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Corporacion America Airport reports April passenger traffic up 1,342.4% y/y

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallMay 14th, 2021

Mitchell airport reports 96% drop in passengers in April

Milwaukee Mitchell International Airport reports another month of severe passenger traffic lows as the Covid-19 pandemic continues to dramatically impact air travel. Milwaukee's airport saw a more than 96% year-over-year decline from April 2020 to .....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 15th, 2020

Extreme weather disrupted almost half of JetBlue"s flights on Thursday with cancellations continuing as the airline recovers

JetBlue Airways canceled or delayed over half of its flights yesterday, leaving passengers stranded for hours. AP/Elaine Thompson JetBlue left hundreds of passengers stranded after delaying or canceling half of its flights on Thursday. The airline said severe weather in Florida and New England caused the flight disruptions. Weather was a primary factor in delays that occurred over the summer, causing issues for American and Spirit. See more stories on Insider's business page. JetBlue Airways canceled or delayed over half of its flights yesterday, leaving passengers at some airports stranded for hours.On Thursday, JetBlue passengers complained on Twitter about hours-long flight delays and subsequent cancellations, with some saying they were stranded for up to 25 hours."The bulk of cancellations ... were the result of dangerous thunderstorms in South Florida and the Northeast last night and into this morning. This weather leads to airport closures and air traffic control programs. Whenever these weather events take place they can also create residual impacts as we work to reposition aircraft and crews," a JetBlue spokesperson told Insider.According to data from FlightAware, 50% of JetBlue flights were disrupted yesterday, with 44% being delayed and 6% being canceled. The airline had the highest ratio of flight disruptions compared to other carriers, including Southwest and American which only had 20% of flights delayed and 1% and 2% canceled, respectively.Meanwhile, Delta Air Lines, which, according to the airline, has the largest operation at New York's JFK International Airport, only had 17% of its flights delayed and 0% canceled on Thursday. Today, JetBlue has already delayed 27% and canceled 6% of its flights, compared to Delta, American, United, and Southwest that have all delayed less than 10% and canceled between 0 and 1%.Weather was the principal factor in the hundreds of flight cancellations incurred by airlines over the summer. In June, American was forced to slash 80 flights a day after extreme weather disrupted the operation. The airline also cut 1% of its schedule for July to help manage the travel boom as it battled weather and labor shortages.Meanwhile, Spirit Airlines' operation broke down after a poorly timed combination of severe weather and staffing issues, forcing it to cancel 2,000 flights as it fought to get its schedule back on track. Its slow recovery got the attention of the US Department of Transportation, which contacted the airline to "remind" them of passenger rights when their flights are canceled, reported The Points Guy. Spirit was still canceling half of its flights into its fifth day of disruptions, while JetBlue has only canceled 8% on its second day, according to FlightAware.Editor's note: An earlier headline implied JetBlue canceled half of its flights on Thursday. It has been updated.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 24th, 2021

Extreme weather caused JetBlue to cancel half of its flights on Thursday with cancellations continuing as the airline recovers

