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"Immunity As A Service" - The Snake-Oil Salesmen & The COVID-Zero Con

"Immunity As A Service" - The Snake-Oil Salesmen & The COVID-Zero Con Authored by Julius Ruechel via Julius Ruechel.com, The Snake-Oil Salesmen and the COVID-Zero Con: A Classic Bait-And-Switch for a Lifetime of Booster Shots (Immunity as a Service) If a plumber with a lifetime of experience were to tell you that water runs uphill, you would know he is lying and that the lie is not accidental. It is a lie with a purpose. If you can also demonstrate that the plumber knows in advance that the product he is promoting with that lie is snake oil, you have evidence for a deliberate con. And once you understand what's really inside that bottle of snake oil, you will begin to understand the purpose of the con. One of the most common reasons given for mass COVID vaccinations is the idea that if we reach herd immunity through vaccination, we can starve the virus out of existence and get our lives back. It's the COVID-Zero strategy or some variant of it. By now it is abundantly clear from the epidemiological data that the vaccinated are able to both catch and spread the disease. Clearly vaccination isn't going to make this virus disappear. Only a mind that has lost its grasp on reality can fail to see how ridiculous all this has become.  But a tour through pre-COVID science demonstrates that, from day one, long before you and I had even heard of this virus, it was 100% inevitable and 100% predictable that these vaccines would never be capable of eradicating this coronavirus and would never lead to any kind of lasting herd immunity. Even worse, lockdowns and mass vaccination have created a dangerous set of circumstances that interferes with our immune system's ability to protect us against other respiratory viruses. They also risk driving the evolution of this virus towards mutations that are more dangerous to both the vaccinated and the unvaccinated alike. Lockdowns, mass vaccinations, and mass booster shots were never capable of delivering on any of the promises that were made to the public.  And yet, vaccination has been successfully used to control measles and even to eradicate smallpox. So, why not COVID? Immunity is immunity, and a virus is a virus is a virus, right? Wrong! Reality is far more complicated... and more interesting. This Deep Dive exposes why, from day one, the promise of COVID-Zero can only ever have been a deliberately dishonest shell game designed to prey on a lack of public understanding of how our immune systems work and on how most respiratory viruses differ from other viruses that we routinely vaccinate against. We have been sold a fantasy designed to rope us into a pharmaceutical dependency as a deceitful trade-off for access to our lives. Variant by variant. For as long as the public is willing to go along for the ride.  Exposing this story does not require incriminating emails or whistleblower testimony. The story tells itself by diving into the long-established science that every single virologist, immunologist, evolutionary biologist, vaccine developer, and public health official had access to long before COVID began. As is so often the case, the devil is hidden in the details. As this story unfolds it will become clear that the one-two punch of lockdowns and the promise of vaccines as an exit strategy began as a cynical marketing ploy to coerce us into a never-ending regimen of annual booster shots intentionally designed to replace the natural "antivirus security updates" against respiratory viruses that come from hugs and handshakes and from children laughing together at school. We are being played for fools.  This is not to say that there aren't plenty of other opportunists taking advantage of this crisis to pursue other agendas and to tip society into a full-blown police state. One thing quickly morphs into another. But this essay demonstrates that never-ending boosters were the initial motive for this global social-engineering shell game ― the subscription-based business model, adapted for the pharmaceutical industry. "Immunity as a service".  So, let's dive into the fascinating world of immune systems, viruses, and vaccines, layer by layer, to dispel the myths and false expectations that have been created by deceitful public health officials, pharmaceutical lobbyists, and media manipulators. What emerges as the lies are peeled apart is both surprising and more than a little alarming. “Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.” - Sherlock Homes”  - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Table of Contents:     Viral Reservoirs: The Fantasy of Eradication     SARS: The Exception to the Rule?     Fast Mutations: The Fantasy of Control through Herd Immunity     Blind Faith in Central Planning: The Fantasy of Timely Doses     Spiked: The Fantasy of Preventing Infection     Antibodies, B-Cells, and T-Cells: Why Immunity to Respiratory Viruses Fades So Quickly     Manufacturing Dangerous Variants: Virus Mutations Under Lockdown Conditions — Lessons from the 1918 Spanish Flu     Leaky Vaccines, Antibody-Dependent Enhancement, and the Marek Effect     Anti-Virus Security Updates: Cross-Reactive Immunity Through Repeated Exposure     The Not-So-Novel Novel Virus: The Diamond Princess Cruise Ship Outbreak Proved We Have Cross-Reactive Immunity     Mother Knows Best: Vitamin D, Playing in Puddles, and Sweaters     The Paradox: Why COVID-Zero Makes People More Vulnerable to Other Viruses     Introducing Immunity as a Service - A Subscription-Based Business Model for the Pharmaceutical Industry (It was always about the money!)     The Path Forward: Neutralizing the Threat and Bullet-Proofing Society to Prevent This Ever Happening Again. *  *  * Viral Reservoirs: The Fantasy of Eradication Eradication of a killer virus sounds like a noble goal. In some cases it is, such as in the case of the smallpox virus. By 1980 we stopped vaccinating against smallpox because, thanks to widespread immunization, we starved the virus of available hosts for so long that it died out. No-one will need to risk their life on the side effects of a smallpox vaccination ever again because the virus is gone. It is a public health success story. Polio will hopefully be next ― we're getting close.  But smallpox is one of only two viruses (along with rinderpest) that have been eradicated thanks to vaccination. Very few diseases meet the necessary criteria. Eradication is hard and only appropriate for very specific families of viruses. Smallpox made sense for eradication because it was a uniquely human virus ― there was no animal reservoir. By contrast, most respiratory viruses including SARS-CoV-2 (a.k.a. COVID) come from animal reservoirs: swine, birds, bats, etc. As long as there are bats in caves, birds in ponds, pigs in mud baths, and deer living in forests, respiratory viruses are only controllable through individual immunity, but it is not possible to eradicate them. There will always be a near-identical cousin brewing in the wings. Even the current strain of COVID is already cheerfully jumping onwards across species boundaries. According to both National Geographic and Nature magazine, 40% of wild deer tested positive for COVID antibodies in a study conducted in Michigan, Illinois, New York, and Pennsylvania. It has also been documented in wild mink and has already made the species jump to other captive animals including dogs, cats, otters, leopards, tigers, and gorillas. A lot of viruses are not fussy. They happily adapt to new opportunities. Specialists, like smallpox, eventually go extinct. Generalists, like most respiratory viruses, never run out of hosts to keep the infection cycle going, forever. As long as we share this planet with other animals, it is extremely deceitful to give anyone the impression that we can pursue any scorched earth policy that can put this genie back in the bottle. With an outbreak on this global scale, it was clear that we were always going to have to live with this virus. There are over 200 other endemic respiratory viruses that cause colds and flus, many of which circulate freely between humans and other animals. Now there are 201. They will be with us forever, whether we like it or not. SARS: The Exception to the Rule? This all sounds well and good, but the original SARS virus did disappear, with public health measures like contact tracing and strict quarantine measures taking the credit. However, SARS was the exception to the rule. When it made the species jump to humans, it was so poorly adapted to its new human hosts that it had terrible difficulty spreading. This very poor level of adaptation gave SARS a rather unique combination of properties: SARS was extremely difficult to catch (it was never very contagious) SARS made people extremely sick. SARS did not have pre-symptomatic spread. These three conditions made the SARS outbreak easy to control through contact tracing and through the quarantine of symptomatic individuals. SARS therefore never reached the point where it circulated widely among asymptomatic community members.  By contrast, by January/February of 2020 it was clear from experiences in China, Italy, and the outbreak on the Diamond Princess cruise ship (more on that story later) that the unique combination of conditions that made SARS controllable were not going to be the case with COVID. COVID was quite contagious (its rapid spread showed that COVID was already well adapted to spreading easily among its new human hosts), most people would have mild or no symptoms from COVID (making containment impossible), and that it was spreading by aerosols produced by both symptomatic and pre-symptomatic people (making contact tracing a joke). In other words, it was clear by January/February 2020 that this pandemic would follow the normal rules of a readily transmissible respiratory epidemic, which cannot be reined in the way SARS was. Thus, by January/February of 2020, giving the public the impression that the SARS experience could be replicated for COVID was a deliberate lie - this genie was never going back inside the bottle. Fast Mutations: The Fantasy of Control through Herd Immunity Once a reasonably contagious respiratory virus begins circulating widely in a community, herd immunity can never be maintained for very long. RNA respiratory viruses (such as influenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), rhinoviruses, and coronaviruses) all mutate extremely fast compared to viruses like smallpox, measles, or polio. Understanding the difference between something like measles and a virus like COVID is key to understanding the con that is being perpetrated by our health institutions. Bear with me here, I promise not to get too technical. All viruses survive by creating copies of themselves. And there are always a lot of "imperfect copies" — mutations — produced by the copying process itself. Among RNA respiratory viruses these mutations stack up so quickly that there is rapid genetic drift, which continually produces new strains. Variants are normal. Variants are expected. Variants make it virtually impossible to build the impenetrable wall of long-lasting herd immunity required to starve these respiratory viruses out of existence. That's one of several reasons why flu vaccines don't provide long-lasting immunity and have to be repeated annually ― our immune system constantly needs to be updated to keep pace with the inevitable evolution of countless unnamed "variants."  This never-ending conveyor belt of mutations means that everyone's immunity to COVID was always only going to be temporary and only offer partial cross-reactive protection against future re-infections. Thus, from day one, COVID vaccination was always doomed to the same fate as the flu vaccine ― a lifelong regimen of annual booster shots to try to keep pace with "variants" for those unwilling to expose themselves to the risk of a natural infection. And the hope that by the time the vaccines (and their booster shots) roll off the production line, they won't already be out of date when confronted by the current generation of virus mutations.  Genetic drift caused by mutations is much slower in viruses like measles, polio, or smallpox, which is why herd immunity can be used to control these other viruses (or even eradicate them as in the case of smallpox or polio). The reason the common respiratory viruses have such rapid genetic drift compared to these other viruses has much less to do with how many errors are produced during the copying process and much more to do with how many of those "imperfect" copies are actually able to survive and produce more copies.  