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Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallMay 25th, 2021

Cashing In On a Cleaner Future

Tremendous amounts of capital are moving into renewable energy projects, but investors can still get in near the "ground floor of green". Ben Rains will show you how to profit from the clean energy revolution. The clean energy movement has been slowly building for decades, and the U.S. appears to finally be on the cusp of a paradigm shift. A mixture of public and private investment is ramping up to accelerate the transition away from fossil fuels. Various bills floating around Washington plan to dedicate billions of dollars to the cause.Greener energy is, of course, far from black and white. Beltway partisanship could certainly slow or curb any serious government spending on clean energy initiatives.Luckily, decades of microscopic progress, coupled with a more recent global push to go greener, means clean energy doesn’t need a trillion-dollar package to thrive. In fact, the U.S. is already much further along the green road than many might assume.The Biden administration set an ambitious goal to “generate clean, American-made electricity to achieve a carbon pollution-free power sector by 2035.” Many analysts and experts understand the goal is somewhat symbolic and is likely an attempt to spur faster adoption of cleaner energy.But the fact that a U.S. president can even float this lofty clean energy goal highlights the major progress already made. It also gives us a peek into the vast amounts of money that could soon flow into the clean, green, and renewable economic ecosystem.And despite the progress, investors still have a chance to get in near the ground floor of green.Continued . . .------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------5 Infrastructure Stocks with Breakout Profit PotentialWith massive amounts of federal spending potentially on the way soon, a select number of infrastructure stocks are poised for a historic surge. Some stocks have doubled... tripled... even 6X’d the S&P – and the money hasn’t even started flowing yet.Zacks has just updated How to Profit from Trillions in Spending for Infrastructure, an urgent report to help investors take full advantage of this rare opportunity.Infrastructure stocks have recently soared as much as +81%... +150%... even +248%.¹ The 5 stocks in this report could rival those returns. Don't delay: this Special Report is only available until Sunday, September 26.See 5 Top Infrastructure Stocks Now >>------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Rather Green Already Renewable energy is far from modern, with various forms of hydropower dating back thousands of years. The first U.S. alternating current hydropower plant began delivering power in Redlands, California in 1893.Wind then began to pop up in the early 1990s, though it remained largely insignificant until the mid-2000s. Solar is the latest bloomer in the current crop of clean energy sources and it did not really arrive until the mid-2010s.Overall, renewables accounted for 20% of the total U.S. electricity generation mix last year, to put it right on par with nuclear energy and just inching ahead of coal. This figure alone might be rather shocking to many. Meanwhile, natural gas led the charge at 40%.Renewables account for one-fifth of total U.S. electricity generation and the EIA projects renewable’s share of the electricity generation mix will double by 2050, from 20% last year to 42%. The report predicts renewables will surpass natural gas over this stretch.More broadly, the International Energy Agency expects renewables will provide 80% of the growth in global electricity demand through 2030. The IEA projected global coal demand won’t ever return to its 2014 peak, as wealthy nations turn to cleaner alternatives.The Solar StoryClean and green energy is poised to grow its share of power generation in the U.S. and beyond in both the near term and for decades to come. That said, many stocks within the broader green space already experienced rather hyperbolic runs. Many of these stocks and broad-industry tracking ETFs soared off the coronavirus lows and then skyrocketed after the November election, only to tumble somewhat quickly back to earth.The logic followed that the new Biden administration would quickly pass trillion-dollar green-focused legislation and kick clean energy into high gear. Clearly this didn’t happen, and the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill the Senate passed in August faces, as of this writing, some substantial hurdles.More importantly, not all companies are good investments. Many of the vogue ESG (Environmental, Social and Governance) funds’ top holdings are mega-cap tech stocks. There are, of course, some names who boast strong businesses within key aspects of the nascent market.The simple numbers point to growth potential in wind and solar, with solar remaining the least utilized green energy source. In 2020, solar accounted for only 2.3% of total U.S. electricity generation, while hydropower made up 7.3% and wind grabbed 8.4%. Solar’s runway offers the most potential, but the right technology is needed in order to harness and store the power, especially in places where it’s not always sunny.Solar energy’s total share of the electricity market was less than 1% above biomass in 2020 and Wall Street isn’t trying to discover ways to pour money into the oldest form of energy. Solar technology remains largely in its infancy, which is why it’s an attractive space.Last year, solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity additions in the U.S. jumped 25% overall, with utility-scale up nearly 29% and small-scale up 19%. About 90% of solar panel shipments were imported, mostly from countries in Asia.The EIA projects solar will pick up the slack and account for 80% of the increase in generation through 2050.Where’s the Money... Projections are rarely precise, especially when looking decades out, yet it seems rather safe to say the future of energy consumption will be a lot greener. Wall Street is currently honing in on the best ways to profit from the new era of energy.The most basic investment pockets for clean energy at the moment are solar, wind, and ancillary segments. Even though solar panels themselves are the catch-all phrase and growing in popularity with businesses, governments, and homeowners, they are highly competitive and rather low-margin.Instead, Wall Street has gravitated to a slightly higher-tech and higher-margin segment of solar that converts the DC power solar photovoltaic panels produced into the AC power used in our homes and businesses. Some of the inverter stocks have skyrocketed over the last five years and have held up in 2021 even as many other companies faded following the epic rise to start the year.Inverters are essential to the solar energy ecosystem and a few of the standout names hold numerous patents on their various technologies. These firms have ample runway as solar energy grows in popularity, with many envisioning a smart-home future where solar panels power homes, electric cars (EV), and even allow consumers to sell electricity back to the grid.Companies are also currently working to expand power storage, EV charging, batteries, grid services solutions, and more. Firms able to successfully master the energy storage capabilities and capacity needed to support a much greener future will be stars.A Possible Sleeping Giant  Next-generation nuclear power could be a hidden investment gem in the coming decades.The U.S. is currently the world’s largest producer of nuclear power and it surpassed coal in annual electricity generation in the U.S. for the first time ever last year. In fact, nuclear energy provided 52% of America’s carbon-free electricity in 2020, making it the largest domestic source of clean energy, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.Yet, nuclear’s share of U.S. electrical generation has remained remarkably stagnant during the last several decades, having supplied around 20% of the nation’s electricity every year since 1990.The U.S. could be ready to invest in next-generation reactors, as consistent forms of non-fossil fuel power are needed to go along with wind, solar, and hydro. The recent craziness with uranium prices might be an early comeback signal.Profiting from the Clean Energy Revolution The push to make our nation greener is set to pump tremendous amounts of capital into renewable energy projects.If the bipartisan infrastructure bill is approved, it will be a powerful tailwind pushing the space forward. As it currently stands, the deal includes the largest investment in clean energy transmission in American history.But this is just one industry preparing for a big shift. The country needs upgraded infrastructure virtually across the board. The infrastructure bill has highlighted the need, and private investment is beginning to ramp up in response.A handful of stocks could generate significant profits in the weeks and months ahead, and I've just updated a special report to help you capitalize on them.How to Profit from Trillions in Spending for Infrastructure provides my top 5 recommendations for targeting significant gains, including:• A fast-growing clean energy firm that’s made a string of acquisitions across several states and Canada...• A powerful transportation company whose stock price has climbed 2X faster than its industry...• An iconic brand with a new CEO, a new focus on technology, and earnings that are projected to skyrocket 300%...• Plus 2 more stocks that could hand you substantial gains as America upgrades its infrastructure from coast to coast. Infrastructure stocks have already climbed as high as +249% in the past year, and the stocks in this report could rival those gains over time.Don’t delay. This Special Report is only available until Sunday, September 26.Click here to claim your copy of How to Profit from Trillions in Spending for Infrastructure >>Good Investing,Ben RainsStock Strategist¹ The results listed above are not (or may not be) representative of the performance of all selections made by Zacks Investment Research's newsletter editors and may represent the partial close of a position.  Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 22nd, 2021

