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Elon Musk Posts "Sex Tape" Online: "Best. Clickbait. Ever."

Tesla Inc (NASDAQ: TSLA) CEO Elon Musk has taken Twitter by storm by sharing his "sex tape" tweet, sending his fans wild guesses.  read more.....»»

Category: blogSource: benzingaAug 13th, 2022

The 23 best Hulu original series, from "The Handmaid"s Tale" to "The Great"

Hulu has many original series like "The Handmaid's Tale," "The Dropout," and "The Great." Here are the best Hulu exclusive shows to stream. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Elisabeth Moss stars on "Handmaid's Tale."Sophie Giraud/Hulu Hulu gives subscribers access to several award-winning original shows, like "The Handmaid's Tale."  The service is also home to exclusive miniseries, including "Pam & Tommy" and "The Dropout." Hulu costs $7/month for ad-supported streaming, and you can get the ad-free plan for $13/month. Hulu Streaming Service $6.99 FROM HULUIn addition to a ton of great movies and network TV shows, Hulu has an impressive collection of original series. From award-winning titles like "The Handmaid's Tale" to new releases like Steve Martin's "Only Murders in the Building," there's a lot to catch up on in Hulu's library of exclusives. If you're not a Hulu subscriber yet, it's simple to sign up through the Hulu website, and the service is easily accessible to stream from most smart TVs, smartphones, media players, and internet browsers. The ad-supported plan costs $7 a month, while ad-free streaming is $13 a month. To help you decide what to watch, we've highlighted some of the service's best original shows. And if you're on the fence about signing up, this selection should help you determine if Hulu's lineup is worth the price of admission. Our picks represent a range of genres, and all of the series we've selected are categorized as fresh by critics on the review-aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes. 'Only Murders in the Building'Selena Gomez, Martin Short, and Steve Martin in "Only Murders in the Building."Craig Blankenhorn/HuluFrom the minds of Steve Martin and John Hoffman, "Only Murders in the Building" is a murder-mystery-comedy starring Martin Short, Selena Gomez, and Martin himself. Though the three main characters are very different at a glance, they share one key trait: an obsession with true crime. When a murder takes place in the trio's apartment building, they team up and follow the clues to find the culprit.All 10 first-season episodes are available to stream right now, and a second season is set to premiere on June 28.'Pam & Tommy'"Pam & Tommy."HuluBased on the real-life scandal from the '90s, "Pam & Tommy" stars Lily James and Sebastian Stan as Pamela Anderson and Tommy Lee. After an unhappy contractor steals the couple's sex tape and posts it online, the video goes viral well before "viral" was a term we understood. The miniseries is a combination love story and crime drama.All eight episodes of the limited series are available to stream now.'The Great'"The Great" is on Hulu.Hulu"The Great," is a fictionalized and satirical take on the life of Catherine the Great. Rather than offer a historically accurate account of events, the show takes a more playful and comedic approach to its story. The series stars Elle Fanning as Catherine, Nicholas Hoult as Peter, and Sebastian De Souza as Leo.The first two seasons of "The Great" are now available to stream on Hulu. A third season is in development.'The Dropout'Hulu"The Dropout" is a series executive produced by Elizabeth Meriwether, starring Amanda Seyfried as Elizabeth Holmes. Based on Holmes' real life, the show follows the young entrepreneur's rise and fall as she launches Theranos, a health tech company based on a lie. The miniseries details the ambition, success, fraud, and inevitable demise of the start-up and its founder.The series premiered on March 3 and all eight episodes will be available to stream on April 7.'Woke'IMDBThis comedy series is packed with cultural analysis as it follows the life of Keef, a Black cartoonist. Keef's life is rocked by an altercation with the police, and afterwards he discovers that he can talk to inanimate objects. Keef's character is based on the show's co-creator, Keith Knight, whose comics in the '90s shed a light on race in America.The first and second seasons of "Woke" are now available to stream.'Dopesick'Michael Keaton in "Dopesick."HuluMichael Keaton and Rosario Dawson star in this limited series inspired by a New York Times bestseller. "Dopesick" is a drama that investigates America's opioid crisis, and how the country's worst drug epidemic was spurred by one corporation. Through the series, we follow our main characters as they seek out the truth and fight the system that has taken advantage of so many.It's only eight episodes long, all of which are available to stream on Hulu.'Letterkenny'HuluThis Hulu original is a Canadian sitcom starring Jared Keeso, Nathan Dales, Michelle Mylett, and K. Trevor Wilson. Originally a YouTube series, "Letterkenny" details the daily trials and tribulations of Letterkenny residents, a fictional rural town in Ontario. Smart and funny, the comedy illustrates what it's like living in a small town of less than 5,000 people.The show premiered back in 2016, and all 10 seasons are available to stream on Hulu, the latest of which was released in 2021.'Solar Opposites'Hulu"Solar Opposites" is the latest adult animation series from the mind of "Rick and Morty" co-creator Justin Roiland. It's the story of four aliens on a mission to protect a super computer who crash-landed in suburban America. As the show's name suggests, the team is divided on how to feel about Earth, resulting in hilarious disagreements. The first two seasons and a holiday special are available on Hulu, with seasons three and four on the horizon as well.'Nine Perfect Strangers'Nicole Kidman in "Nine Perfect Strangers."Vince Valitutti/HuluThis star-studded miniseries is based on the New York Times bestseller by Liane Moriarty, and features Nicole Kidman, Melissa McCarthy, Michael Shannon, Luke Evans, and Bobby Cannavale. "Nine Perfect Strangers" is about just that: nine people living totally different lives, whose paths cross at a boutique health-and-wellness resort.The drama unfolds for the resort's participants as the boutique's director embarks on a journey to reinvigorate them — mind, body, and soul. All eight episodes are available to stream now.'The Handmaid's Tale'HuluHulu Originals' bread and butter, this series based on Margaret Atwood's novel of the same name is set in a dystopian future in which women have been forced into sexual servitude. Elisabeth Moss has won two Emmy Awards for her outstanding and emotional performance as June.Four seasons are currently on Hulu, and it's been renewed for a fifth.'Animaniacs'"Animaniacs"HuluYakko, Wakko, and Dot Warner are familiar faces for any '90s baby who grew up with the original "Animaniacs" series. Hulu's reboot of the show finds the characters two decades separated from their original run but with similarly humorous adventures and songs throughout each episode. The Warners adapt to their time away from showbiz as do favorites Pinky and the Brain who, in the premiere, utilize memes to take over the world.Two seasons are now available to stream on Hulu, and a third season is in the works.'Love, Victor'HuluThis teen drama is based on the popular movie "Love, Simon" and follows Victor as he adjusts to life at a new high school. The series offers an examination of Victor's family life and his sexuality as he struggles between his interest in his girlfriend and another boy.Two seasons of "Love, Victor" are now available to stream. A third and final season is set to premiere in June.'Ramy'IMDB"Ramy" is a comedy drama centered on an American Muslim navigating the cultural divide between his Egyptian immigrant community and his millennial peers. The show's star and co-creator, Ramy Youssef, won the 2020 Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series.The first and second seasons of "Ramy" are now available to stream on Hulu. A third season is in development.'Wu-Tang: An American Saga'HuluBased on the true story of the rise of the Wu-Tang Clan, this miniseries follows Bobby Diggs aka The RZA as he tries to lead his group of friends away from the drug- and crime-riddled streets on New York. The music they create together chronicling their daily struggles and triumphs eventually leads them to meteoric success.The first and second seasons are currently available to stream. A third and final season is on the way.'Pen15'Hulu's "Pen15"HuluComedians Maya Erskine and Anna Konkle star as their 13-year-old selves in a show that captures all of the awkwardness of middle school in the year 2000. The rest of their classmates are portrayed by actual teenagers adding a hilarious twist to this clever comedy.Both seasons of the series are now available to stream. 'The Act'HuluIn 2015, the murder of Dee Dee Blanchard captured the nation's attention after it was revealed to be orchestrated by her daughter in an attempt to escape Dee Dee's abusive Munchhausen syndrome by proxy. "The Act" chronicles all the twists and turns of this captivatingly complex true crime story.The limited series features a total of eight episodes. 'Shrill'HuluAidy Bryant stars as Annie, an overweight woman who, despite societal pressures, has no interest in changing her body. But she's out to make improvements in other areas, namely her career, love life, and family life, but of course having it all is never easy.All three seasons of the comedy from executive producers Lorne Michaels and Elizabeth Banks are streaming now.'Harlots'HuluIn 18th-century London, Margaret Wells butts heads with a rival brothel owner as they vie for control of the city's underground. Plus, she's got daughters to raise amidst her dangerous business dealings. This British drama's three seasons are currently streaming on Hulu.'Marvel's Runaways'HuluThese six teenagers couldn't be more different, except one important commonality — their parents are all evil. Now they must find a way to work together to take down their parents' criminal enterprise.Based on a Marvel Comics series of the same name, all three seasons of "Runaways" are available to stream. Though originally developed as a Hulu original, "Runaways" is also now available to stream on Disney Plus.'Difficult People'HuluBilly Eichner and Julie Klausner star as best friends navigating life in New York City. They're both struggling comedians, but their careers aren't the only thing they're struggling with. They're, well, difficult people, and they can't stand anyone but each other. All three seasons of "Difficult People" are currently streaming.'Future Man'IMDBProduced by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, "Future Man" is an outrageous sci-fi comedy full of clever observations and gross-out gags. When a janitor named Josh Futturman (Josh Hutcherson) is recruited by two time travelers to save the world, the very fate of humanity is put in peril — with hilarious results.All three seasons of "Future Man" are now available to stream on Hulu.'Casual'HuluValerie has just gotten a divorce, and now she and her teenage daughter must move in with her bachelor brother, Alex. With Valerie ready to get back on the horse, Alex must help her navigate the craziness of the dating scene — using the dating app he's invented. All four seasons of "Casual" are currently streaming.'The Bisexual'IMDBLeila has identified as a lesbian her entire adult life, but when her 10-year relationship with Sadie ends, she finds herself attracted to men for the first time. Her new roommate helps her navigate dating both men and women and deal with the upheaval of her entire life and identity. The first season of "The Bisexual" can be streamed now.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMar 29th, 2022