A simple virus with an uncomplicated attack strategy for taking over host cells can tolerate a lot more mutations than a complex virus with a complicated attack strategy. Complexity and specialization put limits on how many of those imperfect copies have a chance at becoming successful mutations. Simple machinery doesn't break down as easily if there is an imperfection in the mechanical parts. Complicated high-tech machinery will simply not work if there are even minor flaws in precision parts. For example, before a virus can hijack the DNA of a host cell to begin making copies of itself, the virus needs to unlock the cell wall to gain entry. Cellular walls are made of proteins and are coated by sugars; viruses need to find a way to create a doorway through that protein wall. A virus like influenza uses a very simple strategy to get inside ― it locks onto one of the sugars on the outside of the cell wall in order to piggyback a ride as the sugar is absorbed into the cell (cells use sugar as their energy source). It's such a simple strategy that it allows the influenza virus to go through lots of mutations without losing its ability to gain entry to the cell. Influenza's simplicity makes it very adaptable and allows many different types of mutations to thrive as long as they all use the same piggyback entry strategy to get inside host cells. By contrast, something like the measles virus uses a highly specialized and very complicated strategy to gain entry to a host cell. It relies on very specialized surface proteins to break open a doorway into the host cell. It's a very rigid and complex system that doesn't leave a lot of room for errors in the copying process. Even minor mutations to the measles virus will cause changes to its surface proteins, leaving it unable to gain access to a host cell to make more copies of itself. Thus, even if there are lots of mutations, those mutations are almost all evolutionary dead ends, thus preventing genetic drift. That's one of several reasons why both a natural infection and vaccination against measles creates lifetime immunity ― immunity lasts because new variations don't change much over time.  Most RNA respiratory viruses have a high rate of genetic drift because they all rely on relatively simple attack strategies to gain entry to host cells. This allows mutations to stack up quickly without becoming evolutionary dead ends because they avoid the evolutionary trap of complexity.  Coronaviruses use a different strategy than influenza to gain access to host cells. They have proteins on the virus surface (the infamous S-spike protein, the same one that is mimicked by the vaccine injection), which latches onto a receptor on the cell surface (the ACE2 receptor) ― a kind of key to unlock the door. This attack strategy is a little bit more complicated than the system used by influenza, which is probably why genetic drift in coronaviruses is slightly slower than in influenza, but it is still a much much simpler and much less specialized system than the one used by measles. Coronaviruses, like other respiratory viruses, are therefore constantly producing a never-ending conveyor belt of "variants" that make long-lasting herd immunity impossible. Variants are normal. The alarm raised by our public health authorities about "variants" and the feigned compassion of pharmaceutical companies as they rush to develop fresh boosters capable of fighting variants is a charade, much like expressing surprise about the sun rising in the East. Once you got immunity to smallpox, measles, or polio, you had full protection for a few decades and were protected against severe illness or death for the rest of your life. But for fast-mutating respiratory viruses, including coronaviruses, within a few months they are sufficiently different that your previously acquired immunity will only ever offer partial protection against your next exposure. The fast rate of mutation ensures that you never catch the exact same cold or flu twice, just their closely related constantly evolving cousins. What keeps you from feeling the full brunt of each new infection is cross-reactive immunity, which is another part of the story of how you are being conned, which I will come back to shortly.  Blind Faith in Central Planning: The Fantasy of Timely Doses But let's pretend for a moment that a miraculous vaccine could be developed that could give us all 100% sterilizing immunity today. The length of time it takes to manufacture and ship 8 billion doses (and then make vaccination appointments for 8 billion people) ensures that by the time the last person gets their last dose, the never-ending conveyor belt of mutations will have already rendered the vaccine partially ineffective. True sterilizing immunity simply won't ever happen with coronaviruses. The logistics of rolling out vaccines to 8 billion people meant that none of our vaccine makers or public health authorities ever could have genuinely believed that vaccines would create lasting herd immunity against COVID. So, for a multitude of reasons, it was a deliberate lie to give the public the impression that if enough people take the vaccine, it would create lasting herd immunity. It was 100% certain, from day one, that by the time the last dose is administered, the rapid evolution of the virus would ensure that it would already be time to start thinking about booster shots. Exactly like the flu shot. Exactly the opposite of a measles vaccine. Vaccines against respiratory viruses can never provide anything more than a temporary cross-reactive immunity "update" ― they are merely a synthetic replacement for your annual natural exposure to the smorgasbord of cold and flu viruses. Immunity as a service, imposed on society by trickery. The only question was always, how long between booster shots? Weeks, months, years?  Feeling conned yet? Spiked: The Fantasy of Preventing Infection The current crop of COVID vaccines was never designed to provide sterilizing immunity - that's not how they work. They are merely a tool designed to teach the immune system to attack the S-spike protein, thereby priming the immune system to reduce the severity of infection in preparation for your inevitable future encounter with the real virus. They were never capable of preventing infection, nor of preventing spread. They were merely designed to reduce your chance of being hospitalized or dying if you are infected. As former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb, who is on Pfizer’s board, said: "the original premise behind these vaccines were [sic] that they would substantially reduce the risk of death and severe disease and hospitalization. And that was the data that came out of the initial clinical trials.” Every first-year medical student knows that you cannot get herd immunity from a vaccine that does not stop infection.  In other words, by their design, these vaccines can neither stop you from catching an infection nor stop you from transmitting the infection to someone else. They were never capable of creating herd immunity. They were designed to protect individuals against severe outcomes if they choose to take them - a tool to provide temporary focused protection for the vulnerable, just like the flu vaccine. Pushing for mass vaccination was a con from day one. And the idea of using vaccine passports to separate the vaccinated from the unvaccinated was also a con from day one. The only impact these vaccine passports have on the pandemic is as a coercive tool to get you to roll up your sleeve. Nothing more. Antibodies, B-Cells, and T-Cells: Why Immunity to Respiratory Viruses Fades So Quickly There are multiple interconnected parts to why immunity to COVID, or any other respiratory virus, is always only temporary. Not only is the virus constantly mutating but immunity itself fades over time, not unlike the way our brains start forgetting how to do complicated math problems unless they keep practicing. This is true for both immunity acquired through natural infection and immunity acquired through vaccination. Our immune systems have a kind of immunological memory ― basically, how long does your immune system remember how to launch an attack against a specific kind of threat. That memory fades over time. For some vaccines, like diphtheria and tetanus, that immunological memory fades very slowly. The measles vaccine protects for life. But for others, like the flu vaccine, that immunological memory fades very quickly. On average, the flu vaccine is only about 40% effective to begin with. And it begins to fade almost immediately after vaccination. By about 150 days (5 months), it reaches zero. Fading immunity after flu shot (Science, April 18th, 2019) The solution to this strange phenomenon lies in the different types of immune system responses that are triggered by a vaccine (or by exposure to the real thing through a natural infection). This has big implications for coronavirus vaccines, but I'll get to that in a moment. First a little background information... A good analogy is to think of our immune system like a medieval army. The first layer of protection began with generalists - guys armed with clubs that would take a swing at everything - they were good for keeping robbers and brigands at bay and for conducting small skirmishes. But if the attack was bigger, then these generalists were quickly overwhelmed, serving as arrow fodder to blunt the attack on the more specialized troops coming up behind them. Spearmen, swordsmen, archers, cavalry, catapult operators, siege tower engineers, and so on. Each additional layer of defense has a more expensive kit and takes ever greater amounts of time to train (an English longbowman took years to build up the necessary skill and strength to become effective). The more specialized a troop is, the more you want to hold them back from the fight unless it's absolutely necessary because they are expensive to train, expensive to deploy, and make a bigger mess when they fight that needs to be cleaned up afterwards. Always keep your powder dry. Send in the arrow fodder first and slowly ramp up your efforts from there. Our immune system relies on a similar kind of layered system of defense. In addition to various non-specific rapid response layers that take out the brigands, like natural killer cells, macrophages, mast cells, and so on, we also have many adaptive (specialized) layers of antibodies (i.e. IgA, IgG, IgM immunoglobulin) and various types of highly specialized white blood cells, like B-cells and T-cells. Some antibodies are released by regular B-cells. Others are released by blood plasma. Then there are memory B-cells, which are capable of remembering previous threats and creating new antibodies long after the original antibodies fade away. And there are various types of T-cells (again with various degrees of immunological memory), like natural killer T-cells, killer T-cells, and helper T-cells, all of which play various roles in detecting and neutralizing invaders. In short, the greater the threat, the more troops are called into the fight. This is clearly a gross oversimplification of all the different interconnected parts of our immune system, but the point is that a mild infection doesn't trigger as many layers whereas a severe infection enlists the help of deeper layers, which are slower to respond but are much more specialized in their attack capabilities. And if those deeper adaptive layers get involved, they are capable of retaining a memory of the threat in order to be able to mount a quicker attack if a repeat attack is recognized in the future. That's why someone who was infected by the dangerous Spanish Flu in 1918 might still have measurable T-cell immunity a century later but the mild bout of winter flu you had a couple of years ago might not have triggered T-cell immunity, even though both may have been caused by versions of the same H1N1 influenza virus. As a rule of thumb, the broader the immune response, the longer immunological memory will last. Antibodies fade in a matter of months, whereas B-cell and T-cell immunity can last a lifetime. Another rule of thumb is that a higher viral load puts more strain on your immune defenses, thus overwhelming the rapid response layers and forcing the immune system to enlist the deeper adaptive layers. That's why nursing homes and hospitals are more dangerous places for vulnerable people than backyard barbeques. That's why feedlot cattle are more vulnerable to viral diseases than cattle on pasture. Viral load matters a lot to how easily the generalist layers are overwhelmed and how much effort your immune system has to make to neutralize a threat. Where the infection happens in the body also matters. For example, an infection in the upper respiratory tract triggers much less involvement from your adaptive immune system than when it reaches your lungs. Part of this is because your upper respiratory tract is already heavily preloaded with large numbers of generalist immunological cells that are designed to attack germs as they enter, which is why most colds and flus never make it deeper into the lungs. The guys with the clubs are capable of handling most of the threats that try to make through the gate. Most of the specialized troops hold back unless they are needed. Catching a dangerous disease like measles produces lifetime immunity because an infection triggers all the deep layers that will retain a memory of how to fight off future encounters with the virus. So does the measles vaccine. Catching a cold or mild flu generally does not.  