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Canadian airline to resume popular international flight to Denver airport

The airline had more than 30,000 passengers out of DIA in 2019......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 20th, 2022

Lufthansa is bringing back its beloved A380 jet next year, reversing a pandemic-era decision. Here are the airlines that have resumed flying the plane since 2020.

The A380 fell out of favor with some airlines when the pandemic hit, but many are now dusting off the cobwebs and restoring the jet to service. A Lufthansa Airbus A380.Chittapon Kaewkiriya / Shutterstock.com The Airbus A380 is continuing to make a comeback as travel demand booms post-pandemic. Several carriers restored the double-decker to service in 2020 and 2021, with Lufthansa announcing a 2023 return. Other airlines have permanently said goodbye to their A380s in favor of more economical planes.  The world's largest passenger plane is continuing to make its comeback as pandemic-era travel restrictions fade away.Airbus A380AirbusAirbus' behemoth A380 stood out in a world deprived of air travelers early on in the pandemic. The ability to fly a huge number of passengers — over 600 people — in a single plane, which the A380 once represented, made it temporarily obsolete.AirbusBut, as pent-up demand for international travel rages this summer, airlines that sent their A380s to storage are now dusting off the cobwebs and getting ready to connect people again.An Emirates Airbus A380.Arnold Aaron/Shutterstock.comHere's how the A380 is making a comeback after being mostly forgotten and abandoned during the pandemic.Airbus A380 MSN1.Ben Birchall/PA Images/Contributor via Getty ImagesFour-engine aircraft, including the Airbus A380 and Boeing 747, were among the most impacted during COVID-19. Airlines no longer needed the amount of space that the aircraft offered — combined with the excessive cost of two additional engines when only two were needed.Emirates Airbus A380Sundry Photography/ShutterstockHere's how the pandemic accelerated the demise of four-engine aircraft like the Airbus A380 and Boeing 747.The A380 also didn't have the benefit of having a second life in the air-cargo realm, as other airliners did, despite its size. Though, that didn't stop some carriers from using the A380 as a makeshift freighter.A Hi Fly Airbus A380 cargo conversion.Hi FlyHere's how one charter airline hollowed out an Airbus A380 for use as a cargo freighter.Destined to fly passengers, some airlines started bringing back the A380 shortly after the onset of COVID-19, with others adding it back into their networks for the first time this year as demand continues to skyrocket.An Airbus A380 operated by Lufthansa.Silas Stein/picture alliance via Getty Images.Emirates, in its role as the world's largest Airbus A380 operator, was unsurprisingly one of the first airlines to restore the mammoth plane.An Emirates Airbus A380 and an American Airlines A321.Philip Pilosian / Shutterstock.comDubai opened to international travelers in July 2020, ahead of most global tourist destinations, and Emirates responded by adding A380 flights to London and Paris the same month.Emirates Airbus A380kamilpetran/ShutterstockSource: Cirium Diio MiSince then, the A380 has returned to many of the Emirates destinations it once served, including the US. The carrier also took delivery of its last-ever A380 during the pandemic, marking a huge milestone for the operator.The final Airbus A380 bound for Emirates.Airbus-Lutz BorckEmirates will receive the last Airbus A380 ever in November. Here's how the world's largest passenger plane went from revolutionary to reject in just a decade.According to aviation-data provider Cirium, the carrier resumed flights between Dubai and New York-JFK on June 21, 2021, followed by flights to Los Angeles, Washington DC, and San Francisco. Emirates' "fifth-freedom" flight between Milan and JFK started in December 2021.Emirates' first-ever Airbus A380, registered A6-EDANYC RussSource: Cirium Diio MiAll of Emirates' A380 luxuries have also been restored, including caviar in first class and in-flight showers.The bathroom of a first class cabin inside an Emirates Airbus A380.Christian Charisius/picture alliance via Getty Images.Meanwhile, Emirates' existing A380 fleet is being retrofitted with a new interior that includes enhancements to each cabin and the addition of a premium economy class.Emirates A380 Premium EconomyEmiratesIn October 2021, All Nippon Airways (ANA) took delivery of its third and final A380 from Airbus's production line in Toulouse, France. The Japanese carrier initially planned to use the aircraft to fly solely between Tokyo and Honolulu, Hawaii, before the pandemic hit.Third and final ANA A380.AirbusSource: AirbusThose flights were rescheduled to start in January 2022, but the carrier has postponed the service until at least July 1, according to Cirium data. That could be further pushed back depending on the border-reopening status in Japan.AirbusSource: Cirium Diio MiWhile ANA has not flown its giant A380 since the pandemic on regularly scheduled flights, it has operated "flights to nowhere" around Japan.AirbusSource: Simple FlyingCompeting Asian carrier Singapore Airlines resumed A380 flights on November 4, 2021, after the launch of the "vaccinated travel lane" program that allowed inoculated visitors to skip quarantine upon arrival in Singapore.Mike Fuchslocher/ShutterstockThe first flight flew from Singapore to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The 160-nautical-mile journey was among the shortest to ever be flown by the A380 in a scheduled capacity.Singapore Airlines Airbus A380Vytautas Kielaitis/ShutterstockSource: Cirium Diio MiSince then, Singapore has relaunched its A380 on several other routes, including two of the world's longest passenger flights from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport and New Jersey's Newark Liberty International Airport.Taylor Rains/InsiderSee inside Singapore's A380 first class suite that features a full bed, private bathroom, and large leather armchairThe ultra-long-haul flights to Singapore push 19 hours. Because of the incredibly long journey, the carrier has created "wellness meals" that help passengers feel fuller, fresher, and more comfortable during the flight.Taylor Rains/InsiderSingapore Airlines just relaunched the world's second-longest flight which connects the country to NYC — see the 'wellness meals' the carrier serves onboard the 19-hour flightIn Europe, British Airways resumed flying the A380 on November 8, 2021, to Frankfurt, Germany, and Madrid from London as a means of getting flight crews reacclimated to the plane.A British Airways Airbus A380.Philip Pilosian / Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio Mi, Simple FlyingAfter its initial European runs, British Airways expanded the A380 to overseas destinations, like Los Angeles, Boston, San Francisco, Dubai, and Johannesburg, South Africa.A British Airways Airbus A380.Thiago B Trevisan / Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio MiAccording to data from Cirium, the airline will resume A380 flights to Dallas/Fort Worth on July 1, 2022, and up its seasonal service between London and Johannesburg to twice a day in October.EQRoy/Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio MiBefore resuming service, the iconic red, white, and blue A380s sat in storage around Europe and as far as the Middle East. In Doha, Qatar, for example, three British A380s sat idle on a taxiway at Hamad International Airport.A British Airways Airbus A380.Thomas Pallini/InsiderHere's what living in the passenger terminal for 48 hours was like.Doha-based Qatar Airways was the second Middle Eastern carrier after Emirates to resume A380 operations after grounding the jets for over a year, flying the plane to Paris and London in December 2021.HasanZaidi/Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio MiThe largest aircraft in Qatar's fleet is the only one to feature a true first-class cabin. Smaller aircraft only feature business-class seats.M101Studio/Shutterstock.comShortly after Qatar relaunched its A380, Australian airline Qantas announced the return of the double-decker in January 2022.A Qantas Airbus A380.Ryan Fletcher / Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio MiAccording to Cirium, the plane flew between Sydney and Los Angles on January 11, followed by flights between Melbourne and Los Angeles on June 6 and Sydney and Singapore on June 21, though Cirium does not show any flights between Australia and London resuming this year.A Qantas Airbus A380.Felipe Sanchez / Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio MiKorean Air was another carrier to quickly return the A380, resuming limited flights of the jet in September 2020 to destinations in Japan and China. Nearly two years later, service to the US finally restarted on Monday with a flight from Seoul to New York JFK.A Korean Air Airbus A380.Thiago B Trevisan / Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio MiBut even as the carrier slowly returns the jet to its standard flying schedule, the A380's tenure in Korea is still set to expire in the next five years.Philip Pilosian/Shutterstock.com"The A380s will be leaving Korean Air's fleet within five years, and the Boeing 747-8i fleet will also follow suit within ten years," Walter Cho, Korean Air's chief executive officer, told FlightGlobal in August.A Korean Air Airbus A380.Thiago B Trevisan / Shutterstock.comSource: FlightGlobalIn 2021, German flag carrier Lufthansa shared Korean’s feelings towards the A380, and it was doubtful whether the airline would ever bring back the jet.A Lufthansa Airbus A380.Chittapon Kaewkiriya / Shutterstock.comSource: LufthansaLufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr said in a second-quarter 2021 earnings call that the "A380 obviously will not come back." However, the carrier reversed its pandemic-era decision on Monday, saying the beloved jet would return in summer 2023.Lufthansa's Airbus A380.Lufthansa.Source: Lufthansa, Seeking AlphaIn a press release, the carrier revealed that booming demand and delayed deliveries of other jets prompted the decision.A Lufthansa Airbus A380.Sundry Photography / Shutterstock.comSource: LufthansaIt is unknown how, when, or how many A380s will be reactivated, or which routes they will fly. However, Lufthansa did reveal it has 14 planes in "deep storage" in Spain in France, six of which have been sold and eight that remain available to the carrier.A Lufthansa Airbus A380 in storage.Santi Rodriguez / Shutterstock.comSource: LufthansaThere is one airline that never gave up on the A380, even during the worst of the pandemic — China Southern Airlines. The carrier only briefly grounded the jet from February 10 to March 24, 2020, per Cirium.A China Southern Airlines Airbus A380.StudioPortoSabbia / Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio MiFrom Guangzhou, China, China Southern's A380 flew to global destinations such as Los Angeles, Sydney, Tokyo, Paris, London, and Amsterdam, Netherlands.Angel DiBilio/Shutterstock.comSource: Cirium Diio MiUnlike China Southern and Lufthansa, some carriers, including Air France, Malaysia Airlines, Thai Airways, and Etihad Airways, decided to stop flying the A380.An Etihad Airways Airbus A380.Fasttailwind/Shutterstock.comEtihad is ditching its largest and swankiest jets including the popular Airbus A380 and Boeing 777Air France quickly retired its A380 fleet in May 2020, early on in the pandemic, and now relies on more-efficient twin-engine aircraft, like the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, Boeing 777, and Airbus A350-900 XWB.Air France Airbus A380roibu/ShutterstockSource: ForbesDespite some retirements, the pandemic hasn't yet killed the beloved A380 jet, even if it has sped up the aircraft's decline in popularity. Some airlines, like their passengers, still do have affection for the iconic plane and aren't ready to part with it just yet.Lufthansa's Airbus A380.Lufthansa.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Airlines" inability to plan and a tight labor market are the reasons your flight doesn"t have enough staff, aviation experts say

The staff shortages ripping through the aviation industry are complicated, a union boss and two aviation analysts told Insider. British Airways and EasyJet both plane to cancel hundreds of flights in July.Victor Jiang/Shutterstock Airlines globally have cancelled hundreds of flights, citing labor shortages.  Insider spoke to aviation consultants and a union boss to discover why airlines are short-staffed.  They blame COVID-19, uncertainty, and the tight labor market for leading carriers to cancel flights.  It's not a surprise if you're feeling nervous about flying at the moment. The list of global airlines to have canceled flights over the last few months reads like a departure board. Delta, Lufthansa, British Airways, Southwest, EasyJet, Alaska, and JetBlue are among the long list of carriers to have all culled flights in by the hundreds. The result has been long queues at airports, lost luggage, long layovers, and acute disappointment. There are multiple reasons fueling the disruptions from bad weather to the economic impact of the war in Ukraine, but labor shortages have been cited as a common reason. Insider spoke to two aviation consultants and a union boss about why the industry is struggling with staff shortages. Firstly, it's complicated …The labor shortage is "not black and white," said John Strickland, of JLS Consulting. Different employers within the industry are affected in their own individual way. Some aren't suffering from a shortage at all, either because they were able to retain more of their workforce during the pandemic, or received longer packages of support from their governments.While highly disruptive for passengers, the cancellations represent a small proportion of flights globally, he said. The pandemic exacerbated existing shortages and changed the labor marketLike many industries, staff shortages were a long-running problem before the pandemic but the pandemic made it much worse as airlines were forced to furlough or let go of workers in their thousands. Oxford Economics estimates that globally, there were 2.3 million fewer people working in aviation by September 2021 compared with the beginning of the pandemic, per the FT. "Now that you're coming out of COVID, and the demand is actually showing signs of rapid recovery. You're starting to see that they have fewer pilots, and the same amount of flying to do," said Umang Gupta, of Alton Aviation, a consultancy.  Something that was made worse by airlines offering pilots voluntary opt-outs during the pandemic, Gupta added. Add into that a squeezed post-pandemic labor market, which is making it harder for some aviation companies to recruit as workers demand higher pay, or reflect on their career. "Now you're seeing that people are not ready to take the job at the salary levels that were offered before so they have to pay more to get the same people," Gupta said. Perhaps the best example of this is a simmering battle ongoing at London's Heathrow airport, where 500 check-in operators for British Airways are threatening to strike June. Union bosses who are leading the strikes say the airline is yet to reinstate a 10% pay cut implemented during the pandemic. British Airways did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment on the negotiations. In general, industry leaders have "been too optimistic about the preparedness of people they've let go to come back," said Mike Clancy, general secretary of the Prospect union, which represents air traffic controllers, licensed technical engineers, and air traffic systems specialists in the UK.  "At the present minute, if you are working in an airport environment, it's even more stressful than normal. Because the traveling public are not happy," Clancy said. Uncertainty has not let bosses adequately planAirline bosses have been accused of failing to act quickly enough to counter staff shortages and of optimistically overselling tickets for flights that they knew they couldn't service.Strickland — who used to work in network planning for airlines — insists amid two years of uncertainty, emergent COVID-19 variants and constantly changing travel restrictions, bosses have been unable to plan adequately because their normal planning cycle has been disrupted. The swathe of cancellations the industry is seeing is an attempt to slim down capacity and stabilize operations. How long will it last?No one knows quite how long it could last. The dropping of the requirement for international travellers into the US to test negative for COVID-19 is likely to further boost international traffic. Gupta highlights that many East Asian airlines are still yet to resume full international travel. "I can't see the summer being anything but lumpy and bumpy," Strickland said. "There are many uncertainties."  Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 14th, 2022

Icelandic low-cost carrier PLAY just operated its first nonstop flight to the US — see the bare-bones Airbus A321neo flying the route

New Icelandic low-cost carrier PLAY just launched its first flight between Reykjavik and the US, bringing its no-frills A321neos to the East Coast. PLAY A321.PLAY Icelandic low-cost carrier PLAY operated its first flight between Reykjavik and the US on Wednesday. The airline uses A321neo for the transatlantic journey, featuring a bare-bones product with no amenities. Passengers get a seat and personal item with their fare, but can purchase extras like bags and snacks. European low-cost carrier PLAY just launched its first-ever flight from the US to Iceland, officially pinning a new city to its international route map.PLAY A321.PLAYThe airline, which is a successor to defunct WOW Air, took off from Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport at 7:47 PM on Wednesday and flew six hours to Keflavik Airport near Reykjavik, landing at 5:09 am the next morning.PLAY ribbon cutting ceremony at Baltimore airport.PLAYSource: FlightAware"The transatlantic flights will be the main focus in PLAY´s operations and it was a huge project to establish a connection in a new continent." PLAY CEO Birgir Jónsson said. "But now we see the fruits of our labor, a well-made, reliable and ambitious flight plan."Birgir Jónsson with flight crew at Reykjavik airport before the inaugural flight.PLAYSource: PLAYFrom Iceland, passengers can stay on the island or continue onto 22 other European destinations.PLAY European route map from Iceland.PLAYThe flight followed PLAY's maiden flight from Iceland to the US that took off from Reykjavik on Wednesday at 11:34 am Eastern time and landed in Baltimore at 5:40 pm, according to FlightAware data.PLAY flight crew boarding the flight to Baltimore.PLAYSource: FlightAwareA water salute welcomed the aircraft and its passengers to the US.PLAY A321neo water salute in Baltimore.PLAYPLAY used an Airbus A321neo narrowbody aircraft for the roundtrip flight, which has become popular on transatlantic journeys because it can connect low-demand city pairs at a lower operating cost.PLAY aircraft at the gate.PLAYThe Boeing 737 MAX is a favorable alternative, with airlines like United and WestJet flying them between North America and Europe.United 737 MAX 9.Philip Pilosian/ShutterstockMore airlines are choosing single-aisle jets for flights from North America to Europe — see the full evolution of jet-powered transatlantic flyingPLAY's A321neo is configured with 194 economy seats, most of which have 29-30 inches of pitch. Extra legroom seats are available for a higher fare and offer 32-35 inches, according to PLAY.PLAY aircraft interior.PLAYOnboard, passengers can expect a bare-bones product similar to Spirit or Frontier. The fare comes with a seat and a personal item, with other bags and snacks costing extra.PLAYThe plane will not offer any inflight amenities like WiFi or entertainment, so travelers should come prepared with pre-downloaded movies, shows, or podcasts.PLAY aircraft.PLAYHowever, the seats onboard do recline. PLAY CEO Birgir Jónsson told Insider that the customer experience is intended to be as "hassle-free" as possible.PLAYPLAY has adopted a casual crew uniform for its flights to capture its mission of "simplicity, fun, and playfulness," with flight attendants wearing t-shirts and sneakers.PLAY flight attendant welcoming passengers.PLAYBaltimore is the first US market the airline will fly to, with Boston, Orlando, and New York's Stewart International Airport joining the route map later this year.PLAY sign at Stewart International Airport ahead of the inaugural flight on June 9.Taylor Rains/InsiderA new European low-cost airline is launching its first route to Florida this fall with fares to Europe starting at $129 — here's what passengers can expectThe carrier will connect the four US cities to destinations in Europe via Iceland, like Berlin, Dublin, London, and Paris.PLAY's full European route map from Iceland. Flights from Orlando will connect to Berlin, Dublin, Gothenburg, London, and Paris.PLAYJónsson explained that the company will remain competitive in the market by focusing on having the lowest fares, emphasizing PLAY's "Pay less, Play more!" motto.PLAYA nearly abandoned New York airport is getting nonstop flights to Europe for the first time since 2019 with fares starting at $109 one-way"We believe the price is the biggest factor in our market," he told Insider. "To be honest, I think brands in airlines is diminishing, it's about convenience, timing, and price."PLAYWednesday marks the first time an Icelandic low-cost carrier has flown to the US since WOW Air ceased operations in 2019.WOW Air.Vytautas Kielaitis/ShutterstockWOW suffered from financial burdens independent of the pandemic, abruptly ceasing operations on March 28, 2019, and leaving thousands of passengers stranded across the world.Board at Boston airport on March 28, 2019, showing cancelled WOW Air flight to Iceland.Angela Rowlings/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty ImagesWhile WOW failed, Jónsson says PLAY will prevail because it is focusing on the aspects of WOW that made it successful and abandoning its predecessor's high-cost practices, like flying widebody planes from Los Angeles to Europe and into Asia.WOW Air Airbus A330.Lukas Wunderlich/Shutterstock"Our model is different because we are entering a widebody market with a narrowbody jet," he explained. "These routes really aren't long-haul and because we are using the geographic location of Iceland, we don't need a widebody jet between major cities, which is the market that's failed."CEO Birgir Jónsson at Boston Logan International AirportPLAY"[WOW Air] completely changed their business model and that's where they lost control of the cost," Jónsson continued. "Play is using the best part of WOW's business model, which is one that has been successful in this market for decades."PLAYRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderApr 21st, 2022