Instagram"s chronological feed is finally back

Instagram chief Adam Mosseri first hinted at the popular feature's return last year after it disappeared in 2016. There's also a new "favorites" option. Instagram head Adam Mosseri.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for WIRED Instagram is bringing back its chronological feed, which it got rid of in 2016. The app has been using an engagement-based ranking, which has become controversial. The algorithm has been found to prioritize divisiveness, violence, and misinformation. Instagram is bringing back a chronologically-ordered feed option, its parent company Meta said Wednesday, after years of user outcry to bring back the popular feature. "We want you to be able to shape Instagram into the best possible experience, and giving you ways to quickly see what you're most interested in is an important step in that direction,"the company said in a blog post. The app will also introduce a "favorites" feed, it said. Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri first said the time-ordered option could come back at a Congressional hearing in December 2021. The app changed to engagement-based photos rankings in users' feeds in 2016. "We've been focusing for a few years now on how to give people more control over their experience, like favorites, which puts accounts you favorite at the top of your feed," Mosseri told senators during a hearing about protecting kids online. "Another we've been working on for months is a chron feed. I wish I had a specific month to give you, but right now we're aiming for early next year."Engagement-based rankings order content based on how likely users are expected to interact with those posts. Mosseri said at the hearing that engagement-based rankings are a way to connect people with the content that they might find most appealing.But they've become a contentious topic as critics say they've helped spawn clickbait articles or stories that news outlets write to hook readers' attention. And engagement-based rankings have also been found to prioritize violent, toxic, false, and politically divisive content. Engagement-based ranking can also lead to days-old posts surfacing in the app instead of new content, frustrating users. Instagram and its parent company, Facebook (now called Meta), have specifically fielded criticism over their algorithms.Former employee-turned whistleblower Frances Haugen shared documents with the press and Congress that revealed, among other things, that Facebook employees were concerned that an algorithm change would promote sensationalistic content. An internal memo showed that Facebook made the change because people were using the app less.Facebook, now known as Meta, has disputed many takeaways from the trove of documents, saying they don't fully encompass its efforts to combat bad actors and promote mental health. When Instagram swapped its chronological feed for an algorithmic one in 2016, it said, "the order of photos and videos in your feed will be based on the likelihood you'll be interested in the content, your relationship with the person posting and the timeliness of the post. As we begin, we're focusing on optimizing the order — all the posts will still be there, just in a different order."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMar 23rd, 2022

Instagram is working to bring back your chronological feed

Instagram chief Adam Mosseri told Congress Wednesday the feed could launch in 2022 as an alternative to the controversial engagement-based algorithm. Instagram head Adam Mosseri.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for WIRED Instagram is bringing back its chronological feed, which it got rid of in 2016. The app has been using an engagement-based ranking, which has become controversial. The algorithm has been found to prioritize divisiveness, violence, and misinformation. Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri said the app is bringing back the option of a chronologically-ordered feed, which it ditched in 2016.During a congressional hearing about protecting kids online Wednesday, Mosseri told senators the company is  "currently working on a version of chron feed we're hoping to launch next year.""We've been focusing for a few years now on how to give people more control over their experience, like favorites, which puts accounts you favorite at the top of your feed," Mosseri said. "Another we've been working on for months is a chron feed. I wish I had a specific month to give you, but right now we're aiming for early next year."So-called engagement-based rankings order content based on how likely users are to interact with those posts. Mosseri on Wednesday defined engagement-based rankings as a way to connect people with the content that they might find most appealing.But they've become a contentious topic as critics say they've helped spawn clickbait articles, or stories that news outlets write to hook readers' attention. And engagement-based rankings have also been found to prioritize content that is violent, toxic, false, and politically divisive. Engagement-based ranking can also lead to days-old posts surfacing in the app instead of new content, frustrating users. Instagram and its parent company, Facebook (now called Meta), have specifically fielded criticism over their algorithms.Former employee-turned whistleblower Frances Haugen shared documents with the press Congress that revealed, among other things, that Facebook employees were concerned that an algorithm change would promote sensationalistic content. An internal memo showed that Facebook made the change because people were using the app less.When Instagram swapped its chronological feed for an algorithmic one in 2016, it said "the order of photos and videos in your feed will be based on the likelihood you'll be interested in the content, your relationship with the person posting and the timeliness of the post. As we begin, we're focusing on optimizing the order — all the posts will still be there, just in a different order."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 8th, 2021

Dow posts first bear-market close since 2020

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatch10 hr. 9 min. ago

GOP unveils "Commitment to America" platform, passing off stock footage of Russia and Ukraine as the US and a Lehman Brothers ad as a quote by Lincoln

After a year of workshopping, Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy unveiled the new GOP platform, featuring Russian stock images and a fake Abe Lincoln quote. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) talks to reporters after attending the swearing-in of Rep. Brad Finstad (R-MN) at the U.S. Capitol on August 12, 2022 in Washington, DC.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images House GOP leaders on Thursday released a video promoting their "Commitment to America" agenda. Footage from the video passes off stock images of Ukraine and Russia as the US, HuffPost reported. In a letter to House members, Minority Leader McCarthy also used a quote wrongly attributed to Lincoln, Daily Beast reported. After a year of workshopping, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy unveiled the GOP's 2023 "Commitment to America" platform — featuring stock footage of Ukraine and Russia used to demonstrate the beauty of the United States and a fake Abraham Lincoln quote used in a letter to members of Congress. In a promotional video released yesterday titled "The Preamble to the Commitment to America," a narrator exhalts America's exceptionalism, blames Democrats for leading the country "off track," and announces the 2023 party platform priorities: an economy that's strong, a nation that's safe, a future built on freedom, and a government that's accountable.The intentionally vague platform seeks to unite the GOP ahead of a tense election season marked by internal conflict and anticipated rifts between moderate Republicans and election-denying allies of Donald Trump, The Washington Post reported.  Several clips in the video meant to portray the diversity and "vibrancy" of America — including scenes of a woman shopping in a supermarket, a child running through a field, and a farmer carrying a bag of wheat — were actually stock footage filmed in Russia and Ukraine, HuffPost first reported. Several images were created by Serg Grbanoff, a filmmaker based in Russia, HuffPost reported, who confirmed to the outlet the images were created in the Volgograd region of his home country. Another image was created by a Shutterstock contributor, DedovStock, who posts shots he takes in Ukraine."Interesting how you guys aren't remotely interested on the issues facing the American people in the video," McCarthy spokesman Mark Bednar told HuffPost when asked about the stock footage.The stock footage wasn't the only issue to arise with the rollout of the platform. In a letter to House members announcing its priorities — tweeted by Politico reporter Olivia Beavers — McCarthy signs his name to letterhead featuring a quote falsely attributed to Lincoln. "Commitment is what transforms a promise into reality," the letter reads, attributing the quote to the nation's 16th president.Christian McWhirter, a historian at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, told The Daily Beast he could find "no reliable evidence" that Lincoln ever uttered those words."They do not appear in his writings and I cannot find them recollected by any of his contemporaries," McWhirter told The Daily Beast.The phrase, attributed online to Lincoln, Shearson Lehman, and anonymous sources depending on the reference point, was printed in a 1986 full-page ad in The Wall Street Journal paid for by investment banking firm Lehman Brothers to thank its long-term employees."Commitment is what transforms a promise into reality," the ad reads, The Daily Beast reported. "It is the words that speak boldly of your intentions. And the actions which speak louder than words. It is making the time when there is none. Coming through time after time after time, year after year after year."Representatives for Rep. McCarthy did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 24th, 2022