JetBlue Airways canceled or delayed over half of its flights yesterday, leaving passengers stranded for hours. meric AP/Elaine Thompson JetBlue left hundreds of passengers stranded after delaying or canceling half of its flights on Thursday. The airline said severe weather in Florida and New England caused the flight disruptions. Weather was a primary factor in delays that occurred over the summer, causing issues for American and Spirit. See more stories on Insider's business page. JetBlue Airways canceled or delayed over half of its flights yesterday, leaving passengers at some airports stranded for hours.On Thursday, JetBlue passengers complained on Twitter about hours-long flight delays and subsequent cancellations, with some saying they were stranded for up to 25 hours."The bulk of cancellations ... were the result of dangerous thunderstorms in South Florida and the Northeast last night and into this morning. This weather leads to airport closures and air traffic control programs. Whenever these weather events take place they can also create residual impacts as we work to reposition aircraft and crews," a JetBlue spokesperson told Insider.According to data from FlightAware, 50% of JetBlue flights were disrupted yesterday, with 44% being delayed and 6% being canceled. The airline had the highest ratio of flight disruptions compared to other carriers, including Southwest and American which only had 20% of flights delayed and 1% and 2% canceled, respectively.Meanwhile, Delta Air Lines, which, according to the airline, has the largest operation at New York's JFK International Airport, only had 17% of its flights delayed and 0% canceled on Thursday. Today, JetBlue has already delayed 27% and canceled 6% of its flights, compared to Delta, American, United, and Southwest that have all delayed less than 10% and canceled between 0 and 1%.Weather was the principal factor in the hundreds of flight cancellations incurred by airlines over the summer. In June, American was forced to slash 80 flights a day after extreme weather disrupted the operation. The airline also cut 1% of its schedule for July to help manage the travel boom as it battled weather and labor shortages.Meanwhile, Spirit Airlines' operation broke down after a poorly timed combination of severe weather and staffing issues, forcing it to cancel 2,000 flights as it fought to get its schedule back on track. Its slow recovery got the attention of the US Department of Transportation, which contacted the airline to "remind" them of passenger rights when their flights are canceled, reported The Points Guy. Spirit was still canceling half of its flights into its fifth day of disruptions, while JetBlue has only canceled 8% on its second day, according to FlightAware.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 24th, 2021

Hawaiian Airlines diverted 2 flights in less than 12 hours after one passenger assaulted a flight attendant and another refused to wear a mask

Two Hawaiian Airlines flights from Honolulu were diverted Thursday after a passenger hit a flight attendant "unprovoked" and another refused to mask. Mehmet Ali Ozcan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images Two Hawaiian Airlines flights were diverted Thursday over disturbances from unruly passengers. One of the flyers assaulted a flight attendant walking down the aisle in an "unprovoked incident." The unruly passenger on the other flight refused to wear a mask. See more stories on Insider's business page. Hawaiian Airlines diverted two flights in under 12 hours this week after unruly passengers onboard caused disturbances.On Thursday morning, a flight from Honolulu to Hilo was forced to return to the airport after "a passenger assaulted one of our flight attendants, who was walking the aisle, in an unprovoked incident," a company spokesperson told The Honolulu Star-Advertiser.The passenger, a 32-year-old man, was arrested for third-degree assault when he deplaned, a spokesperson for Hawaii's Department of Public Safety told the Associated Press. The FBI is investigating the incident, an agency spokesperson told the AP. The flight attendant, meanwhile, was "evaluated and released from work to rest," Hawaiian Airlines told the Star-Advertiser.Later on Thursday, another Hawaiian Airlines flight ran into trouble. On a flight from Honolulu to Seattle, a passenger refused to wear a mask and "caused a disturbance," a company spokesperson told the Star-Advertiser. Flight attendants and an off-duty pilot de-escalated the situation, but the flight was diverted out of an abundance of caution. No one was injured.The incidents come amid a spike in passenger disturbances onboard commercial flights. The FAA said this week that it has received more than 4,000 reports of unruly passengers so far this year, but only one has resulted in a person being criminally charged. That incident involved a Southwest Airlines passenger who was seen punching a flight attendant in the face in a viral video. Many flight attendants are dealing with burnout and adverse effects on their mental health due to the surge in passenger violence, as Insider's Allana Akhtar reported.Delta Airlines recently said it had banned 1,600 passengers and called on others in the industry to share their "no-fly" passenger lists as well.Hawaiian Airlines did not respond to a request for comment. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 24th, 2021

Of the 4,385 reported incidents of air rage this year, only one person has been criminally charged