8 of the 10 busiest airports in the world are in the US — see the list

After temporarily losing its crown to China's Guangzhou airport, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport reclaimed the top spot for 2021. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.ESB Professional/Shutterstock Airports Council International revealed the top 10 busiest airports in the world, with eight being in the US. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport reclaimed the number one spot after temporarily losing it in 2020. Orlando International Airport was the most-improved airport in terms of passenger traffic compared to 2020. The US is now home to eight of the 10 busiest airports in the world, according to a new report by Airports Council International compiling 2021 flight data.According to ACI, a global organization of airport authorities, global airports saw 4.5 billion passengers in 2021, with the top 10 handling 10% of that, or 463 million people. Eight of those were in the US, with the other two airports in China. Passenger traffic in the top 10 has outpaced 2020 by 51.8%, though it still lags behind 2019 numbers by 29.1%, ACI revealed. Nevertheless, travel is bouncing back and the industry is optimistic about the continued recovery in 2022, with US airlines including Alaska, Southwest, and JetBlue on track to top 2019 capacity this summer, according to financial services company Cowen."The ACI World passenger traffic rankings tell the story of an encouraging trend of recovery, with most of the recurrent busiest airports pre-COVID-19 back at the top," ACI World director general Luis Felipe de Oliveira said in a press release. "Although we are cautious that recovery could face multiple headwinds, the momentum created by reopening plans by countries could lead to an uptick in travel in the second half of 2022."The busiest airports in the world were dominated by domestic traffic, which has led the global travel recovery, according to ACI. The international segment has been slower to recover due to continued quarantine requirements and border closures, though most of the world's nations have opened or plan to open by summer.Orlando International Airport was the most-improved airport on the list in terms of passenger volume, jumping 20 spots from 27 in 2020 to seven in 2021, ACI revealed. According to local media reports, the increase can be attributed to the airport reopening to international travel to places like Brazil and England, which brought in nearly two million people in 2021, and increased international traffic by 20.5% compared to 2020.Take a closer look at the top eight busiest airports in the world.10. Las Vegas' Harry Reid International AirportUsa-Pyon/ShutterstockJust under 40 million travelers passed through Las Vegas airport last year, with the airport seeing the second-biggest increase in passenger traffic compared to 2020 at 78.6%. Volume fell 23.1% percent compared to 2019 despite the uptick in travel. Allegiant uses Las Vegas as a major hub and operating base.9. Chengdu Shuangliu International AirportMarkus Mainka/ShutterstockChengdu Airport managed just over 40 million travelers in 2021, which was actually a 1.5% decrease from 2020, and 28.2% below 2019 levels. The airport is home to several Asian carriers, including Air China, Chengdu Airlines, Sichuan Airlines, China Southern Airlines, China Eastern Airlines, Tibet Airlines, Lucky Air, and Shenzhen Airlines.8. Guangzhou Baiyun International AirportMarkus Mainka/ShutterstockGuangzhou was the busiest airport in the world in 2020, stealing the title from Atlanta. The airport managed about 4.2 million passengers in 2021, however, it saw the biggest drop in passenger volume from last year compared to other airports on the list, with an 8% decrease. It was also 45.1% below 2019 levels. Guangzhou is a hub for China Southern Airlines, 9 Air, FedEx Express, Shenzhen Airlines, and Hainan Airlines.7. Orlando International AirportOrlando International Airport.Joni Hanebutt/ShutterstockOrlando handled about 40.3 million passengers last year, seeing the biggest rise in passenger traffic at 86.7%, which can be attributed to the popular beaches and theme parks that Florida has to offer. Despite the rise, Orlando's volume fell 20.3% compared to 2019. No major airline uses the airport as a hub.6. Charlotte Douglas International AirportFang Deng/ShutterstockCharlotte handled about 43.3 million passengers in 2021, which is 59.2% more than in 2020, but still 13.4% fewer passengers than in 2019. The airport has improved the most in terms of busiest airport rankings, having come in at number 34 in 2019. Charlotte is a major hub for American Airlines.5. Los Angeles International AirportLos Angeles International AirportEric Glenn/ShutterstockLos Angeles handled 48 million travelers in 2021, which was a 66.8% increase in traffic compared to 2020. Despite the high volume, Los Angeles' passenger traffic was 45.5% below 2019 levels, which was the biggest drop of any airport on the list. The airport is a hub for several carriers, including Alaska Airlines, United Airlines, American, and Delta Air Lines.4. Chicago O'Hare International AirportEQRoy/ShutterstockChicago's larger airport saw just over 54 million passengers last year, up 75.1% from 2020. However, the airport had the second-biggest drop in passenger levels compared to 2019 with a 36.2% decrease. O'Hare is a hub airport for United and American, and a focus city for low-cost rivals Spirit Airlines and Frontier Airlines.3. Denver International AirportPhoto Spirit/ShutterstockDenver handled about 59 million passengers in 2021, up 74.7% from 2020 and about 15% below 2020. Denver is home to legacy carrier United and low-cost giant Frontier.2. Dallas/Fort Worth International AirportLJ Jones/ShutterstockDallas/Fort Worth is the second-busiest airport in the US in 2021, with some 63 million travelers traversing the airport in 2021, which is 58.7% more than in 2020, but still 16.8% below 2019 levels. The airport serves the Dallas metropolitan area and is American's largest base. 1. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International AirportHartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.ESB Professional/ShutterstockAtlanta, which is home to Delta, has reclaimed its title as the busiest airport in the world after temporarily losing the crown to China's Guangzhou airport in 2020. Atlanta handled over 75 million passengers in 2021, increasing traffic by 76.4% compared to 2020. However, it still lags behind 2019 levels by about 32%. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderApr 18th, 2022

A Swiss company is responsible for creating almost all of the airline food served on planes worldwide. See inside the 132,000-square-foot facility.

Gate Gourmet chefs chop 500 pounds of potatoes and up to 1,000 pounds of chicken every day to prepare thousands of meals for international flights. Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider Gate Gourmet's 132,000-square-foot kitchen in Washington, DC prepares thousands of meals every day for international flights. Chefs make the food from scratch, including chopping up to 1,000 pounds of chicken and 400 pounds of carrots. Workers are responsible for cooking, cooling, and storing meals before they're reheated on the plane, ensuring food is kept fresh. After the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, airlines worldwide were forced to change how food was prepped and served on flights.Economy food on a JetBlue flight.Thomas Pallini/InsiderWhile business and first class meals like beef and salmon were suspended on many domestic routes, long-haul international flights kept the food. But, touchpoints were reduced and the dishes were served in one course instead of multiple.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFortunately, as the spread of COVID weakens, full-service meals are coming back to premium cabins, and catering companies are working hard to meet demand.Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSwitzerland-based Gate Gourmet is the world's leading provider of airline food that caters hundreds of millions of meals per year at over 200 airports across 60 countries. It has 30 locations in the US.Sundry Photography/ShutterstockAll of the airports have large kitchens where employees prepare and hand cook each individual dish based on recipes created by master chefs.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderGate Gourmet's North American headquarters is in Washington, DC, where a 132,000-square-foot kitchen and hundreds of employees are responsible for handling almost all of the food for the dozens of international flights that leave Dulles International Airport every day.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderThe DC location, which is a 24/7 operation and has workers representing over 35 nationalities, prepares food for carriers like United Airlines…A United Airlines airplane is seen at the Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, New Jersey, United States.ayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images…British Airways…A British Airways Airbus A380.Thiago B Trevisan / Shutterstock.com…Air France…Air France.Horacio Villalobos Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images…and Virgin Atlantic Airways.Virgin Atlantic.EQRoy/ShutterstockJim Stathakes, the general manager of Gate Gourmet's Dulles operation, took media on a tour of the facilities. Take a look inside the kitchen and see how airplane food is made from scratch.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderThe tour started at the sanitation station right before entering the main food prep area. Regardless of COVID-19, Gate Gourmet has always had a very strict hygiene policy to ensure all meals are kept clean and healthy.Sanitation station.Taylor Rains/InsiderBecause of this, I had to use a specialty washer to clean my hands and shoes, as well as wear a white coat, a mask, and a red hair net to walk the floor.The water, which had a special cleaner in it, washed off my hands and arms. I simultaneously stood on a pad that cleaned the bottom of my shoes.Taylor Rains/InsiderOnce inside, we learned about the process of turning raw ingredients into meals and how the company stores and transports those dishes for each flight.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderAs opposed to popular belief, most airline food is not days-old prepackaged, frozen food. In actuality, Gate Gourmet prepares each dish within 24 hours of it landing on a passenger's tray table, meaning it is perfectly fresh.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderAccording to Basil Rafreedie, one of the DC kitchen's executive chefs, employees must follow specific recipes.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderMoreover, each menu item is designed to use moisture and other elements, like savory umami, to ensure the food tastes as good in the sky as on the ground.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderAccording to a British Airways menu design manager, Sinead Ferguson, passengers lose 33% of their ability to taste at high altitudes.Economy food on British Airways.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: Peter GreenburgFood prep includes chopping over 500 pounds of potatoes, 400 pounds of carrots, and up to 1,000 pounds of chicken per day, among other ingredients.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderInventory also includes things like giant cans of soup and beans…Workers could go through 12 cans of tomato sauce per day.Taylor Rains/Insider…dozens of produce items, like tomatos, turnips, beets, and cabbage…There are employees specifically tasked with washing produce.Taylor Rains/Insider…meat, like beef, salmon, and pork…Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider…tubs of spices and sauces…Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider...pastries...Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider…alcohol…Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider…and soda cans, which differ in size depending on the airline.Can sizes change, with European carriers typically having smaller sodas.Taylor Rains/InsiderProfessional cooks prepare the entrees and core parts of the meal, while other workers are responsible for cutting simpler things like fruit and cheese and preparing them as side dishes or snacks.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderWhen it comes to hot food, there are strict processes to follow, including chilling the cooked meals before they are reheated via ovens on the plane. Microwaves are not installed onboard for safety reasons.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider"The iPad will show the cooks all the recipes they have to prepare that day, how to make it, and when each flight leaves," Rafreedie said. "When they're done cooking, they have to take the temperature of the food and it has to be at a minimum temperature."Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderThe cooling process, which includes putting the meals in front of a blast chiller, is very specific, but essential for keeping the food safe, fresh, and healthy.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider"They have two hours to get the food below 70 degrees, and once it hits 70, they have another four to get it below 41 degrees," he said. "If the food doesn't make it, it goes to the trash."Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderRafreedie told Insider that the employees are good at managing the temperature, and that "not much" food is thrown out. However, he explained that there are ways to speed the process along if some food is slow to cool, like putting it in ice.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderMeanwhile, Gate Gourmet is also responsible for ensuring the meals stay fresh in case of a flight delay.Produce storage room.Taylor Rains/Insider"We have people outside that monitor the temperature, so if the food goes over 50 degrees for a certain amount of time, we have to change the entree out," he explained. "However, newer planes have chillers, so the cold food stays cold. It's the hot food we have to worry about."Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderThere are many times when the company has to replace food because of delays or cancellations, but Rafreedie said they keep the meals in the kitchen if they know of the delay in advance. Moreover, the chefs will cook extra food as a buffer just in case.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderGate Gourmet has a separate room for preparing specialty food, like religious and medical meals. Rafreedie told Insider they are kept separate to ensure there is no cross-contamination from regular dishes.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Once meals are fully cooked, they are put in containers and prepped for passengers. Gate Gourmet provides all the plates and equipment needed for the meals, including washing them between flights.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderWhen the workers build the meals, meaning getting every dish, plate, and snack ready for transfer, they know the exact equipment needed and will ensure the right quantity is given to the inflight crew.Stock of glassware.Taylor Rains/InsiderOnce every dish is ready to go, they are stored in a "stage and holding cooler." The large room is where the international food sits before it is sent to the plane via truck.Stage and holding room.Taylor Rains/InsiderThe branded trucks can rise high enough to load food into widebody planes, like the Boeing 787 Dreamliner that frequents Dulles airport.The truck is stabilized with four feet that fix themselves to the ground.Taylor Rains/InsiderThe specific food I saw in the cooler was going on a transatlantic flight Tuesday evening and would be served in business or first class cabins. The food had a green stripe on the container to indicate to workers that the food was made the night before.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderThe color-coded system has a different color for each day of the week. For example, green means a dish was made on Monday, while brown means it was made on Tuesday.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderRafreedie told Insider that most of the meals will be served to passengers in the containers they come in, like those traveling in economy or premium economy.Economy food on a British Airways flight.Thomas Pallini/InsiderHowever, flight attendants serving business or first class will transfer the meals to glassware, enhancing the luxury experience. According to Rafreedie, there are step-by-step instructions provided to the flight attendants on how to plate the food.Virgin Atlantic first class food. The airline serves a three-course meal.Virgin Atlantic AirwaysSome airlines, including Turkish and Austrian, actually have onboard chefs that are responsible for presenting the food in decorative ways and adding additional flavorful touches, like spices and sauces.Austrian Airlines onboard chef garnishes a dishAustrian AirlinesJoshua Janow, Gate Gourmet's president of North America, explained the company is getting back to pre-pandemic operations as travel returns. Specifically, the company expects to reach 90% of the volume it produced in 2019, and exceed that by 2023.Meal building space.Taylor Rains/Insider"We're seeing a lot of return this spring, so it's a really big ramp up," Janow said. "A lot of transatlantic flights coming back, volumes increasing overall."Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderAs of March, the company has about 7,500 employees across the US and is making its way back to 2019 levels when it employed some 10,000 people.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider"We've been working with a couple of Afghani settlement organizations and [DC] is one of a few of our units that have been able to link in with these organizations and actually provide several individuals who have come to this country with work," he explained.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderAfter the tour, I got to indulge in some of the meals that have been served on airlines. Molly Brandt, who is Gate Gourmet's innovative chef for North America, explained how she plays a role in developing the food.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/Insider"Gate Group made an active decision to invest moving the needle in airline catering, so my role does not interact with the operation, it is strictly for development purposes," she said.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderMore simply, Brandt is responsible for creating innovative and different menus and presenting them to customers. From there, the meals can be tailored based on budget, brand, and specific wants for each airline.Inside Gate Gourmet's Washington Dulles kitchen.Taylor Rains/InsiderI tried several dishes made by the chefs, like pimento cheese dip…Trying Gate Gourmet dishes.Taylor Rains/Insider…Impossible meatballs…Trying Gate Gourmet dishes.Taylor Rains/Insider…and butternut squash custard.Trying Gate Gourmet dishes.Taylor Rains/InsiderEvery meal was delicious. It was clear from the entire tour and experience that Gate Gourmet is focused on designing menus that give passengers an enjoyable onboard dining experience.Trying Gate Gourmet dishes.Taylor Rains/InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytMar 20th, 2022

Airbus delivered the final Airbus A380 ever to be built just as airlines learn to love the world"s largest passenger jet again