The Promise—And Possible Perils—of Editing What We Say Online

Twitter and Apple have introduced new editing features to their services but analysts have concerns Have you ever sent a text or shared something online that you immediately regretted? Most of us have. Facing the ramifications of saying something thoughtless, reckless, or rash can be a daunting prospect for anyone who frequently communicates by typing out messages and then flinging them into the digital ether. Now, a growing number of apps and services are offering users the alluring ability to edit those messages. In the past month alone, two tech giants, Twitter and Apple, have introduced editing features. Twitter kicked off September by announcing it would begin testing an edit button, first internally and then among subscribers of its paid Twitter Blue service. Within two weeks of that move, Apple released its new iOS 16 operating system, which lets users—for the first time—edit and unsend iMessages. Amid these developments, tech analysts have continued to voice concern over how these features could be used for nefarious purposes, such as spreading disinformation. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] It’s a trend that speaks to a desire among users to speak freely online without overthinking what they’re sharing, says Mor Naaman, a professor of information science at Cornell Tech. “People want to present themselves in the best light, but also to share freely without excessive cognitive load,” he says. “The edit button, if it works well, can support both goals.” Editing tools have been a long-sought-after feature on both services. But demand for a Twitter edit button, in particular, reached new heights earlier this year after Elon Musk polled his followers as to whether they wanted one, shortly before he made an offer to buy the company. How Apple’s edit button works Given the success of edit tools on platforms like Facebook, Reddit, and Slack, Christina Wodtke, a lecturer in computer science at Stanford University, says it’s somewhat surprising that Twitter and Apple didn’t get there sooner. “It’s been pretty common to be able to edit your web posts for a long time, going back to the early web forums,” she says. “Apple and Twitter have a legacy of being built on mobile, rather than on the web. And a mobile SMS doesn’t normally have edits. But now people are asking, why not?” Apple has responded by introducing an edit tool to iMessage. Users can now edit an iMessage up to five times within 15 minutes after sending it and unsend any message up to two minutes after it’s sent. To do this, users need only to tap and hold their sent message, then select “edit” or “undo send.” The message’s recipient will receive an alert that it has been edited or unsent, and can tap “Edited” to see previous versions of the message. These new capabilities have the potential to alter the way people view private messages, Naaman says. “Messages were seen like postcards. Nobody expects you to come to their home and edit the Hawaii postcard you sent them,” he says. “But we do expect to be able to edit, say, our Facebook profile, at any time. If the implementation is right, expectations will change and edits may become acceptable.” How Twitter’s edit button works On Twitter, users will be able to edit a tweet up to five times in the 30 minutes after it’s posted. Once a change is made, a tweet will be marked with an icon, a timestamp and a label that says “Last Edited,” which users can click on to see how the tweet has been edited. The button will give people a “generous” timeframe to workshop their tweets in the court of public opinion, says Wodtke. “What they’re doing is creating an edit button that allows the Twitter audience to be your personal editor,” she says. “So, if you said something that’s lame, you could quickly change it to be more clear or less open to being misinterpreted.” Twitter says the feature was intentionally designed to be transparent and protect the integrity of the conversation. “We’re purposely starting this test with a smaller group to learn and address potential issues before bringing it to more people,” a Twitter spokesperson says. Why edit buttons are controversial To ensure edit tools are used in good faith, experts say tech companies must take certain precautions. The importance of an “edit trail” that prevents the spread of mis- and disinformation can’t be overstated, says Wodtke. Especially when the information is part of the public record. “[Twitter] has a moral imperative to show the history of edits,” she says. Twitter’s implementation of an edit button indicates that it’s trying to strike a balance between allowing self-expression and preventing abuse, says Naaman. He says one of the main threats the company is likely trying to protect against is users editing a tweet after its gone viral to completely change its meaning. “Such an edit, while available via the interface, may not be immediately visible to people who are just viewing the shared tweet,” he says. Even with these safeguards, Wodtke predicts that bad actors will still find ways to take advantage of the feature. “Anytime you put something out there, no matter how well you and your team thought it through, people are gonna find new ways to use it,” she says. “This is definitely no exception. I think we’re going to see a lot of hijinks.”.....»»

Category: topSource: timeSep 23rd, 2022

Pentagon Opens Review Of Its Clandestine Psychological Operations

Pentagon Opens Review Of Its Clandestine Psychological Operations Authored by Dave DeCamp via AntiWar.com, The Pentagon has ordered a sweeping review of how it conducts clandestine information warfare after social media sites removed fake accounts that were suspected of being linked to the US military, The Washington Post reported on Monday. A report published last month by research groups Graphika and the Stanford Internet Observatory detailed the activity of fake accounts on Facebook and Twitter that were promoting pro-Western narratives in posts targeting audiences overseas. The social media companies removed around 150 accounts over the past few years, with some removed recently as they were promoting anti-Russia narratives about the war in Ukraine. Soldiers assigned to the Military Information Support Task Force-Central (MISTF-C) Production Development Detachment at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Image: US Army The report did not attribute blame for the accounts, but two unnamed military officials speaking to the Post hinted that US Central Command (CENTCOM) was involved. Separately, the Post said that Facebook removed fictitious personas created by CENTCOM to counter a Chinese claim that Covid-19 originated from the US Army bio lab in Fort Detrick, Maryland. In response to the Graphika and Stanford Internet Observatory report, Colin Kahl, the undersecretary of defense for policy, ordered the review, which instructed US military command involved in psychological operations to fill the White House in on their activities by next month. Kahl said he wanted to know what types of operations were being carried out and if they were effective. The US military has a long history of psychological operations, but its activities online in that area are shrouded in secrecy. While there are military units that specialize in psyops, such as the US Army’s 4th Psychological Operations Group, the Pentagon also employs more covert forces in this area. A video published by the US Army’s 4th Psychological Operations Group earlier this year: Last year, Newsweek reported that over the past decade, the Pentagon had created the world’s largest clandestine force that consists of about 60,000 people, many of whom use fake identities and operate across the world. A major part of the Pentagon’s undercover force are people that operate exclusively online. Newsweek described them as "cutting-edge cyber fighters and intelligence collectors who assume false personas online." These cyber fighters work to gather data, but some also "engage in campaigns to influence and manipulate social media." Tyler Durden Tue, 09/20/2022 - 21:25.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytSep 20th, 2022

Is BeReal safe? A guide to all the data the app takes, and what you can do to enhance your security

BeReal is safe to use, as long as you're careful about who you send photos to. Here's a breakdown of the data the app can see and how to limit it. BeReal is a social media app, which means it takes a lot of your data.mundissima/Shutterstock BeReal is safe to use, as long as you're careful about who you send photos to. You should make sure not to include any personal or sensitive information inside of your BeReal photos. The BeReal app doesn't take more of your data than any other social media app, like Instagram or Snapchat. The new social media app BeReal has been hitting the top of every "Most Downloaded Apps" chart lately. The basic concept behind it is that you only get to take one photo a day, and you never know when in the day it'll happen.But before you use any new social media app — no matter how popular it is — you should take time to see whether it's actually safe to use. That's why we looked at BeReal's privacy policy and put together this guide on every bit of data and information that BeReal takes, how it compares to other apps, and what you can do to keep yourself secure while using it.What kinds of data does BeReal see?In general, we can split the sort of data that BeReal sees into three categories: Personal data, Device data, and Content data.Personal dataTo sign up for BeReal, you have to provide your name, date of birth, and a phone number. BeReal uses this data to identify you when you log in, and while only your name is public, they keep all the data in their servers. It stays in those servers until three years after the last time you use the app, or until you contact BeReal asking for it to be deleted.They also require you to make a username. This isn't as personal as the other bits of information, but if you use the same username across multiple apps, it can be used to find those other accounts.Lastly, BeReal will repeatedly ask you to give the app access to your phone's contacts list. Doing this will let you know which of your contacts also have BeReal accounts, so you can easily add them to your friends list — but it also means that all their phone numbers will be saved in BeReal's servers.BeReal will ask you search your contacts list.BeReal; William Antonelli/InsiderBeReal promises that it doesn't give out any personal information to third parties, and there's no evidence that BeReal's security is compromised in any way. But you should still always be wary about giving social media companies your info.Device dataAs soon as you open BeReal, it automatically knows what kind of device you're using, what version of iOS or Android you have, and your IP address. This is how most websites and apps work.Your IP address also tells BeReal your current general location. But it usually doesn't get any more specific than what city you're in, and you can even spoof your IP location using a VPN.Finally, BeReal knows how often you open the app. This isn't very sensitive information, but some people might not like an app logging every time they open it.BeReal keeps all of this information for two years.Content dataAnd now, the big stuff.Every time you post a photo on BeReal, that photo is saved to BeReal's servers. Same goes for any comments you make or RealMojis — reactions that use an actual picture of you — that you give. They stay there until three years after the last time you use the app, or until you contact BeReal.BeReal isn't the only one that can save these. Anyone who sees your BeReal posts and comments can screenshot them and potentially share them with others.This is why you shouldn't add anyone you don't trust as a friend on BeReal. And if you're posting something you don't want shared outside of your inner circle, don't post it to the public Discover page.If your BeReal post is set to "Discover," it's public.BeReal; William Antonelli/InsiderAlso be sure not to accidentally take a picture of anything that could get you in trouble at work — like internal company spreadsheets or trade secrets. Jayne Harrison, head of employment law at the British law firm Richard Nelson LLP, even warns that employees who post sensitive work information could be fired or at legal risk.Whenever you post a photo on BeReal, it'll ask for your current location. This location gets shared with BeReal (who saves it for three years) and anyone who sees your photo. It's never a good idea to share your exact location online, so you're better off disabling this setting.Taking photos means you have to give BeReal access to your camera. And to save photos, you have to give it access to your phone's camera roll. BeReal isn't quite clear about how long they keep this data, but it's for at least two years after the last time you post a photo.Insider's takeaway: BeReal is relatively safeIt's true that BeReal takes and stores a decent amount of data. And if you're concerned about big companies knowing your personal information, it's probably not worth making a BeReal account.But in the grand scheme of things, BeReal isn't any more dangerous than any other social media app. If anything, it's safer. Platforms like Facebook and Twitter take everything that BeReal does, but also keep a close eye on all of your interests, political opinions, search history, and even recent purchases. Compared to them, BeReal is pretty limited in scope. Like we noted before, BeReal hasn't experienced any sort of data breaches yet. And since you need to enter a unique code every time you log in, your account has a lot of natural security.If (or when) BeReal adds more features, this might change. But for now, BeReal is safe — or at least, as safe as any social media app can be these days.You can ask BeReal to delete your data earlyBeReal keeps most of your personal information for at least two years after it's collected, even if you delete your account. But if you want to erase that data early, you can ask BeReal to do it.To contact BeReal, you can either send an email to contact@bere.al, or you can mail a physical letter to BeReal, 30/32 boulevard de Sébastopol, 75004 Paris France.There's no guarantee that they'll obey every request, but they do try to respond to each one.How to limit the information BeReal can seeNot all of the data that BeReal wants is mandatory. This means that you can enhance your privacy by restricting what BeReal can see.If you're on an iPhone, open the Settings app and scroll down to the list of apps, then select BeReal. Here you can turn off BeReal's location permissions and its access to your contacts and camera.On an Android, open the Settings app and tap Apps, then All apps, and then BeReal. Tap Permissions, and you can choose whether it's allowed to access your camera, contacts, location, and more.Both iPhone and Android let you change BeReal's access settings.William Antonelli/InsiderJust note that you technically need to give BeReal access to the camera to use most of the app — you can't post photos or see other people's photos without it.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 20th, 2022

US Customs stores duplicates of travelers" phone and laptop contents — including medical records, photos, and calendar appointments — without much oversight, report says