Futures Bounce On Evergrande Reprieve With Fed Looming

Futures Bounce On Evergrande Reprieve With Fed Looming Despite today's looming hawkish FOMC meeting in which Powell is widely expected to unveil that tapering is set to begin as soon as November and where the Fed's dot plot may signal one rate hike in 2022, futures climbed as investor concerns over China's Evergrande eased after the property developer negotiated a domestic bond payment deal. Commodities rallied while the dollar was steady. Contracts on the S&P 500 and Nasdaq 100 flipped from losses to gains as China’s central bank boosted liquidity when it injected a gross 120BN in yuan, the most since January... ... and investors mulled a vaguely-worded statement from the troubled developer about an interest payment.  S&P 500 E-minis were up 23.0 points, or 0.53%, at 7:30 a.m. ET. Dow E-minis were up 199 points, or 0.60%, and Nasdaq 100 E-minis were up 44.00 points, or 0.29%. Among individual stocks, Fedex fell 5.8% after the delivery company cut its profit outlook on higher costs and stalled growth in shipments. Morgan Stanley says it sees the company’s 1Q issues getting “tougher from here.” Commodity-linked oil and metal stocks led gains in premarket trade, while a slight rise in Treasury yields supported major banks. However, most sectors were nursing steep losses in recent sessions. Here are some of the biggest U.S. movers: Adobe (ADBE US) down 3.1% after 3Q update disappointed the high expectations of investors, though the broader picture still looks solid, Morgan Stanley said in a note Freeport McMoRan (FCX US), Cleveland- Cliffs (CLF US), Alcoa (AA US) and U.S. Steel (X US) up 2%-3% premarket, following the path of global peers as iron ore prices in China rallied Aethlon Medical (AEMD US) and Exela Technologies (XELAU US) advance along with other retail traders’ favorites in the U.S. premarket session. Aethlon jumps 21%; Exela up 8.3% Other so-called meme stocks also rise: ContextLogic +1%; Clover Health +0.9%; Naked Brand +0.9%; AMC +0.5% ReWalk Robotics slumps 18% in U.S. premarket trading, a day after nearly doubling in value Stitch Fix (SFIX US) rises 15.7% in light volume after the personal styling company’s 4Q profit and sales blew past analysts’ expectations Hyatt Hotels (H US) seen opening lower after the company launches a seven-million-share stock offering Summit Therapeutics (SMMT US) shares fell as much as 17% in Tuesday extended trading after it said the FDA doesn’t agree with the change to the primary endpoint that has been implemented in the ongoing Phase III Ri-CoDIFy studies when combining the studies Marin Software (MRIN US) surged more than 75% Tuesday postmarket after signing a new revenue-sharing agreement with Google to develop its enterprise technology platforms and software products The S&P 500 had fallen for 10 of the past 12 sessions since hitting a record high, as fears of an Evergrande default exacerbated seasonally weak trends and saw investors pull out of stocks trading at lofty valuations. The Nasdaq fell the least among its peers in recent sessions, as investors pivoted back into big technology names that had proven resilient through the pandemic. Focus now turns to the Fed's decision, due at 2 p.m. ET where officials are expected to signal a start to scaling down monthly bond purchases (see our preview here).  The Fed meeting comes after a period of market volatility stoked by Evergrande’s woes. China’s wider property-sector curbs are also feeding into concerns about a slowdown in the economic recovery from the pandemic. “Chair Jerome Powell could hint at the tapering approaching shortly,” said Sébastien Barbé, a strategist at Credit Agricole CIB. “However, given the current uncertainty factors (China property market, Covid, pace of global slowdown), the Fed should remain cautious when it comes to withdrawing liquidity support.” Meanwhile, confirming what Ray Dalio said that the taper will just bring more QE, Governing Council member Madis Muller said the  European Central Bank may boost its regular asset purchases once the pandemic-era emergency stimulus comes to an end. “Dovish signals could unwind some of the greenback’s gains while offering relief to stock markets,” Han Tan, chief market analyst at Exinity Group, wrote in emailed comments. A “hawkish shift would jolt markets, potentially pushing Treasury yields and the dollar past the upper bound of recent ranges, while gold and equities would sell off hunting down the next levels of support.” China avoided a major selloff as trading resumed following a holiday, after the country’s central bank boosted its injection of short-term cash into the financial system. MSCI’s Asia-Pacific index declined for a third day, dragged lower by Japan. Stocks were also higher in Europe. Basic resources - which bounced from a seven month low - and energy were among the leading gainers in the Stoxx Europe 600 index as commodity prices steadied after Beijing moved to contain fears of a spiraling debt crisis. Entain Plc rose more than 7%, extending Tuesday’s gain as it confirmed it received a takeover proposal from DraftKings Inc. Peer Flutter Entertainment Plc climbed after settling a legal dispute.  Here are some of the biggest European movers today: Entain shares jump as much as 11% after DraftKings Inc. offered to acquire the U.K. gambling company for about $22.4 billion. Vivendi rises as much as 3.1% in Paris, after Tuesday’s spinoff of Universal Music Group. Legrand climbs as much as 2.1% after Exane BNP Paribas upgrades to outperform and raises PT to a Street-high of EU135. Orpea shares falls as much as 2.9%, after delivering 1H results that Jefferies (buy) says were a “touch” below consensus. Bechtle slides as much as 5.1% after Metzler downgrades to hold from buy, saying persistent supply chain problems seem to be weighing on growth. Sopra Steria drops as much as 4.1% after Stifel initiates coverage with a sell, citing caution on company’s M&A strategy Despite the Evergrande announcement, Asian stocks headed for their longest losing streak in more than a month amid continued China-related concerns, with traders also eying policy decisions from major central banks. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index dropped as much as 0.7% in its third day of declines, with TSMC and Keyence the biggest drags. China’s CSI 300 tumbled as much as 1.9% as the local market reopened following a two-day holiday. However, the gauge came off lows after an Evergrande unit said it will make a bond interest payment and as China’s central bank boosted liquidity.  Taiwan’s equity benchmark led losses in Asia on Wednesday, dragged by TSMC after a two-day holiday, while markets in Hong Kong and South Korea were closed. Key stock gauges in Australia, Indonesia and Vietnam rose “A liquidity injection from the People’s Bank of China accompanied the Evergrande announcement, which only served to bolster sentiment further,” according to DailyFX’s Thomas Westwater and Daniel Dubrovsky. “For now, it appears that market-wide contagion risk linked to a potential Evergrande collapse is off the table.” Japanese equities fell for a second day amid global concern over China’s real-estate sector, as the Bank of Japan held its key stimulus tools in place while flagging pressures on the economy. Electronics makers were the biggest drag on the Topix, which declined 1%. Daikin and Fanuc were the largest contributors to a 0.7% loss in the Nikkei 225. The BOJ had been expected to maintain its policy levers ahead of next week’s key ruling party election. Traders are keenly awaiting the Federal Reserve’s decision due later for clues on the U.S. central banks plan for tapering stimulus. “Markets for some time have been convinced that the BOJ has reached the end of the line on normalization and will remain in a holding pattern on policy until at least April 2023 when Governor Kuroda is scheduled to leave,” UOB economist Alvin Liew wrote in a note. “Attention for the BOJ will now likely shift to dealing with the long-term climate change issues.” In the despotic lockdown regime that is Australia, the S&P/ASX 200 index rose 0.3% to close at 7,296.90, reversing an early decline in a rally led by mining and energy stocks. Banks closed lower for the fourth day in a row. Champion Iron was among the top performers after it was upgraded at Citi. IAG was among the worst performers after an earthquake caused damage to buildings in Melbourne. In New Zealand, the S&P/NZX 50 index rose 0.3% to 13,215.80 In FX, commodity currencies rallied as concerns about China Evergrande Group’s debt troubles eased as China’s central bank boosted liquidity and investors reviewed a statement from the troubled developer about an interest payment. Overnight implied volatility on the pound climbed to the highest since March ahead of Bank of England’s meeting on Thursday. The British pound weakened after Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng warnedthat people should prepare for longer-term high energy prices amid a natural-gas shortage that sent power costs soaring. Several U.K. power firms have stopped taking in new clients as small energy suppliers struggle to meet their previous commitments to sell supplies at lower prices. Overnight volatility in the euro rises above 10% for the first time since July ahead of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policy decision announcement. The Aussie jumped as much as 0.5% as iron-ore prices rebounded. Spot surged through option-related selling at 0.7240 before topping out near 0.7265 strikes expiring Wednesday, according to Asia- based FX traders.  Elsewhere, the yen weakened and commodity-linked currencies such as the Australian dollar pushed higher. In rates, the dollar weakened against most of its Group-of-10 peers. Treasury futures were under modest pressure in early U.S. trading, leaving yields cheaper by ~1.5bp from belly to long-end of the curve. The 10-year yield was at ~1.336% steepening the 2s10s curve by ~1bp as the front-end was little changed. Improved risk appetite weighed; with stock futures have recovering much of Tuesday’s losses as Evergrande concerns subside. Focal point for Wednesday’s session is FOMC rate decision at 2pm ET.   FOMC is expected to suggest it will start scaling back asset purchases later this year, while its quarterly summary of economic projections reveals policy makers’ expectations for the fed funds target in coming years in the dot-plot update; eurodollar positions have emerged recently that anticipate a hawkish shift Bitcoin dropped briefly below $40,000 for the first time since August amid rising criticism from regulators, before rallying as the mood in global markets improved. In commodities, Iron ore halted its collapse and metals steadied. Oil advanced for a second day. Bitcoin slid below $40,000 for the first time since early August before rebounding back above $42,000.   To the day ahead now, and the main highlight will be the aforementioned Federal Reserve decision and Chair Powell’s subsequent press conference. Otherwise on the data side, we’ll get US existing home sales for August, and the European Commission’s advance consumer confidence reading for the Euro Area in September. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures up 0.4% to 4,362.25 STOXX Europe 600 up 0.5% to 461.19 MXAP down 0.7% to 199.29 MXAPJ down 0.4% to 638.39 Nikkei down 0.7% to 29,639.40 Topix down 1.0% to 2,043.55 Hang Seng Index up 0.5% to 24,221.54 Shanghai Composite up 0.4% to 3,628.49 Sensex little changed at 59,046.84 Australia S&P/ASX 200 up 0.3% to 7,296.94 Kospi up 0.3% to 3,140.51 Brent Futures up 1.5% to $75.47/bbl Gold spot up 0.0% to $1,775.15 U.S. Dollar Index little changed at 93.26 German 10Y yield rose 0.6 bps to -0.319% Euro little changed at $1.1725 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg What would it take to knock the U.S. recovery off course and send Federal Reserve policy makers back to the drawing board? Not much — and there are plenty of candidates to deliver the blow The European Central Bank will discuss boosting its regular asset purchases once the pandemic-era emergency stimulus comes to an end, but any such increase is uncertain, Governing Council member Madis Muller said Investors seeking hints about how Beijing plans to deal with China Evergrande Group’s debt crisis are training their cross hairs on the central bank’s liquidity management A quick look at global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asian equity markets traded mixed as caution lingered ahead of upcoming risk events including the FOMC, with participants also digesting the latest Evergrande developments and China’s return to the market from the Mid-Autumn Festival. ASX 200 (+0.3%) was positive with the index led higher by the energy sector after a rebound in oil prices and as tech also outperformed, but with gains capped by weakness in the largest-weighted financials sector including Westpac which was forced to scrap the sale of its Pacific businesses after failing to secure regulatory approval. Nikkei 225 (-0.7%) was subdued amid the lack of fireworks from the BoJ announcement to keep policy settings unchanged and ahead of the upcoming holiday closure with the index only briefly supported by favourable currency outflows. Shanghai Comp. (+0.4%) was initially pressured on return from the long-weekend and with Hong Kong markets closed, but pared losses with risk appetite supported by news that Evergrande’s main unit Hengda Real Estate will make coupon payments due tomorrow, although other sources noted this is referring to the onshore bond payments valued around USD 36mln and that there was no mention of the offshore bond payments valued at USD 83.5mln which are also due tomorrow. Meanwhile, the PBoC facilitated liquidity through a CNY 120bln injection and provided no surprises in keeping its 1-year and 5-year Loan Prime Rates unchanged for the 17th consecutive month at 3.85% and 4.65%, respectively. Finally, 10yr JGBs were flat amid the absence of any major surprises from the BoJ policy announcement and following the choppy trade in T-notes which were briefly pressured in a knee-jerk reaction to the news that Evergrande’s unit will satisfy its coupon obligations tomorrow, but then faded most of the losses as cautiousness prevailed. Top Asian News Gold Steady as Traders Await Outcome of Fed Policy Meeting Evergrande Filing on Yuan Bond Interest Leaves Analysts Guessing Singapore Category E COE Price Rises to Highest Since April 2014 Asian Stocks Fall for Third Day as Focus Turns to Central Banks European equities (Stoxx 600 +0.5%) trade on a firmer footing in the wake of an encouraging APAC handover. Focus overnight was on the return of Chinese participants from the Mid-Autumn Festival and news that Evergrande’s main unit, Hengda Real Estate will make coupon payments due tomorrow; however, we await indication as to whether they will meet Thursday’s offshore payment deadline as well. Furthermore, the PBoC facilitated liquidity through a CNY 120bln injection whilst keeping its 1-year and 5-year Loan Prime Rates unchanged (as expected). Note, despite gaining yesterday and today, thus far, the Stoxx 600 is still lower to the tune of 0.7% on the week. Stateside, futures are also trading on a firmer footing ahead of today’s FOMC policy announcement, at which, market participants will be eyeing any clues for when the taper will begin and digesting the latest dot plot forecasts. Furthermore, the US House voted to pass the bill to fund the government through to December 3rd and suspend the debt limit to end-2022, although this will likely be blocked by Senate Republicans. Back to Europe, sectors are mostly firmer with outperformance in Basic Resources and Oil & Gas amid upside in the metals and energy complex. Elsewhere, Travel & Leisure is faring well amid further upside in Entain (+6.1%) with the Co. noting it rejected an earlier approach from DraftKings at GBP 25/shr with the new offer standing at GBP 28/shr. Additionally for the sector, Flutter Entertainment (+4.1%) are trading higher after settling the legal dispute between the Co. and Commonwealth of Kentucky. Elsewhere, in terms of deal flow, Iliad announced that it is to acquire UPC Poland for around USD 1.8bln. Top European News Energy Cost Spike Gets on EU Ministers’ Green Deal Agenda Travel Startup HomeToGo Gains in Frankfurt Debut After SPAC Deal London Stock Exchange to Shut Down CurveGlobal Exchange EU Banks Expected to Add Capital for Climate Risk, EBA Says In FX, trade remains volatile as this week’s deluge of global Central Bank policy meetings continues to unfold amidst fluctuations in broad risk sentiment from relatively pronounced aversion at various stages to a measured and cautious pick-up in appetite more recently. Hence, the tide is currently turning in favour of activity, cyclical and commodity currencies, albeit tentatively in the run up to the Fed, with the Kiwi and Aussie trying to regroup on the 0.7000 handle and 0.7350 axis against their US counterpart, and the latter also striving to shrug off negative domestic impulses like a further decline below zero in Westpac’s leading index and an earthquake near Melbourne. Next up for Nzd/Usd and Aud/Usd, beyond the FOMC, trade data and preliminary PMIs respectively. DXY/CHF/EUR/CAD - Notwithstanding the overall improvement in market tone noted above, or another major change in mood and direction, the Dollar index appears to have found a base just ahead of 93.000 and ceiling a similar distance away from 93.500, as it meanders inside those extremes awaiting US existing home sales that are scheduled for release before the main Fed events (policy statement, SEP and post-meeting press conference from chair Powell). Indeed, the Franc, Euro and Loonie have all recoiled into tighter bands vs the Greenback, between 0.9250-26, 1.1739-17 and 1.2831-1.2770, but with the former still retaining an underlying bid more evident in the Eur/Chf cross that is consolidating under 1.0850 and will undoubtedly be acknowledged by the SNB tomorrow. Meanwhile, Eur/Usd has hardly reacted to latest ECB commentary from Muller underpinning that the APP is likely to be boosted once the PEPP envelope is closed, though Usd/Cad is eyeing a firm rebound in oil prices in conjunction with hefty option expiry interest at the 1.2750 strike (1.8 bn) that may prevent the headline pair from revisiting w-t-d lows not far beneath the half round number. GBP/JPY - The major laggards, as Sterling slips slightly further beneath 1.3650 against the Buck to a fresh weekly low and Eur/Gbp rebounds from circa 0.8574 to top 0.8600 on FOMC day and T-1 to super BoE Thursday. Elsewhere, the Yen has lost momentum after peaking around 109.12 and still not garnering sufficient impetus to test 109.00 via an unchanged BoJ in terms of all policy settings and guidance, as Governor Kuroda trotted out the no hesitation to loosen the reins if required line for the umpteenth time. However, Usd/Jpy is holding around 109.61 and some distance from 1.1 bn option expiries rolling off between 109.85-110.00 at the NY cut. SCANDI/EM - Brent’s revival to Usd 75.50+/brl from sub-Usd 73.50 only yesterday has given the Nok another fillip pending confirmation of a Norges Bank hike tomorrow, while the Zar has regained some poise with the aid of firmer than forecast SA headline and core CPI alongside a degree of retracement following Wednesday’s breakdown of talks on a pay deal for engineering workers that prompted the union to call a strike from early October. Similarly, the Cnh and Cny by default have regrouped amidst reports that the CCP is finalising details to restructure Evergrande into 3 separate entities under a plan that will see the Chinese Government take control. In commodities, WTI and Brent are firmer this morning though once again fresh newsflow for the complex has been relatively slim and largely consisting of gas-related commentary; as such, the benchmarks are taking their cue from the broader risk tone (see equity section). The improvement in sentiment today has brought WTI and Brent back in proximity to being unchanged on the week so far as a whole; however, the complex will be dictated directly by the EIA weekly inventory first and then indirectly, but perhaps more pertinently, by today’s FOMC. On the weekly inventories, last nights private release was a larger than expected draw for the headline and distillate components, though the Cushing draw was beneath expectations; for today, consensus is a headline draw pf 2.44mln. Moving to metals where the return of China has seen a resurgence for base metals with LME copper posting upside of nearly 3.0%, for instance. Albeit there is no fresh newsflow for the complex as such, so it remains to be seen how lasting this resurgence will be. Finally, spot gold and silver are firmer but with the magnitude once again favouring silver over the yellow metal. US Event Calendar 10am: Aug. Existing Home Sales MoM, est. -1.7%, prior 2.0% 2pm: Sept. FOMC Rate Decision (Lower Boun, est. 0%, prior 0% DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap All eyes firmly on China this morning as it reopens following a 2-day holiday. As expected the indices there have opened lower but the scale of the declines are being softened by the PBoC increasing its short term cash injections into the economy. They’ve added a net CNY 90bn into the system. On Evergrande, we’ve also seen some positive headlines as the property developers’ main unit Hengda Real Estate Group has said that it will make coupon payment for an onshore bond tomorrow. However, the exchange filing said that the interest payment “has been resolved via negotiations with bondholders off the clearing house”. This is all a bit vague and doesn’t mention the dollar bond at this stage. Meanwhile, Bloomberg has reported that Chinese authorities have begun to lay the groundwork for a potential restructuring that could be one of the country’s biggest, assembling accounting and legal experts to examine the finances of the group. All this follows news from Bloomberg yesterday that Evergrande missed interest payments that had been due on Monday to at least two banks. In terms of markets the CSI (-1.11%), Shanghai Comp (-0.29%) and Shenzhen Comp (-0.53%) are all lower but have pared back deeper losses from the open. We did a flash poll in the CoTD yesterday (link here) and after over 700 responses in a couple of hours we found only 8% who we thought Evergrande would still be impacting financial markets significantly in a month’s time. 24% thought it would be slightly impacting. The other 68% thought limited or no impact. So the world is relatively relaxed about contagion risk for now. The bigger risk might be the knock on impact of weaker Chinese growth. So that’s one to watch even if you’re sanguine on the systemic threat. Craig Nicol in my credit team did a good note yesterday (link here) looking at the contagion risk to the broader HY market. I thought he summed it up nicely as to why we all need to care one way or another in saying that “Evergrande is the largest corporate, in the largest sector, of the second largest economy in the world”. For context AT&T is the largest corporate borrower in the US market and VW the largest in Europe. Turning back to other Asian markets now and the Nikkei (-0.65%) is down but the Hang Seng (+0.51%) and Asx (+0.58%) are up. South Korean markets continue to remain closed for a holiday. Elsewhere, yields on 10y USTs are trading flattish while futures on the S&P 500 are up +0.10% and those on the Stoxx 50 are up +0.21%. Crude oil prices are also up c.+1% this morning. In other news, the Bank of Japan policy announcement overnight was a non-event as the central bank maintained its yield curve target while keeping the policy rate and asset purchases plan unchanged. The central bank also unveiled more details of its green lending program and said that it would immediately start accepting applications and would begin making the loans in December. The relatively calm Asian session follows a stabilisation in markets yesterday following their rout on Monday as investors looked forward to the outcome of the Fed’s meeting later today. That said, it was hardly a resounding performance, with the S&P 500 unable to hold on to its intraday gains and ending just worse than unchanged after the -1.70% decline the previous day as investors remained vigilant as to the array of risks that continue to pile up on the horizon. One of these is in US politics and legislators seem no closer to resolving the various issues surrounding a potential government shutdown at the end of the month, along with a potential debt ceiling crisis in October, which is another flashing alert on the dashboard for investors that’s further contributing to weaker sentiment right now. Looking ahead now, today’s main highlight will be the latest Federal Reserve decision along with Chair Powell’s subsequent press conference, with the policy decision out at 19:00 London time. Markets have been on edge for any clues about when the Fed might begin to taper asset purchases, but concern about tapering actually being announced at this meeting has dissipated over recent weeks, particularly after the most recent nonfarm payrolls in August came in at just +235k, and the monthly CPI print also came in beneath consensus expectations for the first time since November. In terms of what to expect, our US economists write in their preview (link here) that they see the statement adopting Chair Powell’s language that a reduction in the pace of asset purchases is appropriate “this year”, so long as the economy remains on track. They see Powell maintaining optionality about the exact timing of that announcement, but they think that the message will effectively be that the bar to pushing the announcement beyond November is relatively high in the absence of any material downside surprises. This meeting also sees the release of the FOMC’s latest economic projections and the dot plot, where they expect there’ll be an upward drift in the dots that raises the number of rate hikes in 2023 to 3, followed by another 3 increases in 2024. Back to yesterday, and as mentioned US equity markets fell for a second straight day after being unable to hold on to earlier gains, with the S&P 500 slightly lower (-0.08%). High-growth industries outperformed with biotech (+0.38%) and semiconductors (+0.18%) leading the NASDAQ (+0.22%) slightly higher, however the Dow Jones (-0.15%) also struggled. Europe saw a much stronger performance though as much of the US decline came after Europe had closed. The STOXX 600 gained +1.00% to erase most of Monday’s losses, with almost every sector in the index ending the day in positive territory. With risk sentiment improving for much of the day yesterday, US Treasuries sold off slightly and by the close of trade yields on 10yr Treasuries were up +1.2bps to 1.3226%, thanks to a +1.8bps increase in real yields. However, sovereign bonds in Europe told a different story as yields on 10yr bunds (-0.3bps), OATs (-0.3bps) and BTPs (-1.9bps) moved lower. Other safe havens including gold (+0.59%) and silver (+1.02%) also benefited, but this wasn’t reflected across commodities more broadly, with Bloomberg’s Commodity Spot Index (-0.30%) losing ground for a 4th consecutive session. Democratic Party leaders plan to vote on the Senate-approved $500bn bipartisan infrastructure bill next Monday, even with no resolution to the $3.5tr budget reconciliation measure that encompasses the remainder of the Biden Administration’s economic agenda. Democrats continue to work on the reconciliation measure but have turned their attention to the debt ceiling and government funding bills.Congress has fewer than two weeks before the current budget expires – on Oct 1 – to fund the government and raise the debt ceiling. Republicans yesterday noted that the Democrats could raise the ceiling on their own through the reconciliation process, with many saying that they would not be offering their support to any funding bill. Democrats continue to push for a bipartisan bill to raise the debt ceiling, pointing to their votes during the Trump administration. If Democrats are forced to tie the debt ceiling and funding bills to budget reconciliation, it could limit how much of the $3.5 trillion bill survives the last minute negotiations between progressives and moderates. More to come over the next 10 days. Staying on the US, there was an important announcement in President Biden’s speech at the UN General Assembly, as he said that he would work with Congress to double US funding to poorer nations to deal with climate change. That comes as UK Prime Minister Johnson (with the UK hosting the COP26 summit in less than 6 weeks’ time) has been lobbying other world leaders to find the $100bn per year that developed economies pledged by 2020 to support developing countries as they reduce their emissions and deal with climate change. In Germany, there are just 4 days to go now until the federal election, and a Forsa poll out yesterday showed a slight narrowing in the race, with the centre-left SPD remaining on 25%, but the CDU/CSU gained a point on last week to 22%, which puts them within the +/- 2.5 point margin of error. That narrowing has been seen in Politico’s Poll of Polls as well, with the race having tightened from a 5-point SPD lead over the CDU/CSU last week to a 3-point one now. Turning to the pandemic, Johnson & Johnson reported that their booster shot given 8 weeks after the first offered 100% protection against severe disease, 94% protection against symptomatic Covid in the US, and 75% against symptomatic Covid globally. Speaking of boosters, Bloomberg reported that the FDA was expected to decide as soon as today on a recommendation for Pfizer’s booster vaccine. That follows an FDA advisory panel rejecting a booster for all adults last Friday, restricting the recommendation to those over-65 and other high-risk categories. Staying with the US and vaccines, President Biden announced that the US was ordering 500mn doses of the Pfizer vaccine to be exported to the rest of the world. On the data front, there were some strong US housing releases for August, with housing starts up by an annualised 1.615m (vs. 1.55m expected), and building permits up by 1.728m (vs. 1.6m expected). Separately, the OECD released their Interim Economic Outlook, which saw them upgrade their inflation expectations for the G20 this year to +3.7% (up +0.2ppts from May) and for 2022 to +3.9% (up +0.5ppts from May). Their global growth forecast saw little change at +5.7% in 2021 (down a tenth) and +4.5% for 2022 (up a tenth). To the day ahead now, and the main highlight will be the aforementioned Federal Reserve decision and Chair Powell’s subsequent press conference. Otherwise on the data side, we’ll get US existing home sales for August, and the European Commission’s advance consumer confidence reading for the Euro Area in September. Tyler Durden Wed, 09/22/2021 - 08:05.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeSep 22nd, 2021

Rabobank: Socialism For The Rich And Socialism For The Poor Is The Reality For Us And For Markets

Rabobank: Socialism For The Rich And Socialism For The Poor Is The Reality For Us And For Markets By Michael Every of Rabobank Socialism for the rich / Socialism for the poor US President Biden just spoke at the UN General Assembly, promised no Cold War, and offered nothing but international cooperation: French President Macron deliberately wasn’t there to hear it. China’s Xi Jinping stated all disputes should be handled with “dialogue and cooperation”, and pledged to stop funding offshore coal projects. That’s as nuclear subs and threatened nuclear strikes are the week’s other global stories. When do shoes get bashed on desks, and by whom? This is all as the Wall Street Journal’s Lingling Wei argues “Xi Jinping aims to rein in Chinese capitalism, hew to Mao’s socialist vision”, echoing what I have been argued --again-- in “Profound or profund revolution?”, which explains the ideological roots of the new policy of ‘common prosperity’. Except Lingling has key quotes from people ‘in the room’, where all the elephants are for markets. Here are just some of the highlights: “The Chinese President is not just trying to rein in a few big tech and other companies and show who is boss in China. He is trying to roll back China’s decades-long evolution toward Western-style capitalism and put the country on a different path entirely, a close examination of Mr. Xi’s writings and his discussions with party officials, and interviews with people involved in policy making, show. In Mr. Xi’s opinion, private capital now has been allowed to run amok, menacing the party’s legitimacy, officials familiar with his priorities say. The Wall Street Journal examination shows he is trying forcefully to get China back to the vision of Mao Zedong, who saw capitalism as a transitory phase on the road to socialism. Mr. Xi isn’t planning to eradicate market forces, the Journal examination indicates. But he appears to want a state in which the party does more to steer flows of money, sets tighter parameters for entrepreneurs and investors and their ability to make profits, and exercises even more control over the economy than now. In essence, this suggests that he aims to rewrite the rules of business in what could someday be the world’s biggest economy….the government would have a level of control that would allow it to steer the economy and industry along a path of its choosing, and channel private resources into strengthening state power…."Supervision over foreign capital will be strengthened," said a person familiar with the thinking at China’s top markets regulator.”” Yet I doubt even *that* is clear enough for The Street to understand. Portfolio managers who have been confronted with the above evidence are saying: “I missed the chance to sell last week but we are lower now, so I will stay long.”; “This is a buying opportunity.”; and “It’s behind us, time to buy.” None have read a word of Marx, even after being shown it provides a guide to what happens next, and they don’t plan to. All they need do is not underperform the market and fail conventionally, “because whocouldanooed?” We will no doubt also have US-based billionaires and funds, like a hypothetical ‘Day Rallio’ or ‘Whitepebble’, telling us to go longer Chinese assets, or extolling the virtues of this system. And there are things to extoll: socialism for the poor at least aims to help those who are left behind, and recognizes unregulated markets end up in monopoly or oligopoly and exploitation. Yet that is not what they are selling, but high returns, when China is making clear returns will be low, and only in some sectors at all. If you want a *logical* argument to go long Chinese assets, surely first one needs to have a view on the efficacy of a state-controlled economic model, in the same way one should believe in the tech of a start-up bringing an app to market? Then one needs to accept that it means the equivalent of the low-return-but-safe equivalent of what used to be government bond yields before the failure of free-market capitalism meant we have to pay governments to let us hold their debt. Even that overlooks the longer-run FX down-side risks and the whole Cold War backdrop. Meanwhile, the great joke is that this debate --where there is any-- is taking place against the backdrop of the upcoming Fed policy decision. Markets are on tenterhooks to find out if the FOMC will flag a timetable for the partial removal of the $120bn in QE liquidity it provides to the markets every month, while talking about inequality. In other words, socialism for the rich. The removal of that would be truly revolutionary in the eyes of many, as we are about to undergo another dot-plot Rorschach test.  . Meanwhile, economist Ann Pettifor on central banks points out what will happen when the internal contradictions of our system finally become too great for it to bear: “Fifty years ago, a US president closed the gold window, ended capital controls, and launched a new era of globalized finance. The “Nixon Shock” reshaped the international monetary system overnight, and then gradually changed the status of central bankers. Instead of acting as servants of the domestic economy, monetary policymakers have become masters of the globalized and financialized world economy…Central bankers’ status and constitutional role is therefore primarily a democratic question, not an economic or technical one.” Does this point to higher yields or lower yields ahead? The apparatchiks are already in place in places (and winter palaces), it seems, as “SEC’s Gensler likens stablecoins to 'poker chips’ amid call for tougher crypto regulation”. Gensler is quoted as saying: “History tells us that private forms of money don’t last long,” noting the US experimented with private money in the “wildcat banking era” from the 1830s to the 1860s, which “all had a lot of cost, a lot of problems.” Perhaps time to check if you are holding any NFTs of kulaks? (And meanwhile, Zoom’s $15bn bid for Five9 is under review; the US says it is likely to keep Huawei on its blacklist; and the State Department is reported to be massively expanding its footprint on China, with dozens of new officers in DC and at global embassies to monitor it at all times. No Cold War. All cooperation.) More and more, I am told that what I am talking of here is ‘too much’ for individual market participants to take in or deal with. They want to look at lines on screens; chase spot and ticks; play ‘The Price is Right’, and clock off at 5pm; do the same old deals; or put up stickers saying: “Workers of the world, unite!” or “Don’t tread on me”. We all like to look at the smallest changes in 10-year US bond yields all the time - yet heaven forfend if we have to think about what the world will look like in 10 years’ time! Regardless, socialism for the rich and --or vs-- socialism for the poor is the underlying reality for us and for markets. It may be awkward, or complicated, or involve more thinking than usual about how to trade it properly, but it remains true. On which note, allow me to conclude with an old joke about clashing political ideologies: “Under capitalism, man exploits his fellow man. Under communism, everything is reversed!” Tyler Durden Wed, 09/22/2021 - 09:45.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeSep 22nd, 2021