Emirates is scheduled to fly as many as 128 daily departures with the A380 in 2022 while other airlines rush to ramp up A380 flights again. An Emirates Airbus A380.kamilpetran/Shutterstock.com Airbus has delivered the last A380 it will ever build to Emirates Airlines. The 251st A380 to be delivered to an airline and the 123rd A380 delivered to Emirates marks the end of the superjumbo-building era at Airbus.  Airlines are just beginning to bring their A380s back into flying service after grounding them for most of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Airbus has delivered its 251st and final A380 to a customer after 14 years of airline deliveries.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.Airbus - Bockfilm / Michael LindnerEmirates was the final recipient and brought its 123rd A380 home from Airbus for the final time on December 16. The delivery flight from Hamburg, Germany to Dubai marked the end a 13-year period of deliveries that started in November 2008.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.Airbus-Lutz Borck"It defined us, in many respects," Tim Clark, the president of Emirates, told Insider in July 2020. "We've spent an inordinate amount on product, both in flight and on the ground, and that's really paid off."An Emirates Airbus A380.Soos Jozsef/Shutterstock.comThe president of Emirates says passengers will never again be as comfortable as they have been aboard the enormous discontinued Airbus A380As the largest airline to fly the A380, the Middle Eastern mega carrier is responsible for keeping the A380 program alive through 2021, stemming from an order for the then-unnamed A3XX at the Farnborough Air Show in 2000The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.AirbusOnly 16 years have passed since the first A380 took flight in 2005 until the time of its final delivery. Airbus was not able to turn the A380 into a multi-generational aircraft in the same way Boeing was able to with the rival 747.The final Airbus A380 bound for Emirates.AirbusDouble-decker planes are going extinct as Airbus and Boeing discontinue their largest models. Here's why airlines are abandoning 4-engine jets.But the A380's success can better be measured in impact more so than in number of orders. The world's largest passenger jet overtook Boeing's 747 as the leading status symbol for airlines that travelers clamored to fly on.An Airbus A380.REUTERS/Pascal RossignolSingapore Airlines was the first airline to take home the A380 and helped raise the bar for luxury on the immensely spacious aircraft that could seat more than 500 passengers if airlines wanted.A Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.REUTERS/Tim ChongIt was the start of the superjumbo era and the first time passengers could fly on a plane with two full levels. Airlines could even pack the A380 with luxurious extras and still have more than enough room to house four cabin classes.An Airbus A380 in production.Reuters/Jean Philippe ArlesSingapore Airlines packed the plane with 12 first class suites, 60 business class suites, and 399 economy class seats.A Singapore Airlines first class suite on the Airbus A380.Pascal Parrot/Getty ImagesEmirates and Qatar Airways used the space to offer in-flight bars and decadent first class products while the former took it one step further to include "shower spas" in which first class passengers could enjoy a hot shower mid-flight.An Emirates Airbus A380.Leonard Zhukovsky/Shutterstock.comI went inside an exclusive first class spa onboard an Emirates Airbus A380 and saw why wealthy travelers pay a small fortune to live well at 35,000 feetEtihad Airways created apartments in the sky with its three-room "The Residence" product that came with a living room, bedroom, shower, and private butler.Etihad's "The Residences" on the Airbus A380.EtihadEtihad Airways says the end is near for its A380s and their high-flying apartments featuring butlers, chefs, and private showers that often cost $20,000 a tripAirlines were going strong with the A380 prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, even if it was just a status symbol for many. A lack of new orders to keep the program going, however, meant that the A380's days were always numbered.A Qantas Airbus A380.AP Photo/Rob GriffithBoeing had experienced the same with its 747-8i aircraft of which even fewer were sold than the A380. Twin-engine aircraft were quickly replacing four-engine behemoths, and the pandemic hastened the demise of the A380 at many airlines including Air France and Lufthansa.A Boeing 747-8i aircraft.BoeingSource: BoeingHelping Boeing along, at least, was a demand for the aircraft in the cargo realm. Cargo giants including UPS Airlines and Atlas Air are some of the final customers for the aircraft.A UPS Airlines Boeing 747-8F aircraft.Thiago B Trevisan / Shutterstock.comBoeing just announced the definitive end of the legendary 747 as cargo giant Atlas Air places an order for the final 4 planesAirbus had not developed a freighter variant of the A380; though, airlines like Emirates and Hi Fly did use their A380 passenger cabins to transport boxes.A HiFly Airbus A380 cargo conversion.HiFlyAnother airline is retiring the world's largest passenger plane after just under 3 years of service as the pandemic keeps long-haul flyers grounded. See inside Hi Fly's Airbus A380.The Airbus A380 may never return to its pre-pandemic glory, as indicated by the number of flights airlines have planned for aircraft in combined with pandemic-era retirements.A British Airways Airbus A380.Thomas Pallini/InsiderOn the day of the final A380's delivery to Emirates, airlines around the world flew a total of 99 flights with the aircraft. The same day in 2020 saw only 25 flights, while the same day in 2019 saw 341 flights.A Qatar Airways Airbus A380.REUTERS/Pascal RossignolSource: CiriumThe most A380 flights in a given day in 2021 will only be 107, based on airlines' current schedule according to Cirium data, with December 17 and December 31 currently tied to achieve that number. In 2022, August will see as many as 183 daily departures with the A380, just more than half of the A380's busiest day in 2019.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: CiriumBut there is hope as fans of the A380 will still have decades to fly on the world's largest passenger jet. Some of the airlines that have committed to the A380 during the pandemic have no plans to retire it anytime soon and are even making investments to improve the onboard experience.An Emirates Airbus A380.phichak/Shutterstock.comEmirates unveiled a brand-new interior design for its Airbus A380s that sees enhancements in each cabin, as well as the addition of a premium economy class cabin.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates just unveiled the swanky high-end design for its new Airbus A380 as most airlines say goodbye to the enormous plane — see insideIn first class, the 14 exclusive suites will feature taller doors for even more privacy and new motifs and colors will be found throughout the cabin.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe famed shower spas will also remain with a refreshed look and feel.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderIn business class, the 76 seats will be reupholstered and redesigned with a new champagne-color leather and wood finishing.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe new premium economy class will feature 56 seats in a 2-4-2 configuration with 19.5-inch-wide seats offering up to 40 inches of legroom.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEconomy class and its 388 seats will receive new "ergonomically designed" seats that feature tray tables with wood finishes.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderEven the in-flight bar has been enhanced with new seating options and the same color palette found in business class.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSingapore Airlines in 2017 unveiled new business class seats and first class suites that are unique to the A380 and will soon fly to more destinations around the world.An Airbus A380 of Singapore Airlines approaches the airport in Frankfurt, Germany.ReutersThe first class suites feature their own swivel chair, bed, and 32-inch television, making the enclosed space resemble a luxury office suite more so than an airplane compartment.A first class suite onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.Singapore AirlinesSome suites can also be combined to offer a double bed that's ideal when traveling with a companion.A first class suite onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.Singapore AirlinesAnd in business class, center-aisle seats can also act as a double bed when fully flat.The business class cabin onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.Singapore AirlinesSingapore Airlines will bring its A380s to New York on March 27 to fly the recently resumed Singapore-New York via Frankfurt, Germany route as more airlines build back the A380's US presence.A first class suite onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380.Singapore AirlinesBut Singapore Airlines is another example of replacing the A380 with smaller and more efficient aircraft. The airline uses Airbus A350-900ULR, or ultra-long-range, aircraft to offer non-stop flights between the US and Singapore.Santi Rodriguez / ShutterstockInside the new world's longest flight: What it's like to fly on Singapore Airlines' new route between Singapore and New YorkThere are no first class suites on the smaller aircraft, or any first class seats at all. But travelers can save around four hours by taking the non-stop option in either premium economy class or business class.Onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A350-900ULR.Thomas Pallini/InsiderFor ultra-premium flyers, the choice comes down to getting to the destination sooner or enjoying a luxury suite.Onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A350-900ULR.Thomas Pallini/InsiderSingapore Airlines is partnering with the ultra-exclusive Golden Door spa to redefine luxury on the world's longest commercial flightsAt the Dubai Airshow in November, Emirates brought one of its newly-refurbished A380s that proved to be a star of the show.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderA steady stream of airshow visitors filed through the aircraft, taking selfies in the business class seats and first class suites while marveling at the bar and showers.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBut also on display at the airshow were the A380's replacements, the Boeing 777X and Airbus A350 XWB.An Etihad Airways Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner nicknamed the "Greenliner" at the Dubai Airshow 2021Thomas Pallini/InsiderEmirates, like many global airlines, has plans to incorporate both aircraft into its fleet and both may be flying for the airline long after the A380s have been retired.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderClark, however, said that "nothing is going to be as good" as the A380, not even the soon-to-be largest twin-engine passenger plane in the world.An Emirates Airbua A380 display at the Dubai Airshow.Thomas Pallini/Insider"How could it be as good as the A380 on the upper deck, or as good as it is in economy with 10-abreast seating on the main deck," Clark said of the Boeing 777X.The Boeing 777X at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderClark is referring to the fact that the A380's size is so great that flyers still had extra room in which to stretch out even with 10 economy seats filling a single row.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/Insider"It's palatial," Clark said of the A380. "And people absolutely love it. They still go out of their way to get on the 380."Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderAirbus had even created a website to help travelers find routings on the A380 as the aircraft so popular with frequent flyers.Emirates' refurbished Airbus A380 at Dubai Airshow 2021.Thomas Pallini/InsiderThe US will see more airlines redeploy the A380; though, not all will be as glamorous as those in service with Emirates and Singapore Airlines.Flying on an Emirates A380 from New York to Dubai.Thomas Pallini/InsiderBritish Airways has plans to return its A380s to the US, serving destinations like Boston, Miami, Dallas, San Francisco, Chicago, and Washington, DC.A British Airways Airbus A380.Philip Pilosian / Shutterstock.comSource: CiriumAll Nippon Airways is scheduled to resume A380 flights to Hawaii on March 27; though, continuing travel restrictions impacting Japan may see that date pushed back.An All Nippon Airways Airbus A380.viper-zero / Shutterstock.comSource: CiriumQantas has put its A380s on the schedule to fly between Sydney and Los Angeles beginning March 27.A Qantas Airbus A380.Ryan Fletcher/Shutterstock.comSource: CiriumAnd China Southern Airlines plans to continue flying the A380 between Guangzhou, China, and Los Angeles, as it has been doing throughout the pandemic.A China Southern Airlines Airbus A380.StudioPortoSabbia / Shutterstock.comSource: CiriumAirbus will also help keep the A380 flying and powering the future of flight. MSN1, the first-ever A380 built by Airbus, will be used for flight testing and expanding the capabilities of sustainable aviation fuel, or SAF.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.AirbusSource: AirbusBoeing is similarly nearing the end with the American counterpart to the A380, the 747. Atlas Air will take delivery of the last-ever 747 in 2022, marking the end of an aircraft program that spanned more than half a century.An Atlas Air Boeing 747-8i.Arjan Veltman / Shutterstock.comThe end of Airbus A380 deliveries does not mark the end of the A380 — far from it.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.Airbus"We'll keep it going as long as we can," Clark said.The final Airbus A380 ever to be built, bound for Emirates.AirbusRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 21st, 2021

JetBlue founder David Neeleman"s new airline is coming to New York as part of an 8-route expansion with fares starting at $39

Breeze will grow to 42 routes in February after only launching in May, and is finally bringing its ultra-low-cost flights to New York. The inaugural flight of David Neeleman's Breeze Airways.Thomas Pallini/Insider Breeze Airways is adding Long Island, New York, and West Palm Beach, Florida to its route map. Long Island will see two non-stop routes to Norfolk, Virginia, and Charleston, South Carolina.  West Palm Beach will see an additional six routes to cities in the Southeast, Midwest, and Mid-Atlantic US.  Breeze Airways is expanding on the East Coast with Long Island, New York and West Palm Beach, Florida as its newest destinations.Long Island marks Breeze's fourth Northeast destination behind Hartford, Connecticut, Pittsburgh, and Providence, Rhode Island. Flights will use Long Island MacArthur Airport in Islip, New York, a suburban airport around 50 miles from New York City.Breeze's entrance to the Long Island market comes as rival startup Avelo Airlines just opened a new East Coast base in New Haven, Connecticut. Avelo will soon grow to six routes from Tweed-New Haven Airport, a comparable distance from New York City as MacArthur Airport, to Floridian destinations with plans to serve a not-yet-announced seventh city in the near future.Small airports like MacArthur and New Haven have been the big winners in the startup airline war of 2021, giving travelers more non-stop options and alternatives to major airlines. Breeze just launched in May with bases in Norfolk, Charleston, New Orleans, and Tampa, Florida, with Insider taking the airline's first-ever flight. "Breeze's business model is to add 'nice, new nonstop' flights on routes where only connecting service is offered by other carriers," David Neeleman, Breeze's founder and chief executive officer, said in a statement. Long Island has been a historically tricky destination for ultra-low-cost carriers despite MacArthur Airport's convenience compared to nearby international airports and its proximity to New York City. Allegiant Air and Spirit Airlines have both tried and failed to serve the region through MacArthur and have since left for airports closer to Manhattan such as LaGuardia and Newark Liberty International.Frontier has found success on Long Island with 8 routes to cities across the Southeast from Atlanta to Miami. Its most popular route, based on daily frequencies, is between Long Island and Orlando, Florida, on which as many as three flights will operate on a given day in competition with Southwest Airlines.Long Island is a natural destination for Breeze as the airline has a maintenance base at MacArthur Airport, at which maintenance is performed on the Embraer E190/195 aircraft that will be serving the routes.If Long Island proves to be successful for Breeze, the future air service opportunities could be endless as not many cities outside of Florida are served by rival airlines. Long Island could also be a jumping-off point for flights to Europe with Breeze's new Airbus A220-300 aircraft.The cost-saving economics of the A220 could also open the door to destinations outside of the East Coast. Frontier's past attempts to serve Midwestern and Rocky Mountain destinations including Denver, Detroit, and Chicago, have all ended in those routes being terminated.But as Long Island has experienced in the past, ultra-low-cost carriers tend not to stay long in unprofitable markets and Breeze could be quick to leave if market conditions aren't suitable. To the south, Breeze will also launch West Palm Beach, Florida as a new destination with six new routes. West Palm Beach is Breeze's second Florida destination behind Tampa and has been a friendly destination to ultra-low-cost airlines including Allegiant, Spirit, Frontier, and Sun Country Airlines. Breeze will similarly not directly compete with any airline on its new routes from West Palm Beach. Introductory fares on routes to and from both cities will vary between $39 and $59. Here's where Breeze Airways is flying in 2022. Between Long Island and Norfolk, VirginiaNorfolk, Virginia.Ramunas Bruzas/ShutterstockFlights to Norfolk will start on February 17 with weekender service operating on Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Sundays. Between Long Island and Charleston, South CarolinaCharleston, South Carolina.ShutterstockFlights to Charleston will start on February 18 with weekender service operating twice weekly on Mondays and Fridays.Between West Palm Beach and Richmond, VirginiaRichmond, Virginia.Sean Pavone/ShutterstockFlights to Richmond will start on February 18 with Saturday-only service.Between West Palm Beach and Charleston, South CarolinaCharleston, South Carolina.Shutterstock / Sean PavoneFlights to Charleston will start on February 18 with Saturday-only service.Between West Palm Beach and Akron, OhioAkron, Ohio.Shutterstock.comFlights to Akron will start on February 18 with Saturday-only service.Between West Palm Beach and Columbus, OhioColumbus, Ohio.Sean Pavone/ShutterstockFlights to Columbus will start on February 18 with Saturday-only service.Between West Palm Beach and New OrleansNew Orleans, Louisiana.Sean Pavone/ShutterstockFlights to New Orleans will start on February 18 with Saturday-only service.Between West Palm Beach and Norfolk, VirginiaNorfolk, Virginia.ShutterstockFlights to Norfolk will start on February 18 with Saturday-only service.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 6th, 2021

A sign of the times? KCI now has more service to Cancun than before the pandemic

A boom in travelers eager to get away is expected to push Kansas City International Airport's international flight numbers closer to its pre-pandemic levels. Southwest Airlines — the airport's biggest airline by far — launched their first-ever international service Saturday from Kansas City (Code: MCI). With the addition of nonstop flights to Cancun (Code: CUN), Southwest joins American and Frontier in serving the popular Mexican destination. American resumed its seasonal nonstop service….....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 16th, 2021

Airlines around the world are resuming flights with the world"s largest passenger jet after dumping it during the pandemic