Opponents of the process are concerned that CBP's searching and storing of data, which has previously been hacked, is a constitutional violation. A patch is seen on the sleeve of a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer as he uses facial recognition technology in his booth at Miami International Airport to screen a traveler entering the United States on February 27, 2018 in Miami, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty Images US Customs preserves data from phones, laptops, and tablets seized from international travelers.  The data is held for up to 15 years and can be viewed by thousands of CBP employees. Some opponents of the practice, like Sen. Ron Wyden, believe it to be a violation of privacy. Thousands of international travelers' electronic data is quietly stored in a US Customs and Border Protection database, viewable by thousands of its workers, for up to 15 years, The Washington Post reported.As one of the country's largest law enforcement agencies, with a workforce of roughly 60,000 people, CBP is not required to have a warrant to search phones, tablets, or laptops — which opponents say is a constitutional violation of privacy."Innocent Americans should not be tricked into unlocking their phones and laptops," Sen. Ron Wyden said in a Thursday letter to the agency.It's widely known to international travelers that CBP can rifle through electronics and belongings, but Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, recently shed light on the agency's habit of storing data from seized electronics — including contacts, messages, calendars, photos, social media posts, and medical and financial records — in a database more than 2,500 individuals inside the agency have access to.Information in the database can also be referred to other law enforcement agencies like the FBI or local police departments. "Copies of documents or devices, or portions thereof, which are retained in accordance with this section, may be shared by CBP with Federal, state, local, and foreign law enforcement agencies only to the extent consistent with applicable law and policy," a 2008 CBP search authority policy reads.Citing a staff attorney at the privacy rights nonprofit Electronic Frontier Foundation named Saira Hussain, WaPo reported the database has "few meaningful safeguards" to prevent the information from being mishandled.  Hackers have previously accessed CBP online data in a cyber attack, compromising travelers' photos and license plates. However, a CBP spokesman, Lawrence "Rusty" Payne, told the Post on Thursday that the agency follows regulations and that searches are "exercised judiciously, responsibly, and consistent with the public trust."Several representatives for CBP did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 18th, 2022

It Was Politics That Drove "The Science"

It Was Politics That Drove 'The Science' Authored by Steve Templeton via The Brownstone Institute, Republished from the author’s Substack The science doesn't drive health policy. The policy drives the science... Most academic scientists spend a lot of time writing grants that have very little chance of being funded. Because the funding environment is so competitive, many scientists feel pressure to emphasize the most positive, sensational results they can produce. Some academic scientists take this too far, by ignoring conflicting results or even fabricating data. Research fraud that goes unreported can upset decades of research, which happened recently in the field of Alzheimer’s research. What happens if you take away scientific competition? There is indeed a way to do this, and that’s by working in a government agency. Being a government scientist is not a bad deal for a lot of people. The pay is good, the job is secure, and the expectations aren’t high. Securing funding is pretty easy and completely backwards from academia—you often get the funding first and justify it with a “grant” later. The perceived impact of your publications doesn’t matter, any journal is sufficient. In the case of my position at CDC-NIOSH, mechanistic science wasn’t encouraged. Instead, there was a lot of emphasis on toxicology, which simply involves exposing an animal or tissue to a compound or microbe and determining if there is an adverse effect. If there was, taking further steps to determine why there was an adverse effect wasn’t necessary. It was a simple exposure, assess, report, rinse and repeat process. I wasn’t in my government post-doc position long before I realized that government work wasn’t my calling. It’s not that it wasn’t challenging, it was just challenging in the wrong way. Government scientists often spend more of their time fighting government bureaucracy than scientific problems. In such a red tape-clogged system, self-motivated people eventually get discouraged, while unmotivated people get to coast. There were many examples of bureaucratic dysfunction and waste. In one department, staff members came across a storage room filled with brand new boxes of obsolete computers that had never been opened. No one seemed to know how they got there. Similarly, it wasn’t a rare occurrence to encounter large stores of expensive reagents in a freezer or storage room that had expired without being opened. These examples were simply a function of shifting funding and priorities. Congress would periodically throw money at the agency so everyone could claim they were doing something about a highly visible health problem. If you didn’t spend it, it went away. In another instance, government officials decided they needed an online travel booking program for employees similar to Orbitz for Business. The result was underwhelming–millions of dollars and years later, there were still serious problems with it that resulted in travel delays. Everyone complained about having to use it. They could’ve just used Orbitz for Business, if only it had been allowed.  At one point, traveling to a foreign country to give a research seminar required giving notice one year in advance. This included the title of the talk. Who knows what they are going to talk about one year in advance? One of my favorite horror stories about government bureaucracy was about a CDC employee who got fired accidentally by an unnamed bureaucrat. He didn’t even realize he had been fired until one day his paycheck wasn’t deposited and his security badge stopped working. It took months to get him rehired. The great irony of that story is that it’s nearly impossible to fire someone intentionally. I’m not sure how anyone could do it accidentally. But apparently, it happened. At the CDC branch where I worked, we had a histology core run by a technician who didn’t like his job, and knew he couldn’t get fired. I would send tissue samples and they’d take months to get processed and stained. When I did get them back, there were some curious things about the slides I would notice. Some of the different samples would appear identical on the cut slides. The histology tech was just cutting the same block over and over to make slides and labeling them differently. When I brought up this behavior to my boss, it didn’t surprise him. He told me that the guy was bitter and intended to metaphorically give us all a big middle finger, and there was no way we could stop him. We ended up contracting the nearby university core to do the same work. Meanwhile, worthless histology tech continued to get paid for doing even less.  Once, a CDC pathologist tried to report him for “destruction of government property.” She was one of those self-motivated people who took her job seriously and could be relied upon by others, and at the same time was naïve enough to expect the same. What happened when she raised a stink about lazy histology tech guy? She was reprimanded and labeled a “troublemaker.” Probably because the bureaucrats recognized that her attempt at whistleblowing would just create work for them, and would not actually result in any meaningful change. Once I got reprimanded by my boss for a reason that I cannot clearly recall. Much like the honorable yet naive pathologist, I was calling BS on something and thus not endearing myself to the front office. Although I can’t recall much of the dressing down I received, one thing he said stuck with me: “You can’t change the system from outside the system,.” He meant it was pointless for someone in my lowly contract position to fight anything, it would do nothing and only hurt me and annoy everyone else. Later, I realized that something he didn’t mention was also true–it’s impossible to advance within the system by promising to change it. If you wanted to advance within the CDC or another government agency, you have to demonstrate your dedication to the status quo. That powerful incentive ensures the system is preserved, with perverse incentives fully intact. This dynamic was painfully obvious as I watched the government pandemic response unfold. At the beginning, when uncertainty was the greatest, many leaders seemed reasonable and cautioned against panic, because they knew there was a potential for severe collateral damage. Once more particulars about the virus were known, especially the steep age-stratified risk of severe disease, competing political interests emerged, and as a result messaging and decision-making became distorted.  In normal times, large bureaucratic health agencies driven by political interests do not directly affect the daily lives of most Americans. During a natural disaster, however, these agencies will continue to be driven by politics, not public health, because they are not capable of adapting to a crisis. That’s when the cracks begin to show, and everyone is affected. A prime example is the CDC’s flagship journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). According to the CDC, MMWR exists “…to report events of public health interest and importance to CDC’s major constituents—state and local health departments—and as quickly as possible”, and to distribute “… objective scientific information, albeit often preliminary, to the public at large”. The key word here is “objective”, which is apparently used unironically. Here are MMWR editors describing how they determine what content is suitable for publication: Several other differences [between the MMWR and medical journals] exist. A major one is that, unlike medical journals (with a few exceptions, i.e., certain special supplements such as this one), the content published in MMWR constitutes the official voice of its parent, CDC. One sign of this is the absence in MMWR of any official disclaimers. Although most articles that appear in MMWR are not “peer-reviewed” in the way that submissions to medical journals are, to ensure that the content of MMWR comports with CDC policy, every submission to MMWR undergoes a rigorous multilevel clearance process before publication. This includes review by the CDC Director or designate, top scientific directors at all CDC organizational levels, and an exacting review by MMWR editors. Articles submitted to MMWR from non-CDC authors undergo the same kind of review by subject-matter experts within CDC. By the time a report appears in MMWR, it reflects, or is consistent with, CDC policy. Did you catch all that? There is nothing “objective” about how the CDC determines what is published in their flagship journal. They choose to publish only results that support their policy, and are completely open about it. This is backwards from how health policy should be determined. Science should drive policy recommendations, yet at the CDC, the policy recommendations drive the science.  Once this fact is acknowledged, much of the more controversial “studies” published in MMWR begin to make complete sense. For example, many mask studies claiming significant universal or school masking efficacy published by the CDC (some that I have previously discussed) were poorly designed and executed and easily debunked by outside observers. That’s because the “rigorous multilevel clearance process” involved no concern with the actual methodology of those studies. There was simply a set of predetermined conclusions from CDC directors in search of supporting data. Nothing objective about it. Politically driven science at the CDC and other government health agencies was not limited to mask studies. Risks of severe or long COVID and benefits of COVID vaccines in children and healthy adults were also greatly exaggerated. Worst of all, basic tenets of immunology (e.g. infection-acquired immunity) were denied. Immunologists were expected to go along with it. Many did. Science is a perfect process complicated by flawed human practitioners. Wherever there are people, there will be politics, and wherever there are government health agencies, their political interests will trample any conflicting science. As with any big problem, the first step is admitting there is a problem. After accepting the fact that health agencies are political organizations, the next steps should explore ways to ensure bipartisan administration and remove perverse incentives. Separating research and policy arms of each agency, term limits for administrative positions, and approval of directors by Congress might be a good start.  Obviously, no meaningful change in government health agencies is going to happen without overcoming massive bureaucratic opposition. But a meaningful change is the only outcome we should accept, or we can expect more of the same when the next pandemic comes. Tyler Durden Thu, 09/15/2022 - 17:40.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 15th, 2022

