout the trial, witnesses and plaintiffs had trouble securing court-ordered witness protection for families living in Syria or outside Germany.Fear of speaking out persists, and so does the fear of inactionBenedict, advocates, and lawyers involved in the justice efforts told Insider that throughout the gathering of evidence and trials, many Syrians who have offered testimony have feared retribution, again."The Mukhabarat" — Syrian intelligence forces — "have a very, very long reach. They can reach people in Europe, in France, in Germany, certainly in Turkey," Benedict said, adding that the organization had helped many of the Syrian and victim-led groups bolster their security imprint. Amnesty has also advised al-Darwish and other groups on legal strategies and pressured countries to develop investigative war-crimes units.Al-Darwish added that the success of the trial in Koblenz against al-Gharib had been a boon in terms of being able to show victims and Syrian refugees that pathways to justice existed for Syrians.But there is a fear too among advocates that in the short term neighboring countries are normalizing relations with Syria, willing to forget the government's actions in exchange for trade and security cooperation. Interpol's move to readmit Syria in 2021 makes it easier for the Syrian government to pursue dissidents outside the country."Justice, for me — it's not tools for revenge, not political tools to support this party or that party, justice for me — it's the truth and the guarantee that this will not happen again," al-Darwish said."And to see those people sanctioned, but most importantly to see the birth of a new Syria with a sustainable peace because without justice, I believe that it will not be easy to guarantee sustainable peace," al-Darwish added.On Monday, Wassim Mukdad, a Branch 251 survivor who was a plaintiff in Raslan's case, said, "We want some proof that our suffering counted for something. I hope that me, and a lot of others, were able to give a voice to those who couldn't share their stories."Mustafa on June 4 in Koblenz.Thomas Lohnes/Getty ImagesWhile Mustafa is involved in the broader activism, the political will always be personal as she strives to achieve justice for her father. In 2020, Mustafa would sit outside the Koblenz courthouse with a portrait of her father, flanked by portraits of other missing Syrian detainees.In March 2021, Mustafa spoke with the UN General Assembly and alongside other families launched the Charter for Truth and Justice, a victim-centered list of demands calling for the immediate release of detainees, and an end to inhumane treatment and sexual-based violence in Syria."I think that all Syrians are now in a very challenging and crucial stage where for the first time we are at a stage where we are presented something that is supposed to be justice," Mustafa said. "And we have to decide for ourselves whether this is what we imagined or not."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJan 14th, 2022

Political Scandal Erupts As Djokovic Remains In Limbo, His Lawyers Fight To Overturn Australia Entry Ban

Political Scandal Erupts As Djokovic Remains In Limbo, His Lawyers Fight To Overturn Australia Entry Ban Novak Djokovic will remain in Australian immigration detention limbo following a court’s decision to adjourn his appeal against a visa cancellation, the Associated Press reported. Lawyers for the tennis star launched an appeal seeking to overturn the federal government decision to deport him after federal officials overruled a state vaccine exemption. The world's number one tennis player was denied entry into Australia on Thursday after a storm of protest about a decision to grant him a medical exemption from COVID-19 vaccination requirements to play in the Australian Open. The player, due to contest the Australian Open this month, offered insufficient proof to enter the country under current pandemic rules, the Australian Border Force said Thursday. However, a court agreed not to deport him before a full hearing scheduled for Monday, leaving the Serbian champion holed up in a quarantine hotel in Melbourne for at least the next 72 hours. The saga, fuelled by domestic political point-scoring about the country's handling of a record surge in new COVID-19 infections, has led to an international row, with Serbia's president claiming his nation's most celebrated sportsman was being harassed, while Djokovic's father claimed that "this is a fight for everyone." After the decision to deny entry to the tennis star was confirmed, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison tweeted that Djokovic was subject to the same rules as everyone. "Rules are rules, especially when it comes to our borders. No one is above these rules. Our strong border policies have been critical to Australia having one of the lowest death rates in the world from Covid, we are continuing to be vigilant," he wrote. "There are no special cases, rules are rules," Morrison said at a televised news briefing. "We will continue to make the right decisions when it comes to securing Australian borders in relation to this pandemic." Spanish champion Rafael Nadal told reporters in Melbourne that he felt sorry for his rival "but at the same time, he knew the conditions since a lot of months ago. He makes his own decision." Djokovic, who has consistently refused to disclose his vaccination status while publicly criticizing mandatory vaccines, kicked off the furore when he said on Instagram on Tuesday he had received a medical exemption to pursue a record-breaking 21st Grand Slam win at the Open starting Jan. 17. The announcement prompted an outcry in Australia, particularly in the tournament host city of Melbourne, which has endured the world's longest cumulative lockdown to ward off the coronavirus, a lockdown which has clearly failed judging by the exponential increase in Australian covid cases. As Reuters notes, the move by the Australian government to block Djokovic's entry has caused ructions between Canberra and Belgrade. Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic said on Twitter he had spoken with Djokovic and accused the Australian government of harassment. "We're doing all we can. This persecution is unfair, starting with the Australian prime minister," he later told Serbian media. "They are acting as if the same set of rules apply to everyone, but they've let in others on the same grounds that Novak had applied to." Morrison said he was aware that "representations have been made" by the Serbian embassy in Canberra and denied the accusations of harassment. Djokovic's father told media in Serbia that his son was ushered into an isolation room under police guard when he touched down at Melbourne's Tullamarine airport at about 11:30 p.m. (1230 GMT) on Wednesday after a 14-hour flight from Dubai. His family later held an emotional news conference at Djokovic's restaurant in central Belgrade, with his nine previous Australian Open trophies on display. "They are keeping him in captivity. They are stomping all over Novak to stomp all over Serbia and the Serbian people," said his father Srdjan, who had earlier told local media his son was "the Spartacus of the new world". "I have no idea what's going on. They're holding my son captive for five hours," Srdjan Djokovic said in a statement to Russian news agency Sputnik. "This is a fight for the libertarian world, this is not just a fight for Novak, but a fight for the whole world! If they don't let him go in half an hour, we will gather on the street. This is a fight for everyone." His mother, Dijana, added: "They are keeping him as a prisoner, that's not human and it's not fair." There was also support on the streets of the Serbian capital. "He is the best in the history of that sport and they cannot break him in any other way but this one. But they are not going to break him," said Belgrade resident Zdravko Cukic. Earlier on Wednesday, Djokovic's coach Goran Ivanisevic posted a photo to social media from what appears to be the Melbourne Airport in Australia where Djokovic reportedly was being held, captioning it, "Not the most usual trip Down Under."         View this post on Instagram                       A post shared by Goran Ivanisevic (@goranivanisevicofficial) At a hearing in the Federal Circuit and Family Court of Australia on Thursday evening, lawyers for Djokovic and the government agreed the player could remain in the country until at least Monday. Nick Wood, a lawyer for Djokovic, earlier told Judge Anthony Kelly that Tennis Australia had advised they needed to know about his participation in the tournament by Tuesday. In response, Kelly, who had asked when Djokovic was scheduled to play his first match, said: "If I can say with the respect necessary, the tail won't be wagging the dog here." Djokovic's fate is tied to a political fight in Australia, characterized by fingerpointing between Morrison's conservative administration and the left-leaning Victoria state government. The squabbles rumbled on as Australia's daily COVID-19 infections hit a record high for the fourth consecutive day, with new cases exceeding 72,000, overwhelming hospitals and causing labour shortages. Under Australia's federal system, states and territories can issue exemptions from vaccination requirements to enter their jurisdictions. However, the federal government controls international borders and can challenge such exemptions. Djokovic travelled to Australia after receiving an exemption from the Victorian government. That exemption - the reasons for which are not known - supported his federal government-issued visa. On his arrival, however, Federal Border Force officials at the airport said Djokovic was unable to justify the grounds for his exemption. The Australian task force that sets the exemption parameters lists the risk of serious cardiac illness from inoculation and a COVID-19 infection within the past six months as qualifiers. However, Morrison said on Thursday that Tennis Australia had been advised weeks ago that a recent infection did not meet the criteria for exemption. Tennis Australia and Victoria government officials said Djokovic had received no preferential treatment. Tyler Durden Thu, 01/06/2022 - 09:45.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJan 6th, 2022