Dow Surges 2.3% as Boeing Begins Testing the 737 Max

Dow Surges 2.3% as Boeing Begins Testing the 737 Max SPECIAL ALERT: We’ve just released this quarter’s Ultimate Four report which includes four stocks our team believes have the greatest upside potential over the upcoming quarter. This latest report features favorite stocks from David Bartosiak, Tracey Ryniec, Jeremy Mullin and Madeleine Johnson. Log on to Zacks.com to see these stocks today. Coronavirus cases continued to rise over the weekend, but the market decided not to worry about it on Monday. Instead, the major indices each gained well over 1% to begin a holiday-shortened week. The biggest winner was the Dow, which soared 2.32% (or about 580 points) to 25,595.80. The index got a lot of help from Boeing (BA), which soared 14.4% as test flights for the beleaguered 737 Max began today. The airline giant has been a drag on the index for more than a year now, since a pair of crashes in early 2019 grounded the aircraft and led to several lawsuits. Meanwhile, the S&P jumped 1.47% to 3053.24, while the NASDAQ improved 1.2% (or nearly 117 points) to 9874.15. The indices rallied into the close. Stocks are coming back from their second negative week in the past three. This was the penultimate session for the month of June and each of the indices are heading into the final day with gains for the month. It’s been a wild ride as stocks were very optimistic to start the month before growing increasingly skeptical of the recovery in the back half. Unfortunately, we won’t see as strong a month as May (when each of the indices soared by more than 4%), but a positive result would still be encouraging given the herky-jerky recovery amid a rise in virus cases. We also got some help today from really positive pending home sales, which soared 44.3% in May. That’s the largest one-month spike in the survey’s history and showed that buyers were willing – even eager – to put their money to work. This might be a short week since the market is closed on Friday, but it won’t be an uneventful one. The government employment situation report will be released a day early on Thursday. You may remember that the last one was unexpectedly and impressively positive, with the economy adding 2.5 million jobs and the unemployment rate moving lower to 13.3%. It should be a big factor in sentiment as we begin the three-day, July 4th weekend. Today's Portfolio Highlights: Insider Trader: The E&Ps aren't doing nearly as badly as you’d think from their stocks, so Tracey decided to make another buy in the volatile energy space on Monday. The editor picked up Magnolia (MGY), a small-cap, Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) exploration & production company that’s well off its March lows but still down 52% year-to-date. Several companies from this space will likely declare bankruptcy, but Tracey doesn’t think MGY will be one of them. And neither does their CEO apparently, who bought shares of his own company FIVE times this month in a series of 'confidence' buys. The stock was added today with a 10% allocation. However, the editor warns that this one will be a wild ride, so get ready to be “whipped around”. The complete commentary has a lot more on this new addition. TAZR Trader: The portfolio kicked off the week with a pair of buys: Ciena (CIEN) and Inseego (INSG). CIEN is a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) provider of optical networking equipment that reported a beat-and-raise quarter early this month. Analysts have upgraded their outlooks, and the stock is expected to see profit growth of 38% this year. INSG is a small-cap “pioneer” in 5G and intelligent IoT device-to-cloud solutions. It got a lot of attention and a share price surge after partnering with Verizon to rollout 5G in San Diego. It also reported a beat-and-raise quarter, while its 2020 sales consensus is up 37% to more than $300 million. Kevin put 10% into CIEN and 7% in INSG. Read his complete commentary for much more on these moves. Surprise Trader: This portfolio will see a “major purge” this week as Dave gets ready for the beginning of earnings season. Yep, it’s almost that time once again! The editor started today by selling CarMax (KMX) for an approximately 0.65% profit in about two-and-a-half weeks. The new buy is MSC Industrial (MSM), a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) distributor of metalworking and maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) supplies to industrial customers. It has a positive Earnings ESP of 4.95% for the quarter coming before the bell on Wednesday, July 8. The editor added MSM on Monday with a 12.5% allocation. Read more about today’s moves in the full write-up. Healthcare Innovators: Two innovative companies with tons of potential were added on Monday: Acadia Pharmaceuticals (ACAD) and Axcella Health (AXLA). ACAD has a central nervous system drug that's already approved for Parkinson’s disease psychosis, but might also be used for dementia-related psychosis, depression, and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. These opportunities hold billions of dollars of potential, though there is some event risk with the FDA and clinical trial data. Sales of ACAD are expected to grow 30% this year and another 67% next. AXLA is a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) emerging pharma company focused on liver diseases, especially the development of EMMs for NASH, sickle cell, muscle atrophy and others. This stock has a highly speculative risk/reward profile, but Kevin is taking a chance given the potential upside for research into NASH, which is begging for a partnership with a big pharma name. Read the editor’s full write-up for a lot more on these new buys. Black Box Trader: This week's adjustment included three swaps. The stocks that were sold included: • Louisiana-Pacific (LPX, +0.66%) • Herbalife (HLF) • Lennar (LEN) The new buys that replaced these names were: • Commercial Metals (CMC) • Dine Brands (DIN) • Phillips 66 (PSX) Read the Black Box Trader’s Guide to learn more about this computer-driven service designed to take the emotion out of investing. All the Best, Jim Giaquinto Recommendations from Zacks' Private Portfolios: Believe it or not, this article is not available on the Zacks.com website. The commentary is a partial overview of the daily activity from Zacks' private recommendation services. If you would like to follow our Buy and Sell signals in real time, we've made a special arrangement for readers of this website. Starting today you can see all the recommendations from all of Zacks' portfolios absolutely free for 7 days. Our services cover everything from value stocks and momentum trades to insider buying and positive earnings surprises (which we've predicted with an astonishing 80%+ accuracy). Click here to "test drive" Zacks Ultimate for FREE >>  Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 21st, 2021

Nvidia stock gains after Needham ends bearish call

Needham analyst Ari Shusterman upgraded shares of Nvidia Corp. to hold from underperform on Monday, citing an upbeat meeting with management at last week's CES.....»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchJan 13th, 2020

Hexo upgraded to hold from underperform at Jefferies

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchOct 11th, 2019

Netflix stock gains after Deutsche Bank upgrades to buy ahead of earnings

Netflix Inc. shares are up 1.6% in premarket trading Tuesday after Deutsche Bank's Bryan Kraft upgraded the stock to buy from hold. Netflix is scheduled to report first-quarter earnings after the close. Kraft sees room for the company to beat subscr.....»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchApr 16th, 2019