How to know if someone has blocked you on Facebook Messenger

It's hard to know if you've been blocked on Messenger, but there are signs you can look out for on both mobile and desktop. You can use Messenger's message status icon to determine if someone has blocked you.SOPA Images/Getty Images To find out if someone has blocked you on Messenger, you should first send them a message. If your message is not delivered, even after the recipient has been online, you're most likely blocked. To tell if your message isn't delivered, it will have an empty circle with a check mark for an icon. Facebook doesn't make it easy to know whether someone has blocked you.They do this for privacy and security reasons, which means that, unfortunately, you won't get confirmation that someone has blocked your account.However, it is possible to deduce whether you've been blocked based on how the Messenger app behaves when you try to send a message.Here's how you can tell if someone's blocked you on Facebook Messenger on both mobile and desktop.How to know if someone blocked you on Messenger on mobileThere are signs you can look for to know that someone has blocked you when you message them on the Messenger app.1. Open the Messenger app on your mobile device.Quick tip: You can also open the Messenger app from within the Facebook app by tapping the Messenger icon in the top right corner.2. Tap the new chat icon in the top right corner of the screen.Stefan Ionescu/InsiderTap the new chat icon to begin a conversation. 3. Search for the person you think has blocked you in the search box, and then tap their name in the search results.4. Write a simple message – something like "Hi" – in the message box, and then tap the send icon on the right.5. Check the delivery status of the message.Here's what the delivery statuses mean:Empty circle with no check mark The message has not been sent. This is typically because you don't have any internet access when you try to send a message.Empty circle with a check mark: The message has been sent but not delivered to the recipient.Filled circle with a check mark: The message has been delivered.Icon with the recipient's profile picture: The message has been read.  As long as the recipient is logged into Facebook, your message should be delivered within a few moments, which means you'll see the check mark icon's filled-in version. Of course, it might not be read for a while; your recipient needs to open Messenger and view the message thread for that to happen.If you send a message to someone and the message is not delivered, meaning that only an empty circle with a check mark appears, it generally means one of two things:The user has not logged into Facebook.The user has blocked you on Messenger.6. Check the recipient's Facebook profile. if you see that the recipient has posted to his or her Facebook page or comments on other people's posts, that implies he or she is logged into Facebook. If your message remains undelivered, you are probably blocked.How to know if someone blocked you on Messenger on desktopThe signs to look out for that someone has blocked you on Messenger when you're on desktop are similar to the ones to look for on mobile. You just need to drop the recipient a message on the desktop version of Messenger, look at the message's delivery status, and then check their Facebook profile for any recent activity. 1. Go to messenger.com in your favorite desktop browser, and sign into your Facebook account – if you're not signed in already.Quick tip: If you're on the Facebook website, you can open Messenger by clicking the Messenger icon in the top right of the top menu bar, and then clicking on See all in Messenger in the dropdown.Click on the Messenger icon, and then on “See all in Messenger” to open the browser version of Messenger.Stefan Ionescu/Insider2. In the left panel, type the name of the person you think has blocked you in the search box, and then click on their name when it shows up in the search results.Search for the person you think has blocked you.Stefan Ionescu/Insider3. Write a simple message – something like "Hi" – in the message box, and then click the send icon on the right.4. Check the delivery status icon of the message. The first sign that you have been blocked is that the message will remain undelivered. Of course, this could mean that the person also hasn't logged into Facebook yet, so you need to look for one more sign.5. Check the recipient's Facebook profile for any recent activity. If your message still hasn't been delivered, and they've been posting or reacting to and commenting on other posts, they have probably blocked you.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytSep 15th, 2022

You can now edit and unsend text messages on an iPhone. Here"s how.

This week, iOS 16 became available for iPhone owners to download — giving them the ability to edit and unsend iMessages. Here's how it works. Wishing you all a happy Friday Eve, I'm your host, Jordan Parker Erb. May your Thursday be as sunny and warm as it's projected to be in New York today.And to my readers in the UK and across Europe, be forewarned: Today's the day Amazon is increasing its Prime membership prices. Here's what you'll want to know.Also, the Ethereum blockchain completed its long-awaited Merge upgrade early this morning, cofounder Vitalik Buterin said in a Twitter post. Now, let's get to the rest of the news. If this was forwarded to you, sign up here. Download Insider's app here.Apple1. It's here: iPhone users can now edit and unsend their texts. On Monday, Apple's fall software update, iOS 16, became available for users to download. Insider reporter Katie Canales took the feature for a test drive — and is convinced it's one of Apple's neatest software updates to date.By holding down on a text, you'll have the option to "Undo Send" or "Edit" your message. If you're messaging with someone who hasn't downloaded the update, however, they will get two texts: the original and the edited version. If you unsend a message, the recipient may still see the original message on devices where the software hasn't been updated.Keep in mind, the new features won't work if you're communicating with Android users and their green-colored bubbles — adding more fuel to the ongoing drama between Google and Apple. Overall, though, Katie found it was an exciting new feature to have in the Apple toolbox — so much so that she said it might be the coolest thing the company has done in a long time.Everything you'll need to know about unsending texts.In other news:Prime Video, Netflix, and Spotify are three popular subscription services.Silas Stein/picture alliance via Getty Images2. Netflix laid off 30 animation studio workers. In an email to staff Wednesday, the company said it'd be letting go about 2% of its animation unit. Since the start of the year, Netflix has cut more than 450 staffers, plus 70 animation contractors. More on the latest Netflix cuts. Plus, read the memo sent to staff. 3. A package that exploded on Northeastern University's campus had a note criticizing Mark Zuckerberg attached. CNN reported the package — which was one of two — included a note that criticized the Facebook founder, and the relationship between academics and the advancement of virtual reality. One university worker was injured. What we know so far.4. Want cereal in the office? Collect donations. According to a former Amazon employee, one of the company's managers took away a team's cereal privilege to save money — and asked staff to donate cereal instead. Everything else the employee shared.5. Startup founder salaries have been upended in the market downturn. New data suggests that founders in locations like the Bay Area and Los Angeles have recently seen their salaries dip, perhaps in part because of a tough VC funding environment and macroeconomic uncertainty. How the downturn has affected founders.6. Google will be forced to pay more than $4 billion to the European Union. The tech giant just lost its appeal in its court battle over claims of Android's anticompetitive behavior. Get the full rundown here.7. A startup that lets workers access their wages as they earn them just raised $10 million in fresh funds. Rosaly, a French salary advance fintech startup, wants to become a platform for employee financial wellbeing. Take a look at the pitch deck they used to woo investors, and explore our library of successful pitch decks.  8. A new chart shows the tech companies with the most expensive stock compensation. Amazon and Google are leading the trend of public tech companies diluting their stockholders as a compensation strategy to woo talent to their companies, Insider's analysis found. See where other firms fall.Odds and ends:Avoid oily snacks.Getty Images9. Google's newest product is… potato chips? Ahead of the release of its new Pixel 7 phone in Japan, Google just revived one of its weirdest marketing ploys: releasing limited-edition potato chips in flavors like Snow Cheese and Obsidian Pepper. Check out Google's potato chips.10. Video shows a food-delivery robot meandering through a crime scene. Posted online this week, the footage shows the robot crossing underneath police tape in Los Angeles and into a crime scene. Watch the little courier scooting through the scene. What we're watching today:Amazon is set to increase the price of its Prime membership in the UK.NASA will provide highlights of Perseverance rover's exploration of Mars, a year and a half after it first touched down. 25 years ago, the Google.com domain name was registered. Tokyo Game Show, an entertainment and gaming event, kicks off today. Keep updated with the latest tech news throughout your day by checking out The Refresh from Insider, a dynamic audio news brief from the Insider newsroom. Listen here.Curated by Jordan Parker Erb in New York. (Feedback or tips? Email jerb@insider.com or tweet @jordanparkererb.) Edited by Hallam Bullock (tweet @hallam_bullock) in London.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytSep 15th, 2022