From an evolutionary point of view, this actually makes a lot of sense. Why waste valuable resources developing long-lasting immunity (i.e. training archers and building catapults) to defend against a virus that did not put you in mortal danger. A far better evolutionary strategy is to evolve a narrower generalist immune response to mild infections (i.e. most cold and flu viruses), which fades quickly once the threat is conquered, but invest in deep long-term broad-based immunity to dangerous infections, which lasts a very long time in case that threat is ever spotted on the horizon again. Considering the huge number of threats our immune systems face, this strategy avoids the trap of spreading immunological memory too thin. Our immunological memory resources are not limitless - long-term survival requires prioritizing our immunological resources. The take-home lesson is that vaccines will, at best, only last as long as immunity acquired through natural infection and will often fade much faster because the vaccine is often only able to trigger a partial immune response compared to the actual infection. So, if the disease itself doesn't produce a broad-based immune response leading to long-lasting immunity, neither will the vaccine. And in most cases, immunity acquired through vaccination will begin to fade much sooner than immunity acquired through a natural infection. Every vaccine maker and public health official knows this despite bizarrely claiming that the COVID vaccines (based on re-creating the S-protein spike instead of using a whole virus) would somehow become the exception to the rule. That was a lie, and they knew it from day one. That should set your alarm bells ringing at full throttle. So, with this little bit of background knowledge under our belts, let's look at what our public health officials and vaccine makers would have known in advance about coronaviruses and coronavirus vaccines when they told us back in the early Spring of 2020 that COVID vaccines were the path back to normality. From a 2003 study [my emphasis]: "Until SARS appeared, human coronaviruses were known as the cause of 15–30% of colds... Colds are generally mild, self-limited infections, and significant increases in neutralizing antibody titer are found in nasal secretions and serum after infection. Nevertheless, some unlucky individuals can be reinfected with the same coronavirus soon after recovery and get symptoms again." In other words, the coronaviruses involved in colds (there were four human coronaviruses before SARS, MERS, and COVID) all trigger such a weak immune response that they do not lead to any long-lasting immunity whatsoever. And why would they if, for most of us, the threat is so minimal that the generalists are perfectly capable of neutralizing the attack. We also know that immunity against coronaviruses is not durable in other animals either. As any farmer knows well, cycles of reinfection with coronaviruses are the rule rather than the exception among their livestock (for example, coronaviruses are a common cause of pneumonia and various types of diarrheal diseases like scours, shipping fever, and winter dysentery in cattle). Annual farm vaccination schedules are therefore designed accordingly. The lack of long-term immunity to coronaviruses is well documented in veterinary research among cattle, poultry, deer, water buffalo, etc. Furthermore, although animal coronavirus vaccines have been on the market for many years, it is well known that "none are completely efficacious in animals". So, like the fading flu vaccine profile I showed you earlier, none of the animal coronavirus vaccines are capable of providing sterilizing immunity (none were capable of stopping 100% of infections, without which you can never achieve herd immunity) and the partial immunity they offered is well known to fade rather quickly. What about immunity to COVID's close cousin, the deadly SARS coronavirus, which had an 11% case fatality rate during the 2003 outbreak? From a 2007 study: "SARS-specific antibodies were maintained for an average of 2 years... SARS patients might be susceptible to reinfection >3 years after initial exposure."  (Bear in mind that, as with all diseases, re-infection does not mean you are necessarily going to get full-blown SARS; fading immunity after a natural infection tends to offer at least some level of partial protection against severe outcomes for a considerable amount of time after you can already be reinfected and spread it to others - more on that later.) And what about MERS, the deadliest coronavirus to date, which made the jump from camels in 2012 and had a fatality rate of around 35%? It triggered the broadest immune response (due to its severity) and also appears to trigger the longest lasting immunity as a result (> 6yrs) Thus, to pretend that there was any chance that herd immunity to COVID would be anything but short-lived was dishonest at best. For most people, immunity was always going to fade quickly. Just like what happens after most other respiratory virus infections. By February 2020, the epidemiological data showed clearly that for most people COVID was a mild coronavirus (nowhere near as severe than SARS or MERS), so it was virtually a certainty that even the immunity from a natural infection would fade within months, not years. It was also a certainty that vaccination was therefore, at best, only ever going to provide partial protection and that this protection would be temporary, lasting on the order of months. This is a case of false and misleading advertising if there ever was one. If I can allow my farming roots to shine through for a moment, I'd like to explain the implications of what was known about animal coronaviruses vaccines. Baby calves are often vaccinated against bovine coronaviral diarrhea shortly after birth if they are born in the spring mud and slush season, but not if they are born in midsummer on lush pastures where the risk of infection is lower. Likewise, bovine coronavirus vaccines are used to protect cattle before they face stressful conditions during shipping, in a feedlot, or in winter feed pens. Animal coronavirus vaccines are thus used as tools to provide a temporary boost in immunity, in very specific conditions, and only for very specific vulnerable categories of animals. After everything I've laid out so far in this text, the targeted use of bovine coronavirus vaccines should surprise no-one. Pretending that our human coronavirus vaccines would be different was nonsense.  The only rational reason why the WHO and public health officials would withhold all that contextual information from the public as they rolled out lockdowns and held forth vaccines as an exit strategy was to whip the public into irrational fear in order to be able to make a dishonest case for mass vaccination when they should have, at most, been focused on providing focused vaccination of the most vulnerable only. That deception was the Trojan Horse to introduce endless mass booster shots as immunity inevitably fades and as new variants replace old ones.  Now, as all the inevitable limitations and problems with these vaccines become apparent (i.e. fading of vaccine-induced immunity, vaccines proving to only be partially effective, the rise of new variants, and the vaccinated population demonstrably catching and spreading the virus ― a.k.a. the leaky vaccine phenomenon), the surprise that our health authorities are showing simply isn't credible. As I have shown you, all this was 100% to be expected. They intentionally weaponized fear and false expectations to unleash a fraudulent bait-and-switch racket of global proportions. Immunity on demand, forever. Manufacturing Dangerous Variants: Virus Mutations Under Lockdown Conditions — Lessons from the 1918 Spanish Flu At this point you may be wondering, if there is no lasting immunity from infection or vaccination, then are public health officials right to roll out booster shots to protect us from severe outcomes even if their dishonest methods to get us to accept them were unethical? Do we need a lifetime regimen of booster shots to keep us safe from a beast to which we cannot develop durable long-term immunity? The short answer is no.  Contrary to what you might think, the rapid evolution of RNA respiratory viruses actually has several important benefits for us as their involuntary hosts, which protects us without the benefit of broad lifelong immunity. One of those benefits has to do with the natural evolution of the virus towards less dangerous variants. The other is the cross-reactive immunity that comes from frequent re-exposure to closely related "cousins". I'm going to peel apart both of these topics in order to show you the remarkable system that nature designed to keep us safe... and to show you how the policies being forced on us by our public health authorities are knowingly interfering with this system. They are creating a dangerous situation that increases our risk to other respiratory viruses (not just to COVID) and may even push the COVID virus to evolve to become more dangerous to both the unvaccinated and the vaccinated. There are growing signs that this nightmare scenario has already begun.  “In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem."  - President Ronald Reagan in 1981. Let's start with the evolutionary pressures that normally drive viruses towards becoming less dangerous over time. A virus depends on its host to spread it. A lively host is more useful than a bedridden or dead one because a lively host can spread the virus further and will still be around to catch future mutations. Viruses risk becoming evolutionary dead ends if they kill or immobilize their hosts. Plagues came, killed, and then were starved out of existence because their surviving hosts had all acquired herd immunity. Colds come and go every year because their hosts are lively, easily spread the viruses around, and never acquire long-lasting immunity so that last year's hosts can also serve as next year's hosts ― only those who have weak immune systems have much to worry about. In other words, under normal conditions, mutations that are more contagious but less deadly have a survival advantage over less contagious and more deadly variations. From the virus' point of view, the evolutionary golden mean is reached when it can easily infect as many hosts as possible without reducing their mobility and without triggering long-term immunity in most of their hosts. That's the ticket to setting up a sustainable cycle of reinfection, forever. Viruses with slow genetic drift and highly specialized reproductive strategies, like polio or measles, can take centuries or longer to become less deadly and more contagious; some may never reach the relatively harmless status of a cold or mild flu virus (by harmless I mean harmless to the majority of the population despite being extremely dangerous to those with weak or compromised immune systems). But for viruses with fast genetic drift, like respiratory viruses, even a few months can make a dramatic difference. Rapid genetic drift is one of the reasons why the Spanish Flu stopped being a monster disease, but polio and measles haven't. And anyone with training in virology or immunology understands this!  We often speak of evolutionary pressure as though it forces an organism to adapt. In reality, a simple organism like a virus is utterly blind to its environment — all it does is blindly produce genetic copies of itself. "Evolutionary pressure" is actually just a fancy way of saying that environmental conditions will determine which of those millions of copies survives long enough to produce even more copies of itself.  A human adapts to its environment by altering its behaviour (that's one type of adaptation). But the behaviour of a single viral particle never changes. A virus "adapts" over time because some genetic copies with one set of mutations survive and spread faster than other copies with a different set of mutations. Adaptation in viruses has to be seen exclusively through the lens of changes from one generation of virus to the next based on which mutations have a competitive edge over others. And that competitive edge will vary depending on the kinds of environmental conditions a virus encounters. So, fear mongering about the Delta variant being even more contagious leaves out the fact that this is exactly what you would expect as a respiratory virus adapts to its new host species. We would expect new variants to be more contagious but less deadly as the virus fades to become just like the other 200+ respiratory viruses that cause common colds and flus.  That's also why the decision to lock down the healthy population is so sinister. Lockdowns, border closures, and social distancing rules reduced spread among the healthy population, thus creating a situation where mutations produced among the healthy would become sufficiently rare that they might be outnumbered by mutations circulating among the bedridden. Mutations circulating among the healthy are, by definition, going to be the least dangerous mutations since they did not make their hosts s.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeSep 25th, 2021