30 Facts You Need To Know: A COVID Cribsheet

30 Facts You Need To Know: A COVID Cribsheet Authored by Kit Knightly via Off-Guardian.org, You asked for it, so we made it. A collection of all the arguments you’ll ever need. We get a lot of e-mails and private messages along these lines “do you have a source for X?” or “can you point me to mask studies?” or “I know I saw a graph for mortality, but I can’t find it anymore”. And we understand, it’s been a long 18 months, and there are so many statistics and numbers to try and keep straight in your head. So, to deal with all these requests, we decided to make a bullet-pointed and sourced list for all the key points. A one-stop-shop. Here are key facts and sources about the alleged “pandemic”, that will help you get a grasp on what has happened to the world since January 2020, and help you enlighten any of your friends who might be still trapped in the New Normal fog: “Covid deaths” – Lockdowns – PCR Tests – “asymptomatic infection” – Ventilators – Masks – Vaccines – Deception & Foreknowledge *  *  * PART I: “COVID DEATHS” & MORTALITY 1. The survival rate of “Covid” is over 99%. Government medical experts went out of their way to underline, from the beginning of the pandemic, that the vast majority of the population are not in any danger from Covid. Almost all studies on the infection-fatality ratio (IFR) of Covid have returned results between 0.04% and 0.5%. Meaning Covid’s survival rate is at least 99.5%. * 2. There has been NO unusual excess mortality. The press has called 2020 the UK’s “deadliest year since world war two”, but this is misleading because it ignores the massive increase in the population since that time. A more reasonable statistical measure of mortality is Age-Standardised Mortality Rate (ASMR): By this measure, 2020 isn’t even the worst year for mortality since 2000, In fact since 1943 only 9 years have been better than 2020. Similarly, in the US the ASMR for 2020 is only at 2004 levels: For a detailed breakdown of how Covid affected mortality across Western Europe and the US click here. What increases in mortality we have seen could be attributable to non-Covid causes [facts 7, 9 & 19]. * 3. “Covid death” counts are artificially inflated. Countries around the globe have been defining a “Covid death” as a “death by any cause within 28/30/60 days of a positive test”. Healthcare officials from Italy, Germany, the UK, US, Northern Ireland and others have all admitted to this practice: Removing any distinction between dying of Covid, and dying of something else after testing positive for Covid will naturally lead to over-counting of “Covid deaths”. British pathologist Dr John Lee was warning of this “substantial over-estimate” as early as last spring. Other mainstream sources have reported it, too. Considering the huge percentage of “asymptomatic” Covid infections [14], the well-known prevalence of serious comorbidities [fact 4] and the potential for false-positive tests [fact 18], this renders the Covid death numbers an extremely unreliable statistic. * 4. The vast majority of covid deaths have serious comorbidities. In March 2020, the Italian government published statistics showing 99.2% of their “Covid deaths” had at least one serious comorbidity. These included cancer, heart disease, dementia, Alzheimer’s, kidney failure and diabetes (among others). Over 50% of them had three or more serious pre-existing conditions. This pattern has held up in all other countries over the course of the “pandemic”. An October 2020 FOIA request to the UK’s ONS revealed less than 10% of the official “Covid death” count at that time had Covid as the sole cause of death. * 5. Average age of “Covid death” is greater than the average life expectancy. The average age of a “Covid death” in the UK is 82.5 years. In Italy it’s 86. Germany, 83. Switzerland, 86. Canada, 86. The US, 78, Australia, 82. In almost all cases the median age of a “Covid death” is higher than the national life expectancy. As such, for most of the world, the “pandemic” has had little-to-no impact on life expectancy. Contrast this with the Spanish flu, which saw a 28% drop in life expectancy in the US in just over a year. [source] * 6. Covid mortality exactly mirrors the natural mortality curve. Statistical studies from the UK and India have shown that the curve for “Covid death” follows the curve for expected mortality almost exactly: The risk of death “from Covid” follows, almost exactly, your background risk of death in general. The small increase for some of the older age groups can be accounted for by other factors.[facts 7, 9 & 19] * 7. There has been a massive increase in the use of “unlawful” DNRs. Watchdogs and government agencies have reported huge increases in the use of Do Not Resuscitate Orders (DNRs) over the last twenty months. In the US, hospitals considered “universal DNRs” for any patient who tested positive for Covid, and whistleblowing nurses have admitted the DNR system was abused in New York. In the UK there was an “unprecdented” rise in “illegal” DNRs for disabled people, GP surgeries sent out letters to non-terminal patients recommending they sign DNR orders, whilst other doctors signed “blanket DNRs” for entire nursing homes. A study done by Sheffield Univerisity found over one-third of all “suspected” Covid patients had a DNR attached to their file within 24 hours of hospital admission. Blanket use of coerced or illegal DNR orders could account for any increases in mortality in 2020/21.[Facts 2 & 6] *  *  * PART II: LOCKDOWNS 8. Lockdowns do not prevent the spread of disease. There is little to no evidence lockdowns have any impact on limiting “Covid deaths”. If you compare regions that locked down to regions that did not, you can see no pattern at all. “Covid deaths” in Florida (no lockdown) vs California (lockdown) “Covid deaths” in Sweden (no lockdown) vs UK (lockdown) * 9. Lockdowns kill people. There is strong evidence that lockdowns – through social, economic and other public health damage – are deadlier than the “virus”. Dr David Nabarro, World Health Organization special envoy for Covid-19 described lockdowns as a “global catastrophe” in October 2020: We in the World Health Organization do not advocate lockdowns as the primary means of control of the virus[…] it seems we may have a doubling of world poverty by next year. We may well have at least a doubling of child malnutrition […] This is a terrible, ghastly global catastrophe.” A UN report from April 2020 warned of 100,000s of children being killed by the economic impact of lockdowns, while tens of millions more face possible poverty and famine. Unemployment, poverty, suicide, alcoholism, drug use and other social/mental health crises are spiking all over the world. While missed and delayed surgeries and screenings are going to see increased mortality from heart disease, cancer et al. in the near future. The impact of lockdown would account for the small increases in excess mortality [Facts 2 & 6] * 10. Hospitals were never unusually over-burdened. the main argument used to defend lockdowns is that “flattening the curve” would prevent a rapid influx of cases and protect healthcare systems from collapse. But most healthcare systems were never close to collapse at all. In March 2020 it was reported that hospitals in Spain and Italy were over-flowing with patients, but this happens every flu season. In 2017 Spanish hospitals were at 200% capacity, and 2015 saw patients sleeping in corridors. A paper JAMA paper from March 2020 found that Italian hospitals “typically run at 85-90% capacity in the winter months”. In the UK, the NHS is regularly stretched to breaking point over the winter. As part of their Covid policy, the NHS announced in Spring of 2020 that they would be “re-organizing hospital capacity in new ways to treat Covid and non-Covid patients separately” and that “as result hospitals will experience capacity pressures at lower overall occupancy rates than would previously have been the case.” This means they removed thousands of beds. During an alleged deadly pandemic, they reduced the maximum occupancy of hospitals. Despite this, the NHS never felt pressure beyond your typical flu season, and at times actually had 4x more empty beds than normal. In both the UK and US millions were spent on temporary emergency hospitals that were never used. *  *  * PART III: PCR TESTS 11. PCR tests were not designed to diagnose illness. The Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) test is described in the media as the “gold standard” for Covid diagnosis. But the Nobel Prize-winning inventor of the process never intended it to be used as a diagnostic tool, and said so publicly: PCR is just a process that allows you to make a whole lot of something out of something. It doesn’t tell you that you are sick, or that the thing that you ended up with was going to hurt you or anything like that.” * 12. PCR Tests have a history of being inaccurate and unreliable. The “gold standard” PCR tests for Covid are known to produce a lot of false-positive results, by reacting to DNA material that is not specific to Sars-Cov-2. A Chinese study found the same patient could get two different results from the same test on the same day. In Germany, tests are known to have reacted to common cold viruses. A 2006 study found PCR tests for one virus responded to other viruses too. In 2007, a reliance on PCR tests resulted in an “outbreak” of Whooping Cough that never actually existed. Some tests in the US even reacted to the negative control sample. The late President of Tanzania, John Magufuli, submitted samples goat, pawpaw and motor oil for PCR testing, all came back positive for the virus. As early as February of 2020 experts were admitting the test was unreliable. Dr Wang Cheng, president of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences told Chinese state television “The accuracy of the tests is only 30-50%”. The Australian government’s own website claimed “There is limited evidence available to assess the accuracy and clinical utility of available COVID-19 tests.” And a Portuguese court ruled that PCR tests were “unreliable” and should not be used for diagnosis. You can read detailed breakdowns of the failings of PCR tests here, here and here. * 13. The CT values of the PCR tests are too high. PCR tests are run in cycles, the number of cycles you use to get your result is known as your “cycle threshold” or CT value. Kary Mullis said: “If you have to go more than 40 cycles[…]there is something seriously wrong with your PCR.” The MIQE PCR guidelines agree, stating: “[CT] values higher than 40 are suspect because of the implied low efficiency and generally should not be reported,” Dr Fauci himself even admitted anything over 35 cycles is almost never culturable. Dr Juliet Morrison, virologist at the University of California, Riverside, told the New York Times: Any test with a cycle threshold above 35 is too sensitive…I’m shocked that people would think that 40 [cycles] could represent a positive…A more reasonable cutoff would be 30 to 35″. In the same article Dr Michael Mina, of the Harvard School of Public Health, said the limit should be 30, and the author goes on to point out that reducing the CT from 40 to 30 would have reduced “covid cases” in some states by as much as 90%. The CDC’s own data suggests no sample over 33 cycles could be cultured, and Germany’s Robert Koch Institute says nothing over 30 cycles is likely to be infectious. Despite this, it is known almost all the labs in the US are running their tests at least 37 cycles and sometimes as high as 45. The NHS “standard operating procedure” for PCR tests rules set the limit at 40 cycles. Based on what we know about the CT values, the majority of PCR test results are at best questionable. * 14. The World Health Organization (Twice) Admitted PCR tests produced false positives. In December 2020 WHO put out a briefing memo on the PCR process instructing labs to be wary of high CT values causing false positive results: when specimens return a high Ct value, it means that many cycles were required to detect virus. In some circumstances, the distinction between background noise and actual presence of the target virus is difficult to ascertain. Then, in January 2021, the WHO released another memo, this time warning that “asymptomatic” positive PCR tests should be re-tested because they might be false positives: Where test results do not correspond with the clinical presentation, a new specimen should be taken and retested using the same or different NAT technology. * 15. The scientific basis for Covid tests is questionable. The genome of the Sars-Cov-2 virus was supposedly sequenced by Chinese scientists in December 2019, then published on January 10th 2020. Less than two weeks later, German virologists (Christian Drosten et al.) had allegedly used the genome to create assays for PCR tests. They wrote a paper, Detection of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) by real-time RT-PCR, which was submitted for publication on January 21st 2020, and then accepted on January 22nd. Meaning the paper was allegedly “peer-reviewed” in less than 24 hours. A process that typically takes weeks. Since then, a consortium of over forty life scientists has petitioned for the withdrawal of the paper, writing a lengthy report detailing 10 major errors in the paper’s methodology. They have also requested the release of the journal’s peer-review report, to prove the paper really did pass through the peer-review process. The journal has yet to comply. The Corman-Drosten assays are the root of every Covid PCR test in the world. If the paper is questionable, every PCR test is also questionable. *  *  * PART IV: “ASYMPTOMATIC INFECTION” 16. The majority of Covid infections are “asymptomatic”. From as early as March 2020, studies done in Italy were suggesting 50-75% of positive Covid tests had no symptoms. Another UK study from August 2020 found as much as 86% of “Covid patients” experienced no viral symptoms at all. It is literally impossible to tell the difference between an “asymptomatic case” and a false-positive test result. * 17. There is very little evidence supporting the alleged danger of “asymptomatic transmission”. In June 2020, Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, head of the WHO’s emerging diseases and zoonosis unit, said: From the data we have, it still seems to be rare that an asymptomatic person actually transmits onward to a secondary individual,” A meta-analysis of Covid studies, published by Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in December 2020, found that asymptomatic carriers had a less than 1% chance of infecting people within their household. Another study, done on influenza in 2009, found: …limited evidence to suggest the importance of [asymptomatic] transmission. The role of asymptomatic or presymptomatic influenza-infected individuals in disease transmission may have been overestimated…” Given the known flaws of the PCR tests, many “asymptomatic cases” may be false positives.[fact 14] *  *  * PART V: VENTILATORS 18. Ventilation is NOT a treatment for respiratory viruses. Mechanical ventilation is not, and never has been, recommended treatment for respiratory infection of any kind. In the early days of the pandemic, many doctors came forward questioning the use of ventilators to treat “Covid”. Writing in The Spectator, Dr Matt Strauss stated: Ventilators do not cure any disease. They can fill your lungs with air when you find yourself unable to do so yourself. They are associated with lung diseases in the public’s consciousness, but this is not in fact their most common or most appropriate application. German Pulmonologist Dr Thomas Voshaar, chairman of Association of Pneumatological Clinics said: When we read the first studies and reports from China and Italy, we immediately asked ourselves why intubation was so common there. This contradicted our clinical experience with viral pneumonia. Despite this, the WHO, CDC, ECDC and NHS all “recommended” Covid patients be ventilated instead of using non-invasive methods. This was not a medical policy designed to best treat the patients, but rather to reduce the hypothetical spread of Covid by preventing patients from exhaling aerosol droplets. * 19. Ventilators killed people. Putting someone who is suffering from influenza, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or any other condition which restricts breathing or affects the lungs, will not alleviate any of those symptoms. In fact, it will almost certainly make it worse, and will kill many of them. Intubation tubes are a source of potential a infection known as “ventilator-associated pneumonia”, which studies show affects up to 28% of all people put on ventilators, and kills 20-55% of those infected. Mechanical ventilation is also damaging to the physical structure of the lungs, resulting in “ventilator-induced lung injury”, which can dramatically impact quality of life, and even result in death. Experts estimate 40-50% of ventilated patients die, regardless of their disease. Around the world, between 66 and 86% of all “Covid patients” put on ventilators died. According to the “undercover nurse”, ventilators were being used so improperly in New York, they were destroying patients’ lungs: This policy was negligence at best, and potentially deliberate murder at worst. This misuse of ventilators could account for any increase in mortality in 2020/21 [Facts 2 & 6] *  *  * PART VI: MASKS 20. Masks don’t work. At least a dozen scientific studies have shown that masks do nothing to stop the spread of respiratory viruses. One meta-analysis published by the CDC in May 2020 found “no significant reduction in influenza transmission with the use of face masks”. Another study with over 8000 subjects found masks “did not seem to be effective against laboratory-confirmed viral respiratory infections nor against clinical respiratory infection.” There are literally too many to quote them all, but you can read them: [1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] Or read a summary by SPR here. While some studies have been done claiming to show mask do work for Covid, they are all seriously flawed. One relied on self-reported surveys as data. Another was so badly designed a panel of experts demand it be withdrawn. A third was withdrawn after its predictions proved entirely incorrect. The WHO commissioned their own meta-analysis in the Lancet, but that study looked only at N95 masks and only in hospitals. [For full run down on the bad data in this study click here.] Aside from scientific evidence, there’s plenty of real-world evidence that masks do nothing to halt the spread of disease. For example, North Dakota and South Dakota had near-identical case figures, despite one having a mask-mandate and the other not: In Kansas, counties without mask mandates actually had fewer Covid “cases” than counties with mask mandates. And despite masks being very common in Japan, they had their worst flu outbreak in decades in 2019. * 21. Masks are bad for your health. Wearing a mask for long periods, wearing the same mask more than once, and other aspects of cloth masks can be bad for your health. A long study on the detrimental effects of mask-wearing was recently published by the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Dr. James Meehan reported in August 2020 he was seeing increases in bacterial pneumonia, fungal infections, facial rashes . Masks are also known to contain plastic microfibers, which damage the lungs when inhaled and may be potentially carcinogenic. Childen wearing masks encourages mouth-breathing, which results in facial deformities. People around the world have passed out due to CO2 poisoning while wearing their masks, and some children in China even suffered sudden cardiac arrest. * 22. Masks are bad for the planet. Millions upon millions of disposable masks have been used per month for over a year. A report from the UN found the Covid19 pandemic will likely result in plastic waste more than doubling in the next few years., and the vast majority of that is face masks. The report goes on to warn these masks (and other medical waste) will clog sewage and irrigation systems, which will have knock on effects on public health, irrigation and agriculture. A study from the University of Swansea found “heavy metals and plastic fibres were released when throw-away masks were submerged in water.” These materials are toxic to both people and wildlife. *  *  * PART VII: VACCINES 23. Covid “vaccines” are totally unprecedented. Before 2020 no successful vaccine against a human coronavirus had ever been developed. Since then we have allegedly made 20 of them in 18 months. Scientists have been trying to develop a SARS and MERS vaccine for years with little success. Some of the failed SARS vaccines actually caused hypersensitivity to the SARS virus. Meaning that vaccinated mice could potentially get the disease more severely than unvaccinated mice. Another attempt caused liver damage in ferrets. While traditional vaccines work by exposing the body to a weakened strain of the microorganism responsible for causing the disease, these new Covid vaccines are mRNA vaccines. mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid) vaccines theoretically work by injecting viral mRNA into the body, where it replicates inside your cells and encourages your body to recognise, and make antigens for, the “spike proteins” of the virus. They have been the subject of research since the 1990s, but before 2020 no mRNA vaccine was ever approved for use. * 24. Vaccines do not confer immunity or prevent transmission. It is readily admitted that Covid “vaccines” do not confer immunity from infection and do not prevent you from passing the disease onto others. Indeed, an article in the British Medical Journal highlighted that the vaccine studies were not designed to even try and assess if the “vaccines” limited transmission. The vaccine manufacturers themselves, upon releasing the untested mRNA gene therapies, were quite clear their product’s “efficacy” was based on “reducing the severity of symptoms”. * 25. The vaccines were rushed and have unknown longterm effects. Vaccine development is a slow, laborious process. Usually, from development through testing and finally being approved for public use takes many years. The various vaccines for Covid were all developed and approved in less than a year. Obviously there can be no long-term safety data on chemicals which are less than a year old. Pfizer even admit this is true in the leaked supply contract between the pharmaceutical giant, and the government of Albania: the long-term effects and efficacy of the Vaccine are not currently known and that there may be adverse effects of the Vaccine that are not currently known Further, none of the vaccines have been subject to proper trials. Many of them skipped early-stage trials entirely, and the late-stage human trials have either not been peer-reviewed, have not released their data, will not finish until 2023 or were abandoned after “severe adverse effects”. * 26. Vaccine manufacturers have been granted legal indemnity should they cause harm. The USA’s Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (PREP) grants immunity until at least 2024. The EU’s product licensing law does the same, and there are reports of confidential liability clauses in the contracts the EU signed with vaccine manufacturers. The UK went even further, granting permanent legal indemnity to the government, and any employees thereof, for any harm done when a patient is being treated for Covid19 or “suspected Covid19”. Again, the leaked Albanian contract suggests that Pfizer, at least, made this indemnity a standard demand of supplying Covid vaccines: Purchaser hereby agrees to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pfizer […] from and against any and all suits, claims, actions, demands, losses, damages, liabilities, settlements, penalties, fines, costs and expenses *  *  * PART VIII: DECEPTION & FOREKNOWLEDGE 27. The EU was preparing “vaccine passports” at least a YEAR before the pandemic began. Proposed COVID countermeasures, presented to the public as improvised emergency measures, have existed since before the emergence of the disease. Two EU documents published in 2018, the “2018 State of Vaccine Confidence” and a technical report titled “Designing and implementing an immunisation information system” discussed the plausibility of an EU-wide vaccination monitoring system. These documents were combined into the 2019 “Vaccination Roadmap”, which (among other things) established a “feasibility study” on vaccine passports to begin in 2019 and finish in 2021: This report’s final conclusions were released to the public in September 2019, just a month before Event 201 (below). * 28. A “training exercise” predicted the pandemic just weeks before it started. In October 2019 the World Economic Forum and Johns Hopkins University held Event 201. This was a training exercise based on a zoonotic coronavirus starting a worldwide pandemic. The exercise was sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and GAVI the vaccine alliance. The exercise published its findings and recommendations in November 2019 as a “call to action”. One month later, China recorded their first case of “Covid”. * 29. Since the beginning of 2020, the Flu has “disappeared”. In the United States, since Februart 2020, influenza cases have allegedly dropped by over 98%. It’s not just the US either, globally flu has apparently almost completely disappeared. Meanwhile, a new disease called “Covid”, which has identical symptoms and a similar mortality rate to influenza, is supposedly sweeping the globe. * 30. The elite have made fortunes during the pandemic. Since the beginning of lockdown the wealthiest people have become significantly wealthier. Forbes reported that 40 new billionaires have been created “fighting the coronavirus”, with 9 of them being vaccine manufacturers. Business Insider reported that “billionaires saw their net worth increase by half a trillion dollars” by October 2020. Clearly that number will be even bigger by now. *  *  * These are the vital facts of the pandemic, presented here as a resource to help formulate and support your arguments with friends or strangers. Thanks to all the researchers who have collated and collected this information over the last twenty months, especially Swiss Policy Research. Tyler Durden Sun, 09/26/2021 - 07:00.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nyt17 hr. 37 min. ago