After a Year of Focus on Big Tech’s Harms, Why We’re Still Waiting on Reform

Instead, the biggest changes since last year may be in the minds of consumers In the year since whistleblower Frances Haugen alleged that Facebook and Instagram knowingly downplayed how their products harm young people, stoke division, and weaken democracy, U.S. lawmakers have advanced a flurry of legislative proposals aimed at regulating social media and the tech sector as a whole. But despite hours of hearings and testimony, none of the measures have been signed into law. Many of the proposals are caught in the debate over whether the government can regulate how platforms deal with harmful content or misinformation. The main reason, technology experts say, is America’s strong free speech laws, which are unlike any in the world. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Instead, the biggest changes since last year may be in the minds of consumers, who now are more skeptical than ever of Big Tech. “We’ve had what people are now calling a ‘techlash’ against this idea that social media is always a good thing and is part of the world getting better and better,” says Ethan Zuckerman, an associate professor of public policy, communication, and information at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The Haugen effect The Facebook Papers revealed thousands of pages of leaked internal company research detailing how Facebook (now rebranded to Meta) operated, including how its algorithm fostered anger to drive engagement. The documents were disclosed by Haugen to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission before being provided to Congress in redacted form. They also formed the basis for the Wall Street Journal’s “Facebook Files” series, which began publishing on Sept. 13, 2021. In the 12 months since the Journal published the first news story based on Haugen’s leaks and shook up the tech sector, there has been an unprecedented push to curb the industry’s power. Congress held a series of hearings on social media’s impact on users and society and advanced a number of bills aimed at cracking down on problems ranging from privacy to child online safety to competition. Just last week, the White House released six principles for holding major U.S. tech companies accountable and said it was encouraged to see bipartisan interest in Congress to rein in some of the country’s biggest tech companies. A Twitter whistleblower, Peiter “Mudge” Zatko, has also since come forward to allege that top Twitter executives endangered national security through “egregious deficiencies” in privacy and security. He began testifying before Congress on Tuesday—just as Haugen did last fall. Meanwhile, Meta has made some changes to its platforms, including adding parental controls to Instagram. But it has also, according to Haugen, “further dissolved” its election integrity efforts and “invested less and less” in responsible AI. Earlier this month, Meta reportedly disbanded its Responsible Innovation team, a group of engineers, ethicists, and others who were put in place to address potential downsides of the company’s products. The need for reform is made more urgent by the fact that, despite distrusting social media companies, consumers haven’t really altered the way they use their platforms, says Libby Hemphill, an expert on social media and hate speech at the University of Michigan School of Information. “Haugen’s revelations made consumers more skeptical, but they didn’t actually change consumer behavior. Not even for a minute,” she says. Obstacles to reform Zuckerman says that the U.S. has especially strong protections for free speech—and social media platforms host millions and millions of posts, messages, news reports, and videos that qualify as “speech.” That makes these platforms difficult to regulate. Zuckerman says that when lawmakers try to legislate against mis- and disinformation, it inherently raises questions about who gets to decide what people can and cannot say. “You’re either asking the government to have some control over what is allowable speech, or you’re taking a company and putting it in the very powerful position of becoming an arbiter of speech,” he says. “And neither of those is really comfortable within the U.S. constitutional tradition.” Free speech laws are a tool that tech companies leverage to get what they want, says Kenneth Joseph, an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Buffalo. “That’s due to the vagueness of the concept of free speech, who gets it, and why they should get it,” he says. Despite pushback from tech lobbies, there is one high-profile antitrust proposal, the American Innovation and Choice Online Act (AICO), that is just a few steps away from becoming law. The bill would prevent dominant platforms like Google, Amazon, and Meta from abusing their market power, and giving preference to their own services over those of their competitors. It could prevent Google, for example, from having its own travel recommendations appear at the top of search results. Zuckerman says AICO has gained the most ground of any of the tech reform bills because it’s less politically charged and focuses instead on fair business practices. “In the U.S., [business] is a place where we tend to be a lot more comfortable with the idea that we might intervene,” he says. “[AICO] isn’t just going straight after questions of speech.” But it’s also difficult to separate antitrust reform from other related concerns in the tech world, says Hemphill. “It’s hard to disentangle these issues in a way where you could pull various policy levers that would have an impact on one area without having too much negative impact on another,” she says. The U.S. dilemma Even with bipartisan support, AICO may not become law. Some advocates have voiced concern that if the bill doesn’t pass ahead of the midterms, or at least before control of the House potentially changes, it could die. Other bills that hope to regulate tech companies are in the same boat. “We tend to have this incredibly narrow window, usually the first two years of a presidential term, where we expect that progress can happen,” Zuckerman says. This doesn’t bode well for government-led tech reform in the U.S. But in the European Union (EU), another major tech hub, things are different. “There’s a decent chance that Washington is once again going to grind to a halt. But that doesn’t mean that governments aren’t trying to find ways to make social media companies behave better,” he says. Zuckerman says there is landmark legislation nearing approval in the EU that could bring major tech companies to heel by imposing higher standards for transparency around content moderation. ”The principles behind these proposals are really promising,” he says. Big Tech reform could also turn out to be a double-edged sword, says Josephs, noting that while social media has harmed society in many ways, it’s also been beneficial. “We can think about regulation writ large and say that’s probably, on balance, a good thing,” he says. “But depending on who’s in power and what those regulations ultimately say, there can be a downside to it as well.” Regardless of what happens in the U.S., Zuckerman says, Haugen’s revelations have helped to crystallize a conversation about the harms of social media that started in the wake of the 2016 presidential election, when misinformation ran rampant, he says: “The response has basically been to say, maybe it’s time to be really skeptical about these platforms.”.....»»

Category: topSource: timeSep 14th, 2022

The Fourth Turn, Turn, Turn

The Fourth Turn, Turn, Turn Authored by Charles Hugh Smith via OfTwoMinds blog, The cycles of The Fourth Turning, Fischer and Turchin are all in alignment at this point in history... The 1997 book The Fourth Turning: An American Prophecy proposed a cyclical pattern of four 20-year generations which culminate in a national crisis every 80 years. The book identifies these dates as Fourth Turnings: 1781 (Revolutionary War), 1861 (Civil War) and 1941 (global war). add 80 years and voila, 2021. I use the term Fourth Turning generically to describe an existential crisis that decisively changes the course of national identity and history. In other words, we don't have to accept the book's theory of generational dynamics to accept an 80-year cycle. There are other causal dynamics in play that also tend to cycle: the credit (Kondratieff) cycle, for example. While each of the previous existential crises were resolved positively, positive outcomes are not guaranteed: dissolution and collapse are also potential outcomes. David Hackett Fischer's book The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of History proposes another cycle: humans expand their numbers and consumption until they've exploited and depleted all available resources. As resources become scarce, societies and economies unravel as humans do not respond well to rising prices generated by scarcities. The unraveling continues until consumption is realigned with the resources available. In the past this meant either a mass die-off that drastically reduced human numbers and consumption (for example, The Black Plague), a decline in fertility that slowly reduced population to fit resources, mass migration to locales with more resources or the discovery and exploitation of a new scalable energy source that enabled a new cycle of rising consumption. The 14th century Black Death reduce Europe's population by roughly 40%, enabling depleted forests to regrow and depleted agricultural land to restore fertility. Once the human population regained its numbers and consumption in the 17th century, wood was once again under pressure as the key source of energy, shipbuilding, housing, etc. The development of steam power and the technologies of mining enabled the exploitation of coal, which soon replaced wood as the primary energy source. Oil and natural gas added to the energy humans could tap, followed (at a much more modest level) by nuclear power. Despite gargantuan investments, the recent push to develop solar and wind energy has yielded very modest results, as globally these sources provide about 5% of total energy consumption. (See chart below) It's self-evident that despite breezy claims of endless expansion of consumption, the global human population has now exceeded the resources available for practical extraction. Energy, fresh water, wild fisheries and fertile soils have all been exploited and the easy/cheap-to-extract resources have been depleted. (The chart below of global CO2 emissions is a proxy for energy / resource consumption.) So once again it's crunch-time: either we proactively reduce consumption to align with available resources, or Nature will do it for us via scarcities. Peter Turchin proposed another socio-economic cycle of 50 years in his book Ages of Discord: in the integrative stage, people find reasons to cooperate. In the disintegrative stage at the end of the cycle, people no longer find much common ground or reasons to cooperate. Political, social and financial extremes proliferate, culminating in a rolling crisis. In Turchin's analysis, the previous 50-year age of discord began around 1970, and the current era of discord began in 2020. Those who lived through the domestic terrorism, urban decay, stagflation and political/social/legal crises of the 1970s recall how inter-related crises dominated the decade. In my analysis, the last period of discord in the 1970s was "saved" by the supergiant oil fields discovered in the 60s coming online in the late 1970s and early 1980s. That oil enabled a 40-year boom which is now ending, with no new scalable source of energy available to replace oil, much less enable an expansion of consumption. In other words, the cycles of The Fourth Turning, Fischer and Turchin are all in alignment at this point in history. We have proliferating political, social and financial extremes and a forced transition to lower consumption to align with declining energy. Turn, turn, turn. Right when we need to cooperate on transforming a high-consumption, bubble-dependent "waste is growth" Landfill Economy to declining consumption / Degrowth, we're beset by discord and demographic pressures, as the promises made to the elderly back when it was expected that there would always be 5 workers per retiree cannot possibly be kept now that the worker-retiree ratio is 2-to-1 and there are no limits on healthcare spending for the elderly. Humans are happy to expand their numbers and consumption and much less happy to consume less. They tend to start revolutions and wars in vain attempts to secure enough resources to maintain their profligate consumption and expansion. Today's extremes of wealth and income inequality are optimized to spark political discord and revolts. The wealthiest 20% will be able to pay higher prices, but the bottom 40% will not. The middle 40% will find their disposable income, i.e. their income left over after paying for essentials, will drop to near-zero. When 80% of the populace are crunched financially, revolutions and the overthrow of governments follow. As I've outlined in previous posts, global inequalities are widening as the Core exploits its built-in advantages at the expense of the vulnerable Periphery. Core nations will be much better able to maintain their consumption at the expense of the Periphery nations, which will experience sharp declines in purchasing power and consumption. Previous Fourth Turnings have been resolved one way or another within 5 to 7 years. If this Turning began in 2020, we can expect resolution by 2025 - 2027. As I explained in my book Gloabl Crisis, National Renewal, those nations that embrace Degrowth will manage the transition, while those that cling to the endless-expansion, bubble-dependent Waste Is Growth model will fail. This is why I keep talking about making Plans A, B and C to preserve optionality and reduce financial commitments and consumption now rather than passively await crises over which we will have little direct control. As I've endeavored to explain, those anticipating decades of time to adjust are overlooking the systemic fragilities of the current global financial/supply systems. Tightly bound systems of interconnected dependency chains have been optimized to work perfectly in an era of expansion. They're not optimized to gradually adjust to contraction; they're optimized to break and trigger domino-like breakdowns in interconnected chains. We don't control these macro-trends, we only control our response. *  *  * This essay was first published as a weekly Musings Report sent exclusively to subscribers and patrons at the $5/month ($54/year) and higher level. Thank you, patrons and subscribers, for supporting my work and free website. My new book is now available at a 10% discount this month: When You Can't Go On: Burnout, Reckoning and Renewal. If you found value in this content, please join me in seeking solutions by becoming a $1/month patron of my work via patreon.com. Tyler Durden Wed, 09/14/2022 - 13:05.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeSep 14th, 2022

‘Real Harm to Real People.’ Twitter Whistleblower ‘Mudge’ Testifies Over Security Failures