Peso Hits Record Lows As Leftist Boric Wins Chile Presidency In "Worst Scenario Markets Could Have Envisioned"

Peso Hits Record Lows As Leftist Boric Wins Chile Presidency In "Worst Scenario Markets Could Have Envisioned" Leftist Gabriel Boric, a former student protest leader, won the final round of Chile’s presidential election by a wide margin as the copper-rich Latin American country took a decisive shift to the left after several years of civil unrest. Boric secured 56% of the vote in Sunday’s runoff, well ahead of José Antonio Kast, his ultra-conservative rival, on 44%.  The victory, Bloomberg notes, is likely to spook markets that fear interventionist policies. Boric, 35, will take office in March as one of the youngest presidents in the world and with an ambitious agenda. “I am going to be the president of all Chileans, whether you voted for me or not,” said Boric. The 35-year-old president-elect, who will take office on March 11, said he would strive for unity after a bitter contest between extremes of the political spectrum. Gabriel Boric during an election night rally in Santiago, on Dec. 19 Boric, who is unmarried, bearded and tattooed, first gained prominence a decade ago when he led nationwide demonstrations calling for free and high-quality education. He ran successfully for lower house deputy in 2013 and was re-elected to a second term in a landslide vote. He is the first leader to come from outside the centrist political mainstream that has largely ruled Chile since its return to democracy in 1990. He is also the youngest Chilean president in more than two centuries and the first to secure a second-round victory after losing the first round. His win in a runoff paves the way not only for a generational shift but also for the biggest economic changes in decades for one of Latin America’s richest countries, a global financial market favorite. It was a highly polarized campaign that only moderated in the final stretch as both contenders wooed centrists. He will face enormous challenges including a divided congress, sharp economic slowdown, the writing of a new constitution and the lingering threat of social unrest. “We cannot continue to allow the poor to pay for the inequalities of Chile,” Boric told thousands of cheering supporters in a fiery victory speech which also acknowledged all he needs to do to build alliances. “We will reach out and build bridges so our citizens can live a better life.” He repeated something he told President Sebastian Pinera in a conversation between them broadcast after results were announced: “The agreements need to be among all Chileans and not made behind closed doors.”  They will meet Monday to begin the transition. Kast quickly conceded and spoke to Boric on Sunday evening. ​​During his victory speech, Boric, who is part of a broad leftwing coalition that includes the Chilean Communist party, said he would oppose mining initiatives that “destroy” the environment. That included the contentious $2.5Bn Dominga mining project that was approved this year. “We are a generation that emerged in public life demanding our rights be respected as rights, and not treated like consumer goods or a business,” he said. He has also pledged to enact higher taxes, greater public spending, the scrapping of private pension schemes and student debt, as well as other reforms intended to empower women, indigenous groups and minorities. Boric wants to dismantle some pillars of Chile’s economy such as its private pension funds, which form the bedrock of the local capital markets. He backs higher taxes on both the rich and the nation’s crucial mining industry -- Chile is the world’s biggest copper producer -- while also promising to keep government debt in-check. * * * Boric's victory was greeted with joy (for now, although check back in a few months): streets across the nation of 19 million were filled with honking cars and waving banners in celebration of the changing of the guard. Turnout was about 56% of registered voters, nearly 10 percentage points higher than the first round last month. Supporters of Gabriel Boric celebrate following results from the runoff presidential election in Santiago, on Dec. 19. Boric’s early focus on outreach has an undeniable logic: as he seeks a set of radical shifts including raising taxes on the rich and mining industry, dismantling the country’s private pensions system and boosting social services, he needs to build a coalition with centrists and hard leftists who have clashed for decades. “He will face a divided parliament, so passage of legislation will be difficult and will require strong negotiating skills and pragmatism,” noted Jennifer Pribble, professor of political science at the University of Richmond. Boric describes himself as a moderate socialist who shuns the hard left models of Cuba and Venezuela. Still, Kast and his supporters warned of Boric’s alliance with the communist party as a risk. Meanwhile, Boric’s supporters saw Kast as a dangerous throwback to the right-wing dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet due to an emphasis on public order and conservative social mores. As Bloomberg notes, Boric's emphasis on social justice dovetailed with a period of unrest that exploded over a transit fare hike in 2019 and quickly ballooned into a broader movement demanding better health care, public transport and pensions. During the campaign, Boric often vowed that, “if Chile was the birthplace of neo-liberalism, it will also be its grave.” Boric wants to dismantle some pillars of Chile’s economy such as its private pension funds, which form the bedrock of the local capital markets. He backs higher taxes on both the rich and the nation’s crucial mining industry -- Chile is the world’s biggest copper producer -- while also promising to keep government debt in-check. In March, Boric will take the helm of a nation that’s facing unprecedented political upheaval. Social unrest kicked off the process of drafting a new constitution, now being done by a left-leaning assembly, which will be put to a national referendum in 2022. Regionally, Chile’s election follows the triumph of Pedro Castillo in Peru earlier this year, and stands to add momentum to leftist candidates in Colombia and Brazil, which will hold presidential elections next year. Similarly to Chile, both of those countries are facing increasingly polarized politics. “Chile’s president-elect could become the face of Latin America’s new left, inspiring other candidates in the region,” said Oliver Stuenkel, professor of international relations at Fundacao Getulio Vargas in Sao Paulo. Meanwhile, traders were not impressied: "This is the worst scenario that the markets could have envisioned,” said Klaus Kaempfe, portfolio solutions director at Credicorp Capital in Santiago. “They were waiting for a much tighter vote showing a desire for dialogue.” Boric will have to contend with economic growth that will come to a halt, slowing from a record high near 12% this year to a rate closer to 2%, according to the central bank. Policy makers are also raising interest rates quickly to tame soaring inflation and, while Chile still has relatively sound fiscal accounts, the debt-to-GDP ratio has increased quickly amid pandemic spending. Chilean companies and individuals have moved money abroad at a historic clip over the past few years, weighing on the currency. The Chilean peso sank on Monday, dropping 1.9% after tumbling more than 3% at the open as traders adjust positions for the uncertainty that lies ahead. As Bloomberg notes, Boric’s potential push for higher taxes, greener industries and greater equality are seen leading to more uncertainty among traders, and more bearish bets. CLP lacks a significant dollar resistance level until 880/USD, last seen in March 2020. The Colombian peso was also down 0.7%, testing major dollar resistance are near 4,005/USD as a decline in oil prices outweighed the boost provided by a hawkish central bank decision. And by the close, CLP had plunged to a new record low against the dollar... On Friday, Colombia’s central bank raised the benchmark rate by 50 basis point to 3% as expected; surprise was that three officials voted for a 75bps rate increase, showing a tilt toward a more hawkish stance. In October, five officials opted for an increase of 50bps and two for 25 basis points. The currency would likely have seen a positive market reaction if it wasn’t for oil’s 4.3% decline in the U.S. after Senator Joe Manchin blindsided the White House on Sunday by rejecting Biden’s $1.75 trillion economic plan, leaving Democrats with few options for reviving it.   Tyler Durden Mon, 12/20/2021 - 14:26.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeDec 20th, 2021