"Immunity As A Service" - The Snake-Oil Salesmen & The COVID-Zero Con

"Immunity As A Service" - The Snake-Oil Salesmen & The COVID-Zero Con Authored by Julius Ruechel via Julius Ruechel.com, The Snake-Oil Salesmen and the COVID-Zero Con: A Classic Bait-And-Switch for a Lifetime of Booster Shots (Immunity as a Service) If a plumber with a lifetime of experience were to tell you that water runs uphill, you would know he is lying and that the lie is not accidental. It is a lie with a purpose. If you can also demonstrate that the plumber knows in advance that the product he is promoting with that lie is snake oil, you have evidence for a deliberate con. And once you understand what's really inside that bottle of snake oil, you will begin to understand the purpose of the con. One of the most common reasons given for mass COVID vaccinations is the idea that if we reach herd immunity through vaccination, we can starve the virus out of existence and get our lives back. It's the COVID-Zero strategy or some variant of it. By now it is abundantly clear from the epidemiological data that the vaccinated are able to both catch and spread the disease. Clearly vaccination isn't going to make this virus disappear. Only a mind that has lost its grasp on reality can fail to see how ridiculous all this has become.  But a tour through pre-COVID science demonstrates that, from day one, long before you and I had even heard of this virus, it was 100% inevitable and 100% predictable that these vaccines would never be capable of eradicating this coronavirus and would never lead to any kind of lasting herd immunity. Even worse, lockdowns and mass vaccination have created a dangerous set of circumstances that interferes with our immune system's ability to protect us against other respiratory viruses. They also risk driving the evolution of this virus towards mutations that are more dangerous to both the vaccinated and the unvaccinated alike. Lockdowns, mass vaccinations, and mass booster shots were never capable of delivering on any of the promises that were made to the public.  And yet, vaccination has been successfully used to control measles and even to eradicate smallpox. So, why not COVID? Immunity is immunity, and a virus is a virus is a virus, right? Wrong! Reality is far more complicated... and more interesting. This Deep Dive exposes why, from day one, the promise of COVID-Zero can only ever have been a deliberately dishonest shell game designed to prey on a lack of public understanding of how our immune systems work and on how most respiratory viruses differ from other viruses that we routinely vaccinate against. We have been sold a fantasy designed to rope us into a pharmaceutical dependency as a deceitful trade-off for access to our lives. Variant by variant. For as long as the public is willing to go along for the ride.  Exposing this story does not require incriminating emails or whistleblower testimony. The story tells itself by diving into the long-established science that every single virologist, immunologist, evolutionary biologist, vaccine developer, and public health official had access to long before COVID began. As is so often the case, the devil is hidden in the details. As this story unfolds it will become clear that the one-two punch of lockdowns and the promise of vaccines as an exit strategy began as a cynical marketing ploy to coerce us into a never-ending regimen of annual booster shots intentionally designed to replace the natural "antivirus security updates" against respiratory viruses that come from hugs and handshakes and from children laughing together at school. We are being played for fools.  This is not to say that there aren't plenty of other opportunists taking advantage of this crisis to pursue other agendas and to tip society into a full-blown police state. One thing quickly morphs into another. But this essay demonstrates that never-ending boosters were the initial motive for this global social-engineering shell game ― the subscription-based business model, adapted for the pharmaceutical industry. "Immunity as a service".  So, let's dive into the fascinating world of immune systems, viruses, and vaccines, layer by layer, to dispel the myths and false expectations that have been created by deceitful public health officials, pharmaceutical lobbyists, and media manipulators. What emerges as the lies are peeled apart is both surprising and more than a little alarming. “Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.” - Sherlock Homes”  - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Table of Contents:     Viral Reservoirs: The Fantasy of Eradication     SARS: The Exception to the Rule?     Fast Mutations: The Fantasy of Control through Herd Immunity     Blind Faith in Central Planning: The Fantasy of Timely Doses     Spiked: The Fantasy of Preventing Infection     Antibodies, B-Cells, and T-Cells: Why Immunity to Respiratory Viruses Fades So Quickly     Manufacturing Dangerous Variants: Virus Mutations Under Lockdown Conditions — Lessons from the 1918 Spanish Flu     Leaky Vaccines, Antibody-Dependent Enhancement, and the Marek Effect     Anti-Virus Security Updates: Cross-Reactive Immunity Through Repeated Exposure     The Not-So-Novel Novel Virus: The Diamond Princess Cruise Ship Outbreak Proved We Have Cross-Reactive Immunity     Mother Knows Best: Vitamin D, Playing in Puddles, and Sweaters     The Paradox: Why COVID-Zero Makes People More Vulnerable to Other Viruses     Introducing Immunity as a Service - A Subscription-Based Business Model for the Pharmaceutical Industry (It was always about the money!)     The Path Forward: Neutralizing the Threat and Bullet-Proofing Society to Prevent This Ever Happening Again. *  *  * Viral Reservoirs: The Fantasy of Eradication Eradication of a killer virus sounds like a noble goal. In some cases it is, such as in the case of the smallpox virus. By 1980 we stopped vaccinating against smallpox because, thanks to widespread immunization, we starved the virus of available hosts for so long that it died out. No-one will need to risk their life on the side effects of a smallpox vaccination ever again because the virus is gone. It is a public health success story. Polio will hopefully be next ― we're getting close.  But smallpox is one of only two viruses (along with rinderpest) that have been eradicated thanks to vaccination. Very few diseases meet the necessary criteria. Eradication is hard and only appropriate for very specific families of viruses. Smallpox made sense for eradication because it was a uniquely human virus ― there was no animal reservoir. By contrast, most respiratory viruses including SARS-CoV-2 (a.k.a. COVID) come from animal reservoirs: swine, birds, bats, etc. As long as there are bats in caves, birds in ponds, pigs in mud baths, and deer living in forests, respiratory viruses are only controllable through individual immunity, but it is not possible to eradicate them. There will always be a near-identical cousin brewing in the wings. Even the current strain of COVID is already cheerfully jumping onwards across species boundaries. According to both National Geographic and Nature magazine, 40% of wild deer tested positive for COVID antibodies in a study conducted in Michigan, Illinois, New York, and Pennsylvania. It has also been documented in wild mink and has already made the species jump to other captive animals including dogs, cats, otters, leopards, tigers, and gorillas. A lot of viruses are not fussy. They happily adapt to new opportunities. Specialists, like smallpox, eventually go extinct. Generalists, like most respiratory viruses, never run out of hosts to keep the infection cycle going, forever. As long as we share this planet with other animals, it is extremely deceitful to give anyone the impression that we can pursue any scorched earth policy that can put this genie back in the bottle. With an outbreak on this global scale, it was clear that we were always going to have to live with this virus. There are over 200 other endemic respiratory viruses that cause colds and flus, many of which circulate freely between humans and other animals. Now there are 201. They will be with us forever, whether we like it or not. SARS: The Exception to the Rule? This all sounds well and good, but the original SARS virus did disappear, with public health measures like contact tracing and strict quarantine measures taking the credit. However, SARS was the exception to the rule. When it made the species jump to humans, it was so poorly adapted to its new human hosts that it had terrible difficulty spreading. This very poor level of adaptation gave SARS a rather unique combination of properties: SARS was extremely difficult to catch (it was never very contagious) SARS made people extremely sick. SARS did not have pre-symptomatic spread. These three conditions made the SARS outbreak easy to control through contact tracing and through the quarantine of symptomatic individuals. SARS therefore never reached the point where it circulated widely among asymptomatic community members.  By contrast, by January/February of 2020 it was clear from experiences in China, Italy, and the outbreak on the Diamond Princess cruise ship (more on that story later) that the unique combination of conditions that made SARS controllable were not going to be the case with COVID. COVID was quite contagious (its rapid spread showed that COVID was already well adapted to spreading easily among its new human hosts), most people would have mild or no symptoms from COVID (making containment impossible), and that it was spreading by aerosols produced by both symptomatic and pre-symptomatic people (making contact tracing a joke). In other words, it was clear by January/February 2020 that this pandemic would follow the normal rules of a readily transmissible respiratory epidemic, which cannot be reined in the way SARS was. Thus, by January/February of 2020, giving the public the impression that the SARS experience could be replicated for COVID was a deliberate lie - this genie was never going back inside the bottle. Fast Mutations: The Fantasy of Control through Herd Immunity Once a reasonably contagious respiratory virus begins circulating widely in a community, herd immunity can never be maintained for very long. RNA respiratory viruses (such as influenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), rhinoviruses, and coronaviruses) all mutate extremely fast compared to viruses like smallpox, measles, or polio. Understanding the difference between something like measles and a virus like COVID is key to understanding the con that is being perpetrated by our health institutions. Bear with me here, I promise not to get too technical. All viruses survive by creating copies of themselves. And there are always a lot of "imperfect copies" — mutations — produced by the copying process itself. Among RNA respiratory viruses these mutations stack up so quickly that there is rapid genetic drift, which continually produces new strains. Variants are normal. Variants are expected. Variants make it virtually impossible to build the impenetrable wall of long-lasting herd immunity required to starve these respiratory viruses out of existence. That's one of several reasons why flu vaccines don't provide long-lasting immunity and have to be repeated annually ― our immune system constantly needs to be updated to keep pace with the inevitable evolution of countless unnamed "variants."  This never-ending conveyor belt of mutations means that everyone's immunity to COVID was always only going to be temporary and only offer partial cross-reactive protection against future re-infections. Thus, from day one, COVID vaccination was always doomed to the same fate as the flu vaccine ― a lifelong regimen of annual booster shots to try to keep pace with "variants" for those unwilling to expose themselves to the risk of a natural infection. And the hope that by the time the vaccines (and their booster shots) roll off the production line, they won't already be out of date when confronted by the current generation of virus mutations.  Genetic drift caused by mutations is much slower in viruses like measles, polio, or smallpox, which is why herd immunity can be used to control these other viruses (or even eradicate them as in the case of smallpox or polio). The reason the common respiratory viruses have such rapid genetic drift compared to these other viruses has much less to do with how many errors are produced during the copying process and much more to do with how many of those "imperfect" copies are actually able to survive and produce more copies.  A simple virus with an uncomplicated attack strategy for taking over host cells can tolerate a lot more mutations than a complex virus with a complicated attack strategy. Complexity and specialization put limits on how many of those imperfect copies have a chance at becoming successful mutations. Simple machinery doesn't break down as easily if there is an imperfection in the mechanical parts. Complicated high-tech machinery will simply not work if there are even minor flaws in precision parts. For example, before a virus can hijack the DNA of a host cell to begin making copies of itself, the virus needs to unlock the cell wall to gain entry. Cellular walls are made of proteins and are coated by sugars; viruses need to find a way to create a doorway through that protein wall. A virus like influenza uses a very simple strategy to get inside ― it locks onto one of the sugars on the outside of the cell wall in order to piggyback a ride as the sugar is absorbed into the cell (cells use sugar as their energy source). It's such a simple strategy that it allows the influenza virus to go through lots of mutations without losing its ability to gain entry to the cell. Influenza's simplicity makes it very adaptable and allows many different types of mutations to thrive as long as they all use the same piggyback entry strategy to get inside host cells. By contrast, something like the measles virus uses a highly specialized and very complicated strategy to gain entry to a host cell. It relies on very specialized surface proteins to break open a doorway into the host cell. It's a very rigid and complex system that doesn't leave a lot of room for errors in the copying process. Even minor mutations to the measles virus will cause changes to its surface proteins, leaving it unable to gain access to a host cell to make more copies of itself. Thus, even if there are lots of mutations, those mutations are almost all evolutionary dead ends, thus preventing genetic drift. That's one of several reasons why both a natural infection and vaccination against measles creates lifetime immunity ― immunity lasts because new variations don't change much over time.  Most RNA respiratory viruses have a high rate of genetic drift because they all rely on relatively simple attack strategies to gain entry to host cells. This allows mutations to stack up quickly without becoming evolutionary dead ends because they avoid the evolutionary trap of complexity.  Coronaviruses use a different strategy than influenza to gain access to host cells. They have proteins on the virus surface (the infamous S-spike protein, the same one that is mimicked by the vaccine injection), which latches onto a receptor on the cell surface (the ACE2 receptor) ― a kind of key to unlock the door. This attack strategy is a little bit more complicated than the system used by influenza, which is probably why genetic drift in coronaviruses is slightly slower than in influenza, but it is still a much much simpler and much less specialized system than the one used by measles. Coronaviruses, like other respiratory viruses, are therefore constantly producing a never-ending conveyor belt of "variants" that make long-lasting herd immunity impossible. Variants are normal. The alarm raised by our public health authorities about "variants" and the feigned compassion of pharmaceutical companies as they rush to develop fresh boosters capable of fighting variants is a charade, much like expressing surprise about the sun rising in the East. Once you got immunity to smallpox, measles, or polio, you had full protection for a few decades and were protected against severe illness or death for the rest of your life. But for fast-mutating respiratory viruses, including coronaviruses, within a few months they are sufficiently different that your previously acquired immunity will only ever offer partial protection against your next exposure. The fast rate of mutation ensures that you never catch the exact same cold or flu twice, just their closely related constantly evolving cousins. What keeps you from feeling the full brunt of each new infection is cross-reactive immunity, which is another part of the story of how you are being conned, which I will come back to shortly.  Blind Faith in Central Planning: The Fantasy of Timely Doses But let's pretend for a moment that a miraculous vaccine could be developed that could give us all 100% sterilizing immunity today. The length of time it takes to manufacture and ship 8 billion doses (and then make vaccination appointments for 8 billion people) ensures that by the time the last person gets their last dose, the never-ending conveyor belt of mutations will have already rendered the vaccine partially ineffective. True sterilizing immunity simply won't ever happen with coronaviruses. The logistics of rolling out vaccines to 8 billion people meant that none of our vaccine makers or public health authorities ever could have genuinely believed that vaccines would create lasting herd immunity against COVID. So, for a multitude of reasons, it was a deliberate lie to give the public the impression that if enough people take the vaccine, it would create lasting herd immunity. It was 100% certain, from day one, that by the time the last dose is administered, the rapid evolution of the virus would ensure that it would already be time to start thinking about booster shots. Exactly like the flu shot. Exactly the opposite of a measles vaccine. Vaccines against respiratory viruses can never provide anything more than a temporary cross-reactive immunity "update" ― they are merely a synthetic replacement for your annual natural exposure to the smorgasbord of cold and flu viruses. Immunity as a service, imposed on society by trickery. The only question was always, how long between booster shots? Weeks, months, years?  Feeling conned yet? Spiked: The Fantasy of Preventing Infection The current crop of COVID vaccines was never designed to provide sterilizing immunity - that's not how they work. They are merely a tool designed to teach the immune system to attack the S-spike protein, thereby priming the immune system to reduce the severity of infection in preparation for your inevitable future encounter with the real virus. They were never capable of preventing infection, nor of preventing spread. They were merely designed to reduce your chance of being hospitalized or dying if you are infected. As former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb, who is on Pfizer’s board, said: "the original premise behind these vaccines were [sic] that they would substantially reduce the risk of death and severe disease and hospitalization. And that was the data that came out of the initial clinical trials.” Every first-year medical student knows that you cannot get herd immunity from a vaccine that does not stop infection.  In other words, by their design, these vaccines can neither stop you from catching an infection nor stop you from transmitting the infection to someone else. They were never capable of creating herd immunity. They were designed to protect individuals against severe outcomes if they choose to take them - a tool to provide temporary focused protection for the vulnerable, just like the flu vaccine. Pushing for mass vaccination was a con from day one. And the idea of using vaccine passports to separate the vaccinated from the unvaccinated was also a con from day one. The only impact these vaccine passports have on the pandemic is as a coercive tool to get you to roll up your sleeve. Nothing more. Antibodies, B-Cells, and T-Cells: Why Immunity to Respiratory Viruses Fades So Quickly There are multiple interconnected parts to why immunity to COVID, or any other respiratory virus, is always only temporary. Not only is the virus constantly mutating but immunity itself fades over time, not unlike the way our brains start forgetting how to do complicated math problems unless they keep practicing. This is true for both immunity acquired through natural infection and immunity acquired through vaccination. Our immune systems have a kind of immunological memory ― basically, how long does your immune system remember how to launch an attack against a specific kind of threat. That memory fades over time. For some vaccines, like diphtheria and tetanus, that immunological memory fades very slowly. The measles vaccine protects for life. But for others, like the flu vaccine, that immunological memory fades very quickly. On average, the flu vaccine is only about 40% effective to begin with. And it begins to fade almost immediately after vaccination. By about 150 days (5 months), it reaches zero. Fading immunity after flu shot (Science, April 18th, 2019) The solution to this strange phenomenon lies in the different types of immune system responses that are triggered by a vaccine (or by exposure to the real thing through a natural infection). This has big implications for coronavirus vaccines, but I'll get to that in a moment. First a little background information... A good analogy is to think of our immune system like a medieval army. The first layer of protection began with generalists - guys armed with clubs that would take a swing at everything - they were good for keeping robbers and brigands at bay and for conducting small skirmishes. But if the attack was bigger, then these generalists were quickly overwhelmed, serving as arrow fodder to blunt the attack on the more specialized troops coming up behind them. Spearmen, swordsmen, archers, cavalry, catapult operators, siege tower engineers, and so on. Each additional layer of defense has a more expensive kit and takes ever greater amounts of time to train (an English longbowman took years to build up the necessary skill and strength to become effective). The more specialized a troop is, the more you want to hold them back from the fight unless it's absolutely necessary because they are expensive to train, expensive to deploy, and make a bigger mess when they fight that needs to be cleaned up afterwards. Always keep your powder dry. Send in the arrow fodder first and slowly ramp up your efforts from there. Our immune system relies on a similar kind of layered system of defense. In addition to various non-specific rapid response layers that take out the brigands, like natural killer cells, macrophages, mast cells, and so on, we also have many adaptive (specialized) layers of antibodies (i.e. IgA, IgG, IgM immunoglobulin) and various types of highly specialized white blood cells, like B-cells and T-cells. Some antibodies are released by regular B-cells. Others are released by blood plasma. Then there are memory B-cells, which are capable of remembering previous threats and creating new antibodies long after the original antibodies fade away. And there are various types of T-cells (again with various degrees of immunological memory), like natural killer T-cells, killer T-cells, and helper T-cells, all of which play various roles in detecting and neutralizing invaders. In short, the greater the threat, the more troops are called into the fight. This is clearly a gross oversimplification of all the different interconnected parts of our immune system, but the point is that a mild infection doesn't trigger as many layers whereas a severe infection enlists the help of deeper layers, which are slower to respond but are much more specialized in their attack capabilities. And if those deeper adaptive layers get involved, they are capable of retaining a memory of the threat in order to be able to mount a quicker attack if a repeat attack is recognized in the future. That's why someone who was infected by the dangerous Spanish Flu in 1918 might still have measurable T-cell immunity a century later but the mild bout of winter flu you had a couple of years ago might not have triggered T-cell immunity, even though both may have been caused by versions of the same H1N1 influenza virus. As a rule of thumb, the broader the immune response, the longer immunological memory will last. Antibodies fade in a matter of months, whereas B-cell and T-cell immunity can last a lifetime. Another rule of thumb is that a higher viral load puts more strain on your immune defenses, thus overwhelming the rapid response layers and forcing the immune system to enlist the deeper adaptive layers. That's why nursing homes and hospitals are more dangerous places for vulnerable people than backyard barbeques. That's why feedlot cattle are more vulnerable to viral diseases than cattle on pasture. Viral load matters a lot to how easily the generalist layers are overwhelmed and how much effort your immune system has to make to neutralize a threat. Where the infection happens in the body also matters. For example, an infection in the upper respiratory tract triggers much less involvement from your adaptive immune system than when it reaches your lungs. Part of this is because your upper respiratory tract is already heavily preloaded with large numbers of generalist immunological cells that are designed to attack germs as they enter, which is why most colds and flus never make it deeper into the lungs. The guys with the clubs are capable of handling most of the threats that try to make through the gate. Most of the specialized troops hold back unless they are needed. Catching a dangerous disease like measles produces lifetime immunity because an infection triggers all the deep layers that will retain a memory of how to fight off future encounters with the virus. So does the measles vaccine. Catching a cold or mild flu generally does not.  From an evolutionary point of view, this actually makes a lot of sense. Why waste valuable resources developing long-lasting immunity (i.e. training archers and building catapults) to defend against a virus that did not put you in mortal danger. A far better evolutionary strategy is to evolve a narrower generalist immune response to mild infections (i.e. most cold and flu viruses), which fades quickly once the threat is conquered, but invest in deep long-term broad-based immunity to dangerous infections, which lasts a very long time in case that threat is ever spotted on the horizon again. Considering the huge number of threats our immune systems face, this strategy avoids the trap of spreading immunological memory too thin. Our immunological memory resources are not limitless - long-term survival requires prioritizing our immunological resources. The take-home lesson is that vaccines will, at best, only last as long as immunity acquired through natural infection and will often fade much faster because the vaccine is often only able to trigger a partial immune response compared to the actual infection. So, if the disease itself doesn't produce a broad-based immune response leading to long-lasting immunity, neither will the vaccine. And in most cases, immunity acquired through vaccination will begin to fade much sooner than immunity acquired through a natural infection. Every vaccine maker and public health official knows this despite bizarrely claiming that the COVID vaccines (based on re-creating the S-protein spike instead of using a whole virus) would somehow become the exception to the rule. That was a lie, and they knew it from day one. That should set your alarm bells ringing at full throttle. So, with this little bit of background knowledge under our belts, let's look at what our public health officials and vaccine makers would have known in advance about coronaviruses and coronavirus vaccines when they told us back in the early Spring of 2020 that COVID vaccines were the path back to normality. From a 2003 study [my emphasis]: "Until SARS appeared, human coronaviruses were known as the cause of 15–30% of colds... Colds are generally mild, self-limited infections, and significant increases in neutralizing antibody titer are found in nasal secretions and serum after infection. Nevertheless, some unlucky individuals can be reinfected with the same coronavirus soon after recovery and get symptoms again." In other words, the coronaviruses involved in colds (there were four human coronaviruses before SARS, MERS, and COVID) all trigger such a weak immune response that they do not lead to any long-lasting immunity whatsoever. And why would they if, for most of us, the threat is so minimal that the generalists are perfectly capable of neutralizing the attack. We also know that immunity against coronaviruses is not durable in other animals either. As any farmer knows well, cycles of reinfection with coronaviruses are the rule rather than the exception among their livestock (for example, coronaviruses are a common cause of pneumonia and various types of diarrheal diseases like scours, shipping fever, and winter dysentery in cattle). Annual farm vaccination schedules are therefore designed accordingly. The lack of long-term immunity to coronaviruses is well documented in veterinary research among cattle, poultry, deer, water buffalo, etc. Furthermore, although animal coronavirus vaccines have been on the market for many years, it is well known that "none are completely efficacious in animals". So, like the fading flu vaccine profile I showed you earlier, none of the animal coronavirus vaccines are capable of providing sterilizing immunity (none were capable of stopping 100% of infections, without which you can never achieve herd immunity) and the partial immunity they offered is well known to fade rather quickly. What about immunity to COVID's close cousin, the deadly SARS coronavirus, which had an 11% case fatality rate during the 2003 outbreak? From a 2007 study: "SARS-specific antibodies were maintained for an average of 2 years... SARS patients might be susceptible to reinfection >3 years after initial exposure."  (Bear in mind that, as with all diseases, re-infection does not mean you are necessarily going to get full-blown SARS; fading immunity after a natural infection tends to offer at least some level of partial protection against severe outcomes for a considerable amount of time after you can already be reinfected and spread it to others - more on that later.) And what about MERS, the deadliest coronavirus to date, which made the jump from camels in 2012 and had a fatality rate of around 35%? It triggered the broadest immune response (due to its severity) and also appears to trigger the longest lasting immunity as a result (> 6yrs) Thus, to pretend that there was any chance that herd immunity to COVID would be anything but short-lived was dishonest at best. For most people, immunity was always going to fade quickly. Just like what happens after most other respiratory virus infections. By February 2020, the epidemiological data showed clearly that for most people COVID was a mild coronavirus (nowhere near as severe than SARS or MERS), so it was virtually a certainty that even the immunity from a natural infection would fade within months, not years. It was also a certainty that vaccination was therefore, at best, only ever going to provide partial protection and that this protection would be temporary, lasting on the order of months. This is a case of false and misleading advertising if there ever was one. If I can allow my farming roots to shine through for a moment, I'd like to explain the implications of what was known about animal coronaviruses vaccines. Baby calves are often vaccinated against bovine coronaviral diarrhea shortly after birth if they are born in the spring mud and slush season, but not if they are born in midsummer on lush pastures where the risk of infection is lower. Likewise, bovine coronavirus vaccines are used to protect cattle before they face stressful conditions during shipping, in a feedlot, or in winter feed pens. Animal coronavirus vaccines are thus used as tools to provide a temporary boost in immunity, in very specific conditions, and only for very specific vulnerable categories of animals. After everything I've laid out so far in this text, the targeted use of bovine coronavirus vaccines should surprise no-one. Pretending that our human coronavirus vaccines would be different was nonsense.  The only rational reason why the WHO and public health officials would withhold all that contextual information from the public as they rolled out lockdowns and held forth vaccines as an exit strategy was to whip the public into irrational fear in order to be able to make a dishonest case for mass vaccination when they should have, at most, been focused on providing focused vaccination of the most vulnerable only. That deception was the Trojan Horse to introduce endless mass booster shots as immunity inevitably fades and as new variants replace old ones.  Now, as all the inevitable limitations and problems with these vaccines become apparent (i.e. fading of vaccine-induced immunity, vaccines proving to only be partially effective, the rise of new variants, and the vaccinated population demonstrably catching and spreading the virus ― a.k.a. the leaky vaccine phenomenon), the surprise that our health authorities are showing simply isn't credible. As I have shown you, all this was 100% to be expected. They intentionally weaponized fear and false expectations to unleash a fraudulent bait-and-switch racket of global proportions. Immunity on demand, forever. Manufacturing Dangerous Variants: Virus Mutations Under Lockdown Conditions — Lessons from the 1918 Spanish Flu At this point you may be wondering, if there is no lasting immunity from infection or vaccination, then are public health officials right to roll out booster shots to protect us from severe outcomes even if their dishonest methods to get us to accept them were unethical? Do we need a lifetime regimen of booster shots to keep us safe from a beast to which we cannot develop durable long-term immunity? The short answer is no.  Contrary to what you might think, the rapid evolution of RNA respiratory viruses actually has several important benefits for us as their involuntary hosts, which protects us without the benefit of broad lifelong immunity. One of those benefits has to do with the natural evolution of the virus towards less dangerous variants. The other is the cross-reactive immunity that comes from frequent re-exposure to closely related "cousins". I'm going to peel apart both of these topics in order to show you the remarkable system that nature designed to keep us safe... and to show you how the policies being forced on us by our public health authorities are knowingly interfering with this system. They are creating a dangerous situation that increases our risk to other respiratory viruses (not just to COVID) and may even push the COVID virus to evolve to become more dangerous to both the unvaccinated and the vaccinated. There are growing signs that this nightmare scenario has already begun.  “In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem."  - President Ronald Reagan in 1981. Let's start with the evolutionary pressures that normally drive viruses towards becoming less dangerous over time. A virus depends on its host to spread it. A lively host is more useful than a bedridden or dead one because a lively host can spread the virus further and will still be around to catch future mutations. Viruses risk becoming evolutionary dead ends if they kill or immobilize their hosts. Plagues came, killed, and then were starved out of existence because their surviving hosts had all acquired herd immunity. Colds come and go every year because their hosts are lively, easily spread the viruses around, and never acquire long-lasting immunity so that last year's hosts can also serve as next year's hosts ― only those who have weak immune systems have much to worry about. In other words, under normal conditions, mutations that are more contagious but less deadly have a survival advantage over less contagious and more deadly variations. From the virus' point of view, the evolutionary golden mean is reached when it can easily infect as many hosts as possible without reducing their mobility and without triggering long-term immunity in most of their hosts. That's the ticket to setting up a sustainable cycle of reinfection, forever. Viruses with slow genetic drift and highly specialized reproductive strategies, like polio or measles, can take centuries or longer to become less deadly and more contagious; some may never reach the relatively harmless status of a cold or mild flu virus (by harmless I mean harmless to the majority of the population despite being extremely dangerous to those with weak or compromised immune systems). But for viruses with fast genetic drift, like respiratory viruses, even a few months can make a dramatic difference. Rapid genetic drift is one of the reasons why the Spanish Flu stopped being a monster disease, but polio and measles haven't. And anyone with training in virology or immunology understands this!  We often speak of evolutionary pressure as though it forces an organism to adapt. In reality, a simple organism like a virus is utterly blind to its environment — all it does is blindly produce genetic copies of itself. "Evolutionary pressure" is actually just a fancy way of saying that environmental conditions will determine which of those millions of copies survives long enough to produce even more copies of itself.  A human adapts to its environment by altering its behaviour (that's one type of adaptation). But the behaviour of a single viral particle never changes. A virus "adapts" over time because some genetic copies with one set of mutations survive and spread faster than other copies with a different set of mutations. Adaptation in viruses has to be seen exclusively through the lens of changes from one generation of virus to the next based on which mutations have a competitive edge over others. And that competitive edge will vary depending on the kinds of environmental conditions a virus encounters. So, fear mongering about the Delta variant being even more contagious leaves out the fact that this is exactly what you would expect as a respiratory virus adapts to its new host species. We would expect new variants to be more contagious but less deadly as the virus fades to become just like the other 200+ respiratory viruses that cause common colds and flus.  That's also why the decision to lock down the healthy population is so sinister. Lockdowns, border closures, and social distancing rules reduced spread among the healthy population, thus creating a situation where mutations produced among the healthy would become sufficiently rare that they might be outnumbered by mutations circulating among the bedridden. Mutations circulating among the healthy are, by definition, going to be the least dangerous mutations since they did not make their hosts s.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeSep 25th, 2021