Peiter “Mudge” Zatko characterized Twitter’s deficiencies as a dire global and national security threat In his first public appearance since he made a series of explosive accusations against Twitter in a whistleblower complaint last month, Peiter “Mudge” Zatko, the company’s former security chief, on Tuesday told lawmakers that the social media platform was endangering both users and national security by prioritizing growth over fixing “egregious” security lapses. “What I discovered when I joined Twitter was that this enormously influential company was over a decade behind industry security standards,” Zatko, a well-known hacker with three decades of experience in cybersecurity, told the Senate Judiciary Committee. “It doesn’t matter who has keys if you don’t have any locks on the doors…the company’s cybersecurity failures make it vulnerable to exploitation, causing real harm to real people.” [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] His somber appearance in a formal gray suit and a goatee was a far cry from the flowing long hair Zatko sported when he first appeared before the Senate 24 years ago. But he issued a similar warning this time around as he did then, when he alarmed lawmakers by claiming that he and his fellow hackers could take down the Internet in 30 minutes. “It’s not far-fetched to say that an employee inside the company could take over the accounts of all of the Senators in this room,” he said. Zatko characterized Twitter’s deficiencies as a dire global and national security threat. “When an influential media platform can be compromised by teenagers, thieves, and spies, and the company repeatedly creates security problems on their own, this is a big deal for all of us.” In 84 pages of disclosures submitted to U.S. regulatory agencies in July, Zatko, who invoked federal whistleblower protections, accused the $32 billion company’s top executives of violating the Federal Trade Commission Act and Securities and Exchange Commission regulations by misleading its users, board members and investors about critical security failures. These gaps left the platform open to security breaches, infiltration by foreign governments and exploitation by a range of bad actors, Zatko said. “I think they would like to wave a magic wand and have all of these things fixed,” he told lawmakers on Tuesday. “But they’re unwilling to bite the bullet…and say ‘hey, we’re going to have to devote some time and money to get these basic things in place.'” Read More: ‘Egregious Deficiencies,’ Bots, and Foreign Agents: The Biggest Allegations From the Twitter Whistleblower “Twitter is an immensely powerful platform that cannot afford gaping security vulnerabilities,” said Sen. Richard Durbin, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. “Imagine if it’s a malicious hacker or a hostile foreign government breaking into the Presidents’ Twitter account, sending out false information, claiming there was a terrorist attack on one of our citizens? We could see widespread panic.” Here are the key takeaways from Zatko’s testimony on Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski—AFP/Getty ImagesIndependent Security Consultant and Twitter whistleblower Peiter “Mudge” Zatko testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on September 13, 2022. “One crisis at a time”: Zatko described internal chaos at Twitter Zatko described a company unwilling to commit the resources to patch up even basic vulnerabilities, and internal frustration at what he described as failures in leadership. “The engineers and the employees want this change,” he said about proposed fixes for the security and privacy issues plaguing the platform. “[But] it’s a culture where they’re only able to focus on one crisis at a time. And that crisis isn’t completed, it’s simply replaced by another crisis.” Zatko’s claims landed in the middle of a heated legal dispute over Twitter’s agreement to sell the company to Elon Musk, making their credibility a multibillion-dollar issue. Last month, a judge ruled that Musk could amend his lawsuit against the company to include the allegations made by Zatko, who has been subpoenaed by Musk’s legal team. After Zatko’s whistleblower complaint went public, it was revealed that two months earlier, the company had agreed to pay him more than $7 million in a settlement related to lost compensation. This included a non-disclosure agreement prohibiting him from disparaging the company, according to the Wall Street Journal. Musk seemed to signal he was watching the hearings on Tuesday, tweeting the popcorn emoji. Less than an hour after the hearings ended, Twitter shareholders voted to approve Musk’s original deal. “There’s been a pile-on to Twitter, between Musk’s actions and now Mudge’s accusations, that have very much eroded the value of the stock,” says Natasha Lamb, managing partner at Arjuna Capital, which holds Twitter shares. “Investors view Musk’s purchase as potentially the only way out so that they can recoup value.” Twitter and Musk are set to go to trial over the dispute on October 17. Read More: The Twitter Whistleblower Needs You to Trust Him Claims about Twitter’s links with foreign governments Zatko talked at length about one of the most alarming sections of his disclosure: that Twitter had allowed an agent for the Indian government to be hired in its newly-created Indian office, giving that agent access to internal information. For the last few years, Twitter has been locked in a stand-off with the Indian government over the latter’s desire to censor posts in the country. Zatko says he believes the agent’s goal inside the company was to “understand Twitter’s negotiations with the court and the ministry.” The whistleblower said Tuesday that once he learned about the agent, he set up a small team “just to track that person,” but it was “extremely difficult” to follow the agent’s actions or to contain their activities, due to the inadequacy of Twitter’s internal tools. Zatko went on to accuse higher-ups of turning a blind eye to the situation, saying that when he told one executive about the alleged agent, he was told: “Since we already have one, what does it matter if we have more? Let’s keep growing the office.” During his time at Twitter, Zatko also claims that some employees at the company expressed concerns that the Chinese government could collect data on the platform’s users, and described internal tensions with executives who wanted to maximize Chinese advertising revenue. “The executive in charge of sales very shortly after I joined said, ‘This is a big internal conundrum, because we’re making too much money from these sales, we’re not going to stop,’” he said. Zatko also revealed more information that his disclosures had hinted at. While in the redacted version of his whistleblower complaint that was made public he said he had warned Twitter that “one or more” of its employees were “working on behalf of another particular foreign intelligence agency,” he gave more details on Tuesday. The week before he was fired by the company, Zatko said, he learned that an agent of China’s Ministry of State Security was on the payroll at Twitter. Twitter’s role in geopolitical crises Zatko called the company’s lack of content moderators in other languages “stunning.” He insinuated that this deficiency contributed to the genocide of ​​Muslim Rohingya in Myanmar, in which hate speech and propoganda against the minority group fomented on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter. “When something was happening in Myanmar, you can’t wait until after it happens and then go, ‘Where are the Burmese speakers?’ Twitter has to understand that 80% of their users are outside the U.S. You can’t create a healthy environment or serve the public conversation if all you can do is say, ‘Google Translate’ is doing the right job for me,’” he said. Lawmakers also pointed out that Twitter’s prioritization of its growth over security and privacy measures had serious consequences for users living under authoritarian regimes. “Earlier this year, a Saudi national who worked for Twitter was convicted by a federal jury for stealing the personal data of dissidents who criticized the Saudi regime and handing the data over to the Saudi government,” Durbin said. “This is a matter of life and death as we know for these dissidents.” How the FTC has been “outgunned” by Big Tech One of the reasons that Twitter was able to remain a “decade behind” its competitors on security, Zatko says, was a lack of pressure imposed on the company by regulators. In particular, the whistleblower said that the FTC was “absolutely outgunned” in the face of Big Tech; that the agency “left companies grading their own homework” and allowed them to hire their own auditors, which he said amounted to a conflict of interest. “Clearly what we’re doing right now is not working,” Sen. Richard Blumenthal said. Zatko told lawmakers that Twitter feared other foreign regulators far more than the FTC. In particular, he said that France’s data privacy watchdog Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés (CNIL) “terrified” the company, because they asked technical and quantitative questions and wielded the ability to levy large recurring fines, as opposed to one-time FTC penalties that Twitter “priced in” to their business model. Senators from both parties called for stepping up regulation Zatko’s appearance, however temporarily, spurred a spirit of bipartisanship in Congress on Tuesday. Sen. Lindsay Graham pledged to partner with Elizabeth Warren, with whom he has “different perspectives on almost everything,” to create new legislation to regulate Big Tech. He said he hoped to create “a system more like Europe: a regulatory environment with teeth.” “If Elizabeth Warren and Lindsay Graham can come together around that concept, I think we’re off to the races,” Graham said. Many other senators on both sides of the aisle called for increased regulation and raised the idea of the creation of a new agency. Sens. Amy Kloubachar and Marsha Blackburn both called for a national privacy standard to protect users online. And Sen. Chris Coons used his time to advocate for the bipartisan bill he announced in December, the Platform Accountability and Transparency Act, which would require social media companies to undergo independent audits and publish much more data about how they operate......»»

Category: topSource: timeSep 13th, 2022

S&P 500 gains 3.7% since Monday; Nasdaq posts 4.1% weekly jump

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news......»»

Category: topSource: marketwatchSep 9th, 2022

I"m an executive headhunter. Here are the 2 key elements I look for on your social-media profiles — and the things to avoid at all costs.