San Francisco Homeless Insider Tells All

San Francisco Homeless Insider Tells All Authored by Michael Shellenberger via Substack, Why progressives defend and finance open drug scenes... In my new book, San Fransicko, I describe why progressives create and defend what European researchers call “open drug scenes,” which are places in cities where drug dealers and buyers meet, and many addicts live in tents. Progressives call these scenes “homeless encampments,” and not only defend them but have encouraged their growth, which is why the homeless population in California grew 31 percent since 2000. This was mostly a West Coast phenomenon until recently. But now, the newly elected progressive mayor of Boston, Michelle Wu, has decided to keep open a drug scene at Mass and Cass avenues, even though it has resulted in several deaths from drug overdoses and homicides. Progressives defend their approach as compassionate. Not everybody who is homeless is an addict, they say. Many are just down on their luck. Others turn to drugs after living on the street. What they need is our help. We should not ask people living in homeless encampments to go somewhere else. Homeless shelters are often more dangerous than living on the street. We should provide the people living in tents with money, food, clean needles, and whatever else they need to stay alive and comfortable. And we should provide everyone with their own apartment unit if that’s what they want. But this “harm reduction” approach is obviously failing. Cities already do a good job taking care of temporarily homeless people not addicted to drugs. Drug dealers stab and sometimes murder addicts who don’t pay. Women forced into prostitution to support their addictions are raped. Addicts are dying from overdose and poisoning. The addicts living in the open drug scenes commit many crimes including open drug use, sleeping on sidewalks, and defecating in public. Many steal to maintain their habits. The hands-off approach has meant that addicts do not spend any amount of time in jail or hospital where they can be off of drugs, and seek recovery. Now, even a growing number of people who have worked or still work within the homeless services sector are speaking out. A longtime San Francisco homeless service provider who read San Fransicko, and said they mostly agreed with it, reached out to me to share their views. At first this person said they wanted to speak on the record. But as the interview went on, and the person criticized their colleagues, they asked to remain anonymous, fearing retribution. Why “Housing First” Failed The main progressive approach for addressing homelessness, not just in San Francisco but in progressive cities around the nation, is “Housing First,” which is the notion that taxpayers should give, no questions asked, apartment units to anyone who says they are homeless, and asks for one. What actually works to reduce the addiction that forces many people onto the streets is making housing contingent on abstinence. But Housing First advocates oppose “contingency management,” as it’s called, because, they say, “Housing is a right,” and it should not be condition on behavior change. But such a policy is absurdly unrealistic, said the San Francisco homeless expert. “To pretend that this city could build enough permanent supportive housing for every homeless person who needs it is ludicrous,” the person said. “I wish it weren’t. I wish I lived in a land where there was plenty of housing. But now people are dying on our streets and it feels like we’re not doing very much about it.” The underlying problem with Housing First is that it enables addiction. “The National Academies of Sciences review [which showed that giving people apartments did not improve health or other life outcomes] you cited shows that. San Francisco has more permanent supportive housing units per capita than any other city, and we doubled spending on homelessness, but the homeless population rose 13%, even as it went down in the US. And so we doubled our spending and the problem got worse. But if you say that, you get attacked.” How did progressives, who claim to be evidence-based, ever get so committed to Housing First? “Malcolm Gladwell’s [2006 New Yorker article] “Million Dollar Murray,” really helped popularize this idea,” the person said. “But it was based on an anecdote of one person. It works for who it works for but is not scalable. [Governor] Gavin [Newsom] made a mistake [as San Francisco’s Mayor 2004-2011] which was that we stopped investing in shelter. But that’s because all the best minds were saying, ‘This is what’s going to work.’” One of the claims made defenders of the open drug scenes is that people who live in them are mostly locals who were priced out of their homes and apartments and decided to pitch a tent on the street. In San Fransicko, I cite a significant body of evidence to show that this is false, and that many people come to San Francisco from around the U.S. for the city’s unusually high cash welfare benefits, free housing, and tolerance of open drug scenes. The insider agreed. “People come here because they think they can. It’s bullshit that ‘Only 30 percent [of homeless] are from out of town.’ At least 20,000 homeless people come through town every year. Talk to the people on the street. There’s no way 70 percent of the homeless are from here. Ask them the name of their high school and they guess, ‘Washington? The one around the corner?’ But you can’t even talk about that without being called a fascist.”  The people living on the street suffer from serious addiction, this person said. “During the first point in time count [census of homeless population] in 2007, one-third had a disability, mental illness, or addiction, while last time, it was over two-thirds. The population fundamentally changed, whether from the drugs, or the time on the street. It doesn’t matter because a lot of the problems on the street are drugs-related. Neither San Francisco nor any other municipality can solve the housing policy without changing federal policy.” Life in the open drug scenes is brutal, this person confirmed. “Most homeless encampments are not communities but have paper-thin relationships based on their disease. It’s hard to have healthy relationships when you’re just trying to keep your head above water because you’re so dope dependent.” What San Francisco and other progressive cities are doing isn’t working. “People in those encampments have food brought to them, port-a-potties brought to them, and all they need to do is put drugs in their arm all day. They get really really sick and they die. Portugal didn’t make it so you can do whatever you want. The consequences of your action are treatment driven, but there are consequences. Here there are no consequences. And so we make it worse.” This person was harshly critical of San Francisco’s Department of Public Health for allowing drug overdoses to rise to over 700 per year. “They say, ‘It’s not our fault because it’s fentanyl.” But it’s only gotten worse.” This person stressed they were in favor of harm reduction policies like giving addicts clean needles in exchange for them giving back dirty ones, but not just giving out needles. “I’m all in favor of needle exchange, but not of needle distribution. Ask people to return the needles they’ve been given. There are people who don’t have it together enough. I get that. But when you tell people we’re going to give you whatever you want, to do whatever you want… Sleeping on a sidewalk is a crime. There are things you can’t do. You can’t shoot up on the street. The laws are there for a reason.” Why Progressives Create Homelessness So ⁦@SFPD⁩ just arrested ⁦@christinevans⁩ for interfering with their work of displacing folks in a large encampment under the freeway during a pandemic as Delta is spreading. I was talking to an unhoused pregnant woman when they threatened to arrest me too. pic.twitter.com/NBANKCWA0Y — Kelley Cutler (@NutCheese) July 27, 2021 Open drug scenes look like natural disasters, but they are the result of specific city policies. These policies including giving money, food, and drug paraphernalia to addicts to support their addiction. But even if progressives didn’t give people those things, many addicts