Sound Transit board declines to renew CEO Peter Rogoff"s contract

Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff is stepping down from his role next year, triggering the search for his replacement as the organization's workload picks up......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsSep 24th, 2021

10 hotels in South Florida with gorgeous rooftop pools and lively bars

These are the best hotels with rooftop pools and restaurants in South Florida, including Miami, Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, and more. When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. Tripadvisor South Florida's warm, tropical climate makes it a top vacation destination. From West Palm Beach to Miami, South Florida hotels have incredible rooftops to soak up the sun. Some hotel rooftop bars, restaurants, and pools are open to the public in addition to guests. Table of Contents: Masthead StickySouth Florida is known for its dazzling beaches but also its lively nightlife. And because the region stays warm when the sun goes down, many hotels have in-demand rooftops with outdoor restaurants, bars, and pools that draw visitors day and night.Few things top an afternoon laying out by a pool perched in the sky, enjoying happy hour with views of the Atlantic Ocean in the background, or watching a sunset while savoring a delicious meal. Living in South Florida has given me the opportunity to frequent some of the best hotels, and the following list of hotels all have incredible rooftops that make it easy to savor all the best parts of visiting the Sunshine State.Browse all the best hotels with rooftop pools and restaurants below, or jump directly to a specific area here:The best hotel rooftops in South FloridaFAQ: South Florida hotelsHow we selected the best South Florida hotels with rooftopsMore of the best hotels in FloridaThese are the best hotel rooftops with pools and restaurants in South Florida, sorted by price from low to high. Courtyard Fort Lauderdale Downtown The Easton rooftop combines a pool, restaurant, bar, and nightclub. Marriott Book Courtyard Fort Lauderdale DowntownCategory: Budget Town: Fort Lauderdale Typical starting/peak prices: $152/$365Best for: Friends, solo travelers, Marriott loyalists On-site amenities: 24-hour fitness center, library, business center, pet-friendly rooms, pool, restaurant, barPros: The rooms are well priced, and the rooftop bar is a hot nightlife destination with a DJ and bottle service on the weekends. Cons: On the flip side, the rooftop bar can get crowded, and noise can carry into the guest rooms late into the night.The Courtyard Fort Lauderdale Downtown recently opened in March 2021, nestled in the hip Fort Lauderdale Arts District, just a few miles from Fort Lauderdale Beach and Las Olas Boulevard, the main dining and entertainment strip. Rooms start under $200, which is well priced for a new hotel in such a great location. Most of the 137 guest rooms and suites have views of the Fort Lauderdale city skyline and are outfitted with modern wallpaper, soft carpeting, orange leather armchairs, and sofa beds in some rooms. The hotel is also home to The Easton, a ninth-story rooftop with a restaurant, bar, pool, and plush outdoor seating.  The Easton fills up quickly, especially during weekday Golden Happy Hour, and on the weekends, the rooftop transforms into a nightclub from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. with visitors lining up for live music and bottle service. COVID-19 procedures are available here. Canopy by Hilton West Palm Beach Downtown Ban.ter Treehouse, the 13th-floor rooftop bar and restaurant has seating spread around a sparkling infinity pool. Tripadvisor Book Canopy by Hilton West Palm Beach DowntownCategory: Mid-rangeTown: West Palm Beach Typical starting/peak prices: $174/$423 Best for: Friends, Hilton loyalists, travelers with pets  On-site amenities: Pet-friendly rooms, complimentary evening wine and beer tastings, complimentary bicycle rentals, restaurant, bar, poolPros: The hotel is close to the airport in a great central location for exploring trendy downtown West Palm Beach. Cons: While the views on the rooftop are great, the seating is limited.Canopy by Hilton West Palm Beach opened in 2020 and is the only Hilton Canopy in Florida, a new boutique lifestyle concept from the brand. Canopy hotels pride themselves on creating a locally-driven by connecting guests to events, music, and restaurants in the surrounding area. The 150 room hotel is less than three miles from Palm Beach International Airport and about a mile from the beach. Rooms are brand new and have been outfitted with gray bedding, oversized artwork, and a dedicated workspace. Standard rooms are spacious at almost 400 square feet, and Deluxe Rooms have city and ocean views. Ban.ter, the lobby restaurant, serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Ban.ter Treehouse, the 13th-floor rooftop bar and restaurant serves small plates and cocktails. The indoor/outdoor flow of the latter rooftop restaurant is lush with lots of plants and palm trees and seating is a mix of bartop and four-person tables spread around a sparkling infinity pool. On weekends, a poolside DJ plays high-energy music. COVID-19 procedures are available here. Kimpton Angler's South Beach The hotel is just two blocks from the beach. Tripadvisor Book Kimpton Angler's South BeachCategory: Boutique Town: South Beach, Miami Typical starting/peak prices: $228/$483Best for: Couples, families, IHG Kimpton reward members, travelers with pets   On-site amenities: Evening wine hours, complimentary morning coffee, Orange Theory fitness classes, in-room spa treatments, pool, restaurant, bar, beach accessPros: The Kimpton Angler is just two blocks from the beach and accommodations are large, with options for two and three-story lofts and bungalows.Cons: There's no fitness center, but the hotel has a partnership with OrangeTheory fitness, and classes are included in your stay. Also, there's a charge for Wi-Fi if you're not an IHG Kimpton rewards member.Kimpton hotels are known for their well-designed boutique properties, the Kimpton Angler's South Beach is no exception. Located on the south end of Miami Beach, it's also minutes from the nightlife on Ocean DriveThere's a cohesive nautical theme carried throughout, with sand-colored loveseats, wicker lamps, and navy patterned lounge chairs and curtains in the 132 guest rooms and suites. Standard rooms are 400 square feet with King or Queen sized beds, ample closet space, and oversized walk-in showers with separate tubs. Most rooms also have balconies that overlook either Washington Ave or the hotel's courtyard Mermaid Pool. The sixth-floor rooftop pool and sun deck is a standout feature, with chic black and white lounge chairs framed by panoramic views of the Miami skyline. Large potted plants add privacy to lounge areas, and the pool deck is quiet enough for those who want to catch up on reading. After a dip, order drinks like the photogenic watermelon margarita from the Minnow Bar. COVID-19 procedures are available here. Conrad Miami The sleek pool terrace is one of multiple rooftop lounge areas at the Conrad Miami. Tripadvisor Book Conrad MiamiCategory: LuxuryTown: Brickell, MiamiTypical starting/peak prices: $275/$574Best for: Couples, Hilton loyalists   On-site amenities: Spa, hot tub, rooftop tennis courts, restaurant, pool, barPros: In addition to the great views, the hotel is in a walkable neighborhood and the customer service is top-notch. Cons: Part of the hotel is commercial real estate, and floors 4-15 are business offices, which may take away from the luxury hotel feel. Also, the lobby is located on the 25th floor, which can be confusing.Conrad Miami is in the heart of Brickell, Miami's business district near upscale, art, and dining. This hotel has multiple great outdoor spaces, but chief among them is Nativo Kitchen and Bar on the 25th floor with views of Virginia Key Beach, Key Biscayne, and Biscayne Bay.There is also the 13th-floor rooftop pool with sleek cabanas and the adjacent Sky Pool Bar, serving a casual menu of burgers and chicken wings, local and imported beers, and frozen cocktails.  When not sunning yourself on one of these terraces, retreat to guest rooms with a clean, minimalist style and light wood furniture, gold fixtures, and baby blue accent chairs. Standard rooms have a separate bathtub and shower, complimentary bathrobes, and 50-inch televisions, and all rooms come with wide windows that offer city or ocean views.COVID-19 procedures are available here. The Dalmar, Tribute Portfolio A saltwater pool is flanked by a sleek bar. Tripadvisor Book The Dalmar, Tribute PortfolioCategory: Luxury Town: Fort Lauderdale Typical starting/peak prices: $284/$455 Best for: FriendsOn-site amenities: Yoga classes, restaurants, pool, bar, coffee shopPros: The rooftop restaurant, Sparrow, is great for adults-only celebrations and has exceptional views of Fort Lauderdale. Cons: Past guests have noted that food and drink prices are steep. The Dalmar is located in downtown Fort Lauderdale, only two miles from Fort Lauderdale beach. From framed art by the Lobby Bar restaurant to the living plant wall adorning Rose's Coffee shop near the hotel's entrance, fun design features prominently.There are two great rooftop venues on the 6th floor of the hotel. Sparrow is an indoor/outdoor restaurant and bar, and after 9 p.m., the venue turns into a 21+ lounge. There's a strict dress code (no athletic gear or beachwear) and a DJ that spins late into the night.The other rooftop venue is the saltwater pool reserved for hotel guests, but the poolside bar and grill, Sip and Dip, is open to everyone from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.Inside, guest rooms have midcentury flair with pastel furniture, pleated curtains, and brass lamps. The rooms also have premium Sferra sheets, spacious bathrooms with rainfall showers, and tablets for ordering in-room services. Most rooms have floor-to-ceiling views of either Fort Lauderdale or the Intracoastal and select rooms have balconies. COVID-19 procedures are available here. The Ben, Autograph Collection Spruzzo serves coastal Italian cuisine on the rooftop. Tripadvisor Book The Ben, Autograph CollectionCategory: Luxury Town: West Palm Beach Typical starting/peak prices: $286/$483Best for: Couples, Marriott loyalists, travelers with pets  On-site amenities: Rooftop fire pit, hotel library, in-room dining, pet-friendly rooms, restaurant, poolPros: In addition to the great downtown location and views of the waterfront, Spruzzo, the hotel's Italian rooftop restaurant, has a delicious menu and extensive imported wines. Cons: Spruzzo doesn't take reservations, but instead operates on a first-come, first-served policy. One of the newest additions to downtown West Palm Beach is the waterfront hotel, The Ben. The Marriott-owned luxury boutique hotel commands a great location within walking distance of Clematis Street, West Palm Beach's lively district filled with restaurants and bars, and Rosemary Square, an upscale shopping and dining destination. Guest rooms are polished, with sleek wood floors, leather pleated headboards, and luxe Turkish linens. A standard Interior Double Queen is a comfortable 343 square feet, and many guest rooms have views of Palm Harbor