Is It Time to Consider Going Long The Russell 2000?

For weekend reading, while commenting on going long the Russell 2000, Louis Navellier offers the following commentary: Q2 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more This past week saw a number of potential market headwinds emerge that pressured the major averages lower. Mixed data showing higher inflation at the wholesale level, tame inflation at the […] For weekend reading, while commenting on going long the Russell 2000, Louis Navellier offers the following commentary: if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Henry Singleton Series in PDF Get the entire 4-part series on Henry Singleton in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q2 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more This past week saw a number of potential market headwinds emerge that pressured the major averages lower. Mixed data showing higher inflation at the wholesale level, tame inflation at the consumer level, surprisingly strong retail sales, upbeat manufacturing in the New York region, and subdued consumer confidence, pushed Treasury yields marginally higher on a net basis. The yield on the 10-year Treasury is at a key inflection point, where a move above 1.40% will likely trigger further technical selling. Distractions The potential collapse of Chinese mega-developer Evergrande is provoking the questions about whether this will be a “Lehman moment” creating a systemic impact on global markets. Another potential market mover is varying interpretations of FOMC policy now that the Feds have said their piece. And lastly, Congress has yet to raise the debt ceiling and political brinkmanship is unsettling to the Street, and toss in the recent spike in WTI crude prices to $72/bbl and one would think the market’s best-case scenario is a sideways finish to the year. Hard Look It would seem that, under this set of circumstances, the path of least resistance for equities is lower, but markets are forward-looking and have likely priced in most of the pessimism brought about by these noted risks. Assuming there is progress on all these fronts in the next month, it might behoove investors to take a hard look at going long the Russell 2000, where the majority of stocks are smaller domestic companies. This might be the most under-owned sector with the most room to run. What’s good about this investment setup is that the downside risk is very well-defined by looking at the year-to-date chart of the Russell 2000 iShares ETF (IWM), which has been consolidating in a 20-point range for the past eight months. Logic would have it that if the risks outlined above were truly going to undo the primary bull trend, shares of IWM would have already broken down through key support at $216, where its 200-day moving average sits. Instead, we see a chart pattern where both the 20- and 50-day moving averages are converging with the 200-day MA – and trying to turn higher. Break Levels A break of the $218 level and further violation of the $210 level would be where an appropriate mental or physical stop-loss would be appropriate. This implies a downside risk of 1% to 3.5% and an upside of, let’s say, 20% to 30%. The technical maxim of “the longer the base, the higher the space” comes to mind here. Eight months is a long technical base, and a huge opportunity for profits IF this key support level holds. The Russell 2000 has missed out on this year’s rally. As of last Friday’s close, the S&P 500 is up 18% and the Nasdaq is ahead by 16.7%, but the Russell 2000 is up only 13.3% Considering the fact that the small- to mid-cap stocks hold the greatest amount of investment risk, to see this tier of the market in the midst of so much hand wringing is not only counterintuitive, it is starting to look very compelling. Technical Pressure One thing market technicians will tell us about the IWM chart is that there is intense technical pressure at this inflection point as to where the next powerful move, be it up or down, will be. This set-up is one of the great and most interesting things about the stock market; it will behave in ways that defy logic, only to be understood well after a big move has occurred. There are circumstances beneath the surface of the market’s veneer that are offsetting a weaker NYSE advance/decline line and other negative factors. What these factors are, at present, is elusive, as far as I can tell, but if shares of IWM trade above $235 on heavy volume, it will be “off to the races” for Russell, providing broad confirmation that the bull market has further to go. It’s September and pessimism is elevated due to the unknowns surrounding Fed policy, tax policy, the debt ceiling, rising bond yields, stalemated infrastructure spending, the Delta variant, a meltdown in Evergrande, slowing growth in China, rising oil prices, and global supply bottlenecks. And yet, the Russell 2000 has not rolled over, it actually looks like it is preparing for an upside breakout. This would be a most welcome event, as it would indicate capital flows are increasing risk-on exposure to the U.S. economy. How this scenario unfolds is still a coin toss, but the one thing the IWM chart suggests is that we’ll know one way or the other in the near future. Updated on Sep 24, 2021, 4:50 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkSep 24th, 2021

12 luxury hotels on the Las Vegas Strip that will make you feel like a high roller without spending like one

These are the best luxury hotels in Las Vegas on the Strip in 2021, from the hotel-within-a-hotel The Palazzo at the Venetian to the Four Seasons. When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. TripAdvisor Las Vegas hotels offer opulent luxury at surprisingly cheap prices. Many five-star stays on or near the Las Vegas Strip often start under $250 per night. The best luxury hotels in Las Vegas boast spacious suites, private pools, excellent views, and more. Table of Contents: Masthead StickyThere's plenty to gamble on in Las Vegas, but you don't have to risk the odds when it comes to choosing a hotel. Las Vegas is one of the few US cities where a luxury hotel can regularly start under $250 per night, sometimes as low as $75 to $100. Of course, weekends and high seasons will bring increased prices, but with a little sleuthing you might just snag a great deal so you can save those extra dollars for Sin City's casino floors, top-notch restaurants, and world-class entertainment. Browse all the best luxury Las Vegas hotels below, or jump directly to a specific area:The best luxury hotels in Las VegasFAQ: Luxury hotels in Las VegasHow we selected the best Las Vegas luxury hotelsMore of the best places to stay in Las VegasThese are the best luxury hotels in Las Vegas, sorted by price from low to high. Signature at MGM Grand Every room here is a suite with apartment-like features. Tripadvisor Book Signature at MGM GrandTypical starting/peak prices: $89/$320Best for: Families, business travelersOn-site amenities: Pool, restaurants, shopsPros: All rooms are quiet, apartment-style suites with kitchenettes and are close to the action but removed from the party atmosphere.Cons: The walk to MGM Grand is long and some may view the off-Strip location and lack of a casino as a con.The Signature is an all-suite hotel set back from the MGM Grand's main resort and casino but is still easily accessible to it by indoor walkways. There's no casino on-site, which means the crowd is less rowdy, and the hotel feels peaceful. There are fewer amenities too, though all of the restaurants, entertainment, and wellness found at MGM Grand are just steps away. We once used the Chase Sapphire Reserve card to book here and scored extra perks such as free upgrade, late checkout, and complimentary food and beverage credit. Spacious suites are quiet and include spa baths, flat-screen TVs, separate sitting areas, balconies, and kitchenettes for an apartment-like experience. It's a great fit for a family or someone in town for business on an extended stay.COVID-19 procedures are available here. NoMad Las Vegas The luxe NoMad has its own sleek pool that is private from guests at adjacent Park MGM. Trip Advisor Book NoMad Las VegasTypical starting/peak prices: $99/$345Best for: Couples, friendsOn-site amenities: Spa, salon, fitness center, restaurants, Moroccan-themed pool deck just for NoMad guestsPros: The hotel feels in-the-know and stylish, hidden away from the throngs filling Park MGM, while still offering easy access to its amenities. Cons: The hotel within a hotel concept is intimate, and lacks the big Vegas punch of other big resorts.Located on the upper four floors of the Park MGM Las Vegas, the NoMad Las Vegas is the third location from the luxury NoMad hotel group with properties in New York and Los Angeles.It's one of many hotel-within-a-hotel concepts that are popular in Las Vegas (and within this list) for a more intimate, boutique-quality that feels rare in this town of mega-resorts. Rooms are decadent and design-forward featuring hardwood floors, velvet furnishings, and standalone soaking bathtubs in the bedroom.COVID-19 procedures are available here. Aria Resort & Casino Aria has a 150,000-square-foot casino, 16 restaurants, and more than 4,000 rooms. Trip Advisor Book Aria Resort & Casino Las VegasTypical starting/peak prices: $107/$359Best for: Groups of friends, couplesOn-site amenities: Casino, 16 restaurants, CityCenter shops, nightclub, huge spa, three pools, fitness centerPros: Rooms boast high-end technology for an exceptionally comfortable stay and the location is very central to the Las Vegas Strip.Cons: Food is pricey on property, as is the resort fee.Located on the Las Vegas Strip within the CityCenter complex, Aria is a glittering curvilinear property with a 150,000-square-foot casino, 16 restaurants, and more than 4,000 rooms. Opened just a decade ago, rooms feature fully tricked-out tech, including a one-touch room control system to adjust lighting, curtains, and more from the touch of a tablet.Hakkasan Group's Jewel nightclub is located here, as is a huge spa with 62 treatment rooms, and three pools, including the Liquid pool club for grown folks.Plus, the location is central, close to the City Center, conference events, and all the Strip action.COVID-19 status and policies available here. The Venetian Resort Las Vegas Even the cheapest standard rooms are suites with separate living areas. The Venetian Book The Venetian Las VegasTypical starting/peak prices: $113/$399Best for: Families, first-time visitors, couples, business travelersOn-site amenities: Casino, theater, night club, Grand Canal Shoppes, multiple pools, 80 restaurants, bars, spa, fitness centerPros: Even entry-level rooms at this all-suite hotel are impressively large, and it's tough to beat taking an indoor gondola around. Cons: The opulent style might not be to your tastes if you prefer a sleeker, modern look. This five-star Las Vegas Strip resort is one of the most instantly recognizable resorts on the Las Vegas Strip. Drawing inspiration from Italy, it's best known for its indoor canals and gondola rides, modeled off its namesake city. However, vast interiors show off an array of architectural styles and swathes of Renaissance-era aesthetics, and the hotel is one of the most visually impressive in a city of decadent hotels.There are 80 restaurants — including Thomas Keller's Bouchon — a glittering casino, the Grand Canal Shoppes, and a pool deck that covers 1.2 acres, and every room is a suite, and huge, starting at 650 square feet.The Venetian also connects to the Sands Expo & Convention Center, and guests are granted access to the Canyon Ranch Spa Club gym.COVID-19 procedures are available here.Read our full hotel review of The Venetian Encore at Wynn Las Vegas The Encore is the Wynn's take on a boutique hotel. Oyster.com Book the Encore at WynnTypical starting/peak prices: $115/$410Best for: Groups of friends, couples, familiesOn-site amenities: Encore-only pool, access to Wynn's mega-complex of restaurants, bars, nightclubs, spa, pools, gym, and even a golf course.Pros: This hotel has a boutique vibe with all the perks of a huge resort that caters to a sleek set.Cons: Room pricing is volatile and can swing dramatically in either direction.Not to be confused with the Wynn itself, the Encore is the Wynn's take on a boutique offering. It also comes with all the benefits of being housed within a parent property.While guests of the Wynn can't use Encore facilities, such as the pool, all those booked at Encore are allowed privileges at both. I've scored cheaper deals at Encore, though historically it's sometimes more expensive than Wynn. If you like the glitz of the Wynn but think it feels too overwhelming, or prefer a more intimate approach, the Encore offers a solid alternative.COVID-19 procedures are available here. Nobu Hotel at Caesars Palace Nobu Hotel is zen and quiet, with 182 stylish, Japanese-inspired rooms and suites. Trip Advisor Book Nobu Hotel at Caesars Palace Las VegasTypical starting price: $116/$447Best for: Couples, business travelersOn-site amenities: Nobu restaurant, pool, spa, the full slate of dining, shopping, and entertainment available at adjacent Caesars PalacePros: The hotel is quiet and private with a gorgeous Japanese-inspired design by noted architect David Rockwell.Cons: There is a steep resort fee of $45 per night plus tax.Inside the blockbuster 85-acre, 3,960 room resort Caesars Palace, the intimate Nobu Hotel is tucked away as a boutique hotel-within-a-hotel concept, created by the famed sushi chef of the same name. If Caesars is frenetic and bustling, Nobu Hotel is uber-Zen and quiet, with 182 stylish, Japanese-inspired rooms and suites. Staying here feels a bit like being a celebrity, with added VIP perks.Rooms channel Japanese traditions with deep soaking tubs and come with free Wi-Fi, a 55-inch flat-screen TV, an iPod docking station, and Natura Bisse toiletries, as well as priority seating at Nobu Restaurant and Lounge. Nobu Hotel guests also have access to a private front desk and lounge, the Venus Pool at Caesars Palace, expedited line privilege at OMNIA nightclub, a complimentary Friday social hour, and a dedicated hotel concierge.COVID-19 procedures are available here. Bellagio Las Vegas We love the Bellagio for its central location, designer shopping, and iconic fountain show. TripAdvisor Book Bellagio Las VegasTypical starting/peak prices: $119/$475Best for: Families, first-time visitors, business travelersOn-site amenities: Casino, multiple restaurants and bars, nightlife, spa, pool, designer shoppingPros: This is a fashionable hotel with a classy casino, excellent shopping, and a must-try buffet. Cons: You'll have to brave the summer heat to score cheap prices here.The Bellagio draws a consistent crowd for its central Strip location, popular casino, designer fashion, and curated art, including the signature Dale Chihuly glass installation hanging from the lobby ceiling.It's also a huge draw to those craning for a front-row view of the dancing fountains, and there's no better spot than a room overlooking the action. We've reviewed the balcony room facing the fountains and can confirm it's one of the best rooms on the Strip. Plus, in what's clearly a competitive field, they might have one of the best buffets in Las Vegas, though that's subject to change in a post-pandemic world. COVID-19 procedures are available here.Read our full hotel review of Bellagio Las Vegas Wynn Las Vegas The Wynn is renowned as one of the best on the Strip with world-class amenities, dining, gambling, and entertainment. Booking.com Book the Wynn Las VegasTypical starting/peak prices: $131/$497Best for: Groups of friends, couples, families, first-time visitors, business travelersOn-site amenities: Casino, designer shops, entertainment theater, fitness center, spa, pools, multiple restaurants and barsPros: No detail is overlooked at this stunning resort with a beautiful pool and spa area, beautiful guest rooms, and plenty to keep you on-site.Cons: Some might view the Strip location as far from other attractions, and prices surge in the high season.I once stayed at this luxury resort and casino and was blown away by the level of detail and thoughtfulness in each generously appointed guest room. The design is immaculate with a clean, modern palette and smart-enabled features that only add to an air of sophistication. Since then, the hotel's reputation has only continued to grow as one of the best on the Strip with world-class resort amenities, dining, gambling, and entertainment. There's a reason it's consistently rated as one of the best places to stay in Vegas and if you can secure a good deal, this might be one of the best places to book.COVID-19 procedures are available here.Read our full hotel review of the Wynn Las Vegas Waldorf Astoria Las Vegas A posh pool deck strikes a serene tone. Trip Advisor Book the Waldorf Astoria Las VegasTypical starting/peak prices: $139/$384Best for: Couples, business travelersOn-site amenities: French restaurant, 3 pools, spa, fitness center, easy access to CityCenter complexPros: The Waldorf is a leading figure in luxury and this location is no exception.Cons: A major renovation was delayed due to COVID.Travelers accustomed to the highest level of hospitality book this five-star property known for immaculate service and spacious rooms that start at 500 square feet with extravagant soaking tubs.With no casino on-site, it's another great option when you prefer a more blissful stay. If you come to Vegas for luxe spas, pools, and dining, this is a great bet.COVID-19 procedures are available here. The Palazzo at the Venetian Spread out in standard suites with ample living spaces, plush bedding, sleek bathrooms, all the amenities of the Venetian. TripAdvisor Book The Palazzo at The VenetianTypical starting/peak prices: $142/$399Best for: Groups of friends, couples, familiesOn-site amenities: Pool, spa, access to the Venetian's casino, restaurants, bars, and nightclubs, and entertainment.Pros: This is like a higher-end version of The Venetian with close access to all its attractions.Cons: While prices in summer are cheap, expect them to skyrocket at other times when it's more comfortable to visit the desert.While The Venetian is perhaps more well-known, and cheaper, consider a stay at its sister property, The Palazzo.Newer and more low-key but equally refined, even The Palazzo's standard rooms are dubbed Luxury Suites and are not only more up-to-date than entry-level Venetian offerings but significantly larger. Spread out with ample living spaces, plush bedding, sleek bathrooms, and relish in the fact that your room is just steps from tons of the Strip's best attractions, plus all that the Venetian has to offer.COVID-19 status and policies available here. The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, Autograph Collection Bold, sleek, decor shines on the casino floor, especially in the signature Chandelier Bar. Tripadvisor Book The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, Autograph CollectionTypical starting/peak prices: $150/$500Best for: Groups of friends, couplesOn-site amenities: Celebrity chef-driven restaurants, several bars and lounges, a pool deck with dive-in movie nights, gym, Drybar salonPros: Staying at Cosmo offers the trimmings of a Las Vegas resort in a boutique format. The central location is one of the best on the Strip, and balcony views are hard to come by elsewhere.Cons: In high season, expect the starting rate to at least double.The Cosmopolitan is trendy, hip, and sophisticated, and generally feels like you're hanging out inside a chandelier (likely why they have a bar named after one). It's a favorite among those visiting Las Vegas who want to join in on nightlife action over betting at tables, though the latter is readily available too. Plus, it's one of the few hotels with balconies — request one facing Bellagio for a great view of the fountain show.A member of the Autograph Collection of hotels, it's also a great way for Marriott Bonvoy members to earn and redeem points. Book here if you're looking to blur the lines between a glam getaway and a healthy dose of revelry.COVID-19 procedures are available here.Read our full hotel review of The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas The Four Seasons Hotel Las Vegas There's a private, tranquil pool area just for Four Seasons guests, plus all the perks and attention to detail associated with the brand. Trip Advisor Book the Four Seasons Hotel Las VegasTypical starting/peak prices: $250/$495Best for: Couples, business travelersOn-site amenities: Private pool only for Four Seasons guests, all the bars, restaurants, spa of Mandalay Bay.Pros: Enjoy top luxury accommodations with impeccable service and a private pool that is separate from the more raucous Mandalay Bay.Cons: The Mandalay Bay crowd can be rowdy, and you still have to navigate that space to find the Four Seasons. The location is also at the far end of the Las Vegas Strip.The Four Seasons is a symbol of luxury and one that often comes with an accompanying high price tag. However, I've seen deals around $200 per night at this location hidden within Mandalay Bay, and it's widely regarded as one of the nicest hotels in Vegas.Rooms feel like a scintillating oasis of luxury, cocooned away from the frenetic pace of the Strip, though, it's right there when you choose to seek it out. There's a private, tranquil pool area for Four Seasons guests only, plus all the perks and indulgent attention to detail you'd expect from a Four Seasons.COVID-19 procedures are available here. FAQ: Luxury hotels in Las Vegas Westend61/Getty Images Where is Las Vegas?Las Vegas is located in the southern tip of the state of Nevada, near the borders of both California and Arizona. When will I find the best deals on Las Vegas luxury hotels?You'll often find the cheapest hotel prices in Las Vegas midweek in summer, when scorching hot temperatures keep most travelers away, or in the winter, after New Year's Day, when it's still too cool to hit the pool. Once the temperatures turn milder, expect prices to rise.Much of Las Vegas tourism also revolves around an annual convention calendar, which often drives up hotel prices. Holidays also see an influx of crowds.Why are Las Vegas hotels cheap?Because Vegas resorts make most of their profits on the casino floor, cheap room rates are intended to attract guests who will then spend their extra money on slots and tables.As Las Vegas is located in a desert climate, you can expect hot, hot summers and cool winters. No matter when you visit, it's likely to be chilly at night. Early winter and spring, however, offer the nicest, mildest weather when it will be the most comfortable to stroll the Las Vegas Strip or lounge at the pool.Though, if you're planning to spend most of your time indoors on the casino or convention floor, the weather likely won't be a big factor when considering the time of year to visit.Is Las Vegas open?Las Vegas is open, without restrictions involving capacity limits and large gatherings.However, the State of Nevada has mandated that everyone, including fully vaccinated individuals, wear a mask in public indoor settings, including resorts and casinos, restaurants, bars, showrooms, and meeting spaces. Masks are also required on public transportation.Large indoor events also have masks, testing, and vaccination requirements so check before arriving both with local Las Vegas mandates, the Nevada Health Response updates, as well as your individual hotel and destination.Is it safe to stay in hotels right now?The CDC says fully vaccinated people can safely travel in the US. And, with added caution, experts we spoke to said it is safe to stay in a hotel.  How we selected the best Las Vegas luxury hotels All hotels are five-star stays with exceptional luxury service, decor, rooms, amenities, and high-quality attractions.Hotels have been personally visited and/or vetted by our team of reviewers whenever possible, and include accompanying reviews in most cases.Every standard room in this list feels like you've upgraded to a suite or more indulgent offering.Hotels are also loved by guests with top ratings and reviews on sites such as Trip Advisor, Booking.com, and Hotels.com.All of these luxury hotels are priced under $250 per night to start in the low season. For this guide, we looked for hotels on or right near the Strip. However, you may also want to consider some of the best Vegas hotels off the Strip too.All hotels also have updated COVID-19 policies, which we've outlined below.Hotel rooms are sophisticated and spacious, even for entry-level, standard rooms. More of the best places to stay in Las Vegas Airbnb The best cheap hotels in Las VegasThe best Las Vegas hotels off the StripThe best Las Vegas hotel suites for all budgetsThe best Las Vegas Airbnbs Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 24th, 2021