The Airbus A380 was falling out of favor with some airlines when the pandemic hit. But others are eager to bring it back into flying service. An Emirates Airbus A380. Arnold Aaron/Shutterstock.com The Airbus A380 is making a comeback as more pandemic-era travel restrictions are lifted. British Airways, Singapore Airlines, and Qatar Airways say they will fly their A380s before the end of the year. Other airlines have permanently said goodbye to their A380s in favor of more economical planes. The world's largest passenger plane is making its comeback as airlines around the world are moving quickly to once again shuttle travelers around the world as pandemic-era travel restrictions continue to fall. An Airbus A380. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol Airbus' behemoth A380 stood out like a sore thumb in a world deprived of air travelers early on in the pandemic. The indulgences in air travel and the ability to fly as many passengers in a single plane that the A380 once represented made it temporarily obsolete. An Airbus A380. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol But long-haul flying is returning as countries open their borders. The A380 is once more facilitating vacations, long-distance reunions, business travel, and the countless other reasons travelers have for flying around the world. An Airbus A380. AP Airlines that sent their Airbus A380s to storage are now dusting off the cobwebs and getting flight crews reacquainted with the aircraft. They'll soon fly hundreds of passengers across two full levels of seats. A British Airways Airbus A380. Thomas Pallini/Insider Here's how the A380 is making a comeback after being mostly forgotten and abandoned during the pandemic. An Emirates Airbus A380. Arnold Aaron/Shutterstock.com Four-engine aircraft including the Airbus A380 and Boeing 747 were among the most impacted during the pandemic. Airlines no longer needed the amount of space that the aircraft offered combined with the excessive cost of two additional engines when only two were needed. An Emirates Airbus A380. Sundry Photography/Shutterstock.com Here's how the pandemic accelerated the demise of four-engine aircraft like the Airbus A380 and Boeing 747. The A380 also didn't have the benefit of having a second life in the air cargo realm, as other airliners did, despite its size. Though, that didn't stop some airlines from using the A380 as a makeshift freighter. A HiFly Airbus A380 cargo conversion. HiFly Here's how one charter airline hollowed out an Airbus A380 for use as a cargo freighter. Destined to fly passengers, the A380 is now getting the chance to do it once more as three airlines have plans to resume scheduled flights with the aircraft before the end of 2021. An Airbus A380. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol Singapore Airlines is the latest airline to announce plans that bring back the A380 thanks to the new "vaccinated travel lane" program that allows vaccinated visitors to skip quarantine upon arrival in Singapore. A Singapore Airlines Airbus A380. photosounds/Shutterstock The first Singapore Airlines A380 flight since April 2020 will operate on November 4 to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The 160-nautical-mile flight is among the shortest to ever be flown by the A380 in a scheduled capacity. A Singapore Airlines Airbus A380. REUTERS/Jean Philippe Aries Source: Cirium Diio Mi Other Singapore Airlines destinations slated to receive the aircraft after Kuala Lumpur include London; Sydney, Australia; Shanghai, China; Beijing, China; Hong Kong; Dehli, India; Mumbai, India; and Osaka, Japan. Singapore Airlines flight attendants and a rendering of the airline's Airbus A380. Edgar Su/Reuters Source: Cirium Diio Mi Singapore Airlines uses its A380s to offer a premium experience in the sky, unlike anything its smaller planes could offer. Suites are offered in first class, for example, and two can be combined to form a "double suite" with a bed for two. A first class suite onboard a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380. Singapore Airlines In Europe, British Airways will resume flying the A380 on November 8. Frankfurt, Germany and Madrid, Spain will be the first destinations from London as a means of getting flight crews reacclimated with the plane. A British Airways Airbus A380-800 descends for a landing at Washington Dulles International Airport as seen, Wednesday, June 1, 2016 in Ashburn, Va. AP Photo/Alex Brandon Source: Cirium Diio Mi After its initial European runs, British Airways' overseas destinations including Los Angeles and Dubai will be the first to receive the aircraft followed by San Francisco, Singapore, Miami, and Johannesburg, South Africa in 2022. A British Airways Airbus A380. Thiago B Trevisan / Shutterstock.com Source: Cirium Diio Mi The iconic red, white, and blue A380s sat in storage around Europe and as far as the Middle East. In Doha, Qatar, for example, three British Airways A380s sat idle on a taxiway at Hamad International Airport. A British Airways Airbus A380. Thomas Pallini/Insider Hamad International Airport was just voted "best airport in the world" by Skytrax. Here's what living in the passenger terminal for 48 hours was like. A total of 469 passengers can be seated in British Airways' A380 configuration, which includes 97 business class seats and 14 first class suites. Inside a British Airways Airbus A380 cabin. British Airways Source: SeatGuru On October 15, All Nippon Airways took delivery of its third and final A380 from Airbus's production line in Toulouse, France. The Japanese carrier had planned to use the aircraft to fly solely between Tokyo and Honolulu, Hawaii before the pandemic hit. An All Nippon Airways Airbus A380. Airbus Source: Airbus Those flights are scheduled to resume in January, according to the airline's most recent schedule. Though, that may change depending on the travel landscape in Japan. An All Nippon Airways Airbus A380. viper-zero / Shutterstock.com Source: Cirium Diio Mi Emirates, in its role as the world's largest Airbus A380 operator, is unsurprisingly flying the most A380 flights of any airline. An Emirates Airbus A380. ZGPhotography/shutterstock Dubai opened to international travelers in July 2020, ahead of most global tourist destinations, and Emirates responded by adding A380 flights to London and Paris. An Emirates Airbus A380. kamilpetran/Shutterstock.com Source: Cirium Diio Mi Since then, the A380 has returned to many of the Emirates destinations it has served including the US. American A380 destinations include Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, and Washington, DC with as many as six daily A380 flights to the US planned for December. An Emirates Airbus A380. Nitis Petcharat / Shutterstock Here's how Emirates is planning to build back in the US after cutting services during the pandemic.Source: Cirium Diio Mi "Slowly but surely, the A380s are going to fly and they're going to fly to all of those [pre-COVID] destinations," Essa Sulaiman Ahmad, Emirates' division vice president for the US and Canada, told Insider. "The United States is ready for it." An Emirates Airbus A380. AP All of Emirates' A380 luxuries have also been restored including caviar in first class and in-flight showers. An Emirates Airbus A380. Agent Wolf/Shutterstock.com And Emirates' existing A380 fleet is also in the process of being retrofitted with a new interior that includes enhancements to each cabin and the addition of a premium economy class. Premium economy onboard an Emirates Airbus A380. Emirates See inside the new cabins of Emirates' Airbus A380 fleet. Qatar Airways plans to resume flights on the Airbus A380 on December 15, serving Paris and London. A Qatar Airways Airbus A380. Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto/Getty Source: Cirium Diio Mi The largest aircraft in Qatar Airways fleet is the only to feature a true first class cabin. Smaller Qatar Airways aircraft only feature business class seats. A Qatar Airways Airbus A380. REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol Korean Air also resumed limited flying with the A380 in September 2020 to destinations in Japan and China. Starting December 1, the aircraft is scheduled to fly to more destinations including Bangkok, Thailand, and Paris. A Korean Air Airbus A380. AP/Airbus, C. Brinkmann But even as Korean Air slowly returns the jet to its standard flying schedule, the A380's tenure in Korea is still set to expire in the next five years. A Korean Air Airbus A380. Kate Taylor/Business Insider "The A380s will be leaving Korean Air's fleet within five years, and the Boeing 747-8i fleet will also follow suit within ten years," Walter Cho, Korean Air's chief executive officer, told FlightGlobal in August. A Korean Air Airbus A380. Lukas Wunderlich / Shutterstock.com Source: FlightGlobal Lufthansa shares Korean Air's feelings towards the A380 and it's doubtful whether the German carrier will restore the aircraft to flying service at any time in the future. A Lufthansa Airbus A380. Chittapon Kaewkiriya / Shutterstock.com Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr said that the "A380 obviously will not come back" in a second-quarter 2021 earnings call. A Lufthansa Airbus A380. Santi Rodriguez / Shutterstock.com Source: Seeking Alpha If Lufthansa does commit to retiring the planes, it will join Air France, Malaysia Airlines, Thai Airways, and Etihad Airways in the club of former A380 operators. An Etihad Airways Airbus A380. Markus Mainka/Shutterstock.com Here's why premium travelers will lose out the most by Etihad Airways retiring its A380s with private apartments that cost $20,000 per flight.Source: Executive Traveller Air France quickly retired its A380 fleet in May 2020, early on in the pandemic, and now relies on more efficient twin-engine aircraft like the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, Boeing 777, and Airbus A350-900 XWB. An Air France Airbus A380. Thomas Pallini/Business Insider Here's what flying on an Air France Airbus A380 was like in economy. Australian flag carrier Qantas does not currently have A380 flights scheduled for the remainder of 2021. The first scheduled flight is for July 1, 2022, between Sydney and Los Angeles, a staple route for the aircraft. A Qantas Airbus A380. Ryan Fletcher/Shutterstock.com Qantas just announced the resumption of US and London flights from Sydney following the reopening of New South Wales to vaccinated tourists but has tapped the Boeing 787 Dreamliner to perform the first flights. A Qantas Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner. Benjamin Zhang/Business Insider One airline that never gave up on the A380, even during the worst of the pandemic, is China Southern Airlines. From Guangzhou, China, the A380 flew to global destinations such as Los Angeles, Sydney, Tokyo, Paris, London, and Amsterdam, Netherlands. A China Southern Airlines Airbus A380. StudioPortoSabbia / Shutterstock.com Source: Cirium Diio Mi The pandemic hasn't yet killed the Airbus A380, even if it has sped up the aircraft's demise. Airlines, like their passengers, still do have affection for the aircraft and aren't ready to part with them just yet. The sun isn't setting on the Airbus A380 just yet. phichak/Shutterstock.com Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 19th, 2021

New airline ITA has officially taken over for Alitalia - see the full history of Italy"s troubled flag carrier

Alitalia has officially ceased operations and handed the baton to newcomer ITA, which stands for Italian Air Transport. ITA Airways Chairman Alfredo Altavilla poses with rendering of new livery ITA Press Office/Handout via REUTERS Government-owned Alitalia ceased operations on October 15, marking the end of its 74-year era. Alitalia has been replaced by ITA Airways, a brand new airline that will not be responsible for the old carrier's debt. ITA plans to buy 28 Airbus jets, create a new aircraft livery, and launch a new loyalty program. Alitalia has officially ceased operations and handed the baton to newcomer ITA Airways, which stands for Italian Air Transport.Italy's national carrier Alitalia has had a rocky past full of financial struggles, employee strikes, and other damaging events, forcing it to make the decision to cease operations on October 15 after 74 years of service. The airline stopped the sale of tickets in August and has committed to refunding all passengers who were booked on flights after October 14.On Thursday, the airline flew its final flight from Cagliari, Italy to Rome, according to FlightAware, officially sealing the fate of Alitalia. On Friday, the country's new flag carrier ITA took its place with a new livery, airplanes, and network, flying its first route from Milan Linate Airport to Bari International Airport in southern Italy.-João ☕ (@joaointhesky) October 14, 2021 Here's a look at Alitalia's storied past and the plan of its successor. Alitalia as a brand began in 1946, one year after World War II ended, first flying in 1947 within Italy and quickly expanding to other European countries and even opening intercontinental routes to South America. Passengers disembarking from an Alitalia Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The full name of the airline was Italian International Airlines, a joint effort between the United Kingdom through British European Airways - a precursor to British Airways - and the Italian government. A British European Airways Vickers Viscount. Museum of Flight/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia True to its name, Alitalia flew its first with Italian aircraft produced by now-defunct manufacturers in aerospace including Fiat and Savoia-Marchetti. An Alitalia Fiat G-12. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Following a merger with Italy's other airline, aptly named Italian Airlines or Linee Aeree Italiane, in 1957, Alitalia - Linee Aeree Italiane became Italy's top carrier. A Linee Aeree Italiane Douglas DC-3. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Armed with a sizeable fleet of 37 aircraft including the four-engine Douglas DC-6 and Corvair 340, the airline was ranked 12 in the world for international carriers. Passengers disembarking an Alitalia aircraft. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia As Europe returned to normalcy following the war, so did Italy and the 1960s became a pivotal decade for both the country and its airline as the 1960 Summer Olympics would be held in Rome. An Alitalia poster highlighting the upcoming Olympic Games in Rome. David Pollack/Corbis via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The year saw Alitalia carry over one million passengers, introduce jets into its fleet, and move to a new home at Rome's Fiumicino Airport. Rome's Leonardo da Vinci Fiumicino Airport in 1961. Carlo Bavagnoli/Mondadori via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia entered the jet age with a mix of European and American aircraft such as the Sud Caravelle SE210… An Alitalia Sud Caravelle. Touring Club Italiano/Marka/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia And the Douglas DC-8. An Alitalia DC-8. Adams/Fairfax Media via Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia American aircraft largely comprised the airline's fleet once settled into the jet age with a short-haul fleet featuring the McDonnell Douglas DC-9 and later the McDonnell Douglas MD-80... An Alitalia MD-80. Etienne DE MALGLAIVE/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Complemented by a similarly American-dominated long-haul fleet consisting of aircraft such as the Boeing 747. An Alitalia Boeing 747 chartered by Pope John Paul II. Scott Peterson/Liaison/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia The arrival of the 747 was a seminal moment for Alitalia and it was the first aircraft to wear the airline's famed green, white, and red livery with an "A" shape on the tail. Alitalia's red and green "A" tail design. Etienne DE MALGLAIVE/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia was the first European airline to transition fully into the jet age and continued the switch with more wide-body aircraft such as the Airbus A300. An Alitalia Airbus A300. aviation-images.com/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Other aircraft that would join the Alitalia jet fleet included the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, McDonnell Douglas DC-10... An Alitalia McDonnell Douglas MD-11. Education Images/Universal Images Group/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia And Boeing 767-300ER for long-haul flights. An Alitalia Boeing 767-300ER. JOKER/Hady Khandani/ullstein bild/Getty Source: Boeing and Alitalia Alitalia even had uniforms designed by Georgio Armani, who also contributed to aircraft interior designs. Italian designer Georgio Armani. Vittoriano Rastelli/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Source: Alitalia The airline's short-haul fleet later included a European favorite, the Airbus A320 family. An Alitalia Airbus A320 airplane approaches to land at Fiumicino airport in Rome Reuters Source: Boeing As Italy's national airline, Alitalia was also known for flying the Pope with the papal plane using the flight number AZ4000, better known as Shepherd One An Alitalia plane chartered by the Pope. AP Photo/Plinio Lepri Source: Telegraph Despite rising traffic throughout its history with Italy being a popular European tourist and leisure destination, the airline struggled with profitability. Alitalia check-in desks at Rome's Fiumicino Airport. ANDREAS SOLARO/AFP/Getty As a state-owned airline, Alitalia could always depend on the government to keep it flying, until the European Union stepped in and forbade financial support in 2006. An Alitalia Airbus A330. AP Photo/Riccardo De Luca Source: New York Times The 2000s then saw serious discussion into Alitalia's future with the Italian government wanting to sell its stake in the airline. The airline was opened for bidders in 2007 but yielded no results. A crow flying passed an Alitalia plane. AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia Source: New York Times Air France-KLM Group, the parent company of Air France and KLM as well as several smaller European airlines, then offered to buy the struggling airline but couldn't get labor unions on board and the deal collapsed. Alitalia and Air France-KLM Group signage. FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP via Getty Source: Reuters The Italian government, not wanting to lose its flag carrier, continued to prop up its airline via emergency loans in violation of European Union rules. The European Commission in Brussels. Greg Sandoval/Business Insider Source: European Union The third attempt in two years to sell the airline came after the Air France-KLM Group deal collapsed with an investors group forming the Compagnia Aerea Italiana to purchase the airline, despite heavy pushback from labor unions. An Alitalia Boeing 777. VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Source: Reuters This Alitalia began operations in 2009, with Air France-KLM soon coming back into the picture taking a 25% stake from CAI. Alitalia meeting with Air France, Delta, and KLM executives. ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP via Getty Source: Financial Times The new airline quickly began differentiating itself from its former self, leasing aircraft instead of purchasing them with the fleet consisting of the Airbus A330 family… An Alitalia Airbus A330. Alberto Lingria/Reuters Source: FlightGlobal And Boeing 777 family comprising the airline's long-haul fleet. An Alitalia Boeing 777. Abner Teixeira/Getty Source: FlightGlobal It wasn't long before Alitalia was plagued with issues ranging from union strikes to underperforming subsidiaries and even a sting operation that saw Alitalia employees arrested for theft, according to contemporaneous news reports. Alitalia workers protesting at Fiumicino Airport. AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino Source: New York Times and BBC With bankruptcy looming in 2013, Alitalia secured another bailout with help from the government that highlighted the need for restructuring. An Alitalia Airbus A320. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: New York Times Alitalia saw a new investor in 2015, Eithad Airways, which would take a 49% stake in the airline and Alitalia - Compagnia Aerea Italiana became Alitalia - Societa Aerea Italiana. Alitalia and Etihad celebrating a new partnership. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: Alitalia With a new investor in tow, Alitalia began cost-cutting measures but facing a backlash from employees due to planned job cuts, the airline began bankruptcy proceedings and the government announced Alitalia would be auctioned. Alitalia and Etihad's merger livery. AP Photo/Antonio Calanni Source: Reuters Meanwhile, another airline was positioning itself to become the new Italian flag carrier, the aptly named Air Italy. An Air Italy Airbus A330-200. Air Italy Rebranded from Meridiana, a regional Italian airline, Air Italy was jointly owned by private company Alisarda and Qatar Airways. A Qatar Airways Boeing 777-200LR. Thomas Pallini/Business Insider The airline chose Milan as its main hub ceding Rome to Alitalia. Long-haul flights from Milan to New York began in June 2018, with expansion to Asia happening soon after. Air Italy's inaugural ceremony for Milan-New York flights. David Slotnick/Business Insider Affected by the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max and without the Italian government as a benefactor, Air Italy closed up shop in early 2020, giving back full control of Italy to Alitalia. An Alitalia Airbus A320. ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty While Air Italy was getting its start, the Italian government would once again seek outside investors with European, North American, and Asian airlines expressing interest in Alitalia. Alitalia aircraft in Italy. Alberto Lingria/Reuters Among those interested were UK low-cost carrier EasyJet... EasyJet airplanes are pictured at Tegel airport in Berlin. Reuters Source: Bloomberg Irish low-cost carrier Ryanair… A Ryanair commercial passenger jet takes off in Blagnac near Toulouse. Reuters Source: The Guardian The Lufthansa Group… Strike of Germany's cabin crew union UFO at Frankfurt airport. Reuters Source: CNBC Delta Air Lines… A Delta Air Lines Boeing 777-200. James D. Morgan/Getty Source: Bloomberg And China Eastern Airlines… A China Eastern Airlines Airbus A320. REUTERS/Jon Woo Source: Reuters As well as Italian railway group Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane. A Ferrovie dello Stato Italiane train. TIZIANA FABI/AFP via Getty Source: Reuters One after the other, the airlines dropped their interest, and ultimately, the Italian government re-nationalized the airline on March 17 during the coronavirus pandemic. Alitalia was re-nationalized amid the coronavirus pandemic. Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Source: Reuters  Despite bailouts from the state, the pandemic and subsequent lockdown of Italy took the ultimate toll on Alitalia, forcing it to make the decision to close the airline and launch a new one. Alitalia aircraft at the Frankfurt airport Vytautas Kielaitis/Shutterstock Source: The Local On August 25, the airline stopped selling tickets and announced on its website that it would be offering free flight changes or refunds for passengers booked on Alitalia flights after October 14. People at Alitalia check in counter TK Kurikawa/Shutterstock Source: The Local When the airline ceased operations, its successor, Italia Transporto Aereo, took its place. Alitalia's last flight flew from Cagliari, Italy to Rome on October 14, and ITA launched operations with a flight from Milan to Bari, Italy on October 15. ITA app and logo rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: AeroTime Talks between the European Commission and Italy over Alitalia and ITA began in March 2021, with Rome designating 3 billion euros ($3.6 billion) to establish the new flag carrier. ITA signage at Catania airport rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Initially, ITA was slated to begin operations in April 2021, but lengthy discussions between Italy and the European Commission delayed its launch. Flags outside European Commission building in Brussels VanderWolf Images/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Part of the negotiations focused on confirming ITA's independence of Alitalia to ensure it did not inherit the billions of debt the old carrier owed to the state. Alitalia Airbus A319 Wirestock Creators/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Talks also included asking ITA to forfeit half of Alitalia's slots at Milan Linate Airport, which the airline was unwilling to do. Alitalia aircraft sit at Milan Linate airport Gabriele Maltinti/Shutterstock Source: Reuters ITA determined giving up that many slots at Linarte would be too big of a loss and proposed forfeiting slots at Rome Fiumicino Airport as a compromise. Alitalia check in counter Leonardo da Vinci Fiumicino airport TK Kurikawa/Shutterstock Source: Reuters At the end of the discussions, negotiators agreed to allow ITA to keep 85% of slots at Linate and 43% at Fiumicino. Green ribbon barrier with the ITA airline logo inside the Leonardo da Vinci airport rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Also under negotiation was Alitalia's brand and its loyalty program, MilleMiglia. The European Commission said ITA would have to give up both. Alitalia Airbus A320 Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Reuters Under European Commission rules, MilleMiglia cannot be bought by ITA and must be put out for public tender, meaning another airline or entity outside the aviation industry can purchase the program. There are an estimated five million MilleMiglia miles that customers have not been able to use. Customer checking into an Alitalia flight Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: EuroNews However, ITA was able to bid on Alitalia's brand, which it did the day before its launch. The airline bought the Alitalia name for €90 million ($104 million), though ITA executives say they don't plan on replacing the ITA name. Alitalia aircraft Light Orancio/Shutterstock Source: Reuters ITA began operations on October 15, the day after Alitalia's last flight. The new airline secured €700 million ($830 million) in funding earlier this year, which helped it purchase some of Alitalia's assets. Alitalia employees with new livery in 2015 Simone Previdi/Shutterstock Source: Reuters The successor acquired 52 of Alitalia's aircraft, seven being wide-bodies, and has plans to purchase and lease new ones, the first of which will enter the fleet in early 2022. Alitalia Boeing 777 Deni Williams/Shutterstock Source: Reuters By 2025, the airline expects to have 105 aircraft in its fleet and earn over 3.3 billion euros in revenue. ITA logo with Alitalia aircraft Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Reuters, Airways Magazine Moreover, ITA plans to renew its fleet with next-generation aircraft, which is expected to make up 77% of its fleet in four years. According to ITA, the aircraft will reduce CO2 emissions by 750 thousand pounds from 2021 to 2025. Milan Linate Airport Alexandre Rotenberg/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine, ITA Airways The 31 new-generation planes, which include short, medium, and long-haul aircraft, will be leased by Air Lease Corporation. Airbus A320neo Airbus Source: Airways Magazine Meanwhile, 28 new Airbus jets, including ten Airbus A330neos, seven Airbus A220 family aircraft, and 11 Airbus A320neo family jets, will be purchased. Airbus A220 Airbus Source: Airways Magazine As part of a carbon-reducing project, the first 10 flights to depart Rome on October 15 will use sustainable aviation fuels made by Italian energy company Eni. The project will contribute to the EU's "Fit for 55" proposal, which strives to reduce carbon emissions by at least 55% by 2030. Eni headquarters in Rome MyVideoimage.com/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine ITA introduced a new livery on launch day, which includes a light blue paint scheme representing unity, cohesion, and pride of the nation, as well as homage to Italy's national sports team, which wears sky blue during competitions. On the tail will be the Italian tricolor of red, white, and green. ITA Airways Chairman Alfredo Altavilla poses with rendering of new livery ITA Press Office/Handout via REUTERS Source: Airways Magazine In regards to its network, the carrier launched with 59 routes to 44 destinations. ITA plans to increase its routes to 74 in 2022 and 89 by 2025, while destinations are expected to increase to 58 in 2022 and 74 by 2025. ITA logo ITA Airways Source: Airways Magazine ITA will focus its operation out of Rome's Leonardo da Vinci International Airport and Milan Linate Airport, establishing itself as a "reference airline" for both business and leisure travelers. bellena/Shutterstock.com Source: Airways Magazine The carrier also plans to target the North American market, with flights from Rome to New York launching on November 4. Joey Hadden/Insider Source: CNN As for the over 11,000 Alitalia workers, 70% were hired to work for ITA, which has 2,800 employees. 30% of that came from outside Alitalia. The company plans to add 1,000 new jobs in 2022 and reach 5,750 employees by 2025. Alitalia staff at Milan Linate Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: Reuters, Airways Magazine ITA plans to improve upon Alitalia's services, including incentivizing good customer service by attaching employee salary with customer satisfaction. Alitalia staff Sorbis/Shutterstock Source: CNN ITA has set up a loyalty program called Volare, effective October 15, which is split into four levels: smart, plus, premium, and executive. Customers can use accrued points for any flight in ITA's system. ITA app rarrarorro/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine According to ITA executives, the company plans to join a major international alliance, though it has not stated which one it prefers. Alitalia was aligned with the SkyTeam alliance, which is comprised of carriers like Delta, Air France, and KLM. Alitalia Embraer 190LR SkyTeam livery InsectWorld/Shutterstock Source: CNN, Reuters However, ITA chairman Alfredo Altavilla said it was open to all options. "ITA can't be a stand-alone carrier forever," he said. Alitalia Boeing 767 SkyTeam livery Eliyahu Yosef Parypa/Shutterstock Source: Reuters While it is the end of an era with the closing of Alitalia, there are high hopes for its successor. "ITA Airways has been created to intercept the recovery of air traffic in the coming years on the strength of the foundations of its strategy: sustainability, digitalization, customer focus, and innovations," said ITA CEO Fabio Lazzerini. Alitalia plane with ITA logo Yaya Photos/Shutterstock Source: Airways Magazine Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytOct 15th, 2021