would still live in open drug scenes. As such, the main reason “homelessness” is so much worse in progressive West Coast cities is because progressives hotly oppose efforts by cities to close the open drug scenes and move addicts into shelters and rehab. By blocking the closing of open drug scenes, which is referred to as “clearing an encampment,” people in need of help don’t get it. “The San Francisco Coalition on Homelessness recently [July 2021] protested an encampment clearing where a woman was pregnant,” the insider told me. “As soon as everybody left, the woman went into a shelter, after having been on the streets for three months. She went indoors. It’s like, ‘What are you fighting for? The right of this person to stay on private property and be pregnant?’” One of the questions I tried to answer in San Fransicko was when it was that street addicts started living in tents. I concluded that it started with the “Occupy Wall Street” protests in 2011, when progressive activists in San Francisco, Oakland, and other cities lived in tents in front of government buildings to protest capitalism. This person confirmed this account. “You’re right that the tents popped up after Occupy,” they said. “But it wasn’t just that the Occupy activists gave the homeless their tents. It was that the homeless saw well-heeled whites sleeping in tents. It got moralized.” The most influential homeless advocate in San Francisco, and perhaps the United States as a whole, is the head of the San Francisco Coalition on Homelessness, Jennifer Friedenbach. Over the last three decades, Friedenbach has taken control over San Francisco’s homelessness budget and other policies. She blocks the closure of open drug scenes, calls people who disagree with her fascists and racists, and organizes protests at the homes of politicians. Time to house all San Franciscans, don’t you think? pic.twitter.com/PA5fFGivhN — Jennifer Friedenbach (@fbach4) May 18, 2021 A typical example of Friedenbach’s tactics could be seen in posters she promoted in May. The headline read, “See a tent? Just fucking leave it alone, thanks. Maybe instead of complaining about a homeless person’s only shelter from the elements, you could do something about the economic conditions that put them there in the first place?” The main reason San Francisco lacks sufficient homeless shelters is because Friedenbach and other Housing First advocates have long opposed them. They have demanded that money go to providing people with their own apartment units. The reason, Friedenbach explained to me, is that “if you ask unhoused people, they’re not screaming for shelter. They’re screaming for housing.” In the spring of 2021, Friedenbach published an op-ed opposing a proposal considered by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors to create, within eighteen months, sufficient homeless shelters and outdoor “Safe Sleeping Sites” for all of the city’s unsheltered homeless. “One can simply take a look to New York City,” she wrote. “Their department spends about $1.3 billion dollars of its budget on providing shelter for their unhoused population while thousands remain on the street. . . . As a result, New York has a higher rate of homelessness than San Francisco.” But the claim was misleading. New York shelters the vast majority of its homeless, whereas San Francisco leaves the vast majority of its homeless unsheltered. “New York [City] has made the decision that everyone should have an exit from the street,” noted Rafael Mandelman, a San Francisco county supervisor. “San Francisco has consciously chosen not to make that commitment. And the conditions on New York’s streets versus San Francisco streets are somewhat reflective of what that means.” Friedenbach controls how San Francisco spends its astonishing $850 million annual budget. “Jenny built her power base by becoming a master of the budget’s “add back” process,” said the San Francisco insider. “The night before the budget is announced, it gets reviewed by the Board of Supervisors, but they’re trying to get out of there by midnight, and that’s when these ‘community asks.’ The board goes and trims stuff out of the mayor’s budget and does “add backs'' of money for struggling nonprofits. Jenny has mastered that process. And so if you’re a nonprofit executive director, and you want money in the add back process, which everyone does, you have to go through Jenny.” This person said that Friedenbach also operates behind the scenes. “She controls fake front groups like the Homeless Service Providers’ Coalition and the Justice Budget Coalition,” said the insider. “She knows the issue well. A lot of people look to her.” But more importantly, Friedenbach, like many progressive defenders of open drug scenes, demonize the people who stand up to her. “They shut down the discussion,” the insider said. “Everybody is just like, ‘Police bad. Public health good.’ It’s Animal Farm. But the city’s homeless outreach team can’t do their jobs without the cops. That’s the stuff that shuts down any meaningful discussion.” Why do they do it? Radical anti-system ideology. “There’s a San Francisco Coalition on Homelessness hat which says, ‘Coalition on Homelessness: On The Frontlines of Class Warfare,’” said the insider. “They feel like they’re fighting class warfare. They tell people to not take shelter.” I documented in San Fransicko that Friedenbach and other homeless advocates are motivated in significant measure by their belief that capitalism, not addiction, is responsible for the suffering on the streets. After I appeared on Joe Rogan, a clinical psychologist who for two decades ran programs for homeless veterans at the San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center, which included homeless vets, emailed me. “I agree with all you say about the ‘homeless’ people who are actually mislabeled mentally ill and drug addicts,” wrote Dr. Mark Zaslav. “I like your comparison of the ‘ideology’ of people who “advocate” for the homeless to a religion gone haywire. But I wanted, as a psychologist, to add another point for your consideration.  This is the fact that this leftwing religion is based on split-off hatred and contempt for civilization itself.  When I attended substance abuse conferences in San Francisco run by community leaders, it became clear to me that these people had no understanding of mental health disorders like addiction – they regarded “homeless” addicts as heroes of some kind.   “Thus, each drug addict defecating on the streets in the Tenderloin was a massive middle finger to some imagined white male with a briefcase.  The premise of your solutions, which make so much sense, assume that adherents to the now reigning ideology want things solved.  They do not.  They want people inconvenienced by addicts – the homeless become quote literal scared cows who roam society reminding everyone of the sins of capitalism. “You mentioned Noam Chomsky.  These people are angry and full of hate.  They have tapped into a form of blindness among the voters of places like San Francisco or California itself – these are angry people endlessly telling themselves they are compassionate while projecting their hatred toward the ‘bourgeoise.’ I am afraid this does not end well. “ The San Francisco homelessness insider agreed, and despaired over the religious fervor in which the people who work at the San Francisco Coalition on Homelessness, the San Francisco Public Health Department, and many elected members of the Board of Supervisors are gripped. “Maybe homelessness is part of capitalism and racism,” said this person. “I can’t solve that and neither can any nonprofit organization. I can’t stand seeing people suffering on the streets. What are we going to do right now?” .*  *  * Michael Shellenberger is a Time Magazine "Hero of the Environment,"Green Book Award winner, and the founder and president of Environmental Progress. He is author of just launched book San Fransicko (Harper Collins) and the best-selling book, Apocalypse Never (Harper Collins June 30, 2020). Our research and writing depends on individuals like you. Please consider subscribing now so we can expand our work in the coming year Tyler Durden Mon, 11/29/2021 - 22:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 29th, 2021