Interfering with flight crews is a Federal crime, but criminal charges against unruly passengers have been extremely rare. Flight attendants they have gotten sick less due to pandemic-era cleaning protocols. Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The FAA has received 4,385 reports of unruly passengers and opened 789 investigations this year. Of those, only one case has had criminal charges filed by the Department of Justice. Arline workers told Congress the lack of criminal enforcement puts public safety at risk. See more stories on Insider's business page. In a year with record levels of conflict aboard commercial airlines, the US Federal Aviation Administration has posted some shocking numbers: 4,385 reports of unruly passengers; 789 investigations; 162 enforcement cases; $1.1 million in fines.But there's one number that lags noticeably behind the rest: criminal charges for passengers who have assaulted flight crews or otherwise interfered with their duties.As a civil authority, the FAA cannot criminally charge anyone, so criminal cases in aviation are the purview of the FBI and the Department of Justice.To say there is a hitch in the enforcement process would be an understatement.So far, after thousands of reports and hundreds of in-flight incident investigations this year alone, the only person to be charged is Vyvianna Quinonez, who was filmed in May punching a flight attendant in the face as a Southwest flight approached San Diego.According to a complaint filed earlier this month in US District Court in San Diego, Quinonez was also charged with interfering with flight crew members and attendants. Quinonez reportedly told law enforcement at the time of her arrest that she was acting in self defense.Federal aviation regulations allow the FAA to impose fines of up to $35,000, but the criminal penalties - up to 20 years in prison if convicted of interfering with the operation of an aircraft - require the DOJ to prosecute a case. A DOJ spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Sara Nelson, International President of the Association of Flight Attendants, told the House Subcommittee on Aviation that members of her union are frustrated by the lack of meaningful penalties when they try to enforce the rules in the air."We tell them [passengers] that it is a federal offense to not comply with crew member instructions," Nelson quoted one member as saying. "Then the plane is met by airline supervisors or airport law enforcement and the passenger gets a slap on the wrist and sent on their way."Nelson called the numbers "staggering" and predicted that there would be more incidents in 2021 than in the entire history of commercial aviation if trends continue.For its part, the FAA has taken steps to escalate the severity of consequences for bad behavior in-flight under a zero-tolerance policy Administrator Steve Dickson rolled out earlier this year. Under the new policy, counseling and warnings are off the table - all passengers found guilty of unruly behavior will be fined.But getting the criminal side of the equation to work requires even greater coordination of public, private, state, local, and federal departments than has been happening so far. In an open letter to airport leaders, Dickson begged for greater cooperation from local law enforcement to lay the groundwork for cases that the DOJ can use."Every week, we see situations in which law enforcement was asked to meet an aircraft at the gate following an unruly passenger incident," he wrote. "Many of these passengers were interviewed by local police and released without criminal charges of any kind.""When this occurs, we miss a key opportunity to hold unruly passengers accountable for their unacceptable and dangerous behavior," he added.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 24th, 2021

The FAA says airlines must crack down harder on unruly passengers - and is giving them 1 week to respond