United is expecting December to be the busiest air travel month in almost 2 years

United Airlines announced on Thursday that it is planning its largest domestic schedule since 2019 in anticipation of a busy winter travel season. A United Airlines Boeing 737. Carlos Yudica/Shutterstock.com United Airlines is expecting December to be its busiest holiday travel month in two years. The airline has scheduled over 3,500 flights daily domestic departures in December. United will offer nearly 70 daily flights to ski destinations, including a new route from California to Aspen. See more stories on Insider's business page. United Airlines announced on Thursday that it is planning its largest domestic schedule since 2019 in anticipation of a busy winter travel season.United Airlines is expecting strong holiday travel this year, with a 16% increase in winter travel searches on its website and mobile app compared to the same time in 2019, according to the carrier. To prepare for the surge in demand, the airline said it has scheduled over 3,500 daily domestic departures this December, which is 91% of the flights offered in 2019.While the schedule is still subject to change, United said it anticipates the busiest Thanksgiving travel days to be Wednesday, November 24, and Sunday, November 28. Meanwhile, the most popular winter travel days are expected to be Thursday, December 23, and Sunday, January 2."We're seeing a lot of pent-up demand in our data and are offering a December schedule that centers on the two things people want most for the holidays: warm sunshine and fresh snow. We know families and friends are eager to reunite this holiday season, which is why we're thrilled to add new flights that will help them connect and celebrate together," said United's vice president of network planning and scheduling Ankit Gupta.The airline plans to resume routes it had suspended during the pandemic and introduce new ones, with the intent to connect the Midwest to warm-weather cities as well as offer more service to ski destinations across the US. New service to warm destinations includes direct flights to Las Vegas and Phoenix from Cleveland and Indianapolis to Orlando.United also plans to resume eight nonstop routes from Midwest cities to Florida, including Tampa, Orlando, Fort Myers, and Fort Lauderdale. The airline is also resuming four popular routes from winter 2020, including Columbus, Ohio; Indianapolis, Indiana; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Fort Myers. Overall, the airline will offer up to 195 daily departures to 12 destinations in the Sunshine State, marking the most amount of flights offered to Florida in the company's history.Travelers heading to ski destinations will have nearly 70 daily flight options, including a brand new route from John Wayne Airport in Santa Ana, California to Aspen. Other popular destinations include Jackson Hole, Wyoming; Steamboat Springs, Colorado; and Bozeman, Montana.While United's schedule could be the busiest it has been in over a year, the airline is still not at capacity, and the TSA does not expect to screen as many passengers as it did in 2019."While we do expect travel volume to increase during Thanksgiving week, specifically on the Sunday after Thanksgiving (28 Nov) we are not expecting to reach the 2.8+ million number we saw in 2019. Screening times vary for numerous reasons and vary by airport, so it's almost impossible to give specific screening time predictions. However, we're very confident that TSA officers will meet the challenge of screening millions of passengers on their way to and from their holiday destinations," TSA spokesperson Daniel Velez told Insider.In 2019, the TSA screened over 26 million passengers and flight crews over Thanksgiving from Monday, November 22 to Sunday, December 1, with December 1 being the busiest day in the TSA's 18-year history, according to the agency. Despite the high volume of travelers, the agency said 99.8% of passengers nationwide waited less than 30 minutes in the security checkpoint line, while 99.2% of those with TSA Pre waited less than 10 minutes.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 8th, 2021

JetBlue just began flying between New York and London with the smallest plane of any airline on the route - here"s why I"m eager to book it again

There's a certain weight to international travel that I didn't feel on JetBlue, largely because it's familiar and the plane only seated 138 people. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider JetBlue Airways just began flying between New York and London with one of Airbus' newest jets. The Airbus A321neoLR is the next-generation variant of the popular A321 and is capable of flying transatlantic flights. JetBlue has packed the aircraft full of customer-friendly features that take away from the fact that the aircraft is smaller than what competitors use. See more stories on Insider's business page. JetBlue Airways began flying between New York and London in August, bringing its low fares to Europe for the first time. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I flew on JetBlue's historic first trip to London and saw how low fares and great service will give competitors a run for their money Introductory fares on the route started at $599 round-trip for economy class and $1,979 for Mint business class. Inside JetBlue Airways' new Airbus A321neoLR. Thomas Pallini/Insider One way the airline is keeping prices low is by flying smaller aircraft across the pond. Inside JetBlue Airways' new Airbus A321neoLR. Thomas Pallini/Insider JetBlue chose the Airbus A321neoLR for its European flights and is currently the only airline to fly a single-aisle aircraft between New York and London. JetBlue Airways' first Airbus A321neoLR. JetBlue Airways and Airbus The trend is becoming more common as airlines try to lower costs on lucrative transatlantic flights, and manufacturers like Airbus are accommodating by making the planes fly further than ever before. Dominique Boutin/TASS/Getty Read More: Double-decker planes are going extinct as Airbus and Boeing discontinue their largest models. Here's why airlines are abandoning 4-engine jets. Some frequent flyers, including myself, dread the idea of having to fly on a single-aisle plane across an ocean. But after two flights on the aircraft, I was more than happy with the experience and enjoyed flying on it more than some larger aircraft. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Here's why I'd book another flight on a JetBlue Airbus A321neoLR when flying transatlantic. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Insider paid a media rate to fly from New York to London and back As a New Yorker, I've taken countless JetBlue flights in my flying career and have seen how quickly the airline has improved its onboard product in recent years. Those improvements culminated in the Airbus A321neoLR, flying exclusively between New York and London. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider JetBlue's latest seat products and satellite WiFi can be found on the aircraft, as well as other features like the JetBlue "pantry." Inside JetBlue Airways' new Airbus A321neoLR. Thomas Pallini/Insider I specifically book a standard economy seat for the overnight flight to London in seat 24A. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider I sat down in the seat and felt surprisingly at ease. It felt like just another flight on JetBlue, an airline on which I'd become incredibly comfortable flying. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I flew on a newly upgraded JetBlue plane and despite less legroom and slimmer seats, the refresh is exactly what the airline needed JetBlue offers 32 inches of legroom in these seats as well as 18.4 inches of width. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider For a larger traveler like myself, the extra room made a world of difference. I didn't feel hemmed in or struggling to find a comfortable position. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Those dimensions make JetBlue's seats more spacious than all of its competitors on the route, despite the smaller plane. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider American Airlines offers between 31 and 32 inches of seat pitch for its economy seats on the Boeing 777-300ER, according to SeatGuru, while seat widths range between 16.2 and 17.1 inches. An American Airlines Boeing 777-300ER. Nicolas Economou/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Source: SeatGuru British Airways' Boeing 777-200 aircraft offers 31 inches of pitch and 17.5 inches of seat width in economy, according to SeatGuru. A British Airways Boeing 777. Reuters Source: SeatGuru Delta Air Lines' Boeing 767-400ER aircraft offer 31 inches of pitch and a nearly comparable 18.1 inches of width, according to SeatGuru. A Delta Air Lines Boeing 767-400. Philip Pilosian/Shutterstock.com Source: SeatGuru Virgin Atlantic Airways offers between 31 and 34 inches of pitch on its Airbus A350-1000 XWB aircraft in economy, according to SeatGuru, with a seat width of 17.4 inches. A Virgin Atlantic Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. Robert Smith/MI News/NurPhoto/Getty Images Source: SeatGuru United Airlines offers the closest rival on its premium-configured Boeing 767-300ER with seat pitches varying between 31 and 34 inches for economy seats and 18.5 inches of pitch, according to SeatGuru. The 34-inch pitch seats are paid, extra-legroom "Economy Plus" seats. A United Airlines Boeing 767-300ER. Thomas Pallini/Business Insider JetBlue's spacious seats are accompanied by a low-density configuration of only 138 seats across 31 rows. In economy, you can see from the first row all the way to the last with no dividers in between. Inside JetBlue Airways' new Airbus A321neoLR. Thomas Pallini/Insider American, by comparison, has 216 economy seats alone on its Boeing 777-300ER flying between New York and London. American Airlines Boeing 777 at New York JFK airport before boarding passengers. William Perugini/shutterstock The only other airline flying planes with fewer passengers between New York and Europe is French boutique airline La Compagnie. A La Compagnie Airbus A321neo. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I toured La Compagnie, the all-business class airline flying between the US and France. It's the closest thing to flying private across the Atlantic. Having fewer seats means it takes less time to board and deplane the aircraft. It might even take less time to board and deplane than JetBlue's other aircraft that have more seats. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Personally, having fewer people onboard made it feel like there was a lot less hassle during boarding and deplaning. Flying to London felt no different than if I was flying down to Florida, and it made the overall experience a lot less stressful. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Beyond its impressive spaciousness, the economy seat itself had all the usual trimmings for a transatlantic product a 10.1-inch in-flight entertainment screen with a USB charging port, 110v AC power outlet, and adjustable headrest. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Also on display during boarding was the Airbus Airspace cabin found on its newest jets. Mood lighting welcomes passengers onboard with LED lights above giving the impression of a starry night. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Economy seats are configured in a standard 3-3 configuration with an equal number of aisle, window, and middle seats. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider It didn't take long to get everybody onboard and ready for the seven-hour crossing. We would've departed right on time had it not been for bad weather in the area that prevented us from pushing back from the gate. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider But once we got underway, it was smooth sailing to London. The A321neoLR handled what little turbulence we experienced quite well. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Flight attendants walked up and down the aisle to perform the in-flight service, just like a normal flight. It took a bit longer than it should have but that was chalked up to it being the very first flight. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider One cool feature of JetBlue's transatlantic product is that customers can order their meals from the in-flight entertainment system. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider I quickly fell asleep and woke up over Ireland in time for breakfast with only around an hour left in the flight. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider The fuel-efficient Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan engines also make the cabin incredibly quiet and conducive to uninterrupted sleep. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider The flight ended, as all do, and I was thinking more about how happy I was in London than the fact that I flew across the Atlantic in a single-aisle plane. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider I flew back to New York just a few days later on the very same aircraft. The only difference was that this time, I was in business class. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider JetBlue rolled out a brand-new Mint business class seat for this aircraft to give flyers maximum privacy and exclusivity. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I flew JetBlue's new London to New York route in Mint business class. It's a premium leisure traveler's dream but some kinks need to be ironed out. Business class seats are arranged in a 1-1 configuration across 12 rows, taking up nearly half of the aircraft. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Each seat offers direct aisle access and has closing doors for additional privacy. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider There were even fewer passengers on this flight so boarding took less than 30 minutes and we were quickly on our way to New York. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider The flight time was also around seven hours for this leg thanks to favorable winds. What the A321neoLR lacks in speed, however, JetBlue makes up for in the in-flight service. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider A three-course meal was served for lunch, accompanied by multiple pre-landing snacks. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider And for those still hungry, the JetBlue "pantry" is available on the aircraft where passengers can take whatever snacks and beverages they like. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Besides the extra flight duration, I could hardly tell the difference or care that I was on a smaller plane. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 25th, 2021

South African Airways is flying again after its government cut funding last year. Here"s a look at the collapse and revival of the 87-year-old national airline.