The Rittenhouse Case Proves The Establishment Wants To Bring Back Star Chamber Tyranny

The Rittenhouse Case Proves The Establishment Wants To Bring Back Star Chamber Tyranny Authored by Brandon Smith via Alt-Market.us, One of the most interesting stories from the early days leading up to the American Revolution involves the events surrounding the Boston Massacre. On March 5th, 1770 the Stamp Act had just been repealed but British Soldiers were ever present in Boston as a show of force against the “rowdy” colonists. The British government, in order to save face, implemented the Townshend Acts instead as a means to continue taxing the colonies (without representation, of course). Anger was growing in the streets. The presence of the Red Coats in the city added to the public fury and protests were sparked. One such protest was raging in front of the Custom House on King Street over a disagreement between wig maker Henry Knox and a soldier. The argument grew into what was later described as a riot. Allegedly, the crowd became violent and started throwing objects at the soldiers. One of the soldiers let off a shot and then someone yelled “Fire!”, causing all the Red Coats to shoot into the crowd killing five of them and injuring others. The colonial justice system could have chosen to use their position to railroad the soldiers in question and make an ideological example out of them. Instead, in the first trial of Captain John Preston, ample legal representation was given (the lawyer was John Adams, who would later become the 2nd President of the US), along with a fair trial. Adams’ position that the soldiers believed they were under imminent danger of bodily harm convinced the jury and a not-guilty verdict was given for the majority of the soldiers, with manslaughter charges for two of them. Adams felt that his victory in the defense of the British soldiers was actually a victory for the colonies and ultimately the Revolution. You see, the British looked upon the colonials as “insurrectionists” and barbarians. They did not think that a fair trial for a soldier in the colonies was even possible. By proving them wrong with grace, logic and objectivity, Adams and the jury destroyed a common lie perpetuated by the monarchy and the British establishment. The colonies had more honor than the British did. This lack of honor among the British establishment became evident before and during the Revolutionary War when the “Star Chamber” became the defacto law of the monarchy in the colonies. The Star Chamber was an elitist-operated “justice system” or tribunal originally designed so that the British aristocracy was assured a fair trial whenever they actually faced a criminal charge. In other words, it was a special court for the power elites that was separate and superior to the courts used for average peasants. Publicly, it was also presented as a means for commoners to redress grievances against aristocrats, but it was well understood that the Star Chamber would rarely go against the nobility UNLESS they had also offended the king. If they went against the king, they would be black-bagged like anyone else. During the unrest in the colonies, however, the Star Chamber was used in a different manner; it became a weapon to crush dissent among subjects that spoke out against the empire and sowed the seeds of “sedition”. The dreaded court was highly secretive and the public was often obstructed from its proceedings. Its rulings were overseen by the establishment rather than a jury and in many cases those people being charged were never given a chance to defend themselves. They were sentenced before they ever entered a courtroom, if they entered a courtroom at all. Silence was often considered an admission of guilt rather than a right of the accused. Punishments were brutal, including torture and imprisonment under the worst possible conditions. The death penalty was not allowed, but the court would instead place defendants in conditions so horrible that they tended to die on their own. All of this was justified under the claim that every person charged was treasonous, and therefore they did not deserve a fair trial among their peers. After the war was over and the British were defeated, the Founding Fathers drafted large portions of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights in order to counter and prevent the same abuses they saw under the Star Chamber. The 5th Amendment in particular was directly inspired as a way to stop Star Chamber-like abuses of court power. But lets leap ahead to current day, where we find that the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, now nearing its end, has beyond anything else revealed a vicious intention by the establishment to bring back the oppression of the Star Chamber through the media manipulated court of public opinion, mob rule as well as violations of well established constitutional law. The political left could have chosen the path of reason, allowing justice to take its natural course through a display of objectivity and fairness as John Adams and the colonials did during the Boston Massacre trial. They have instead chosen to take the same route as the British, motivated by a “win at any cost” mentality, using lies, strategic omissions, censorship and threats of mob violence to turn the Rittenhouse trial into a political proxy war. Here are just a handful of examples that show the establishment and the media are seeking to undermine centuries of normal constitutional protections including the right of self defense… The Kenosha “Peaceful Protest” Misdirection First, lets be clear that the media’s handling of the entire Kenosha incident was corrupt from the very beginning. Aside from refusing to call the riots that erupted what they were – RIOTS, the media has also consistently mischaracterized the police shooting as brutality against black suspect Jacob Blake. Blake, crippled by the incident, has been painted as a “victim and hero” in the news. In reality, Blake had a warrant out for his arrest including trespassing, disorderly conduct and sexual assault. The police were made aware of this before they attempted to detain him. Blake also had a history of resisting arrest, and of course attempted to do so again in Kenosha. Videos clearly show Blake trying to march away from officers and jump back into his vehicle. The media claimed Blake was unarmed, yet he is also clearly holding a karambit style knife in the same videos, which the police ordered him to drop and he refused. The Wisconsin DOJ confirmed that Blake was armed and Blake himself admitted to having the knife. Officers were already on edge as Blake tried to reach into his car, or use his car to get away, or possibly use the car as a weapon. Frankly, Blake’s history and behavior at the scene make him a criminal, not a hero or a victim. All this information was readily available within about a day of the event. The media attempted to hide these FACTS surrounding his shooting from the public and deliberately sowed seeds of unrest. And the ignorant and reactionary people within the BLM movement ate up the propaganda. When violence broke out, the media portrayed the riots as “peaceful protests” for “racial justice”. Even though, just as with George Floyd, there was no evidence whatsoever that racial motivations had anything to do with it. The riots were based on lies from beginning to end, and this false narrative has bled into and tainted the handling of the Kyle Rittenhouse case – For even if Rittenhouse was defending himself from attackers, the attackers are still presented as the “good guys” because they were fighting for “racial justice”, which again, is simply not true. The Kid Defending Himself Was Actually The Villain Because He Defended Himself? The prosecution in the Rittenhouse case should have watched the widely available video evidence (and the secret FBI evidence) and seen that without a shadow of a doubt Rittenhouse was defending himself from an unprovoked attack by an unhinged mob. It is no coincidence that every person Rittenhouse was forced to shoot had a violent criminal record, including Joseph Rosenbaum who had multiple convictions for pedophilia including 11 counts of child molestation. These people were chasing Rittenhouse because they intended to do him harm just as they had done others harm. The media and the prosecution offer a bizarrely disconnected view, in which Kyle Rittenhouse “provoked” the mob into attacking him simply because he was there and because he had a firearm. Multiple witnesses and FBI surveillance footage indicate Joseph Rosenbaum chased and then attacked Rittenhouse, trying to take his rifle by force, which was why he was shot. But this does not matter in the Star Chamber. Lead Prosecutor Thomas Binger openly argued that Rittenhouse ‘lost his right to self defense because he was carrying a gun.’ Binger apparently overlooks the fact that one of Rittenhouse’s attackers, Gaige Grosskreutz, had a gun (illegally due to his felony record) and admitted in court that he ran at Rittenhouse with the weapon pointed at him when Rittenhouse shot him. But somehow, only Kyle’s gun was the cause of the violence and all his attackers were responding to the threatening presence of his weapon? This has been the overarching crux of the prosecution’s case as well as the media narrative: They say Rittenhouse should be treated as an “active shooter” and that the leftist mob was leaping into action, bravely trying to stop him. This does not translate at all when we watch the video of the event; it is clear that Rittenhouse is being pursued by the mob and and they attack him from behind, causing him to fall to the ground. Only then does he defend himself with the rifle against his attackers, including Anthony Huber who tried to bash Kyle’s head in with a skateboard and Grosskreutz who ran at him with a Glock. To clarify, because this may not be a widely understood factor, if someone is trying to get away from you, you cannot attack them and then legally claim “self defense” was your motive. Only police officers have the right to physically detain a person who is trying to escape. Also, if Rittenhouse was an “active shooter” you would think he would have fired belligerently into the crowd, but he did not; he only fired on the people trying to hurt him. The prosecution and media narratives are a blatant attack on the right of self defense in general. In closing arguments, the prosecution argued that Rittenhouse was a “coward” that should have used his fists to fight off the angry mob instead of using his rifle; displaying a clear intent to attack not just Rittenhouse, but overall gun rights. The case itself is obviously politically slanted against Rittenhouse because he is a conservative. Had this been a leftist shooting a mob of conservatives under the same circumstances at the Jan 6th riot I doubt it would have ever gone to trial. The implications of this are far reaching. If Rittenhouse is found guilty despite all the evidence to the contrary, the assertion will then be that self defense is no longer a protected right for anyone with the wrong politics. It will be seen as open season on conservatives at any such events in the future and all defense law will come into question, especially any defense law that involves gun rights. The 5th Amendment Attack And The Strategy Of Subverting A Trial Various establishment institutions have been trying to undermine the 5th Amendment and the right to remain silent for decades now. Once again, we saw this evidenced in the Rittenhouse trial when prosecutors sought to attack the defendant on potential evidence that was ostensibly dismissed before the trial by the judge. The prosecution asked questions related to the evidence anyway. The judge removed the jury from the room and then chastised Binger, who then proceeded to question Rittenhouse’s right to remain silent on the issue. This may seem to be overly complicated legal jousting, but this action by the prosecution was an aggressive attempt to taint the jury with misconceptions of the defendant as a violent “vigilante” rather than the victim of a mob attack. Also, questioning a defendant’s right to remain silent is belligerent to say the least. But beyond that, the faux pas by the prosecution could have led to an immediate mistrial declared. Keep in mind that the prosecution had already suffered numerous failures and the case was going downhill for them. I suspect that this may have been an attempt by Binger to deliberately cause a mistrial and to retry Rittenhouse at a later date, undoing his many mistakes and getting another opportunity to bury Rittenhouse despite his innocence. This is how the Star Chamber begins – When you can be tried over and over again until the establishment gets the outcome they wanted. Furthermore, if the right to remain silent comes into question, then any refusal to answer questions could become an assumed admission of guilt. Silencing The Alternative Media And Obstructing Honest Reporting Perhaps the most blatant act by the establishment has been to use Big Tech to censor various elements and observations of the Rittenhouse trial. Facebook and Twitter have been policing Rittenhouse related posts, and YouTube blocked the majority of independent streamers covering the live closing arguments of the case. The mainstream media has completely avoided any mention of this decision, but of course they would; it makes them the only source for case coverage and their narrative the only narrative. And how about that thermal surveillance evidence from the FBI that only saw the light of day in the middle of the trail? Withholding evidence is a direct obstruction of justice but also a direct attempt to undermine public insight into the case. The narrative is easier to fabricate if one filters out any evidence that contradicts it. This control of the narrative has led to widespread disinformation in the Rittenhouse case. There are still many leftists out there that actually think the people Kyle shot were black and that Rittenhouse is a “racist.” The media has asserted for the past year that Rittenhouse’s self defense was somehow related to “white supremacy.” Media hacks like CNN’s Don Lemon have also insinuated that the judge in the case is biased and possibly racist. The media has asserted that if Rittenhouse is not found guilty that riots will erupt once again to provide punishment where the courts “failed.” If riots do explode, it will be because of the misleading and poisonous lies constantly spread by the same mainstream media. But let’s think about the consequences of this for a moment… The Star Chamber is an ideal tyrannical tool, but the establishment and leftists do not have it in hand yet. They want it badly, and their behavior during the Rittenhouse case makes this clear. I REPEAT: The Star Chamber is not upon us yet, but it is coming soon if these people get their way. Rule by the mob goes well beyond the effects of the Star Chamber, but this could be by design. Think of it this way: Say Rittenhouse is found Not Guilty, and BLM mobs burn down Kenosha in response. Future courts and future juries in similar cases might then decide it’s easier to ignore facts and evidence so that mob violence is avoided and the leftists are appeased. The Star Chamber will return because it will be seen as a preferable alternative to national riots. The Star Chamber will become a mechanism for the “greater good” and the establishment will get what it wanted all along. This cannot be allowed to happen. The Rittenhouse trial does not represent a singular shooting event and an isolated case for self defense, it represents a fulcrum point for the very fabric of our society and what justice will actually mean in the years to come. If an obviously innocent kid is convicted of murder merely because of his political beliefs, or if the mob is allowed to burn and destroy swaths of a city because the verdict is Not Guilty, then every effort the Founding Fathers made to stop the creation of another Star Chamber will be erased. *  *  * If you would like to support the work that Alt-Market does while also receiving content on advanced tactics for defeating the globalist agenda, subscribe to our exclusive newsletter The Wild Bunch Dispatch.  Learn more about it HERE. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/17/2021 - 23:40.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 18th, 2021