The iPhone 13 is here

Apple's iPhone 13 lineup is now available. The new iPhone models promise improved performance, better battery life, and upgraded cameras. When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. The new iPhone 13. Apple Apple unveiled the iPhone 13, iPhone 13 Mini, iPhone 13 Pro, and iPhone 13 Pro Max on September 14. Apple says they come with new camera features, improved performance, and better battery life. The iPhone 13 models start at $699 and are now available for purchase. See more stories on Insider's business page. Apple unveiled the iPhone 13 on September 14. The redesigned iPhone features a 20% smaller notch.The iPhone 13 comes in five colors - pink, blue, midnight, starlight, and Product Red - and has the same flat-edge display as the iPhone 12. Apple reoriented the rear camera, positioning the two lenses diagonally rather than vertically.The new device runs Apple's new A15 Bionic chip, which Apple says allows it to deliver 15.8 trillion operations per second. The iPhone 13 has a bigger battery that lasts 2.5 hours longer than the iPhone 12 as well as a display that's 28% brighter than last year's device, Apple says.Apple says it improved the camera in the iPhone 13, allowing it to capture more light and color, and added cinematic mode to videos, giving them a filmlike quality by automatically changing the focus.The iPhone 13 Mini, also debuted on September 14, contains the same capabilities in a smaller form factor.iPhone 13 Mini and iPhone 13 priceThe iPhone 13 Mini starts at $699. This is the same price as the iPhone 12 Mini when it launched in October of last year.The iPhone 13 with 128 GB of storage costs $799. Again, this is also the same price as its predecessor, the iPhone 12.Keep in mind that these prices assume that your iPhone purchase will be paired with a mobile carrier service plan. Expect an increase of about $30 for all models to get an iPhone from Apple without an included carrier SIM card.iPhone 13 Mini (small, Preferred: Apple)iPhone 13 (small, Preferred: Apple)iPhone 13 Mini and iPhone 13 release dateBoth the iPhone 13 Mini and the iPhone 13 are available to purchase right now. They officially launched in stores and online on September 24. The new iPhone 13 Pro. Apple iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro MaxApple's new iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max come with upgrades to performance and battery life.The high-end devices also run on Apple's five-core GPU A15 Bionic chip, which Apple says provides 50% faster graphics performance than competing phones. The iPhone 13 Pro uses Apple's ProMotion technology, which adapts the frame rate depending on how you're using your phone, either providing faster frame rates or preserving your battery life.The cameras on the iPhone 13 Pro have been improved as well: Apple says they provide a 2.2X improvement in low light compared with the iPhone 12 Pro, faster shutter speeds, and better portrait photos using the device's telephoto lens. Apple also added the ability to take macro photos, allowing users to focus at a close distance for super detailed photos.Apple says the iPhone 13 Pro's battery will last 1.5 hours longer than the iPhone 12 Pro's and 2.5 hours longer than the iPhone 12 Pro Max's.iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max priceThe new devices come in four colors: graphite, gold, silver, and Sierra Blue. The Sierra Blue color is new for this year and an update on last year's Pacific Blue. The iPhone 13 Pro starts at $999, while the iPhone 13 Pro Max starts at $1,099. These are the same prices as last year's iPhone 12 Pro models at launch.iPhone 13 Pro (small, Preferred: Apple)iPhone 13 Pro Max (small, Preferred: Apple)iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max release dateAlong with the rest, both iPhone 13 Pro models are available to purchase right now. They launched in stores and online on September 24.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 24th, 2021

2 Chick-fil-A locations in LA stopped serving breakfast because they don"t have enough workers

A manager at one of the restaurants said that they are trying to hire to fill gaps in front and back of house. Two Chick-fil-A locations have stopped serving breakfast. Anonymous Two LA Chick-fil-A locations put up signs saying that they were no longer serving breakfast. A manager at one of the restaurants said that they are trying to hire to fill gaps in staffing. Fast-food restaurants have simplified menus throughout the pandemic to speed up service. See more stories on Insider's business page. Two Chick-fil-A restaurants in Los Angeles have stopped serving breakfast because of a lack of workers and "supply chain challenges," according to signs posted outside the locations."We're adjusting hours because of the labor shortage," Joqueeta Holmes, manager of the Sunset Boulevard location, told Insider. Hours were shortened from 7 a.m. to midnight to 10 a.m. to 10 p.m, beginning September 6."We're hiring weekly and hold interviews every week to help fill the gaps in back and front of house," Holmes said, adding that they offer a referral bonus to current workers who refer new employees. The location is recruiting younger workers to keep the restaurant working, too. "We are definitely hiring high school workers more than we have in the past, and being more flexible scheduling around school," Holmes said. A representative for Chick-fil-A did not respond to a request for comment.Chick-fil-A might be leaving money on the table by suspending breakfast service. In 2018 and 2020, breakfast hash browns made the list of top ten most ordered items. Breakfast also tends to be more profitable for businesses because of the lower cost of ingredients like eggs and bacon."Breakfast is higher margin," than other meals, Kalinowski Equity Research founder and CEO Mark Kalinowski told Insider. Another Chick-fil-A in Florida made a similar move earlier this summer, limiting menus to just lunch and dinner.The problem isn't unique to Chick-fil-A or Los Angeles. Fast-food locations around the country are temporarily closing dining rooms or cutting hours without enough staff to keep them open. Two more Chick-fil-A locations in northern Alabama have started closing early because of "extremely short staffing," Grace Dean reported for Insider."We, along with many businesses, are in the middle of a hiring crisis," the Calera, Alabama Chick-fil-A restaurant said in a Facebook post. A McDonald's location in North Carolina made a similar move, closing the dining room while keeping the drive-thru running. Two campus Starbucks locations at the University of Alabama temporarily closed dining rooms due to "limited staff and supply chain challenges," The Crimson White reported. Three more Chick-fil-A restaurants in Alabama had to close their dining rooms over lack of staff, though they continued to make food for delivery.A Dunkin' location in Colorado temporarily closed operations completely after it was down to only three workers, Zahra Tayeb reported for Insider, and at least two Dunkin' locations in Rochester, New York have also shortened hours.The Instagram accounts of both Los Angeles Chick-fil-As read "No breakfast until further notice" in their bios. Simplifying menus was a common tactic among fast-food restaurants over the last year and a half to reduce wait times and work with smaller staffs. McDonald's stopped selling all-day breakfast in March 2020, and cut down the menu to just best-selling items, but eliminating a meal from menus completely is still unusual in the fast-food world. Other franchisees are taking similar measures to attract younger workers. A McDonald's in Medford, Oregon, has a banner out front advertising that it is hiring 14- and 15-year-old workers."There are always staffing issues, but this is unheard of," the restaurant operator, Heather Coleman, told Insider. She said the situation is unique in her family's 40-year history operating McDonald's franchises. 14 and 15-year-olds can legally work in fast-food restaurants, though there are strict limits from the Department of Labor on exactly what tasks they can do. Do you have a story to share about a retail or restaurant chain? Email this reporter at mmeisenzahl@businessinsider.com.Expanded Coverage Module: what-is-the-labor-shortage-and-how-long-will-it-lastRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 24th, 2021

: SL Green Realty upgraded to neutral from underperform at BofA Securities

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchSep 24th, 2021

: Vornado Realty Trust upgraded to neutral from underperform at BofA Securities

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchSep 24th, 2021

SPAC To The Future: An AI-Fueled Freight Marketplace With Boundless Potential

Transfix and G Squared Ascend I (GSQD), just announced their intentions to merge, rendering tremendous upside potential to this under-the-radar SPAC. Transfix and special purpose acquisition company (SPAC), G Squared Ascend I GSQD, announced their intentions to merge in an investor conference call held Tuesday morning (9/21). The two companies laid out their plan to take this revolutionary freight technology company public. The presentation outlined Transfix's operations & financials, along with a breakdown of how the unconventional public debut will be funded. This deal is expected to close in the first quarter of 2022.Transfix is a digital business-to-business (B2B) freight marketplace powered by AI and machine learnings to deliver best-in-class outcomes. This enterprise's vision "is to build the world's most connected & intelligent freight platform." Transfix is growing with this nascent technology-powered shipping space, but they are not alone. Uber Freight is also staking its claim in this opportunity-induced segment, as on-demand shipping needs proliferate in this rapidly digitalizing economy.Transfix has illustrated a proven track record of consistent outsized growth underscored by margin expansion, with a customer retention rate of 93%. This data and automation fueled enterprise is swiftly expanding its platform capabilities through strategic acquisitions and smart organic investments to maintain its market-leading positioning. Over the past 5 years, Transfix has achieved a topline compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 81%, and this is not anticipated to slow down much, with management projecting a 55% CAGR over the next 5 years.The notable trepidation that could keep investors at bay here is Transfix's lack of profitability, something that is becoming increasingly common in this overzealous public equity market. Still, this freight marketplace has illustrated tremendous margin improvements thus far that should translate to robust, profitable growth over the next few years. Management is currently forecasting a positive EBITDA by the end of 2023.At its current price point, the SPAC shares are trading at around a 3.5x price to 2021 sales, which is exceptionally reasonable for a stock with this type of growth outlay. However, you are taking on the risk of uncertainty surrounding mounting competition and prolonged income losses. That being said, these are the type of risk plays that will yield the most significant long-term returns if its assumptions hold up over the next 5 years.GSQD experienced incredible volumes when the investment group announced their intentions to take Transfix public, yet there has been little movement in the actual equity. On the other hand, the warrants for GSQD (GSQD.WT), which are effectively a 5-year options to purchase the shares at any price above $11.50, took off with a 25% pop on the day of this announcement. I would stay with the still hindered equity, which has tremendous upside going into this unique merger.The entire SPAC market fell out of favor earlier this year after investors experienced some extensive burns in this overzealous & convoluted investment space. Now it would seem that this nascent asset class has sunk back below investors' radars and opportunity is growing ripe for well-positioned (post-merger announcement) SPACs. GSQD may be a SPAC to consider in this post-bubble environment. More Stock News: This Is Bigger than the iPhone! It could become the mother of all technological revolutions. Apple sold a mere 1 billion iPhones in 10 years but a new breakthrough is expected to generate more than 77 billion devices by 2025, creating a $1.3 trillion market. Zacks has just released a Special Report that spotlights this fast-emerging phenomenon and 4 tickers for taking advantage of it. If you don't buy now, you may kick yourself in 2022.Click here for the 4 trades >>Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report G Squared Ascend I Inc. (GSQD): Get Free Report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 23rd, 2021

Mack-Cali selling waterfront trophy for $380M

Mack-Cali is in contract to sell a trophy office tower on the Hudson River waterfront for $380 million, according to sources close to the deal. Mark Meisner’s Nanuet-based Birch Group is the buyer of 101 Hudson Street, a 1.2 million square-foot class A office tower in Jersey City which Mack-Cali... The post Mack-Cali selling waterfront trophy for $380M appeared first on Real Estate Weekly. Mack-Cali is in contract to sell a trophy office tower on the Hudson River waterfront for $380 million, according to sources close to the deal. Mark Meisner’s Nanuet-based Birch Group is the buyer of 101 Hudson Street, a 1.2 million square-foot class A office tower in Jersey City which Mack-Cali bought for $329 million in 2004. The REIT remortgaged the tower with a 10-year, $250 million loan in 2016, money that was used repay outstanding secured and unsecured debt as the company worked to streamline its suburban office portfolio to focus on its prime waterfront assets. Last year, AIG inked a deal to take a reported 230,000 s/f of space in the building, previously known as the Goldman Sachs tower. Mack-Cali declined to comment on the sale and no word yet from the Birch Group. Cushman & Wakefield confirmed its Adam Spies, Andy Merin, David Bernhaut, Kevin Donner, Gary Gabriel and Frank DiTommaso arranged the sale, but declined further comment. The sale stands out among two years of suburban office disposition at Mack-Cali. This year alone, the company has sold $549 million of suburban office buildings and newly appointed CEO Mahbod Nia has been focused on boosting the share price and rewarding investors who’ve stuck with the firm through a takeover battle and a pandemic. During the 2Q earning call he said, “We remain highly focused on our strategic objectives of simplifying the business and streamlining the balance sheet, as illustrated by the disposal of virtually all of our remaining suburban assets during the quarter, substantially in line with our pre-pandemic valuation expectations.” A Colony Capital and Northstar (NRE) alum, Nia was credited with helping NRE get its business in order ahead of a sale to AXA Investment Managers that netted a 16 percent IRR. During a summer NAREIT meeting, Nia spoke about expanding Mack-Cali’s lucrative multifamily platform beyond its core in New Jersey. He told investors during the earning call, “That comment was more centered around concentration risk and whether to the extent that we do gravitate more toward becoming a multifamily REIT, whether we should be more concentrated in our current markets or look to new markets. “We’re at the point where we’re really evaluating potential options for us in the future, but no conclusive decisions have been made at this point.” The Waterfront office portfolio – which included 101 Hudson – was 75.4 percent leased, up from 74.2 percent as of March 31, 2021, reflecting 75,500 s/f of leases signed during the quarter, including 51,600 s/f of new leases. The office portfolio also enjoyed a 2.5 percent increase in NOI from the previous year. Analysts have given the efforts a gold star. Although BTIG’s Thomas Catherwood just lowered his share price target from $30 to $26, Mack-Cali is still considered a buy. As of September, its share price was 16.65 – way below the 56 it enjoyed in its heyday during the 2000s but a major improvement on its most recent 52-week low of 10.35. Catherwood attributed the price target change to the company’s shorter hold period for its remaining office assets. He said investors could lose sight of positive near-term potential as dispositions, incremental short-term debt, COVID-impacted apartment rental rates, and recent office lease expirations result in lower earnings. The sale of 101 Hudson is likely to help Mack-Cali pay down a $400 million loan and credit facility it arranged with JPMorgan Chase Bank in May 2021. David J. Smetana, chief financial officer, said during the earning call that the company was also looking at disposal of excess land adding, “hotels probably are not part of our long-term kind of operating core portfolio. So those in total should be able to take care of the remaining line balance.” The post Mack-Cali selling waterfront trophy for $380M appeared first on Real Estate Weekly......»»