The airline has served South Africa since before the country became truly independent from the UK and has a history largely molded by its country's laws. SAA relaunches flights after a year of inactivity Reuters South African Airways relaunched operations with a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town after a year of inactivity. Though not involved in the relaunch, the airline has likely secured a new investor, Takatso Consortium. SAA said it's optimistic about its revival, but it's not without its skeptics. See more stories on Insider's business page. South African Airways was on the brink of disappearance after years of financial struggles, but it may have received a lifeline.On Thursday, the carrier relaunched operations on a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town using money it received from the South African government. After getting in millions from the state, the long-suffering carrier was denied further funding last year, and, as FlightGlobal reported, business rescuers entrusted with the difficult task of rescuing the 87-year-old airline had given it two options: liquidation or a wind-down and sale process.However, SAA has likely secured a private investor, Takatso Consortium, in June 2021, which agreed to funnel up to $243 million into the crippled airline over the next three years. Takatso Consortium CEO Gidon Novick said the relaunch is independent of the negotiations between the consortium and the carrier.Take a look at South African Airways' collapse and rebirth. The airline itself dates back to 1934 when South Africa's Union Airways was nationalized to form the new South African Airways. The state-owned airline would become the flag carrier of South Africa, which was still part of the British Empire at the time. A South African Airways Junkers aircraft. The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Source: South African Airways Initial operations for South African included regional flights within Africa. Intra-African and domestic flights were operated by aircraft including the Junkers Ju 52, Douglas DC-3, and Junkers Ju 86. A Douglas DC-3 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways Once World War II ended, South African expanded beyond the shores of its home continent with a multi-stop flight to the heart of the British Empire. The route was known as the "Springbok" service, after the national animal of South Africa. An Avro York aircraft similar to the one used by South African Airways. The Montifraulo Collection/Getty Source: South African Airways The 34-hour, three-day service initially flown by an Avro York aircraft, stopped in Nairobi, Kenya; Khartoum, Sudan; Cairo, Egypt; and Castel Benito, Libya, before arriving in Bournemouth, England. An Avro York aircraft similar to the one used by South African Airways. The Montifraulo Collection/Getty Source: South African Airways Springbok would also become the radio callsign for South African Airways flights. A Douglas DC-3 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com More modern aircraft from Western manufacturers including the Lockheed Constellation L-749 and Douglas DC-4 were later added, helping fuel international expansion. A Douglas DC-4 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways The airline added flight attendants on its services in 1946 and later added in-flight movies to some of its flights in the same decade. A Douglas DC-3 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways South Africa entered the jet age in 1953 with a British Overseas Airways Corporation de Havilland Comet operated by South African Airways that flew from Johannesburg to London. A BOAC de Havilland Comet aircraft. PA Images/Getty Source: South African Airways Intercontinental expansion continued with South African Airways later growing its route network to Australia in 1957 with "Wallaby" service. A Douglas DC-4 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways The 1960s then saw further expansion to South America, with flights to Rio de Janeiro, and then North America, with flights to New York, using the Boeing 707. A South African Airways Boeing 707 aircraft. Antony Matheus Linsen/Fairfax Media/Getty Source: South African Airways South African hit a milestone in the 1970s with its first Boeing 747 aircraft, an aircraft that had begun flying passengers only at the beginning of the decade. The quad engine aircraft quickly became a status symbol for the world's airlines. A South African Airways Boeing 747 aircraft. Rolls Press/Popperfoto/Getty Source: South African Airways Other new arrivals included the Boeing 737… A South African Airways Boeing 737-800 aircraft. JOKER/Hady Khandani/ullstein bild/Getty Source: South African Airways And Airbus A300. A South African Airways Airbus A300 aircraft. STR New/Reuters Source: South African Airways South African was also one of the first commercial operators of a unique Boeing product, the 747SP. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways A shortened version of the popular Jumbo Jet but with the same four engines, the 747SP offering extended ranges unmatched by most aircraft of the time. The range of the 747SP was so great that South African flew it from Seattle to Cape Town nonstop, a distance of over 8,800 nautical miles, on its delivery flight. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways While airlines liked the 747SP for its performance capabilities, South African had a different reason involving the country's apartheid policy. A Boeing 747SP aircraft. Mo Azizi / Shutterstock.com Due to the discriminatory policy, some African countries had restricted South African Airways flights from entering their airspaces and the airline would often have to fly indirect routes to get to Europe. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: New York Times The Boeing 747SP allowed for South African to go around the countries without having to stop for fuel on the way to Europe. Other aircraft frequently used Cape Verde as a refueling stop for flights to Europe, despite the archipelago's location off the coast of West Africa. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: New York Times A route from Johannesburg to Athens on the 747SP, for example, stopped in Lisbon and Rome along the way. The flight flew direct or with one stop to Lisbon, and then headed into the continent. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways The 1980s then saw turbulence for the carrier as Western nations adopted sanctions against South Africa for its apartheid policies. Flights to the US and Australia were revoked in addition to the countries that had barred South African's flights. Australian protests against South Africa's apartheid policy. Robert Pearce/Fairfax Media/Getty Source: South African Airways When apartheid ended in the 1990s, South African was allowed to grow its route network once again and the airline no longer needed to fly the long, costly routes to avoid some nations. A South African Airways Airbus A320 aircraft. Rogan Ward/Reuters Source: South African Airways One of the most notable displays of the new airline came in 1995 during the Rugby World Cups when a South African Airways Boeing 747 did a flyover of the stadium with "Good Luck Bokke," a nickname for the South African team, painted on the belly. The feat was repeated multiple times in later years by other airlines. An aircraft flyover at a 2013 Springboks vs All Blacks rugby match, David Rogers/Getty Source: South African Airways and Safair The decade also saw the airline win the title of Africa's leading airline from 1994 on to 2015. The 1990s, however, also saw the airline begin its financial losing streak. South African Airways aircraft. William F. Campbell/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Source: QZ The 2000s saw South African undergo a fleet renewal where most of its long-haul Boeing jets were retired in favor of European-built Airbus planes. The new long-haul flagships became the Airbus A330… A South African Airways Airbus A330 aircraft. SUMAYA HISHAM/Reuters Source: Planespotters.net And A340-600. A South African Airways Airbus A340-600 aircraft. Bruce Bennett/Getty Source: Planespotters.net South African was later brought into organizations to which it had been denied including the International Civil Aviation Organization and joined the Star Alliance. South African Airways joined Star Alliance in 2006. SIPHIWE SIBEKO/Reuters Source: South African Airways Its new-found praise and acceptance, however, couldn't replace the financial woes of the airline. In 2019, South African entered the equivalent of bankruptcy protection and began restructuring after racking up nearly $3 billion in debt. South African Airways employees protest during the airline's bankruptcy. Siyabonga Sishi/Reuters Source: QZ Despite being in the midst of restructuring, South African leased a new aircraft, the Airbus A350-900 XWB, which ultimately launched on the Johannesburg-New York route in January 2020. A South African Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. South African Airways Read More: Bankrupt South African Airways just debuted its newest plane, the Airbus A350, weeks early despite verging on the brink of collapse The swanky new aircraft would be ideal for the ultra-long-haul routes that South African planned to use them for. A South African Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. South African Airways With the new aircraft in the air and flying passengers, the hope was that South African might have a plan to save itself from collapse. A South African Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. South African Airways South Africa's government, which has been incrementally providing relief, however, ultimately pulled the plug in April 2020. A South African Airways Airbus A340-600. Fabrizio Gandolfo/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Source: FlightGlobal Without intervention from either the government or a private buyer willing to keep the airline going, South African Airways looked like it was going to disappear from the skies for good. A South African Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. Sumaya Hisham/Reuters However, the airline is back up and running after over a year of inactivity. SAA relaunched operations on September 23 with a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town using an A320 aircraft, which carried 123 passengers on the maiden journey. SAA's first flight in over a year Reuters Source: Aerotime Hub The relaunch came after months of restructuring, which included reducing its debt and cutting its workforce by 80%, down from 4,000 to 802. SAA relaunch at Johannesburg airport Reuters Source: Aerotime Hub, ch-aviation The airline will be backed by Takatso Consortium, a joint-venture between Harith General Partners and Global Aviation, which is in late stage talks to buy the majority stake from the South African government in June. South African union buildings Burhan Ay Photography/Shutterstock Source: africannews Takatso Consortium is set to be SAA's lifeline, though is not reportedly involved in the airline's management, relaunch, or funding. However, Takatso CEO Gidon Novick said in a statement that negotiations to take a 51% share are "substantially complete." SAA A320 at Johannesburg airport Thiago B Trevisan/Shutterstock Source: ch-aviation The consortium's deal made with South Africa's Department of Public Enterprises includes investing up to $243 million into the airline over the next three years. SAA A330 takes off from Lusaka, Zambia Vidit Luthra Source: africannews Without its private funds yet secured, the company is using $33.8 million of the $712.3 million bailout it received from the state to restart operations. SAA A320 Thiago B Trevisan/Shutterstock Source: ch-aviation SAA's interim CEO Thomas Kgokolo said the company needs a modern fleet of aircraft if it is going to be competitive outside of Africa. Currently, its all-Airbus fleet has an average age of more than 15 years. SAA plane in Namibia Felix Lipov/Shutterstock Source: africannews However, Kgokolo said ticket sales are promising and early numbers indicate flights could be 75% full. SAA passengers Reuters Source: africannews The airline's fleet has shrunk, having only six of the original 44 it had before insolvency. SAA will start with a small network, operating one domestic route and five regional routes, including to Accra, Ghana; Kinshasa, DRC; Harare, Zimbabwe; Lusaka, Zambia; and Maputo, Mozambique. SAA plane in Johannesburg Reuters Source: ch-aviation While it still has a long way to go, SAA's relaunch has brought pride and excitement for its employees. Crew members danced and sang at the Johannesburg airport before the maiden flight. SAA employees dance after relaunch Reuters Source: Reuters While the airline is optimistic about its return, skeptics believe it will be short-lived. According to Efficient Group economist Dawie Roodt, Takatso Consortium's absence from the relaunch is not a good sign. SAA A340 wing Vidit Luthra/Shutterstock Source: jacarandafm He explained that the slow deal with the consortium makes him wonder where the money to keep SAA in the air is going to come from. Without the agreement finalized, the airline will likely have its wings clipped again soon, according to Roodt. SAA tail at Frankfurt airport Vytautas Kielaitis/Shutterstock Source: jacarandafm Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 23rd, 2021

The 5 Best Credit Cards For Seniors And Retirees In 2022

Choosing the right credit card as a senior or retiree can sometimes be tricky. There are many options available, and it’s essential to find one that offers the best benefits for your current needs. Unfortunately, those needs and our preferences change as we age, so the card that was our ideal fit in our twenties […] Choosing the right credit card as a senior or retiree can sometimes be tricky. There are many options available, and it’s essential to find one that offers the best benefits for your current needs. Unfortunately, those needs and our preferences change as we age, so the card that was our ideal fit in our twenties or thirties is probably not the best fit for us today. This article will highlight five of the best credit cards for seniors and retirees in 2022. I’ll also explain why these cards stand out from the competition. So whether you’re looking for a new card to add to your stack or just starting to plan for retirement, read on for my top picks. .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Ray Dalio Series in PDF Get the entire 10-part series on Ray Dalio in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q1 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more #1 The best travel credit card for retirement: The Chase Sapphire Preferred Card If we were to do a poll asking all of America’s retirees or soon-to-be retirees what the top ten items on their bucket list are, traveling around the world or, at the very least, visiting another country is almost sure to be high on the list. But unfortunately, many people either don’t have the money or the time to travel as much as they would like when they’re young, so they always leave fulfilling that dream for their golden years. If that is your case and you plan to travel frequently in retirement, perhaps to visit your children or grandchildren or simply to be a tourist in a faraway land, then having a good travel rewards credit card is a must. Travel rewards cards are great for people who love to travel, obviously. But they’re also great for retirees and seniors who might not be able to travel as often as they’d like. Why? Because most travel cards offer valuable perks and benefits that can save you a ton of money on your travels if used correctly. Key perks of the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card The Chase Sapphire Preferred Card is one of the best travel cards out there, and it’s an ideal choice for seniors and retirees who love to explore the world. The first significant perk is a whopping 60,000 points welcome bonus after spending $4,000 on purchases from account opening in the first three months. This bonus alone is worth anywhere from $600 to $750, depending on how you redeem them. After the first year, you’ll receive an annual $50 statement credit for hotel stays as long as you booked them through Chase Ultimate Rewards. After you add travel insurance (trip cancellation/interruption, baggage delay, and trip delay insurance, as well as auto rental collision damage waiver and travel and emergency assistance services) and the other benefits with partners like Lyft, DoorDash, and Gopuff, you’re looking at close to $900 worth of benefits. What makes this a great travel card is that: You can redeem your points for travel at a valuation of 1.25 cents per point through Chase Ultimate Rewards. You can transfer points at a 1:1 rate to many popular airline loyalty programs, where you can get even more benefits. The card doesn’t add foreign transaction fees. Additionally, the card’s rewards on travel purchases are also great. You get 5x points on travel booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards (saving you close to 5% off the purchase price), 3x on dining, online grocery purchases, and select streaming services, and two points on all other travel purchases, and one point on everything else. #2 The best premium benefits credit card for retirement: The Platinum Card from American Express If you’re looking for hands down one of the best travel experiences, you don’t have to look much further than The Platinum Card from American Express. American Express is one of the best-known credit card brands globally, and it’s almost sure to be accepted everywhere your travel takes you. Amex offers different versions of the Platinum credit card for other countries, such as the American Express Platinum Card for Canadians. These cards all bring very similar perks, but the US version (“The Platinum Card”) is hands down the best. Keep in mind that this is a premium credit card, so it comes with a hefty annual fee of $695. However, the welcome bonus offsets the fee several times over during the first year, and the long list of rewards, statement credits, and travel perks makes this a sweet deal even after that. Key perks of The Platinum Card The statement credits alone offset the annual fee. With this card, you get $200 back on hotel stays of more than two nights booked through American Express Travel. In addition, you can save $200 in airline fees, $240 on select streaming and entertainment services, $155 on Walmart+ memberships, $200 on Uber, and more. In terms of luxury or premium travel, besides all the travel insurance you can think of, you get access to the Platinum Travel Service, which works similar to a concierge service that helps you set up custom-tailored itineraries every time you hop on a plane to your next destination. You also get access to the American Express Global Lounge Collection that will make layovers and your pre-flight waiting times an absolute pleasure in more than 1,400 airport lounges worldwide. You can also breeze through airport security with a $189 statement credit on a CLEAR membership and even more credit for Global Entry and TSA Precheck services. Once you’re approved for this card, you’ll also receive an instant upgrade in elite status on two of the most important hotel chains in the world. You’ll receive Marriott Bonvoy Gold Elite Status and Hilton Honors Gold Status just for owning this card. In addition, this can grant you complimentary hotel room upgrades and other on-site perks. If you have a big budget set up for travel during retirement, having The Platinum Card from American Express will stretch that budget further than you thought possible, and it will help you enjoy your travels much more. #3 The best credit card for a retiree’s grocery purchases: Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express There are few contenders to the Blue Cash Preferred Card for grocery purchases in the US. This card makes rewards simple: it’s a cashback card that offers four everyday-spending categories focusing on grocery purchases. Key perks of the Blue Cash Preferred® Card The biggest perks of the Blue Cash Preferred card are the card’s cashback rates, which are off the charts. For example, this card pays you back 6% on grocery purchases in select US supermarkets (with a cap of $6,000 per year) and an additional 6% on select US streaming services. Besides these two categories, you get 3% back on transit and gas and the standard 1% cash back on all other purchases. This card even brings car rental loss and damage insurance, which can offset a good portion of your car rental costs if you ever need to rent a vehicle. But, while this perk comes with most premium cards, the key here is that the Blue Cash Preferred Card doesn’t carry an annual fee. That means you’re getting this benefit for free. So, if you’re planning to settle down during your golden years to live a laid-back lifestyle, binge-watching your favorite shows, and take a road trip to visit friends and family, this may be the perfect card for you. #4 Best business credit card for senior entrepreneurs: Ink Business Cash® Visa Retirement is a great time to start a business. You can take advantage of your experience, budget, and know-how to increase your chances of success compared to younger entrepreneurs. If you don’t feel like getting up early and commuting to work anymore (after all, you did retire), you can always start a remote business. Hire a virtual mailbox service to handle all your incoming business mail, and handle everything else yourself from the comfort of your home. Suppose starting a business is on your to-do list, or you already have a business up and running. In that case, a business credit card is a great tool to help you manage your business finances and earn rewards on business expenses. One of the seniors’ best business credit cards is the Ink Business Cash® Visa from Chase. Key perks of the Ink Business Cash® Visa Perks start with a handsome welcome bonus of $750 in cash back after spending $7,500 in the first three months of opening your account. This is equivalent to an extra cashback rate of 10% on top of the standard cash back rates you’ll earn whether or not you’re a new Ink Business Cash card holder. With this card, you can get 5% cash back on the first $25,000 spent in combined purchases at office supply stores and on cell phones, landlines, internet, and cable. This means this card can help you save up to $1,250 on office supplies and communications annually. You’ll also earn 2% on the first $25,000 spent on gas and restaurants, plus 1% on everything else. So if you’re starting your business and require significant purchases, you can take advantage of the 0% intro APR for the first 12 months of account opening. Add in free account management software to easily track business expenses and additional cards for your employees at no extra cost, without an annual fee, and you’re laughing. #5 The best credit card for medical expenses: The AARP® Essential Rewards Mastercard from Barclays® You would only expect that an AARP co-branded credit card would make it to the top spots on the list of the best credit card for retirees. After all, AARP’s mission is to “enhance the quality of life for all as we age, leading positive social change and delivering value to members through advocacy, service, and information.” In collaboration with AARP, Barclays crafted the AARP® Essential Rewards Mastercard, specially designed to help seniors and retirees save on medical expenses. And the best part is that it’s free; there’s no annual fee. Key perks of the AARP® Essential Rewards Mastercard Besides not having an annual fee, the AARP® Essential Rewards Mastercard brings home a $100 cashback welcome bonus that you’ll get after charging $500 worth of purchases in the first three months of card membership. Apart from the welcome bonus, this cashback card also gives you an unlimited 3% cash back rate on gas and drug store purchases and an unlimited 2% cashback rate on medical expenses. While this may not seem like much for a healthy adult in their prime, it can add up significantly if you have any chronic health condition that requires regular medication or doctor’s visits. The AARP® Essential Rewards Mastercard can also help you save on travel expenses with a 0% APR introductory offer on balance transfers for 15 months (17.49%-26.49% variable APR after that). Finally, by applying for this card, you support AARP because Barclays donates $10 to the AARP Foundation for every new account opened and 1% of all eligible purchases made by cardholders. The bottom line: Do I need a new card for retirement? You might be thinking, “I’ve had the same credit card for years, and it’s working just fine. Do I really need to get a new one for retirement?” The answer is maybe. It depends on your circumstances and what you’re looking for in a credit card. If you already have a rewards card with thousands of points begging to be redeemed on a trip to Hawaii but are still short by a few thousand points, by all means, keep using your current card (although signing up for one of the options mentioned above and earning a juicy welcome bonus could give you the points you’re missing in record time). The key is to identify how your spending habits and preferences have changed or will likely change in the future and compare those against your current rewards card (or cards) and a likely candidate from this list to determine if you will do better by applying to the new card. Article by Jordan Bishop, Due About the Author Jordan Bishop discovered the power of credit cards at a young age. His first splash into travel hacking came with the wildly viral launch of Yore Oyster, which landed him national media attention and more than a million frequent flyer miles. He leveraged that opportunity to help tens of thousands of people save millions of dollars on flights, all while globetrotting the world. Updated on Jul 1, 2022, 3:47 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkJul 1st, 2022