Marina or Palm Beach Island. The hotel's 7th-floor rooftop restaurant and bar, Spruzzo, is quite popular, especially on weekends, serving coastal Italian cuisine. It's quickly become a local hangout for young professionals. During the day, hotel guests may reserve one of the cabanas next to the heated saltwater pool, and at night, enjoy watching the sunset over the Palm Beach Intracoastal from the fire pit with a cocktail in hand. COVID-19 procedures are available here. Moxy Miami South Beach There are six different hotel restaurants including a swanky rooftop lounge. Marriott Book Moxy Miami South BeachCategory: BoutiqueTown: South Beach, MiamiTypical starting/peak prices: $289/$489Best for: Friends, Marriott loyalists Onsite amenities: 6 dining and drinking venues, pet-friendly rooms, complimentary beach chairs, complimentary rooftop fitness classes, complimentary morning coffee, poolPros: The Upside rooftop level has incredible views of the South Beach oceanfront along with plenty of seating. Each guestroom also have two beach chairs on South Beach included. Cons: Although there's plenty of places to sunbathe, The Upside rooftop only has a shallow wading pool.Newly opened Moxy Miami South Beach is the first resort-style property for the Moxy brand.Only two blocks from the bustling nightlife of South Beach, the hotel gets lively, especially on the weekends and caters to a young crowd. The purposeful design features lots of Instagrammable details like neon wall signs and fun pool floats.Standard guestrooms are a cozy 224 square feet but maximize the space with retro details like rotary phones and custom artwork by local Miami artists. Walk-in rain showers and Egyptian cotton linens add a sumptuous touch.There are six different hotel restaurants including a lobby bar, Bar Moxy, and Serena, an elevated Mexican restaurant in a lush garden setting adjacent to the hotel's main 72-foot pool. The hotel's 8th story rooftop, The Upside is reserved for hotel guests and has a shallow pool, lounge chairs, and plenty of daybeds. The Upside has great views of South Beach, and a DJ spins house and hip-hop tunes throughout the afternoon and evening. The hotel also offers complimentary bikes (helmets included) to explore the neighborhood. COVID-19 procedures are available here. The Betsy South Beach The oceanfront deck offers a front-row view of the Atlantic Ocean. Tripadvisor Book The Betsy South BeachCategory: BoutiqueTown: South Beach, MiamiTypical starting/peak prices: $289/$609Best for: Couples, travelers with pets On-site amenities: Spa, library, fitness center, restaurants, bars, arts and cultural programming, beach access, poolPros: With only 130 rooms, the hotel offers a peaceful, intimate South Beach stay and all the arts programming is a boon for culture enthusiasts. Cons: Restaurant menu items are expensive and come with an automatic 20% gratuity fee, but that's on par with most hotels on Ocean Drive.The Betsy Hotel is a landmark hotel on South Beach located on Miami's main strip, Ocean Drive, but is tucked away from the noise of the nightclubs and late-night revelry. Arts programming features heavily here, drawing a sophisticated crowd of well-heeled creative types who book posh, albeit sometimes small, rooms with walnut floors, velvet armchairs, and cream-colored curtains that frame floor-to-ceiling windows. The 250-square-foot standard Classic King is cozy but comes with a marble bathroom, a large walk-in shower, luxe Sferra linens, and is pet-friendly, welcoming dogs under 40 pounds. There are two pools: a courtyard pool and a fourth-floor rooftop infinity pool with chaise lounges and 360-degree views of Miami. The bar serves poolside drinks, and food may be brought up from the hotel's restaurant, LT Steak & Seafood. After a swim, catch a sunset from the rooftop's Skyline Deck, a patio overlooking the ocean with unobstructed water views.COVID-19 procedures are available here. East Miami An expansive rooftop pool deck has stellar views over the city and multiple areas to swim. Tripadvisor Book East MiamiCategory: Luxury Town: Brickell, MiamiTypical starting/peak prices: $305/$529Best for: Couples, business travelersOn-site amenities: 24-hour fitness center with classes, complimentary bicycles, restaurants, 4 pools, barsPros: Sugar, the bar on the 40th floor, has one of the best views of downtown Miami and some of the best cocktails I've had in Miami. Cons: The food and cocktails at Sugar are great, but even with a reservation, the wait is long and service can be slow. East Miami is centrally located in downtown Brickell and Sugar, the hotel's rooftop restaurant and bar on the 40th floor has arguably the best view of the entire Miami skyline.The restaurant is 21+ after 6 p.m. and there's a strict dress code (nightlife attire is enforced after sunset). Equally impressive are the four pools (a lap pool, spa pool, plunge pool, and hot tub) on the hotel's fifth-floor deck. So many offerings mean you won't have to worry about waiting for a sun lounger.Standard guest rooms start at 300 square feet, though there are also has large one, two, and three-bedroom residences. All 352 rooms come with a private balcony, floor-to-ceiling windows, and contemporary decor that includes cream-colored furniture, teal wallpaper, and orange throw pillows. COVID-19 procedures are available here. 1 Hotel South Beach Four distinct pool decks offer incredible views. 1 Hotel South Beach/TripAdvisor Book 1 Hotel South BeachCategory: Luxury Town: South Beach, MiamiTypical starting/peak prices: $425/$899Best for: Couples, friends, familiesOn-site amenities: Spa, fitness classes, salon, pet-friendly rooms, coffee and juice bar, beach club, restaurants, bars, multiple poolsPros: There are four different dazzling pool areas, one of which has stunning views from the hotel's 18th-story rooftop. Food, rooms, and customer service are all outstanding at this hotel. Cons: Prices can more than double during the winter high season, and the hotel's 18 story rooftop pool is restricted to adults 21+.Considered one of the best hotels on South Beach, 1 Hotel South Beach takes up an entire block and sits on 600 feet of Miami's prime beachfront. The hotel is pricey but worth the splurge for its sophisticated boho beach vibes, impeccable service, outstanding food, and airy rooms.The lobby makes a remarkable first impression with soaring ceilings and crisp seating around glass-topped wooden coffee tables, but it's the multiple pool decks that really dazzle.There are four different pools: the beachfront South pool, the third floor Cabana Pool, the enormous 30,000 square foot Center Pool, and the gorgeous 18th-story rooftop pool, Watr at the 1 Hotel Rooftop, which is Miami's largest rooftop pool and lounge. Inside, the 426 guest rooms are a celebration of nature and sustainability, sourcing most items from reclaimed materials. A coastal-inspired color palette and large windows make them feel airy and light alongside beachy accents featuring driftwood, tree stumps, and custom wood plank headboards. COVID-19 procedures are available here. FAQ: South Florida hotels When is the best time to visit South Florida?While South Florida experiences nearly year-round sunshine, the best time to visit is from February to May. During those months, temperatures are cooler, and crowds tend to taper off, although there is a spike of visitors during spring break.During the summer months, the temperature and humidity soar, and daily afternoon thunderstorms are common. Florida's hurricane season starts June 1 and lasts until the end of November with August and September being the most active hurricane months.Weather-wise, November through January is also a good time to visit. The temperatures hover around 75 degrees, although it's not uncommon to experience a few sub 50 degree days when a cold front comes through. But keep in mind that hotel prices tend to peak during the November to January holiday months. Do I have to book a room to visit a hotel rooftop?Many of the hotels included in this list have rooftop bars and restaurants open to the public that do not require an overnight hotel reservation, but most of the rooftop pools are reserved for hotel guests. Some hotels offer daytime cabana rentals or a day pass through Resort Pass that includes access to the hotel's pool, spa, or other amenities. Availability changes often, so always call ahead and ask. How do I get around South Florida?South Florida is a large area that encompasses three counties: Broward, Miami-Dade, and Monroe, though most locals consider southern cities in Palm Beach County like West Palm Beach as part of South Florida.Touring South Florida requires a car and some planning as traffic can get congested, especially during morning and evening rush hours. While the public transportation system is mostly reliable in downtown areas, renting a car is the best way to explore all of South Florida. If you're flying into Miami, Fort Lauderdale, or West Palm Beach and staying close to your hotel, you can use taxis or rideshare apps to get around. How do I find a hotel with a rooftop?Most hotels with a rooftop will list it on their hotel website, and third-party booking sites like Booking.com and Hotels.com will usually include a  rooftop in the hotel description or on the list of hotel amenities. Also, the third-party booking site Kayak has a search filter to only pull up properties with rooftops. Do hotel guests receive priority on rooftops?It depends on the property. Most of the hotels restrict the pool areas to hotel guests or guests with day passes. Rooftops with a combined pool and restaurant area do take outside reservations, so it's advised to make restaurant reservations when checking in. How we selected the best South Florida hotels with rooftops I'm a South Florida-based travel writer and have personally visited almost every hotel on this list. All of the hotel rooftops have an excellent bar or restaurant, a picturesque pool, and sensational city or ocean views.Every hotel is located in a popular neighborhood in West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, or Miami. Some of the hotels have downtown locations close to shopping, museums, and restaurants. Others are beachfront or within walking distance to the beach.Besides the great rooftops, many of the properties include perks like a nightly hosted wine hour, complimentary bicycles, and pet-friendly guest rooms.All of the properties have excellent recent reviews on third-party travel sites like Tripadvisor or Booking.com.Because of the location and amenities of the properties, most of the hotels are in the luxury category, but booking during low season can lock in reasonable rates.We've indicated which hotels are ideal for couples, friends, families, or solo travelers, and have included a mix of all kinds of properties.Each hotel promotes COVID safe practices and has updated its COVID practices to include enhanced cleaning procedures. More of the best hotels in Florida Trip Advisor The best hotels in FloridaThe best beach hotels in FloridaThe best hotels in South BeachThe best hotels in MiamiThe best hotels in Key WestThe best hotels in Fort LauderdaleThe best hotels in Orlando and KissimmeeThe best hotels in Walt Disney WorldThe best hotels in Destin Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 23rd, 2021