Category: realestateSource: realestateweeklySep 23rd, 2021

"It All Depends On One Word - Trust" - John Rubino Warns "Worst-Case Scenario Too Horrible" To Consider

"It All Depends On One Word - Trust" - John Rubino Warns "Worst-Case Scenario Too Horrible" To Consider Via Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com, It looks like we are on track for yet another global financial meltdown.  This time it is coming out of China in the form of a failed property development company called Evergrande.  It’s five times bigger than Lehman Brothers, whose failure cratered the global economy in 2008.  Will central banks, including the Fed, just let it all fail or will they print massive amounts of money trying to stop the fall?   If history is a guide, we should get ready for the most money creation ever.  In May, financial writer John Rubino said, “This is beyond the ability of any individual to fix.  We can’t save the system.” We sure can print a lot of money to try though. Massive global money printing is what is coming, and it will come with huge consequences for all fiat currencies.  Rubino explains, “Stocks are tanking, cryptos are tanking, currencies of the world are getting volatile, politics are volatile and gold is going up while all this is happening, which it is supposed to do.  Gold is supposed to be the safe haven where you hide out when nothing else seems trustworthy... That hasn’t been the case in prior bear markets.  When stocks tanked, they pulled down gold and silver... It’s a good sign when markets start to behave rationally again.  When high risk assets don’t seem worth it anymore, capital flows into real assets that hold their value no matter what the government is doing to the currency.  That’s the way it’s supposed to work, and that is the way it is working... Trust is probably the key word in this whole discussion.  Fiat only exists because we trust the people who are managing them to maintain their value.  You take the trust away and there is nothing there.  A fiat currency is not a real thing.  It doesn’t actually exist other than little pieces of paper that have no intrinsic value or computer code, which also has no intrinsic value.  So, you take away the trust that we had in the Fed, Treasury, Congress and the President to do the right thing, and be honest, when it comes to the financial markets, you take that away and there really isn’t anything there.  Nobody would want to hold a currency managed by people they can’t trust.  Pay attention to that because the less we trust the guys in charge, the less we trust the currency.  The less we trust the currency, the less we trust the financial markets and the less valuable these financial assets are.  So, it all ties together, and it all depends on that one word—Trust.” What’s Rubino’s biggest fear?  Rubino warns, “My biggest fear is that we screw up our finances, we screw up geopolitics, and we get into a big war because we are close to that now.   The U.S., Russia and China are bumping up against each other, and we are like scorpions in a bottle on this little planet with all these high tech weapons. . . . My biggest fear is we take it well beyond the world of finance to no holds barred military action.  There’s no way to predict anything when you start doing something like that.  The worst case scenario is too horrible to even think about.” Join Greg Hunter as he goes One-on-One with John Rubio, founder of the popular website DollarCollapse.com.  To Donate to USAWatchdog.com Click Here Tyler Durden Thu, 09/23/2021 - 16:25.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 23rd, 2021

Progress Announces Third Quarter 2021 Financial Results

Q3 Revenue and EPS Significantly Ahead of GuidanceFull Year 2021 Guidance Raised Again BEDFORD, Mass., Sept. 23, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Progress (NASDAQ:PRGS), the leading provider of products to develop, deploy and manage high-impact business applications, today announced financial results for its fiscal third quarter ended August 31, 2021. Third Quarter 2021 Highlights: Revenue of $147.4 million increased 34% year-over-year on an actual currency basis, and 33% on a constant currency basis. Non-GAAP revenue of $152.6 million increased 38% on an actual currency basis, and 36% on a constant currency basis. Annualized Recurring Revenue (ARR) of $444 million increased 25% year-over-year on a constant currency basis. Operating margin was 31% and Non-GAAP operating margin was 47%. Diluted earnings per share was $0.70 compared to $0.53 in the same quarter last year, an increase of 32%.  Non-GAAP diluted earnings per share was $1.18 compared to $0.78 in the same quarter last year, an increase of 51%. "We're very pleased to announce Q3 results that significantly beat our previous guidance for revenue and earnings, and we're raising 2021 guidance for the third time this year," said Yogesh Gupta, CEO at Progress. "We also announced the signing of a definitive agreement to acquire Kemp, a leader in the Application Experience (‘AX') space. Kemp meets all our acquisition criteria, fits perfectly with our total growth strategy, and brings a very talented team to Progress." Additional financial highlights included(1):   Three Months Ended   GAAP   Non-GAAP (In thousands, except percentages and per share amounts) August 31,2021   August 31,2020   %Change   August 31,2021   August 31,2020   %Change Revenue $ 147,417     $ 109,699     34 %   $ 152,597     $ 110,882     38 % Income from operations $ 46,046     $ 33,193     39 %   $ 71,163     $ 47,117     51 % Operating margin 31 %   30 %   100 bps   47 %   42 %   500 bps Net income $ 30,976     $ 23,977     29 %   $ 52,577     $ 35,605     48 % Diluted earnings per share $ 0.70     $ 0.53     32 %   $ 1.18     $ 0.78     51 % Cash from operations (GAAP) /Adjusted free cash flow (Non-GAAP) $ 35,224     $ 31,112     13 %   $ 35,022     $ 30,101     16 % (1)See Legal Notice Regarding Non-GAAP Financial Information Other fiscal third quarter 2021 metrics and recent results included: Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments were $383.7 million at the end of the quarter. DSO was 54 days compared to 49 days in the fiscal third quarter of 2020 and 44 days in the fiscal second quarter of 2021. On September 21, 2021, our Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend of $0.175 per share of common stock that will be paid on December 15, 2021 to shareholders of record as of the close of business on December 1, 2021. On September 23, 2021, we announced a definitive agreement to acquire Kemp Technologies, a leader in the Application Experience space, for $258 million in cash. Anthony Folger, CFO, said: "Q3 results were outstanding across every metric and our confidence in our business is reflected in the increased outlook for 2021. In addition to our strong financial results and outlook, we continued to execute our total growth strategy while remaining disciplined with the acquisition of Kemp, a deal that positions us exceptionally well for 2022 and beyond." 2021 Business Outlook Progress provides the following guidance for the fiscal year ending November 30, 2021 and the fiscal fourth quarter ending November 30, 2021:   Updated FY 2021 Guidance(September 23, 2021)   Prior FY 2021 Guidance(June 24, 2021) (In millions, except percentages and per share amounts) GAAP   Non-GAAP   GAAP   Non-GAAP Revenue $520 - $524   $548 - $552   $503 - $509   $529 - $535 Diluted earnings per share $1.56 - $1.58   $3.68 - $3.70   $1.51 - $1.55   $3.46 - $3.50 Operating margin 21%   40%   21%   39% Cash from operations (GAAP) /Adjusted free cash flow (Non-GAAP) $168 - $172   $168 - $172   $160 - $164   $158 - $162 Effective tax rate 20% - 21%   20% - 21%   20% - 21%   20% - 21%   Q4 2021 Guidance (In millions, except per share amounts) GAAP   Non-GAAP Revenue $129 - $133   $134 - $138 Diluted earnings per share $0.13 - $0.15   $0.73 - $0.75 Based on current exchange rates, the expected positive currency translation impact on Progress' fiscal year 2021 business outlook compared to 2020 exchange rates is approximately $6.8 million on GAAP and non-GAAP revenue, and approximately $0.04 on GAAP and non-GAAP diluted earnings per share. The expected positive currency translation impact on Progress' fiscal Q4 2021 business outlook compared to 2020 exchange rates on GAAP and non-GAAP revenue is approximately $0.6 million. The expected positive impact on GAAP and non-GAAP diluted Q4 2021 earnings per share is $0.01. To the extent that there are changes in exchange rates versus the current environment, this may have an impact on Progress' business outlook. Conference Call Progress will hold a conference call to review its financial results for the fiscal third quarter of 2021 at 5:00 p.m. ET on Thursday, September 23, 2021. The call can be accessed on the investor relations section of the company's website, located at www.progress.com. Additionally, you can listen to the call by telephone by dialing 800-773-2954 or +1 847-413-3731, passcode 50220857. The conference call will include comments followed by questions and answers. An archived version of the conference call and supporting materials will be available on the Progress website within the investor relations section after the live conference call. Legal Notice Regarding Non-GAAP Financial Information Progress provides non-GAAP financial information as additional information for investors. These non-GAAP measures are not in accordance with, or an alternative to, generally accepted accounting principles in the United States ("GAAP"). Progress believes that the non-GAAP results described in this release are useful for an understanding of its ongoing operations and provide additional detail and an alternative method of assessing its operating results.  A reconciliation of non-GAAP adjustments to the company's GAAP financial results is included in the tables below and is available on the Progress website at www.progress.com within the investor relations section. Additional information regarding the company's non-GAAP financial information is contained in the company's Current Report on Form 8-K furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission in connection with this press release, which is also available on the Progress website within the investor relations section. Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements This press release contains statements that are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Progress has identified some of these forward-looking statements with words like "believe," "may," "could," "would," "might," "should," "expect," "intend," "plan," "target," "anticipate" and "continue," the negative of these words, other terms of similar meaning or the use of future dates. Forward-looking statements in this press release include, but are not limited to, statements regarding Progress' business outlook and financial guidance. There are a number of factors that could cause actual results or future events to differ materially from those anticipated by the forward-looking statements, including, without limitation: (1) Economic, geopolitical and market conditions can adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition, including our revenue growth and profitability, which in turn could adversely affect our stock price. (2) We may fail to achieve our financial forecasts due to such factors as delays or size reductions in transactions, fewer large transactions in a particular quarter, fluctuations in currency exchange rates, or a decline in our renewal rates for contracts. (3) Our ability to successfully manage transitions to new business models and markets, including an increased emphasis on a cloud and subscription strategy, may not be successful. (4) If we are unable to develop new or sufficiently differentiated products and services, or to enhance and improve our existing products and services in a timely manner to meet market demand, partners and customers may not purchase new software licenses or subscriptions or purchase or renew support contracts. (5) We depend upon our extensive partner channel and we may not be successful in retaining or expanding our relationships with channel partners. (6) Our international sales and operations subject us to additional risks that can adversely affect our operating results, including risks relating to foreign currency gains and losses. (7) If the security measures for our software, services, other offerings or our internal information technology infrastructure are compromised or subject to a successful cyber-attack, or if our software offerings contain significant coding or configuration errors, we may experience reputational harm, legal claims and financial exposure. (8) We have made acquisitions, and may make acquisitions in the future, and those acquisitions may not be successful, may involve unanticipated costs or other integration issues or may disrupt our existing operations. (9) Delay or failure to realize the expected synergies and benefits of the Kemp acquisition could negatively impact our future results of operations and financial condition; (10) The continuing impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak on our employees, customers, partners, and the global financial markets could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. For further information regarding risks and uncertainties associated with Progress' business, please refer to Progress' filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended November 30, 2020. Progress undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this press release. About Progress Progress (NASDAQ:PRGS) provides the best products to develop, deploy and manage high-impact business applications. Our comprehensive product stack is designed to make technology teams more productive and we have a deep commitment to the developer community, both open source and commercial alike. With Progress, organizations can accelerate the creation and delivery of strategic business applications, automate the process by which apps are configured, deployed and scaled, and make critical data and content more accessible and secure—leading to competitive differentiation and business success. Over 1,700 independent software vendors, 100,000 enterprise customers, and three million developers rely on Progress to power their applications. Learn about Progress at www.progress.com or +1-800-477-6473. Progress and Progress Software are trademarks or registered trademarks of Progress Software Corporation and/or its subsidiaries or affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. Any other names contained herein may be trademarks of their respective owners. Investor Contact:   Press Contact: Michael Micciche   Erica McShane Progress Software   Progress Software +1 781 850 8450   +1 781 280 4000 Investor-Relations@progress.com   PR@progress.com CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS(Unaudited)   Three Months Ended   Nine Months Ended (In thousands, except per share data) August 31,2021   August 31,2020   %Change   August 31,2021   August 31,2020   %Change Revenue:                       Software licenses $ 51,930     $ 27,514     89 %   $ 115,354     $ 77,806     48 % Maintenance and services 95,487     82,185     16 %   275,831     241,959     14 % Total revenue 147,417     109,699     34 %   391,185     319,765     22 % Costs of revenue:                       Cost of software licenses 1,574     1,103     43 %   3,763     3,302     14 % Cost of maintenance and services 14,895     11,971     24 %   42,887     35,607     20 % Amortization of acquired intangibles 3,599     1,664     116 %   10,719     4,974     116 % Total costs of revenue 20,068     14,738     36 %   57,369     43,883     31 % Gross profit 127,349     94,961     34 %   333,816     275,882     21 % Operating expenses:                       Sales and marketing 29,737     22,186     34 %   88,468     68,100     30 % Product development 25,616     20,676     24 %   76,579     64,117     19 % General and administrative 16,451     13,514     22 %   46,335     38,702     20 % Amortization of acquired intangibles 7,978     4,176     91 %   22,836     12,484     83 % Restructuring expenses 40     91     (56 )%   1,133     1,826     (38 )% Acquisition-related expenses 1,481     1,125     32 %   2,721     1,439     89 % Total operating expenses 81,303     61,768     32 %   238,072     186,668     28 % Income from operations 46,046     33,193     39 %   95,744     89,214     7 % Other expense, net (6,539 )   (2,962 )   (121 )%   (14,409 )   (9,206 )   (57 )% Income before income taxes 39,507     30,231     31 %   81,335     80,008     2 % Provision for income taxes 8,531     6,254     36 %   17,841     17,947     (1 )% Net income $ 30,976     $ 23,977     29 %   $ 63,494     $ 62,061     2 %                         Earnings per share:                       Basic $ 0.71     $ 0.53     34 %   $ 1.45     $ 1.38     5 % Diluted $ 0.70     $ 0.53     32 %   $ 1.43     $ 1.37     4 % Weighted average shares outstanding:                       Basic 43,762     45,036     (3 )%   43,896.....»»

Category: earningsSource: benzingaSep 23rd, 2021

How to use Live Text, a new iPhone feature in iOS 15 that lets you copy text from photos

Live Text is a new feature on iPhones in iOS 15 that lets you copy and import text from photos you take or save onto your device. Live Text is coming to iPhones with iOS 15. Apple Live Text is a new feature on iPhones in iOS 15 that lets you copy and import text from photos onto your device. If you take or save a picture that has text in it, you can use Live Text to copy and paste that text into any app on your iPhone. If you have an iPhone XS or newer, you can grab text just by pointing your camera at it. Visit Insider's Tech Reference library for more stories. It's incredibly annoying when you want to copy text from a screenshot, but have to manually type it all out yourself. That's where Live Text comes in - this new iOS 15 feature lets you pull any text from pictures you take or have saved on your phone. And once you've pulled the text, you can paste it into any text field. It's great for quickly sharing addresses, phone numbers, and anything else you don't want to type out manually.Live Text works with typed and handwritten text, and understands English, Chinese (Traditional and Simplified), Portuguese, French, Italian, German, and Spanish. It's available on any iPhone (or iPad) released in 2018 or later.Here are three ways to use it.Important: Live Text is a new feature in iOS 15, which is now available for nearly all iPhones. If you're not sure how to update your iPhone, check out our article, "How to update your iPhone to iOS 15 and troubleshoot any update issues."How to use Live Text in the Photos appFirst, you can use Live Text on any photo you have saved in the Photos app. This includes screenshots, saved photos, and pictures you've taken yourself.1. Open the Photos app and find a picture with text on it.2. When you open the picture, a small square icon will appear in the bottom-right corner. Tap it.Quick tip: If no icon appears, close the photo and open it again. If it's still not there, try holding your finger on some of the text in the photo. If nothing happens, Live Text likely doesn't recognize any words in the picture. Tap the Live Text icon when it appears. William Antonelli/Insider 3. The picture will darken, except for the space around the picture's text. You can now interact with the text by holding your finger down on it to highlight it. Once highlighted, you can copy, share, translate it, and more. The text in the image is now selectable. William Antonelli/Insider If you copy the text, you can paste it into any text field on your device.You can also do this natively with pictures that appear on websites in Safari. Just tap and hold your finger on a photo with text in it to select that text.How to use Live Text to type in any appIf you want to quickly scan text you've found in real life, you can use Live Text to type directly into any text box.1. Open any app that you can type in and tap a text field.2. In the black pop-up that appears, tap the Scan Text option. It might also just appear as the small square icon. You can scan text right into an empty text box. William Antonelli/Insider 3. Your iPhone's camera will turn on. Point it at whatever text you want to use, and then tap Insert when it's highlighted. Hover over the text you want to import, and you'll see it appear in the text box. William Antonelli/Insider Depending on how the text you're trying to scan is formatted, you might need to try this a few times.How to use Live Text while taking a pictureThis feature lets you grab text just by pointing your camera at it. It might not be available on some older iPhone models.1. Open your Camera app and point the camera at some text.2. When the square Live Text icon appears in the corner, tap it.3. Your device will highlight the text. You can then hold your finger down on it to copy it, share it, or look it up. You can select text right from the Camera app. Apple How to set up Focus, a new iPhone feature that lets you block all notifications except from certain people or appsHow to sign up for Apple's iPhone Upgrade Program and get a new discounted iPhone every yearHow to change the app icons on your iPhone or iPadHow to take a screenshot on every iPhone modelRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 23rd, 2021