Etihad just flew its new $366 million Airbus A350 to the US for the first time, shuttling passengers 14 hours from the UAE — see inside

Etihad is continuing its decarbonization efforts with its new A350-1000 jet, dubbed Sustainability50, which complements its Boeing 787 "Greenliner." Etihad's first A350 flight to JFK.Etihad Airways Etihad flew its new A350 aircraft on flights from Abu Dhabi to the US for the first time on Thursday. The plane journeyed 13 hours to New York and 14 hours to Chicago, which are two of the carrier's longest routes. The jet is powered by fuel-efficient Rolls-Royce engines to reduce CO2 emissions by 25%. Etihad unveiled its first-ever Airbus A350-1000 aircraft on a flight from Abu Dhabi to Paris in April, making it the first A350 jet to be flown by a UAE carrier.Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad AirwaysAfter several months of operating medium-haul flights, like to Mumbai and New Delhi, the carrier officially started flying the jet on ultra-long-haul routes to the US on Thursday.Etihad's first A350 flight to JFK.Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad Airways, FlightAwareThe plane flew about 13 hours to New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport and 14 hours to Chicago O'Hare International Airport, which are two of the longest routes the Middle Eastern carrier operates.Etihad's first flight from UAE to the US.FlightAwareSource: FlightAware, FlightAware"We are proud to bring the Airbus A350 into service in the US," Etihad SVP of global sales and cargo Martin Drew said. "This is an incredible aircraft with highly efficient fuel consumption and CO2 savings, which enables us to support our goals to reduce carbon emissions and deliver an unmatched flight experience for our guests."Etihad's first A350 flight to JFK.Etihad AirwaysAccording to the carrier, all routes servicing New York and Chicago will be operated by the A350 going forward. Passengers departing Abu Dhabi can use the airport's Customs and Border Protection pre-clearance to avoid immigration lines in the US on arrival.EA Photography/Shutterstock.comThe airline's first A350, which it nicknamed Sustainability50, was painted in a special livery to commemorate the UAE's 50th birthday and Etihad's goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.Shoaib Ahmed Jan/Shutterstock.comSource: Etihad AirwaysSustainability50 is part of the company's larger "Sustainability50 programme" that will use the $366 million jet as a testbed for new procedures, technologies, and initiatives to reduce the carrier's carbon footprint.Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad AirwaysEtihad's A350 is powered by two Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engines, which reduce fuel burn and CO2 emissions by 25% compared to previous-generation widebody aircraft, the carrier said.Rolls-Royce Trent XWB engine.Rolls-RoyceSource: Etihad Airways"Our teams have worked closely together to craft a product and travel proposition that will ensure every journey with Etihad is a choice well made – both for our guests and for the planet," Etihad CEO Tony Douglas said in an April press release.Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad AirwaysThe Sustainability50 program will complement Etihad's Boeing 787-10 "Greenliner,” which the airline put on display at the Dubai Air Show in November.An Etihad Airways Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner nicknamed the "Greenliner" at the Dubai Airshow 2021Thomas Pallini/InsiderSee inside a brand-new $338.4 million Etihad Boeing 787-10 'Greenliner' that the airline says flew the world's most sustainable flightAccording to Etihad, the Greenliner flew the world's "most sustainable flight ever" from London to Abu Dhabi in October, having reduced the flight's carbon emissions by 72%.An Etihad Airways Boeing 787-10 Dreamliner nicknamed the "Greenliner" at the Dubai Airshow 2021Thomas Pallini/InsiderSource: InsiderOnboard the A350 jet will be an enhanced customer experience, complete with award-winning "smart seats" in economy…Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad Airways…and private business studios with sliding doors and lay-flat beds. Moreover, every seat has direct aisle access.Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad Airways"By introducing the A350, we have almost doubled premium capacity on our New York and Chicago routes to 44 seats in the Business cabin, which provides a luxurious experience comparable to First Class on other international airlines," Drew said.Etihad AirwaysThe plane has a total capacity of 371 passengers, with 44 in business and 327 in economy, including 45 extra legroom seats.Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad AirwaysThe A350 has been fitted with comfort-enhancing features to help passengers better battle jetlag on the 14+ hour flights. Specifically, the cabin lighting is specially designed to promote sleep and was inspired by "shadows cast by Abu Dhabi's palm trees."Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad AirwaysMoreover, the inflight entertainment screens have a new “dark-mode interface” to reduce light pollution, further lessening the effects of jetlag.Etihad AirwaysSource: Etihad AirwaysRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJul 1st, 2022

Lufthansa is bringing its Airbus A380 super-jumbos out of retirement as travel demand soars. Take a look inside.

The airline said it will un-retire some or all of its eight A380s by 2023 because of rising customer demand and delayed delivery of new planes. A Lufthansa Airbus A380.Santi Rodriguez / Shutterstock.com Germany's Lufthansa is un-retiring its Airbus A380s as demand for travel soars. The carrier took its A380s out of service at the onset of the pandemic but could bring back as many as eight. The 73-meter-long A380 is the world's largest passenger plane and seats more than 500 people. German flag-carrier Lufthansa is bringing its Airbus A380 super-jumbos back into service.Lufthansa's Airbus A380.Lufthansa.The airline said it plans to un-retire the jets by 2023 as a result of surging passenger demand and delays in deliveries of other planes it has on order.Lufthansa's Airbus A380.Lufthansa.Lufthansa grounded its fleet of 14 A380s during the pandemic, sending the jets to Spain for long-term storage as international travel ground to a halt. It sold six back to Airbus but has eight left.Two Airbus A380s operated by Lufthansa parked at Teruel Airport, Spain, in 2020.Javier Escriche/picture alliance via Getty Images.At 73 meters long and 24 meters tall, the A380 is the world's largest passenger jet. Depending on configuration, A380s can seat as many as 850 people. Lufthansa's planes fit around 520 passengers.An Airbus A380 operated by Lufthansa.Silas Stein/picture alliance via Getty Images.The cabin is split into two decks. 420 economy class seats are located on the main deck, while the upper deck hosts 98 business class seats and eight first class seats.Lufthansa's A380 seating plan.Lufthansa.Inside the economy cabin, the seats are laid out in a three-four-three configuration, with 42 rows of seating.Inside the cabin of the A380.Lufthansa.The lower deck is split into four compartments.Inside the cabin of the A380.Lufthansa.All of the economy class seats have monitors for in-flight entertainment...Economy class seats on a Lufthansa Airbus A380.Mario Tama/Getty Images....as well as charging ports and control panels located on the inside of the armrest.Inside the A380.Lufthansa.A spiral staircase to the upper deck is located at the back of the plane.The A380 has two decks.Lufthansa.Business class seats are located in a two-two-two configuration.Business class seats on the Lufthansa Airbus A380.Mario Tama/Getty Images.Business class seats are fully reclinable and have adjustable headrests with reading lights, several storage areas, charging ports, and larger screens than those in economy.The business class seating of an Airbus A380 operated by Lufthansa.Hannes Magerstaedt/Getty Images.First class seats are the most spacious and luxurious, with each boasting privacy partitions, ottomans which double up as storage spaces, large tray tables, and 16.5-inch entertainment screens, according to The Points Guy.First class seating in Lufthansa's A380.Lufthansa.There are control panels and additional storage spaces situated in the side counters.First class seating in the A380 operated by Lufthansa.Lufthansa.The first class seating area is arranged in a one-two-one configuration.First class seating in the A380 operated by Lufthansa.Lufthansa.The first class seating area also features large bathroom spaces with vanity units.The bathroom in first class.Lufthansa.Lufthansa's first Airbus A380 joined the airline's fleet in 2010.Former German Chancellor Angela Merkel christens an Airbus A380 for Lufthansa in 2015.DANIEL ROLAND/AFP via Getty Images.Lufthansa said it's figuring out how many of its eight A380s will be back in service by summer 2023.An A380 operated by Lufthansa lands at Frankfurt airport before the jets were decommissioned during the pandemic.Silas Stein/picture alliance via Getty Images.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

I flew out of what was once considered the worst airport in the world. Except for a few hiccups, it was a smooth experience.

For years, Manila's Ninoy Aquino International Airport ranked among the worst airports in the world, but it's recently undergone a series of upgrades. Flying with Philippine Airlines via business class from Ninoy Aquino International Airport.Marielle Descalsota/Insider For years, Manila's Ninoy Aquino International Airport was ranked the world's worst airport. Local officials said "significant improvements" were made under the Duterte administration. I flew business class from the airport and was surprised by its quality lounge and delicious food. Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) is the main airport of Manila, the capital of the Philippines.Ninoy Aquino International Airport.Marielle Descalsota/InsiderNAIA was named after Benigno Aquino Jr., a politician who was killed on the tarmac in August 1983. It had previously been known as Manila International Airport. NAIA served over 48 million people in 2019, with some 42 passenger airlines operating at the airport, an airport representative told Insider.For years, NAIA ranked consistently among the worst airports in the world. It was named the world's worst airport from 2011 to 2013 by widely cited travel website Guide to Sleeping in Airports, which wrote that NAIA is "large and frustrating," and advised travelers to "expect to wait in numerous long lines as you make your way to your flight."In early 2016, the airport had a 40% on-time performance OTP, according to a report by the Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA).NAIA has since worked to clean up its image. It's undergone a series of upgrades and renovations, and in September 2019, it recorded an 83% OTP from national carriers."Despite challenges, setbacks, and criticisms, it is undeniable that the country's main gateway – the Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA) – has come a long way from where it was before," the MIAA said in a May 2022 statement seen by Insider. The authority added that it aims to give passengers a "safe, reliable, convenient, and comfortable travel."Even so, NAIA currently has a 3/10 rating on UK-based airline- and airport-customer review site Skytrax from over 360 reviews. Skytrax describes the airport as "congested" with "excessive" immigration and security queues."The floors in the transit waiting area looked like they hadn't been mopped or cleaned in days,"a South Korean passenger wrote on Skytrax in March 2020. "By far the worst airport in Asia I have been to," she added.I've been flying in and out of NAIA since I was a child, and I remember how chaotic my experiences at the airport were in the mid and late 2000s.Terminal 2 at NAIA.Marielle Descalsota/InsiderCurious to experience it now, as an adult, I recently booked a business class flight from Manila to Singapore via the country's national carrier, Philippine Airlines (PAL).I spent around 1,600 Singapore dollars (around $1,152) for a return ticket. In comparison, a return economy ticket cost around S$650 ($470). The flight from Manila to Singapore takes around three-and-a-half hours.It took about 40 minutes to drive to NAIA's Terminal 2 from Makati, the country's financial and economic center. There was minimal traffic and the initial security checks were a breeze. Terminal 2 is exclusive to PAL international and domestic flights.It didn't take long before I encountered the first problem: I tried to check in via the business class counter, but there was nobody there.The business class counter at Philippine Airlines.Marielle Descalsota/InsiderThere were several economy class counters. Snaking queues led up to them.There was only one counter allocated for business class. It had a red carpet laid out in front of it, but there was no one manning the counter. When I asked another staff member for help, he told me to check in via economy.I waited for staff to show up at the counter for 15 minutes, and when nobody did, I joined the long line at economy.The economy counters at Philippine Airlines.Marielle Descalsota/InsiderThe economy counter was fully staffed and the line was surprisingly speedy. The staff members were efficient: After checking my passport, travel details, and vaccination certificates, I was told to make my way through immigration. But the security ended up stopping me as I was missing a departure card. I had to double back and request one from the ticketing counter.After filling out the form, I made my way through immigration and security, which took less than 10 minutes. I spotted the Mabuhay Lounge, PAL's business class lounge, at the corner of the terminal.The Mabuhay Lounge.Marielle Descalsota/InsiderThe lounge was spacious and had simple furnishings. There were fewer than five people at the lounge, which meant that service was prompt and attentive. I took a seat near the bar, where I perused the menu. Unlike other lounges that serve food buffet-style, Mabuhay Lounge offers unlimited a la carte orders. It had Asian, Western, and Filipino fare.The food was made to order, and it was delicious.Food at the Mabuhay Lounge.Marielle Descalsota/InsiderI had the fish sisig, which is a sizzling hot plate dish, a chicken kebab, and toast. The sisig was one of the best I've ever had — it tasted better than many of the Filipino restaurants I've dined at. I topped off my order with Japanese potstickers and a muffin, which were also delicious. The bar had a dedicated staff member who was mixing drinks on demand. The lounge's margarita and long island iced tea were on par with drinks from some of my favorite bars. My flight ended up being delayed by 40 minutes. I didn't even mind, because the lounge was so comfortable.When I made my way to the gate, I found a chaotic scene and long lines of people behind the counters.The gates at NAIA Terminal 2.Marielle Descalsota/InsiderI took a seat outside the airport's dedicated vape room. In around 20 minutes, boarding began and, as always, business class passengers were the first to be called. The experience was efficient and hassle-free.The airport might have a ways to go before it can fully shed its negative reputation, but it's come a long way since it was crowned the worst airport in the world.Business class in Philippine Airlines.Marielle Descalsota/InsiderWhile my flight was delayed, I found the airport's immigration and security queues efficient. The business class lounge had decent amenities and great service. The lounge was quiet, and it felt like the perfect place to relax in the midst of a busy airport.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 28th, 2022

I ditched budget airlines and flew for $90 with British Airways, and I"d definitely choose a flag carrying airline again