Boomers are only making the 2021 housing crisis worse

Boomers are staying put in their houses as they age. That could be a big problem for other generations who want to build wealth through real estate. Baby boomers are staying put. Matt Henry Gunther/Getty Images Boomers have more real-estate wealth than any other generation, according to a NYT analysis of Fed data. Unlike previous generations, many of them aren't listing their houses for sale as they get older. It's exacerbating a historic housing shortage that's made it difficult for millennials to buy homes. See more stories on Insider's business page. Baby boomers hold more real-estate wealth than any other generation.The Silent Generation held that distinction until 2001, according to Michael Kolomatsky's analysis of Federal Reserve Data for The New York Times. As was typical of older generations, many had begun selling their homes to move in with their families or into assisted-living facilities or nursing homes, leaving boomers to take over as the biggest wealth holders in real estate.But boomers are now breaking tradition. They've surpassed the Silent Generation, per the Times' data analysis, holding the most real estate wealth of any generation for the past 20 years. While this peaked in 2011 at about 49%, boomers still hold 44% of real estate wealth in 2021, compared to 31% of Gen Xers, the next richest generation. By this token, Gen Xers should have held the most real estate wealth as of 2017, but they're still far behind.It's a sign that boomers are "aging in place," Kolomatsky writes, a growing concept that the pandemic has exacerbated. It's partly because some boomers are cautious of nursing homes in a Covid era, he added.But it's also because people are wary of putting their houses up for sale. Gay Cororaton, the director of housing and commercial research for the National Association of Realtors (NAR), previously told Insider that some owners haven't been listing their homes as a pandemic safety precaution. Others are wary of putting them on the market for fear of being unable to find an affordable replacement to buy, she said.Rather than engaging with a scorching real-estate market, many boomers are investing in remodeling instead. With the value of homes going up nationwide, they've became more willing to spend on remodeling than past generations, fueling a home improvement boom.Their willingness to stay put is also worsening the housing crisis of 2021, fueled by a rush for homeownership in a remote work era. A sudden crunch in the supply of lumber, combined with chronic underbuilding since the Great Recession, has coalesced into a historic housing shortage. If boomers don't move out of their homes to retire in line with their predecessors, the supply will just worsen.Read more: Millennials are getting screwed again by their 2nd housing crisis in 12 yearsHousing prices have reached record highs, sparking cutthroat competition and heated bidding wars rife with all-cash offers and higher down payments. While this has pushed many aspiring homeowners away from the housing hunt, it's been especially bad for millennials, many of whom are looking to buy a home for the first time.Housing was largely an out-of-reach dream for millennials for years. Soaring living costs, student debt, and the fallout of the Great Recession made saving for a down payment difficult. While some were able to catch up on savings and snag a home during the pandemic, largely driving 2020's housing boom, as shown by the National Association of Realtors' recent Generational Trends Report. But that has curdled into a logjam in 2021. Millennials have found themselves facing their second housing crisis in a dozen years. "Now that they have economically recovered and are looking to buy a home for the first time, we're faced with this housing shortage," Daryl Fairweather, chief economist at Redfin, previously told Insider. "They're already boxed out of the housing market."Boomers aren't helping matters. The longer they hold onto their houses, the harder it will be for other generations to build wealth through real estate.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 22nd, 2021

Kontoor Brands names replacement for retiring chief human resources officer Scott Schoener

After three decades of service to the Lee and Wrangler brands, Scott Schoener will retire from Kontoor Brands in December. He will be replaced as chief human resources officer by Tammy Heller......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsSep 21st, 2021

The U.S. Is Losing the Global Race to Decide the Future of Money—and It Could Doom the Almighty Dollar