Jörg Kasten, a managing partner at the executive-search firm Boyden, broke down the keys to attracting headhunters on sites like LinkedIn. The "Endorse" button on LinkedIn is a double-edged sword, according to headhunter Jörg Kasten.Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images Jörg Kasten is a managing partner at the executive-search firm Boyden. He says that social media plays a major role when he's looking for candidates. For Insider, he explains the ways to attract headhunters' attention on LinkedIn and other sites. This is an edited, translated version of an article that originally appeared on September 5, 2022.Social networks have become indispensable tools for employees, allowing them to market themselves to maximize their professional success.More and more managers and executives have also started to discover the advantages of a strong social-media profile.They need to convey traditional parts of their jobs, such as delivering presentations and interacting with employees and business partners, in a digital format.This is why headhunters now use these channels to search for and select suitable candidates.And headhunters' clients want to hire managers who present themselves well online.What headhunters look for on social mediaTwo key things headhunters want to see are empathy and the ability to inspire people through actions and behavior.These are skills that successful managers must have.Headhunters will try to look beyond things like the number of followers one has, however. C-suite positions are more about being an opinion leader, meaning that people in the industry listen to what you have to say.The goal is to be the go-to voice in your own sector. That's why managers should also only publish serious and target-group-oriented posts on sites like LinkedIn. That applies equally to sharing posts from other profiles and any political content.One big pitfall is overdoing it with content creation; too much self-promotion and constant updates will scare off headhunters and can be a crucial reason why a potential candidate misses out on a vacant top-level position.If someone is posting several blogs per week on a variety of topics, headhunters may infer that the person writing the posts isn't the actual author and that they are getting professional help.Managers are too often tempted to adopt a kind of influencer status on social media instead of providing tangible and relevant information about themselves and their activities.This is especially key in the profile-summary section, which users should employ to provide meaningful content about what the candidate has done, rather than a flashy statement.On the other hand, it's also important that a candidate's profile isn't empty and outdated. Having no content leaves a bad impression and a headhunter will quickly lose interest.Incidentally, the "Endorse" button on LinkedIn is a double-edged sword. Used the right amount, endorsing other LinkedIn users' skill can underscore credibility in key areas of expertise. When used excessively, the profile ─ and thus the person behind it ─ comes across as inauthentic and lacking credibility.Even a seemingly small lapse can prevent headhunters from shortlisting a candidate. For example, if a recruiter is looking for a head of sustainability, and they see that a potential candidate has posted a story with their sports car next to them, the person will very likely be deemed unsuitable for the role.It's crucial that managers consider their audience and the potential effects of their online presence when posting anything.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 9th, 2022

This is how companies are reacting to the Queen"s death – and not everyone is getting it right

From Domino's Pizza and Heinz to Lego and Playmobil, a host of brands have paid tribute to the late monarch, with very mixed results. Companies have been posting tributes to the late Queen on social media.Tim Graham/Getty Images Elizabeth II, who died on Thursday, was Britain's longest-serving monarch. Many companies and brands have posted tributes to the late Queen on social media. Some have been accused by Twitter users of missing the mark during the 10-day mourning period. Britain lost its longest-serving monarch and entered 10 days of national mourning on Thursday.After Buckingham Palace officially announced the Queen's death on Thursday night, companies unleashed a deluge of social media posts and online tributes.Some, however, have been accused of missing the mark with the somber nation.From multinational food manufacturers to lingerie companies, here are the brands being mocked for their tributes to Queen Elizabeth II. Ann Summers Ann Summers is a British retailer that sells lingerie and sex toys.Unfortunately, its public tribute to the late Queen was immediately followed by adverts for sex toys, lingerie, and other erotica. —Summer Ray (@SummerRay) September 8, 2022 Those in the comment section were highly amused by the unorthodox tribute. One user even said the website left her "crying with laughter." Domino's PizzaThe American pizza chain was one of the first to share its sympathies online. Less than an hour after the official announcement, Domino's Twitter account shared a blacked-out image featuring only a muted black logo.The text read: "Everyone at Domino's joins the nation and the world in mourning the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Our thoughts and condolences are with the Royal Family."—Domino's Pizza UK (@Dominos_UK) September 8, 2022 Domino's UK Twitter account also switched to a black logo and banner. One Twitter user dubbed the decision "insane."EcotricityBritish energy company Ecotricity's controversial post came from its founder, Dale Vince.Vince tweeted an altered image of the late Queen in a lime green jacket that had been replaced with a soccer shirt adorned with the company's logo in bold letters.The caption read: "Thanks, Liz." —Dale Vince (@DaleVince) September 8, 2022 The unusual tribute did not go down well, with one user commenting: "no I'm sorry this is so disrespectful. how DARE you photoshop the queen to advertise ur club DISGRACE."PlaymobilGerman toy producer Playmobil's tribute was a black and white image of a toy meant to be Queen Elizabeth II. —PLAYMOBIL (@playmobil) September 8, 2022It shared two images of the Queen Elizabeth toy, the second exclusively to its UK account.Rival toymaker Lego also featured a Queen Elizabeth toy in a social media post announcing the temporary closure of one of their Legoland theme parks. One Twitter user didn't think the Playmobil toy was a totally appropriate tribute, commenting underneath the post: "Unreal. Zero respect."HeinzThe American food company Heinz (best known in Britain for its baked beans) also posted a tribute to the late monarch. Like Domino's Pizza, Heinz opted for a blacked-out post with a simple message of respect. —Heinz (@HeinzUK) September 8, 2022 Some, however, took issue with the company's choice of font, with one user calling it "so unserious."One British comic tweeted about the post adding: "It's so weird for companies to weigh in on the Queen dying. Nobody is waking up tomorrow and being like why didn't Heinz say anything????????"Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytSep 9th, 2022

New Jobless Claims Lower: 222K; Powell Starts Q&A

This is the lowest weekly initial jobless claims level since the 202K we saw back ahead of Memorial Day. Thursday, September 8, 2022New Jobless Claims have hit the tape ahead of today’s opening bell, as they do nearly every Thursday morning, and the results are either good or bad, depending on your perspective — even if they are not game-changing, regardless which way you’re looking at it. Initial Jobless Claims reached 222K last week, -6K from the downwardly revised 228K the previous week. This is the lowest weekly headline level since the 202K we saw back ahead of Memorial Day.I say “depending on your perspective” because low jobless claims represent tightness in an already-tight labor market, which is what the Fed would like to see gain a little slack in order to fight inflation. Thus, initial claims might be considered “good news is bad news,” if you consider a 75 basis-point (bps) Fed funds rate hike two weeks from yesterday “bad news.” You may just consider it a reality that the markets have been baking into the cake over the past 10 sessions or so.Continuing Claims, posted a week in arrears from initial claims, rose to 1.473 million two weeks ago from 1.437 million the week prior to that. Historically, this still illustrates an overall healthy employment situation, but it is the highest weekly print in the last 12 weeks — also the highest read since prior to the summer months. And while this might equate to “bad news is good news” for the same reason indicated above, consider new jobless claims are forward indicators (to an extent) of longer-term claims. Therefore, we may expect a drop in this metric come next week.A Q&A with Fed Chair Jay Powell has just begun, so market participants will be paying close attention to the words he uses to describe the Fed’s thinking regarding economic developments at this stage. We may hear him speak on the 75 bps rate hike we saw from the European Central Bank (ECB) this morning (a deeper cut than the 50 bps many analysts were expecting). Powell is unlikely to telegraph the extent of the Fed’s pending rate hike on September 21st, but if he lets it slip, you know it won’t get past investors.Meanwhile, that zero-balance the market was experiencing only minutes ago has shot down to negative triple-digits (-130 points) on the Dow, -20 points on the S&P 500 and -85 points on the Nasdaq. It seems like even Powell’s appearance these days puts a queasy feeling into the stock market’s collective stomach. Perhaps he can offer some soothing relief. Tuning in now…Questions or comments about this article and/or its author? Click here>> Special Report: The Top 5 IPOs for Your Portfolio Today, you have a chance to get in on the ground floor of one of the best investment opportunities of the year. As the world continues to benefit from an ever-evolving internet, a handful of innovative tech companies are on the brink of reaping immense rewards - and you can put yourself in a position to cash in. One is set to disrupt the online communication industry. Brilliantly designed for creating online communities, this stock is poised to explode when made public. With the strength of our economy and record amounts of cash flooding into IPOs, you don’t want to miss this opportunity.>>See Zacks’ Hottest IPOs NowWant the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report Invesco QQQ (QQQ): ETF Research Reports SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY): ETF Research Reports SPDR Dow Jones Industrial Average ETF (DIA): ETF Research Reports To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 8th, 2022

Weekly Jobless Claims Below Expectations

Weekly Jobless Claims Below Expectations. New Jobless Claims have hit the tape ahead of today’s opening bell, as they do nearly every Thursday morning, and the results are either good or bad, depending on your perspective — even if they are not game-changing, regardless which way you’re looking at it. Initial Jobless Claims reached 222K last week, -6K from the downwardly revised 228K the previous week. This is the lowest weekly headline level since the 202K we saw back ahead of Memorial Day.I say “depending on your perspective” because low jobless claims represent tightness in an already-tight labor market, which is what the Fed would like to see gain a little slack in order to fight inflation. Thus, initial claims might be considered “good news is bad news,” if you consider a 75 basis-point (bps) Fed funds rate hike two weeks from yesterday “bad news.” You may just consider it a reality that the markets have been baking into the cake over the past 10 sessions or so.Continuing Claims, posted a week in arrears from initial claims, rose to 1.473 million two weeks ago from 1.437 million the week prior to that. Historically, this still illustrates an overall healthy employment situation, but it is the highest weekly print in the last 12 weeks — also the highest read since prior to the summer months. And while this might equate to “bad news is good news” for the same reason indicated above, consider new jobless claims are forward indicators (to an extent) of longer-term claims. Therefore, we may expect a drop in this metric come next week.A Q&A with Fed Chair Jay Powell has just begun, so market participants will be paying close attention to the words he uses to describe the Fed’s thinking regarding economic developments at this stage. We may hear him speak on the 75 bps rate hike we saw from the European Central Bank (ECB) this morning (a deeper cut than the 50 bps many analysts were expecting). Powell is unlikely to telegraph the extent of the Fed’s pending rate hike on September 21st, but if he lets it slip, you know it won’t get past investors.Meanwhile, that zero-balance the market was experiencing only minutes ago has shot down to negative triple-digits (-130 points) on the Dow, -20 points on the S&P 500 and -85 points on the Nasdaq. It seems like even Powell’s appearance these days puts a queasy feeling into the stock market’s collective stomach. Perhaps he can offer some soothing relief. Tuning in now… Special Report: The Top 5 IPOs for Your Portfolio Today, you have a chance to get in on the ground floor of one of the best investment opportunities of the year. As the world continues to benefit from an ever-evolving internet, a handful of innovative tech companies are on the brink of reaping immense rewards - and you can put yourself in a position to cash in. One is set to disrupt the online communication industry. Brilliantly designed for creating online communities, this stock is poised to explode when made public. With the strength of our economy and record amounts of cash flooding into IPOs, you don’t want to miss this opportunity.>>See Zacks’ Hottest IPOs NowWant the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 8th, 2022