Flying from London to Basel, Switzerland was a breeze with the flag carrier airline, though drinks service was a little slow. A collage of Insider's Sam Tabahriti drinking a mimosa and a view outside the plane in the air.Insider I flew for $90 with British Airways from London's Heathrow Airport to Basel, Switzerland. The flight itself was smooth, though I did have to wait a while to get a drink on the plane. I was scared my flight would be canceled amid the current chaos, but it went ahead.  For many years, British Airways called itself the world's favorite airline, though according to the World Airline Awards, Qatar Airways is actually the best of the best.A British Airways' plane.Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty ImagesUsed to flying with low-cost airlines such as Ryanair or Easyjet, I thought I would change for once and try British Airways thanks to a low cost ticket on a route from London to Basel, Switzerland.A monitor showing the flight's announcement.InsiderOn most low-cost airlines, tickets are very cheap but do not include any luggage. Oftentimes, you're only allowed to take a backpack or handbag for free, and you must pay a supplement to add small cabin luggage.A suitcase.InsiderBut with BA you are allowed small cabin luggage and a handbag or backpack that should fit under the seat in front of you.A screengrab of BA's baggage allowance.BAMy seat was automatically allocated to number 17 when I checked in through the BA app. The process was very easy and straightforward.A selfie of Insider's Sam Tabahriti.InsiderApart from the first few rows at the front of the aircraft, all seats are the same and have similar legroom.A view of the number of the seat.InsiderIt's not too spacious, but it sure is enough for a short journey. My seat did feel different from the others I am used to on other airlines — it felt a bit more secure.The legroom from my seat.InsiderBA has a grouping system when embarking. Each passenger is allocated to a group – from group 1 to group 9.A view of the plane from my seat.InsiderGroup 1 includes first-class passengers and business passengers, those who are executive club gold members, and Oneworld Emerald members.A British Airways priority baggage label and First Class label on a suitcase.Steve Parsons/Getty ImagesWhen I boarded the flight, there was plenty of space in the overhead locker above the seats. I was even allowed to leave my backpack there instead of putting it under the seat in front of me.The shelf bin.InsiderOnce everybody boarded the plane, the crew was quick to announce they were about to demonstrate the safety rules: "Please, pay attention as it may differ from other airlines," the lead member said.The crew demonstrating the safety rules.InsiderThe journey was pleasant and easy. At one point, I looked outside and the light was outstanding. There's something indescribable about this view.The sunlight hitting one of the plane's wings.InsiderWhile the flight itself was smooth, I did have to wait a while for a drink after ordering. I was eventually given a bottle of Prosecco and orange juice to make mimosas after I reminded the staff that I was waiting.Picture showing a bottle of Prosecco, orange juice, and flat water.InsiderI took full advantage of it and it made about three glasses (due to the small plastic cup they hand out). I also did not know they offered a pack of potato chips and a bottle of water – which helped after drinking the Prosecco.A selfie of Insider's Sam Tabahriti drinking a free mimosa.InsiderAs soon as we landed and got the clear to leave, people rushed to their luggage. I never quite understand why people feel rushed to get out.People rushing to get their luggage as we landed.InsiderI always thought BA was one of those pricey airlines but it turns out, it isn't. When you total the price of the ticket and added luggage on other airlines, for this route, it was neck and neck.Heathrow airport Terminal 4.InsiderBefore I got to the airport, I was slightly concerned my flight would be canceled amid the chaos impacting international travel in recent weeks. My flight had already been canceled once, but I was given an earlier flight with two-week notices, which gave plenty of time to decide whether to jump on the new flight.People queuing to check-in at Heathrow Terminal 5 as travellers embarking on overseas trips faced chaos as flights were cancelled and cross-Channel rail services were hit by major delaysSteve Parsons/PA Images via Getty ImagesOverall, I enjoyed my flight with BA and would definitely fly again with it — and if I am lucky enough, I might get another chance to make mimosas next time.Outside the airplane during the flight.InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 26th, 2022

American Airlines is ending services to 3 US cities amid a massive nationwide pilot shortage

The three routes being stopped were served by wholly-owned American subsidiaries Piedmont Airlines and Envoy Air. An American Airlines Boeing-777Getty Images American Airlines is cutting routes to the cities of Islip and Ithaca in New York, and Toledo, Ohio. This is because of a shortage of regional pilots, a spokesperson told The Dallas Morning News. The routes were served by wholly-owned American subsidiaries Piedmont Airlines and Envoy Air. American Airlines is ending services to two cities in New York state and one in Ohio because of a shortage of pilots.The carrier will cut routes to Islip, New York; Ithaca, New York; and Toledo, Ohio from September 7, multiple news outlets reported."In response to the regional pilot shortage affecting the airline industry, American Airlines has made the difficult decision to end service," an American Airlines spokesperson told The Dallas Morning News.Earlier this month, American CEO Robert Isom said it had grounded about 100 regional jets because it couldn't find enough workers.Worst affected by the canceled routes will be Toledo. American is the only major airline that serves Eugene F. Kranz Toledo Express Airport, offering flights to its hub at Chicago O'Hare Airport.Allegiant Air is the only other carrier offering flights to and from Toledo, with twice-weekly flights on routes to Phoenix, Arizona and three airports in Florida.American is also scrapping its daily flights to its hub in Philadelphia from Ithaca Tompkins International Airport. Once this route is no longer available, the airport will be left with a vastly reduced schedule, only offering flights to Detroit with Delta and Newark with United.The third route American is slashing is its daily operation from Long Island McArthur Airport in Islip to Philadelphia. The airport is also served by Southwest, Frontier Airlines, and Breeze Airways.American's flights to and from Toledo are are operated by regional carriers Piedmont Airlines and Envoy Air, both of which are wholly-owned American subsidiaries, as American Eagle. The flights to and from Islip and Ithaca are operated by Piedmont Airlines as American Eagle."We're extremely grateful for the care and service our team members provided to our customers in Islip, Ithaca, and Toledo, and are working closely with them during this time," the American spokesperson told The Dallas Morning News.They added that American would contact passengers who had booked flights to or from those airports after September 7 to make alternative travel plans.Airlines and airports are currently suffering from staffing shortages, leading to long lines for check-in and security, canceled flights, and angry passengers.People are returning to the skies as demand for both leisure and business travel rebounds, but airlines have struggled to balance their staffing levels to meet changing demand amid waves of lockdowns, alternating between furloughs, layoffs, and hiring sprees.The US Transportation Security Administration screened 2.38 million flight passengers on Sunday and has been screening a similar number of travelers each day throughout June, which is just below pre-pandemic levels.Airlines including Delta, JetBlue, Alaska, Lufthansa, and British Airways have cut their summer schedules due to surging demand and staffing challenges. Tens of thousands of US flights — both domestic and international — were delayed or canceled over the Juneteenth and Father's Day weekend.Earlier this month, Piedmont Airlines and Envoy Air reached a deal with the Air Line Pilots Association to almost double pilots' salaries.Isom said on June 3 that American was hiring 2,000 pilots.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJun 21st, 2022

The top 20 best airports in the world according to passengers

Aviation rating firm SkyTrax uses global customer satisfaction surveys for 550 airports worldwide to create this top 20 list. Hamad International Airport.Thomas Pallini/Insider Aviation ranking firm SkyTrax has unveiled the best airports in the world for 2022. Asia and Europe dominated the list, with Qatar's Hamad International Airport maintaining its top title. The highest-ranked US airport was Seattle-Tacoma at number 27, but no North American airport cracked the top 20. The top 100 airports in the world have once again been unveiled.Aviation rating firm SkyTrax has announced its annual World Airports Awards for 2022 on Thursday, and Asia and Europe dominated the list. The organization uses global customer satisfaction surveys taken from 2021 to 2022 to determine the top airports. According to SkyTrax, the surveys, which include over 550 airports worldwide, are the "quality benchmark for the world airport industry" and are "independent of any airport control, influence or input." The survey covers things like terminal layout, comfort, seating, WiFi availability, restaurant options, retail vendors, and level of staff service, per the firm.Doha's Hamad International Airport held onto its crown this year after being named the top airport in the world in 2021. Last year was the first time in eight years that Singapore's Changi International Airport was dethroned as the number one airport.Among the top 20 airports in the world, there were 10 in Asia and 10 in Europe. Australia's Melbourne International Airport came in at number 26, while only two North American airports made the top 30, including Seattle-Tacoma and Vancouver.Overall, 12 US airports managed to crack the top 100 list, while Canada only earned three spots. Here's a closer look at the top 20 airports in the world, according to SkyTrax.20. Hong Kong International AirportHong Kong International Airport.Lee Yiu Tung/Shutterstock.comHong Kong International Airport fell from number 10 in 2021 to number 20 this year. The airport is the gateway to Hong Kong, once serving as one of the largest cargo and passenger airports in the world. However, the COVID-19 pandemic caused the hub to lose significant traffic, and effectively fall "off the map," Bloomberg reported.Despite the low numbers, it still earned the title of best airport with less than two million passengers, according to SkyTrax. The airport serves as a base for Cathay Pacific, Cathay Dragon, Hong Kong Airlines, Hong Kong Express Airways, and cargo carrier Air Hong Kong.19. Vienna International AirportVienna International Airport.Uskarp/Shutterstock.comVienna International Airport jumped four spots from number 23 in 2021 to number 19 in 2022. The airport is a gateway to Central Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East, and acts as a hub for Austrian Airlines. Vienna is also a focus city for Eurowings Europe, ultra-low-cost airline Ryanair, Korean Air Cargo, and Hungarian-based Wizz Air.18. Guangzhou Baiyun International AirportGuangzhou Baiyun International Airport.Markus Mainka/Shutterstock.comChina's Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport ranked number 18 in 2022, falling four spots from last year. Besides earning a top 20 spot, the airport also earned several other awards, including being the best airport in China, the cleanest airport in China, and the best airport with over 40 million passengers.Guangzhou acts as a hub for China Southern Airlines, 9 Air, FedEx Express, Shenzhen Airlines, and Hainan Airlines, and as a focus city for China Eastern Airlines.17. Copenhagen AirportCopenhagen Airport.Stig Alenas/Shutterstock.comCopenhagen Airport, which serves as a gateway to the Oresund region of Denmark, jumped one spot from number 18 in 2021. The airport also earned an award for the best immigration processing. Copenhagen serves as a hub for Scandinavian Airlines and Norwegian Air Shuttle, and a focus city for Danish carrier DAT. 16. Madrid-Barajas AirportMadrid-Barajas Adolfo Suárez Airport.Izabela_h/Shutterstock.comSpain's Madrid-Barajas Airport rose four spots in 2022 after barely making the top 20 list last year. The airport is the gateway to Madrid, as well as a popular connection point for Europeans traveling to and from Latin America. Madrid-Barajas is a hub airport for Iberia, Air Europa, easyJet, Ryanair, and Vueling.15.  Amsterdam Schiphol AirportSchiphol Airport, AmsterdamGrace Dean/InsiderAmsterdam Schipol Airport fell three spots in 2022. The airport is one of the busiest and largest in the world, acting as a gateway to Europe and the Netherlands. Amsterdam also won the award for best airport website and digital services. Dutch flag carrier KLM, KLM Cityhopper, KLM Cargo, and cargo carrier Martinair use the airport as a hub.14. Dubai International AirportDubai International Airport.Sorbis/Shutterstock.comDubai International Airport rose five spots this year, ranking number 14 in 2022. The airport is a major gateway to the United Arab Emirates, is one of the largest airports in the Middle East, and is a major cargo hub in the region. Dubai has become a key hub for Emirates, which operates the largest fleet of Airbus A380 jumbo jets. The airport is also home to FedEx Express and Flydubai.13. London Heathrow AirportLondon Heathrow Airport.Gordon Bell/Shutterstock.comLondon Heathrow Airport fell out of the top 10 this year, having ranked number eight in 2021. The airport is one of the busiest in the world and serves as the main international gateway to London. Heathrow is a base for British Airways and a focus city for Virgin Atlantic.12. Chubu Centrair International AirportNagoya Chubu Centrair International Airport.TungCheung/Shutterstock.comJapan's Chubu Centrair International Airport still felt short of making the top 10 list this year after ranking 11 in 2021. The airport is the gateway to the Chubu region of the country and was named the best regional airport in the world. Chubu is a hub for All Nippon Airways and Jetstar Japan, and a focus city for Japan Airlines and Polar Air Cargo.11. Helsinki-Vantaa AirportHelsinki-Vantaa Airport.Yasni/Shutterstock.comFinland's Helsinki-Vantaa Airport was named the number 11 best airport in the world for 2022, jumping two spots from last year. The airport also earned the title of the best airport in northern Europe. Helsinki is home to Finland flag carrier Finnair and Nordic regional airline Norra.10. Kansai International AirportKansai International Airport.Lewis Tse Pui Lung/Shutterstock.comRounding out the top 10 best airports is Kansai International Airport at number 10, which serves as the main gateway to the Greater Osaka region of Japan. In addition to making the top 10 list, Kansai earned two other awards, including the best low-cost terminal and the best airport for baggage delivery. All Nippon Airways, FedEx Express, Japan Airlines, Jetstar Japan, Nippon Cargo Airlines, and Peach are hubbed at Kansai.9. Zurich AirportZurich Airport.Ko Aun Lee/Shutterstock.comZurich Airport maintained its top 10 spots this year but fell two spots from number seven in 2021. The airport is one of Switzerland's busiest airports, acting as a hub for Edelweiss Air and Swiss International Airlines. Zurich won a handful of additional awards, including being the best airport for security processing and being the cleanest airport in Europe.8. Istanbul AirportIstanbul Airport.gokcentunc/Shutterstock.comLocated on the European side of Turkey, Istanbul Airport jumped nine spots from number 17 in 2021 to number 8 in 2022. The hub airport is new, officially opening in April 2019 and becoming the city's main international gateway. Istanbul Airport is still being expanded, and, by 2025, is set to become the world's largest airport by passenger traffic with the capability to handle 200 million travelers per year, according to the airport.Istanbul is home to Turkish Airlines and won several other awards, including the best family-friendly airport, best airport shopping, best airport in southern Europe, and best airport with 30-40 million passengers.7. Munich AirportMunich Airport.Mikhail Markovskiy/ShutterstockMunich Airport stayed in the top 10 this year, only falling one spot from 2021. The airport earned several other awards, including being named the best airport in central Europe, being the best airport with 10 to 15 million passengers, and having the best airport hotel. Munich is one of the busiest in Germany by passenger traffic and acts as a hub for Lufthansa and Lufthansa CityLine. 6. Paris Charles de Gaulle AirportParis Charles de Gaulle Airport.Alexandre Rotenberg/Shutterstock.comParis Charles de Gaulle Airport jumped nine spots from number 15 in 2021 to number six in 2022. The airport, which is one of the busiest in the world, was also named the best airport in Europe and the best airport in Western Europe. Charles de Gaulle is home to Air France, Air France Cargo, and FedEx Express.5. Incheon International AirportIncheon International Airport.Sorbis/Shutterstock.comRounding out the top five airports in the world is South Korea's Incheon International Airport. The airport is a major international gateway and is home to several carriers, including Air Busan, Air Incheon, Air Seoul, Asiana Airlines, Eastar Jet, FedEx Express, Jeju Air, Jin Air, Korean Air, Polar Air Cargo, and T'way Air. Incheon is also a focus city for Thai Airways, China Eastern Airlines, and China Southern Airlines.4.  Narita International AirportNarita International Airport.Kazzure Gonzalez/Shutterstock.comJapan's Narita International Airport stayed in the top five this year, coming in at number four. The airport is the second-largest in the city and a main international gateway into the Greater Tokyo region. Narita was named the best airport for five to 10 million passengers and serves as a hub for Japan Airlines, All Nippon Airways, Jetstar Japan, Nippon Cargo Airlines, Peach, Spring Airlines Japan, and ZIPAIR Tokyo.3.  Singapore Changi AirportSingapore Changi Airport.Stefano Zaccaria/Shutterstock.comAfter losing its crown in 2021, Singapore Changi Airport has been named the third-best airport in the world for 2022. The airport earned the top title from 2013 to 2020 but was beat out by Doha's Hamad International Airport last year.Despite once-again falling short, the airport still won several awards this year, including best airport staff in the world and Asia, best airport dining, and best airport for two to five million passengers. Changi has several amenities, like a swimming pool and movie theater, and is home to Singapore Airlines, Jetstar Asia Airways, Scoot, and SilkAir.2. Tokyo International Airport.Tokyo International Airportglen photo/Shutterstock.comTokyo International Airport, commonly known as Haneda Airport, is once again the second-best airport in the world. The airport is the busier of the two airports serving Tokyo, having been restricted to just domestic and regional flying for many years. However, international flights were launched in 2010, and the airport is a convenient option for inbound passengers visiting Tokyo.The airport won a handful of other awards this year, including being the world's cleanest airport, the world's best domestic airport, having the best accessible facilities, and being the best airport in Asia. Haneda is home to Air Do, Japan Airlines, All Nippon Airways, Skymark Airlines, and Skynet Asia Airways.1. Hamad International AirportHamad International Airport.Thomas Pallini/InsiderDoha's Hamad International Airport is once again the best airport in the world, having dethroned Singapore Changi Airport for the top title in 2021. Hamad is the primary gateway to Qatar after replacing the country's old airport in 2014.The airport is home to several amenities and vendors, as well as a convenient passenger train that easily shuttles travelers through the terminals. Flag carrier Qatar Airways is the main airline hubbed at Hamad.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 18th, 2022