"I don’t think the U.S. is aware there is a race" In cities across China, the country’s central bank has begun rolling out the e-renminbi—an all-digital version of its paper currency that can be accessed and accepted by merchants and consumers without an internet connection, credit or even a bank account. Already having conducted more than $5 billion in e-renminbi transactions, China has opened its digital currency up to foreigners. Next year, when Beijing hosts the Winter Olympic Games, authorities are expecting to let the world test drive its technological achievement. The U.S., by contrast, is having trouble even concluding its multi-year exploration into the possibility of an e-dollar. In fact, an upcoming Federal Reserve paper on a potential U.S. digital currency won’t take a position on whether the central bank of the United States will, or even should, create one. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Instead, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said in recent testimony to Congress, this paper will “begin a major public consultation on central bank digital currencies…” (Once planned for July, the paper’s release has since been moved to September.) Once the world leader in digital payments and technological innovation, the U.S. is being outpaced by its top global adversary as well as much of the industrialized and the developing world. The Bahamas recently announced the integration of its digital Sand Dollar into a stock exchange, while Australia, Malaysia, Singapore and South Africa are moving forward with the world’s first cross-border central bank digital currency exchange program led by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), which is known as the central bank of central banks. Such developments have been somewhat outshined by El Salvador’s recent decision to make bitcoin a legally accepted currency, which few expect to make significant impact in the payment space. But outside of the cryptocurrency space, nations around the globe are making significant strides in the development of the digital future of money — supported by governments and backed by powerful central banks. Leadership in this space will have implications for more than just payments: geopolitical ambitions, economic growth, financial inclusion and the very nature of money could all be dictated by who leads the charge and how. “I don’t think the U.S. is aware there is a race” Digital currencies are the next wave in the “evolution of the nature of money in the digital economy,” Hyun Song Shin, economic adviser and co-leader of the Monetary and Economic Department at the Bank for International Settlements, tells TIME. As more of our world migrates from physical brick-and-mortar to wireless and cloud-based, the way we pay for things is changing as well. A central bank digital currency would operate just like cash, but instead of having to carry it in a physical wallet or put it into a bank account, it would be stored and accessed digitally. Not only could U.S.-backed digital currency facilitate easier, modern banking, it could prove vital in protecting American international influence. Late to the party, the U.S. is “stepping up its research and public engagement” on digital currencies, the Federal Reserve says, including forming working groups on cryptocurrency and other kinds of digital money, and experimenting with technology that would be central to producing a digital dollar. The Fed’s regional Boston branch is overseeing these efforts with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on what’s known as Project Hamilton. But the path towards a digital U.S. dollar has met many challenges, skeptics and outright opponents. All while China, and other countries, push forward. Lagging behind the world Just how far behind is the U.S. in the development of a central bank-issued digital currency (CBDC)? According to global accounting firm PwC’s inaugural CBDC global index, which tracks various CBDCs’ project status from research to development and production, the U.S. ranks 18th in the world. America’s potential efforts trail countries like Sweden, South Korea and China but also countries like the Bahamas, Ecuador, Eastern Caribbean and Turkey. China, with its government’s hyperfocus on maintaining control and overseeing data, has been working to develop a CBDC for almost a decade. And the U.S. is probably not close to catching up. Analysts like Harvard economics professor Kenneth Rogoff, who study monetary policy and digital currencies, estimate that the U.S. could be at least a decade away from issuing a digital dollar backed by the Fed. In that time, Rogoff argued in an op-ed earlier this year, the modernization of China’s financial markets and reduction or removal of its currency controls “could deal the dollar’s status a painful blow.” Read More: How China’s Digital Currency Could Challenge the Almighty Dollar China has already largely moved away from coin and paper currency; Chinese consumers have racked up more than $41 trillion in mobile transactions, according to a recent research paper from the Brookings Institution, with the lion’s share (92%) going through digital payment processors WeChat Pay and Alipay. “The reason you could say the U.S. is behind in the digital currency race is I don’t think the U.S. is aware there is a race,” Yaya Fanusie, an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security, and a former CIA analyst, tells TIME in an interview. “A lot of policymakers are looking at it and concerned…but even with that I just don’t think there’s this sense of urgency because the risk from China is not an immediate threat.” Not only is the U.S. running significantly behind in the development of a CBDC, we are trailing the rest of the world in digital payments broadly. Kenya, for example, has almost fully digitized its economy through its digital currency and payment system MPESA, making transactions free and almost instantaneous. India’s Unified Payments Interface (UPI) allows users to transfer money instantly between bank accounts with no cost. Brazil’s PIX facilitates the transfer of money between people and companies in up to 10 seconds. All of these programs work through and are overseen by the countries’ central banks rather than commercial banks or other private companies. What’s holding the U.S. back? Critics argue CBDCs are simply a solution in search of a problem and potentially harmful. Many see support from the banking sector as vital to the success of a digital U.S. dollar, however commercial banks in the U.S. have taken a largely adversarial stance. “The proposed benefits of CBDCs to international competitiveness and financial inclusion are theoretical, difficult to measure and may be elusive,” the American Bankers Association said in a statement at a recent congressional hearing on digital currencies. “While the negative consequences for monetary policy, financial stability, financial intermediation, the payments system, and the customers and communities that banks serve could be severe.” The Bank Policy Institute, which lobbies on behalf of the country’s largest banks, went so far as to argue that neither the Fed nor the U.S. Treasury even has the constitutional authority to issue a digital currency. Commercial banks dominate the U.S. financial system to such a degree that unraveling them would be ostensibly impossible, experts say, they also would be a powerful adversary. Former Goldman Sachs managing director Nomi Prins notes banks have clearly seen the writing on the wall. “Banks are centralized middlemen with respect to financial transactions,” Prins, author of Collusion: How Central Bankers Rigged The World, tells TIME. “The more popular cryptocurrency or digital currency becomes, the fewer profits the banking system can reap from traditional services and verification methods that allow them to hold, take or use their customers’ money, and the more financial power they stand to lose as a result.” Even disruptive financial technologies like PayPal, Venmo and Zelle work through the banking system, rather than around it, thanks in large part to the banks’ power. Central bankers also generally have concluded that commercial banks are a necessary piece of a potential CBDC ecosystem, thanks to their pre-existing regulatory guardrails and ability to move money. Read More: How Jay Powell’s Coronavirus Response Is Changing the Fed Forever Top policymakers at the Fed, including influential Vice Chair for Supervision Randal Quarles, have joined the banking industry in arguing that a digital dollar “could pose significant and concrete risks” and that the potential benefits “are unclear.” Fed Governor Christopher Waller said in August he was “skeptical that a Federal Reserve CBDC would solve any major problem confronting the U.S. payment system,” in a recent speech he titled “CBDC: A Solution in Search of a Problem?” Further, there’s no central U.S. authority with direct oversight or responsibility for any of this. In addition to the Fed, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Office of Thrift Supervision, Financial Stability Oversight Council, Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council and the Office of Financial Research would all have some stake in the development of a digital currency backed by the central bank, to say nothing of state and regional authorities. “The U.S. has an active congressional debate, which is beneficial and very important,” Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard tells TIME in an interview. “But the U.S. also has a diffusion of regulatory responsibility with no single payments regulator at the federal level, which is not as helpful. That diffusion of responsibility is part of what creates the lags that our system is working through.” None of this exists in China where the Chinese Communist Party oversees the central bank, commercial banks and their regulators and is unconcerned with privacy. How a downgraded dollar could hamstring U.S. influence An American CBDC could have lasting geopolitical impact and curb a longstanding international effort to reduce reliance on the mighty U.S. dollar. “Why we should care about this is that the U.S. financial system is not intrinsically dominant,” Fanusie says. “Other countries, both allies and adversaries, are sincerely interested in finding ways to decrease their dependence on the dollar.” With the U.S. dollar as the world’s reserve and primary funding currency, the U.S. can restrict access to funding from financial markets, limit countries’ ability to sell their natural resources and hinder or block individuals’ access to the banking sector. “Other countries, both allies and adversaries, are sincerely interested in finding ways to decrease their dependence on the dollar” While dollar dominance has rankled much of the world for decades, there has been no suitable replacement for the U.S., with its massive economy, sophisticated banking system and sprawling international presence. China is in the midst of a long-term push to simultaneously grow its financial markets and internationalize its currency. Both have the end goal of allowing China and its allies to limit the ability of the U.S. to enforce its will through economic actions like sanctions. Fanusie wrote in a January report that being the first major economy to roll out a digital currency is “part of China’s geopolitical ambitions.” However, the renminbi will not become the world’s reserve currency — at least, not any time soon. But what China has done by being in the forefront of CBDC development is put itself in position to take the lead on development and implementation of rules and regulations for digital currencies on a global scale. “While America led the global revolution in payments half a century ago with magnetic striped credit and debit cards, China is leading the new revolution in digital payments,” writes Brookings’ economic studies fellow Aaron Klein. Why should central banks offer digital currencies? Over the past decade, digital currencies, including cryptocurrency and “stablecoins,” have sprung up like weeds. Some purport to be just as safe as dollars, but are backed by questionable assets. In a crisis regulators worry they could fluctuate wildly in value or lose their value altogether. Having central banks, which are responsible for the printing and circulation of coins and paper money, issue digital currencies is in part a reaction to this private sector activity, Shin says, “accelerated by the potential encroachment of private digital currencies, and the need to preserve the role of money as a public good.” “The status quo is not an option” Notably, a U.S. digital currency could provide benefits to everyday people. It could increase financial inclusion and fix flaws in current payments systems, Shin adds, citing findings of a recent BIS study. For example, transferring money between U.S.-based bank accounts, even those held by the same person, can take days. The process can be even longer when crossing international borders. Credit and debit card transactions similarly don’t settle for days and come with significant fees for merchants, who sometimes pass them on to customers. CBDCs could grant universal access to the banking sector and quickly facilitate the distribution of paychecks and government funds, reducing the need for costly bank workarounds like check cashing and payday loans. Championing CBDCs Brainard has been pushing the Fed to move on a digital currency for years, but there was little urgency from others at the Fed or in Congress. Companies developing their own currencies, consumers investing in cryptocurrency and the COVID-19 pandemic making paper notes anathema to many Americans changed that. Before COVID-19, Facebook’s Libra project (now known as Diem) showed lawmakers and central bankers the potential for a private company to step in and fill the void by effectively minting its own currency that could be spent by users around the world. “The status quo is not an option,” Diem co-creator David Marcus said at the International Monetary Fund’s 2019 fall meeting. “Whether it’s Libra or something else, the world is going to change in a profound way.” Brainard, for one, has taken notice. “My own thinking is that stablecoins and related private sector initiatives are moving very rapidly, which makes it incumbent on us to move more rapidly,” she tells TIME. “That is why I have been pushing to advance outreach, cross-border engagement, and policy and technology research for several years now.” So-called stablecoins — unregulated digital currencies created by private companies that purport to represent dollars but are completely unregulated — have become a significant worry for lawmakers and shown the importance of considering tying currency to a central bank. “It’s getting harder and harder for community banks to compete for new customers when big tech companies can afford to spend billions on marketing and technology,” Sen. Sherrod Brown, who chairs the Senate Banking Committee, tells TIME. “But many of these new ‘fintech’ products don’t come with the consumer protections, federal backing or customer service and relationships with the community that small banks and credit unions provide.” During a hearing on digital currencies in June, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Protection, compared stablecoins to worthless “wildcat notes” that were issued by speculators in the 19th century. Her expert at that hearing, Lev Menand, an Academic Fellow and Lecturer in Law at Columbia Law School, went further in his testimony, calling stablecoins “dangerous to both their users and … to the broader financial system.” With private companies pushing deeper into the digital currency space, rival countries seeking to seize leadership and a public that is moving further away from physical currency, the U.S. is facing a world in which it may not control or even lead the world’s payment systems. That would make the future of money look very different from the past......»»

Category: topSource: timeSep 21st, 2021

NASDAQ Briefly Tops 10K and Finishes with New High

NASDAQ Briefly Tops 10K and Finishes with New High The NASDAQ momentarily reached five figures on Tuesday as money moved back into tech and gave the reopening rally a much-needed break. That’s right… the index eclipsed 10,000 for the first time ever today. It wasn’t able to stay over that mark, but it did finish at a fresh closing high. The NASDAQ rose 0.29% (or about 29 points) to 9953.75. The first record high since the coronavirus was achieved just yesterday. The FAANGs were out front once again with Facebook (FB), Apple (AAPL), Amazon (AMZN) and Netflix (NFLX) all advancing by more than 3% each. Stocks that were clobbered during the shutdown had been leading the market higher for over a week due to excitement over the reopenings.   Investors were moving into areas like airlines, financials, casinos, cruise companies and retailers… and this renewed interest came at the expense of tech. Well, that ended on Tuesday… and unfortunately so did the Dow’s six-day winning streak. It slipped 1.09% (or approximately 300 points) to 27,272.30. But don’t feel too bad, the index jumped just under 7% last week. The S&P inched into positive territory for 2020 yesterday, but it’s back in the red after slipping 0.78% to 3207.18. Investors have been waiting for some pullback in this hot market, but today’s pause probably isn’t enough to quell their concerns when you consider the epic surge since the coronavirus low in late March. Tomorrow we’ll get comments from Chair Jerome Powell after the Fed meeting. He’s not expected to be making much news, but should reassure the market that the central bank will continue doing all it can to support this economy. Today's Portfolio Highlights: Stocks Under $10: The portfolio cashed in a triple-digit winner yesterday in Altimmune (ALT), and Brian was back today with a replacement pick. The editor added Duluth Holding (DLTH) a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) casual wear, workwear and accessories retailer with a Zacks VGM of “A”. This company had a strong beat in its most recent report and earnings estimates have been heading higher for this quarter and this year. It also has a nice valuation. In addition to all this, DLTH has a 32% short interest position, which means it’s ripe for squeezing in an improving environment with a reopening economy. Read the full write-up for more. Surprise Trader: The S&P took a break on Tuesday after turning positive for 2020, which Dave considers to be “a perfect day for a little housekeeping”. He sold part or all of three positions today, including half of CAE (CAE) for a nice 46.9% return in less than a month. The editor also sold all of Casey’s General Store (CASY) and Ciena (CIEN) for slight losses. But that’s not all. The editor added homebuilder Lennar (LEN) today, which has beaten for four straight quarters with a surprise of 53% last time. It seems poised to continue that streak with an Earnings ESP of 6.98% for the quarter coming before the bell on Tuesday, June 16. Read the full write-up for more on all of today’s moves. By the way, this portfolio had one of the best performers of the day as Chewy (CHWY) rose 5.6%. TAZR Trader: Shares of Elastic (ESTC) have only pulled back slightly since soaring before its quarterly report. However, Kevin added this enterprise data search and analytics platform on Tuesday because its expected to continue growing revenues by more than 25% into next year. The company reported revenue growth of more than 53% in its most recent quarter, but is still small enough to be a M&A target. The editor added this Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy) with a 7% allocation and would buy more if it slips to the $74-$75 area. Read more about ESTC in the complete commentary, along with all the raised target prices from institutional analysts. Zacks Short List: The portfolio changed out four positions in this week’s adjustment. The stocks that were short-covered on Tuesday included: • Ross Stores (ROST) • Darden Restaurants (DRI) • ACInterActiveCorp (IAC) • V.F. Corp. (VFC) The new buys that replaced these names are: • Aptiv PLC (APTV) • Las Vegas Sands (LVS) • Royal Dutch Shell (RDS.A) • Ryman Hospitality (RHP) Learn more about this emotion-free portfolio that takes advantage of falling and volatile markets by reading the Short List Trader Guide. All the Best, Jim Giaquinto Recommendations from Zacks' Private Portfolios: Believe it or not, this article is not available on the Zacks.com website. The commentary is a partial overview of the daily activity from Zacks' private recommendation services. If you would like to follow our Buy and Sell signals in real time, we've made a special arrangement for readers of this website. Starting today you can see all the recommendations from all of Zacks' portfolios absolutely free for 7 days. Our services cover everything from value stocks and momentum trades to insider buying and positive earnings surprises (which we've predicted with an astonishing 80%+ accuracy). Click here to "test drive" Zacks Ultimate for FREE >>  Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 21st, 2021

NASA plans to spend up to $400 million on commercial space stations. It"s evaluating about a dozen proposals from companies.