Sudanese PM, Cabinet Arrested, Internet Curtailed In Apparent Military Coup

Sudanese PM, Cabinet Arrested, Internet Curtailed In Apparent Military Coup Following weeks of rising tensions between civilian and military members of a state council attempting to guide Sudan to Democracy two years after the fall of longtime dictator Omar al-Bashir, the Sudanese military has decided to end Sudan's Democratic experiment - arresting the prime minister and a large number of senior cabinet members and pro-grovernment party leaders, and shutting off the Internet - with a coup, per reports from Reuters and the AP. In response, thousands of Sudanese citizens have taken to the streets in Khartou and its twin city of Omdurman to protest the military's decision to seize power from a fragile government that had only just barely made the transition to civilian rule. The coup is hardly a surprise for the US and EU; a failed coup attempt last month infuriated progressive Sudanese who pushed for the overthrow of al-Bashir, while the country's more conservative Islamists support a military-led government. Access to the Internet was "widely disrupted" during the coup, while the country’s state news channel started playing patriotic traditional music. Military forces even reportedly stormed the TV station's office in Omdurman and arrested a few employees. This latest coup comes less than one month before the powerful Sudanese Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan was expected to turn over leadership of the Sudan's Sovereign Council, a transitional committee including both military and civilian members that was supposed to steward the transition to democracy, According to the AP, a military takeover "would be a major setback for Sudan, which has grappled with a stop-and-go transition to democracy since long-time ruler Omar al-Bashir was toppled by mass protests two years ago." Reports of a coup attempt emerged before dawn on Monday in Sudan. By mid-morning the country's information minister confirmed that Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok had been detained and moved to an undisclosed location. Several other senior officials were detained, and all of their whereabouts were unknown, according to a statement from the country's information ministry posted to Facebook. Gen. Burhan hinted that he might not willingly turn over command of the state council last month during a TV interview: Burhan, who leads the council, warned in televised comments last month that the military would hand over power only to a government elected by the Sudanese people. His comments suggested he might not stick to the previously agreed timetable, which called for the council to be led by a military figure for 21 months, followed by a civilian for the following 18 months. Under that plan, the handover was to take place sometime in November, with the new civilian leader to be chosen by an alliance of unions and political parties that led the uprising against al-Bashir. The Sovereign Council was supposed to lead Sudan to elections by the end of 2023. As tensions mounted, the Biden Admin's envoy to the region, Jeffrey Feltman, said he met with Sudanese officials over the weekend in an attempt to fix the growing rift between the civilians and the military. Jeffrey Feltman, the U.S. special envoy to the Horn of Africa, said Washington was “deeply alarmed” by reports. Feltman met with Sudanese officials over the weekend in an effort to resolve the growing dispute between civilian and military leaders. EU foreign affairs chief Joseph Borrell tweeted that he’s following events with the “utmost concern." Ironically, this latest coup in the Middle East-North Africa region occurred right around the 10th anniversary of the 'Arab Spring', which saw nearly half a dozen governments in Sudan's region - including nearby Tunisia, Libya and Egype - overthrown during Democratic uprisings with decidedly mixed results. While coups (or attempted coups) aren't uncommon in the developing world, Sudan's (now former) leader should probably count himself lucky: At least he's still alive, unlike some other former third-world leaders we could name. Well, at least for now, anyway. Tyler Durden Mon, 10/25/2021 - 07:15.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeOct 25th, 2021