The FAA has proposed $1 million in fines for unruly passengers, but flight attendant union leader Sara Nelson asked the US for more protection. PROSPEROUS BAY, SAINT HELENA - OCTOBER 21: An air stewardess waits for the steps to be placed at the aeroplane door on the runway at St Helena airport on October 21, 2017 in Prosperous Bay, Saint Helena. Following the introduction of weekly flights to the island, resident St Helenians, known locally as 'Saints', are preparing for a potential influx of tourists and investment as well as enjoying the possibilities brought by much faster transport links with South Africa. Previously, travel to the island involved travelling for a week by the Royal Mail Ship (RMS) 'Saint Helena' from Cape Town. Saint Helena is a 46 square mile island in the South Atlantic which has been under British control since 1834. Leon Neal/Getty Images The FAA has asked airlines to step up their efforts to curb passenger violence on planes. The FAA has received about 4,000 reports of unruly passenger violence between January and September. Flight attendants union leader Sara Nelson has asked the FAA to take more action to protect workers. See more stories on Insider's business page. The Federal Aviation Administration asked airlines to provide information on their efforts to reduce passenger violence within one week.The FAA met with trade groups representing Delta, American, United, and other airlines on Tuesday regarding the country's passenger violence crisis, Reuters reported. The federal agency reportedly told airlines to "commit to take more action" to stop violence on board."Aviation safety is a collaborative effort," FAA administrator Steve Dickson said in a tweet. "Thank you to [Airlines for America], [Regional Airline Association] and [National Air Carrier Association] for your continued partnership and substantial work to help reduce unruly behavior. Look forward to continuing our work together to protect passengers and crew."-FAA Steve Dickson (@FAA_Steve) September 21, 2021The FAA will hold similar meetings with airport and labor representatives, Reuters reported.The FAA has received about 4,000 reports of unruly passenger violence between January and September 2021. Most of the reports related to passengers refusing to wear a mask.Flight attendants have born the brunt of violence on airlines. One in five flight attendants said they've had a passenger get physically angry with them, according to the industry's largest union.Flight attendants told Insider they've feared for their safety due to the risk of violence on board after many have reported being punched, spat on, and called racial slurs by passengers. Attendants said their mental health has declined due to regular verbal harassment from frustrated passengers.The federal agency has proposed more than $1 million in fines for unruly passengers this year, but flight attendant union leader Sara Nelson asked the FAA and Department of Justice for further protection."It is time to make the FAA 'zero tolerance' policy permanent, the Department of Justice to utilize existing statute to conduct criminal prosecution, and implement a series of actions proposed by our union to keep problems on the ground and respond effectively in the event of incidents," Nelson said in July......»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 21st, 2021

Corporacion America Airport reports April passenger traffic up 1,342.4% y/y

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallMay 14th, 2021

Corporacion America Airport reports March passenger traffic down 44% y/y

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallApr 14th, 2021

New SA airport data reveals extent of damage caused by Covid

Local officials are not sure when passenger traffic will fully return to pre-pandemic levels......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMar 16th, 2021

Asur reports February total passenger traffic down 49.2%

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallMar 4th, 2021

Asur reports Q4 passenger traffic down 44.9% y/y

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallFeb 24th, 2021

Corporacion America Airport reports January passenger traffic down 64.4%

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallFeb 16th, 2021

RDU vs. CLT: How a rough 2020 affected North Carolina"s biggest airports

The fact that Charlotte's airport beats RDU when it comes to its passenger traffic is no surprise to anyone who’s battled crowds to race through its terminals — but which one fared better in mitigating the pandemic in terms of passenger counts?.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsFeb 16th, 2021

RDU vs. CLT: How Triangle airport"s rough 2020 compares with Charlotte"s

The fact that Charlotte's airport beats RDU when it comes to its passenger traffic is no surprise to anyone who’s battled crowds to race through its terminals – but which one fared better in mitigating the pandemic in terms of passenger counts?.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsFeb 14th, 2021

DIA"s passenger traffic dropped 51% in 2020, but the airport still ranked among world"s busiest

Despite the precipitous drop due to Covid-19, the airport still had some bright spots in 2020......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsFeb 9th, 2021

Year-end stats reveal pandemic plunge in passenger traffic at MSP airport

Fewer planes flew, and those planes carried far fewer passengers when compared to 2019......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsJan 29th, 2021

Pittsburgh International Airport reports 96% drop in April passenger count, appoints new CFO

CEO of the Allegheny County Airport Authority Christina Cassotis discusses the impact Covid-19 is having on the city's international airport......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 15th, 2020

Corporacion America Airport reports April passenger traffic down 98.3%

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallMay 14th, 2020

Boeing expects airline passenger traffic under 25% in September, Reuters reports

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallMay 12th, 2020

Corporacion America Airport reports March passenger traffic down 48.7% y/y

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallApr 15th, 2020