NASA expects to retire the International Space Station by the end of the decade. The agency is turning to private companies to build new alternatives. The International Space Station, photographed by Expedition 56 crew members from a Soyuz spacecraft after undocking, October 4, 2018. NASA/Roscosmos NASA plans to award up to $400 million to companies that want to build private space stations. From about a dozen proposals, NASA aims to pick two to four by the end of the year, CNBC reported. NASA hopes to be one of many customers on these private stations after the International Space Station retires. See more stories on Insider's business page. NASA is preparing to award up to $400 million to companies that want to build their own space stations.The agency has relied on the International Space Station (ISS) for 20 years, but it won't last forever. NASA expects to retire the ISS by the end of the decade, eventually emptying it and pushing it into Earth's atmosphere to burn up.NASA doesn't want to build a new space station itself. Instead, it's turning to private companies, offering them contracts to build their own stations through a program called Commercial Low-Earth Orbit Destinations.That program has "received roughly about a dozen proposals," Phil McAlister, NASA's commercial-spaceflight director, told CNBC reporter Michael Sheetz. NASA plans to pick two to four of those proposals by the end of the year and distribute up to $400 million in contracts between the winners, according to CNBC. An illustration shows an Axiom Space module orbiting Earth. Axiom Space "We got an incredibly strong response from industry to our announcement for proposals for commercial, free fliers that go directly to orbit," McAlister told CNBC. "I can't remember the last time we got that many proposals [in response] to a [human spaceflight] contract announcement."Operating the ISS currently costs NASA about $4 billion per year. Buying facilities on larger stations operated by private companies could save the agency more than $1 billion per year, McAlister said.NASA declined to name the companies that submitted proposals, citing a "blackout" period while it evaluates them. But more than 50 entities expressed interest when the program was announced, including SpaceX, Blue Origin, Boeing, and Airbus, according to Sheetz. McAlister said the current proposals come from a mix of legacy spaceflight companies and startups."We are making tangible progress on developing commercial space destinations where people can work, play, and live," he told CNBC.NASA used a similar contest to encourage commercial spaceships The Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft is lowered onto an Atlas V rocket in Cape Canaveral, Florida, on November 21, 2019. Cory Huston/NASA NASA took a similar approach when it sought a replacement for the Space Shuttles: It offered funding to companies to develop and build new spaceships. The agency's Commercial Crew Program chose SpaceX and Boeing out of a group of proposals and funded each to develop new human-rated spaceships. Last year, NASA estimated that program would save it $20 billion to $30 billion.SpaceX's Crew Dragon ship is the product of that program, and it's now regularly flying astronauts to and from the ISS for NASA. It also just flew its first tourists on a mission that did not involve NASA beyond the use of its launchpad in Cape Canaveral, Florida. SpaceX has another private mission lined up in January, in which it's set to fly four people to the ISS for the company Axiom Space. The Crew Dragon spaceship Endeavour approaches the International Space Station with astronauts on board, April 24, 2021. NASA Private companies have also developed the vehicles that carry cargo to the ISS for NASA. As it does with all of these spaceships, NASA hopes to be one of many customers paying for space on future space stations. That's partially why its contracts won't fully fund their development."Going forward, we do not anticipate paying for the entire commercial destinations. We don't think that's appropriate, as the companies are going to own the intellectual property and they're going to be able to sell that capability to non-NASA customers," McAlister told CNBC.There are already new space stations in the making. China launched the first piece of its own space station earlier this year, and just completed its first three-month astronaut mission there last week. NASA, meanwhile, has already awarded Axiom Space $140 million to fly modules up to the ISS that will eventually detach from it to become their own space station. Axiom aims to launch its first module in 2024.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 21st, 2021

US stock futures rebound after Evergrande crisis sparks worst sell-off since May, as oil recovers lost ground

There was a strong "buy-the-dip" impulse after the Evergrande crisis sent stocks tumbling, strategists said. Evergrande is China's second-biggest property developer. Noel Celis/Getty Images US stocks look set for gains Tuesday after the S&P 500 suffered its worst day since May. Markets are concerned the debt crisis at Chinese property developer Evergrande could spread. Yet strategists said there is a strong "buy-the-dip" reaction that is supporting equities. See more stories on Insider's business page. US stock futures rallied on Tuesday after the debt crisis at giant Chinese property developer Evergrande sent equities tumbling the previous day.Elsewhere in markets, oil prices recovered some of the ground given up on Monday. US bonds and the dollar retreated after investors bought up the safe-haven assets in the previous session.S&P 500 futures were up 0.9% as of 6.00 a.m. ET. The US benchmark stock index fell as much as 3% on Monday, but ended up finishing 1.7% lower, its biggest fall since May.Dow Jones futures rose 338 points for a 1% gain, after the related index closed Monday with a fall of 614 points, or 1.78%. Nasdaq 100 futures climbed 0.81%, after the tech-heavy index ended down 2.1%.Analysts said the "buy-the-dip" mentality that has supported stocks all year remains strong among investors - helping explain why equities pared their losses in late trading on Monday and the rebound in equities on Tuesday.Yet strategists said that the upcoming Federal Reserve interest-rate decision on Wednesday would keep investors on edge, with the central bank weighing up when to withdraw support for the economy in light of strong growth and inflation. The meeting of Fed policymakers begins today.US stocks were already in quiet retreat when the Evergrande debt crisis rocked markets on Monday, leading to fears of worldwide financial contagion and talk of China's "Lehman Brothers moment." However, many analysts played down the risk to the wider financial system, suggesting Beijing might intervene.Evergrande - China's second-biggest property company, which owes more than $300 billion to creditors - is expected to miss making key bond interest payments due Thursday.Its stock fell 0.44% Tuesday, building on a plunge of 10.24% the previous day, after S&P Global Ratings said a default is likely on those payments. S&P said it doesn't expect the Chinese government to provide any direct support to Evergrande and that China's banking sector can deal with a default by the developer without significant disruption.Read more: Goldman Sachs says to buy these 17 stocks that are poised to continue out-growing their peers regardless of shocks to the economyRelative calm descended upon the broader Hong Kong market as investors waited to see what will happen next. The Hang Seng index closed 0.52% higher after dropping 3.3% the previous day, and a gauge from the city of real-estate firms steadied. Chinese markets are due to reopen on Wednesday after being closed Monday and Tuesday for holidays.In Europe, the continent-wide Stoxx 600 index climbed 0.94% in early trading on Tuesday, and the UK's FTSE 100 rose 0.98%.Oil prices rebounded along with stocks on Tuesday. Brent crude oil climbed 1.24% to $74.83 a barrel, while WTI crude advanced 1.31% to $71.05 a barrel.The bounce was supported by "improved risk sentiment, and more importantly the global energy crunch currently unfolding in the natural gas market," said Saxo Bank chief investment officer Steen Jakobsen.US bonds slipped after investors bought them up in search of safe assets on Monday. The yield on the key 10-year US Treasury note was up 2.4 basis points to 1.333%. The dollar index slipped 0.14% to 93.15.Bitcoin was down 0.6% to $43,263, according to Bloomberg prices, on Tuesday after tumbling from above $47,000 the previous day as investors fled riskier assets.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 21st, 2021

Hawaii Dental Service President, CEO Mark Yamakawa to retire this year

HDS is undergoing an executive search to find the local dental insurance agency's next leader......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 21st, 2021

How JFK customs searches 1 million packages a day for illegal items

Customs and Border Protection officers at JFK airport search 1 million mail packages a day for illegal drugs, food, anima.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytMar 23rd, 2021

Renovation work begins on longest Eisenhower Airport runway

The work is a continuation of a three-phase rehabilitation project at the airport......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMar 2nd, 2021

Where Should I Retire?: We want to retire in ‘an area like the Berkshires, but warmer’ — where should we go?

The search for 'an upscale retirement area with lots of hiking, biking, great restaurants and culture.'.....»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchJan 30th, 2021

Where Should I Retire?: My husband wants to be by the ocean, but I lived through Katrina and love lakes — where can we (semi) retire and rent for $2,000 a month?

We are both open to moving just about anywhere warm and near water, but would like it to be walkable, inclusive and have an airport......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchJan 2nd, 2021

JCPenney begins new CEO search for fresh start

The 118-year-old retail giant's new owners, Brookfield Partners and Simon Property Group, announced that they are looking for someone "focused on modern retail, the consumer experience, and the goal of creating a sustainable and enduring JCPenney.".....»»

Category: topSource: foxnewsDec 30th, 2020

Amid Covid-19 recovery, SUNY Erie begins search for new leader

Already facing a lot of uncertainty about what the fall semester will look like amid the coronavirus response, leadership at SUNY Erie will also be tasked with hiring a new president......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsApr 24th, 2020

Stephenson to retire as AT&T CEO, Stankey elected as replacement

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallApr 24th, 2020