Supreme Court restricts — but does not end — Environmental Protection Agency"s ability to regulate greenhouse-gas emissions

The Clean Air Act will still allow the EPA to regulate the greenhouse-gas emissions driving our climate crisis. The Environmental Protection Agency headquarters in Washington, DC, on January 19, 2020.Lucy Nicholson/Reuters The Supreme Court ruled in the case of West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday. The court says the EPA can't make power plants switch to sustainable energy sources under the Clean Air Act. EPA can still regulate greenhouse-gas emissions, but the decision opens federal agencies to more lawsuits. The Supreme Court dealt a blow to US efforts to limit climate change on Thursday, but it stopped short of completely blocking such efforts.Partially siding with conservative states and fossil-fuel companies on the case of West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency, the court offered a narrow interpretation of the Clean Air Act. In an opinion delivered by Justice John Roberts, the court ruled 6-3 that the EPA cannot require power plants to shift away from fossil fuels to lower-emission forms of energy.The decision limits the EPA's ability to drastically cut greenhouse-gas emissions and facilitate a transition to more sustainable energy systems. But it does not prohibit the agency from regulating greenhouse-gas emissions under the Clean Air Act in order to prevent catastrophic levels of climate change, according to Tom Lorenzen, who previously spent a decade managing the legal defense of EPA rules at the Justice Department."There is continuing uncertainty, and there will certainly be litigation over how far EPA can go. But this is not the decision that the petitioners were looking for," Lorenzen told Insider.A coal-fired electricity plant in Juliette, Georgia, on April 1, 2017.Chris Aluka Berry/Reuters"My big fear was that EPA was going to have no authority to regulate greenhouse gases. EPA still has ample authority to do that," he said.However, the decision could hinder all kinds of federal regulation going forward. It enshrines a new principle called the "major questions doctrine," which says that federal agencies can't make decisions about questions of major economic or political significance without specific, clear instructions from Congress. It's up to courts to determine which questions are major enough to require this level of congressional guidance.That doctrine opens the door for challenges to regulations across US agencies — rules for healthcare, workplace safety, the financial sector, or telecommunications, for example. Challengers could argue that Congress, rather than the experts who work at federal agencies, should provide hyperspecific guidance on those topics."We are a very complex society, and it is virtually impossible for Congress to address all those complexities down to the smallest detail in statute. So the argument against this is it would basically paralyze the federal government," Lorenzen said.Indeed, the dissent from Justice Elena Kagan, signed by Stephen Breyer and Sonya Sotomayor, argued that the ruling could paralyze climate action."The stakes here are high," Kagan wrote, adding, "The Court appoints itself — instead of Congress or the expert agency — the decisionmaker on climate policy. I cannot think of many things more frightening."How did this case end up in front of the Supreme Court?People rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on February 28, 2022.Photo by Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for NRDCLegal experts have been asking the same question.The dispute began with the 2015 Clean Power Plan, announced by former President Barack Obama, in which the EPA would require many coal-fired power plants to shift to energy sources with lower emissions, like gas, solar, or wind power. The agency's authority to do so came from the Clean Air Act of 1970.In 2019, however, former President Donald Trump's EPA repealed the plan and replaced it with the more relaxed Affordable Clean Energy Rule, which simply imposed rules to make power plants more energy-efficient.That didn't last long. In January 2021, the DC Circuit Court of Appeals determined that the Trump rule was a misinterpretation of the Clean Air Act — it was too weak.Before President Joe Biden's EPA could set forth its own rules, attorneys general from 19 states, led by West Virginia — and a handful of coal companies — pushed for the Supreme Court to review the lower court's decision.To the surprise of many legal experts, the court accepted the case, despite having no active regulation to rule on."There's no regulation under the Trump rule. There's no regulation under the Obama rule. What is the court reviewing?" Lorenzen said.That's why some legal experts, including Lorenzen, have said there's no constitutional reason for the Supreme Court to have taken this case in the first place.Many of the attorneys general behind the case are fueled by donors who also supported the nomination and confirmation of five of the current Supreme Court justices — John G. Roberts, Samuel A. Alito Jr., Neil M. Gorsuch, Brett M. Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — The New York Times reported. All five of those justices co-signed Thursday's ruling.What exactly did the Supreme Court decide?People protest against Sen. Joe Manchin as they blockade the Grant Town Coal Waste Power Plant in Grant Town, West Virginia, on April 9, 2022.Stephanie Keith/ReutersThe Supreme Court invoked the major questions doctrine to say that EPA doesn't have the authority to cap the power industry's carbon-dioxide emissions at a level that forces it to transition to more sustainable forms of energy. The court argued that Congress did not specifically give EPA the authority to implement such rules, which is necessary under the major questions doctrine."If an issue is a big deal, they expect Congress to be explicit about it," Lorenzen said.However, he added, "There's no plain test for identifying when a regulation is that important."Under the major questions doctrine, challengers can argue that agencies can't enact regulations without hyperspecific guidance from Congress. In the future, that could mean more regulations are decided by Congress, rather than by the experts in federal agencies, and it could get more regulations caught up in court.That's what the Supreme Court was really deciding in its session, Lorenzen said: How much authority should be given to federal agencies, as the executive branch of government?"This is really a fight about executive power, and the climate is the collateral damage," Ed Carr, who studies climate adaptation at Clark University in Massachusetts, told Insider.In the case of the EPA, the court only ruled that the major questions doctrine applies to regulations about which types of fuel power plants use to generate energy. So the EPA may not be able to require power plants to shift to renewable energy, as it tried to under Obama's Clean Power Plan."They have left the door open for EPA to do potentially much more than the Affordable Clean Energy Rule promulgated by the Trump administration," Lorenzen said. "In fact, that dissent takes the majority to task for not defining what the limits on EPA's authority are."What does this mean for the environment?A car emits exhaust from its tailpipe in New York, on August 2, 2018.Lucas Jackson/ReutersThis decision isn't the death knell for US climate goals that many experts feared. It leaves room for the EPA to enact new regulations that would reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.The Supreme Court's decision to take this case in the first place may have slowed federal climate action, though. Now the Biden administration's EPA must act quickly to enact a new set of regulations in the two years before a new administration could take over.Though the US has been slowly reducing emissions for about a decade, it is still the world's second-biggest emitter of greenhouse gases.In April, the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that the world must reach its emissions peak and begin reducing its output of greenhouse gases immediately, in order to avoid warming the planet more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above the preindustrial standard.Failure to drastically cut emissions could lead global temperatures to rise more than 2 degrees Celsius, causing further mass animal and plant extinctions, significant increases in the frequency and severity of heat waves and droughts, and tipping points that could lock in even greater levels of warming.Emissions must peak by 2025 at the latest, according to the hundreds of scientists who authored the report — though some authors argued that we don't even have that much time.If the court had ruled that the EPA couldn't regulate greenhouse-gas emissions, Carr said it would have ended "any real hope of staying under 1.5 [degrees]."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider4 hr. 29 min. ago

Live updates: Florida judge blocks the state"s 15-week abortion ban

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Florida judge blocks the state's 15-week abortion banDemonstrators chant slogans during a rally in support of abortion rights in Miami, Florida.Lynne Sladky/AP PhotoA Florida judge blocked the state's 15-week abortion ban that was set to go into effect Friday. The ban violated Florida Constitution's right to privacy, Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper ruled.Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, who signed the restrictions into law, said his administration will appeal the decision.Read Full StoryBiden says he supports a filibuster exception to protect abortion and privacy rightsPresident Joe BidenSTEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said he now supports the Senate making an exception to the filibuster rule to pass protections for abortion and privacy rights."If the filibuster gets in the way, it's like voting rights ... we should require an exception to the filibuster for this action," Biden saidBiden's push to overturn the filibuster has run into opposition from moderate Democrats Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, key votes in the evenly divided 50-50 Senate.Read Full StoryBiden to appoint anti-abortion judge to lifetime federal post: reportPresident Joe Biden addresses the Supreme Court’s decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade June 24, 2022 in Cross Hall at the White House in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion.Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden will reportedly nominate an anti-abortion judge to a lifetime position in federal court — days after he vowed to protect abortion rights.Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth and other unnamed officials told the Louisville Courier-Journal that Biden planned to nominate lawyer Chad Meredith, who has defended Kentucky's anti-abortion legislation.Yarmuth said it was "clear" that the pending nomination was "part of some larger deal" with Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell.On the day the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe was handed down, Biden vowed to do "all in my power to protect a woman's right in states where they will face the consequences of today's decision." The White House and McConnell's office did not respond to requests for comment.Read MoreDem's slim majority in Congress and a conservative Supreme Court make it unlikely Roe v. Wade can be savedActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesDespite calls from Democrats to protect abortion rights, it's unlikely that the Supreme Court's latest decision to throw out the constitutional right to an abortion will be overturned anytime soon."I don't think that we are going to see a reversal in Dobbs," Radhika Rao, a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law, told Insider. "We're not going to see the return of the abortion right." Conservative justices have a 6-3 stranglehold on the nation's highest court, while Democrats have too slim of a majority in Congress to overcome Republicans' filibusters.Read MoreGeorge Washington University refuses to fire SCOTUS Justice Clarence ThomasJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesGeorge Washington University has rejected calls for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to be fired from a teaching position after he joined the court's other conservative justices in overturning Roe v. Wade."Because we steadfastly support the robust exchange of ideas and deliberation, and because debate is an essential part of our university's academic and educational mission to train future leaders who are prepared to address the world's most urgent problems, the university will neither terminate Justices Thomas' employment nor cancel his class in response to his legal opinions," a letter stated.Read Full StoryKansas voters will be the first to address abortion rights after SCOTUS rulingThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade sent the question of abortion back to the states. — and the first direct electoral test of abortion rights in the post-Roe era will take place in Kansas.On Aug. 2, voters in Kansas will vote on a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to an abortion in the state.The amendment would overturn a 2019 state court ruling that established a right to an abortion.Keep Reading Missouri health system restarts emergency contraception amid abortion ban fearsState laws banning abortion "from the moment of fertilization" could interfere with access to emergency contraception.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesA Missouri health system announced it would stop providing emergency contraception over concerns that its patients and staff could be prosecuted under the state's strict new abortion ban — then reversed course hours later.Missouri was the first state to make abortion illegal after the US Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. Advocates fear that sweeping and vague abortion bans could also impede access to contraception or fertility treatment.Saint Luke's Health System referenced those concerns in their announcement, saying they would stop giving emergency contraception "until the law in this area becomes better defined."The medical system later said they would resume giving out the contraception. The sudden shift shows the confusion and uncertainty over how far state-level abortion bans apply.Read Full StoryHere's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider4 hr. 29 min. ago

Live updates: Biden supports filibuster exception to protect abortion rights

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Biden says he supports a filibuster exception to protect abortion and privacy rightsPresident Joe BidenSTEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said he now supports the Senate making an exception to the filibuster rule to pass protections for abortion and privacy rights."If the filibuster gets in the way, it's like voting rights ... we should require an exception to the filibuster for this action," Biden saidBiden's push to overturn the filibuster has run into opposition from moderate Democrats Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, key votes in the evenly divided 50-50 Senate.Read Full StoryBiden to appoint anti-abortion judge to lifetime federal post: reportPresident Joe Biden addresses the Supreme Court’s decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade June 24, 2022 in Cross Hall at the White House in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion.Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden will reportedly nominate an anti-abortion judge to a lifetime position in federal court — days after he vowed to protect abortion rights.Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth and other unnamed officials told the Louisville Courier-Journal that Biden planned to nominate lawyer Chad Meredith, who has defended Kentucky's anti-abortion legislation.Yarmuth said it was "clear" that the pending nomination was "part of some larger deal" with Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell.On the day the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe was handed down, Biden vowed to do "all in my power to protect a woman's right in states where they will face the consequences of today's decision." The White House and McConnell's office did not respond to requests for comment.Read MoreDem's slim majority in Congress and a conservative Supreme Court make it unlikely Roe v. Wade can be savedActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesDespite calls from Democrats to protect abortion rights, it's unlikely that the Supreme Court's latest decision to throw out the constitutional right to an abortion will be overturned anytime soon."I don't think that we are going to see a reversal in Dobbs," Radhika Rao, a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law, told Insider. "We're not going to see the return of the abortion right." Conservative justices have a 6-3 stranglehold on the nation's highest court, while Democrats have too slim of a majority in Congress to overcome Republicans' filibusters.Read MoreGeorge Washington University refuses to fire SCOTUS Justice Clarence ThomasJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesGeorge Washington University has rejected calls for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to be fired from a teaching position after he joined the court's other conservative justices in overturning Roe v. Wade."Because we steadfastly support the robust exchange of ideas and deliberation, and because debate is an essential part of our university's academic and educational mission to train future leaders who are prepared to address the world's most urgent problems, the university will neither terminate Justices Thomas' employment nor cancel his class in response to his legal opinions," a letter stated.Read Full StoryKansas voters will be the first to address abortion rights after SCOTUS rulingThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade sent the question of abortion back to the states. — and the first direct electoral test of abortion rights in the post-Roe era will take place in Kansas.On Aug. 2, voters in Kansas will vote on a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to an abortion in the state.The amendment would overturn a 2019 state court ruling that established a right to an abortion.Keep Reading Missouri health system restarts emergency contraception amid abortion ban fearsState laws banning abortion "from the moment of fertilization" could interfere with access to emergency contraception.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesA Missouri health system announced it would stop providing emergency contraception over concerns that its patients and staff could be prosecuted under the state's strict new abortion ban — then reversed course hours later.Missouri was the first state to make abortion illegal after the US Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. Advocates fear that sweeping and vague abortion bans could also impede access to contraception or fertility treatment.Saint Luke's Health System referenced those concerns in their announcement, saying they would stop giving emergency contraception "until the law in this area becomes better defined."The medical system later said they would resume giving out the contraception. The sudden shift shows the confusion and uncertainty over how far state-level abortion bans apply.Read Full StoryHere's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider6 hr. 29 min. ago

Judges in 4 states have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortions

With the Supreme Court having overturned Roe v. Wade, state courts are emerging as key battlegrounds in the fight over abortion laws. People attend an abortion-rights protest at the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on June 24, 2022.Rick Bowmer/AP Courts in three states have so far blocked state-level abortion bans after Roe was overturned.  Judges in Louisiana, Kentucky, and Utah temporarily blocked "trigger laws" banning abortion. Here's where abortion access currently stands and where judges have blocked bans.  The Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday. Here's where abortion access currently stands, and where courts have temporarily blocked abortion bans so far:!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider6 hr. 29 min. ago