Advertisements


Ex-Google CEO Eric Schmidt Emerges As White Knight For NYC"s Broke Princeton Club

Ex-Google CEO Eric Schmidt Emerges As White Knight For NYC's Broke Princeton Club One month after the Princeton Club in midtown Manhattan shut its door down indefinitely after defaulting on nearly $40 million in mortgage debt, the venue frequented by so many grads of the Ivy safety school may have found a savior in ex-Google CEO, billionaire Eric Schmidt. Schmidt (obviously a Princeton graduate) who has donated tens of millions to the Ivy League school in the past and who most recently played a crucial role in Hillary Clinton's failed attempt to defeat Donald Trump for the 2016 election, has bid on the club’s loan through his family’s investment office, Bloomberg reports citing people familiar with the situation. If his bid wins, Schmidt would provide the funds to make improvements so the 10-story private club on West 43rd Street is more suitable as a co-working space, Bloomberg sources said. It’s not known how many other bidders Schmidt is competing with or if his current bid is the highest. The auction is scheduled to conclude Nov. 29. The storied club which was founded in 1866 and includes two restaurants, banquet space, squash courts and 58 guest rooms, ran out of cash after being closed for 15 months during the pandemic and losing about one-third of its 6,000 dues-paying members. After efforts to raise capital failed, lender Sterling National Bank put the club’s $39.3 million debt in default and enlisted Newmark Group to sell the note by the end of November. Unlike other Manhattan-based Ivy League clubs, some of which are supported financially by their associated schools, the Princeton club has no affiliation with Princeton University; that meant it was also the only one to default. Schmidt, 66, ranks 56th on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index with a net worth of $27.9 billion. The former Google chief executive officer’s family investment office is based in the same Menlo Park, California, building that also houses his philanthropic foundation, established in 2006 with his wife Wendy Schmidt, Bloomberg notes. A former trustee of Princeton University, Schmidt is also on the club’s member roster. His donations over the years to Princeton include $25 million in 2009 to support technology research, money to rebuild the school’s computer science department and $5 million last year to endow a professorship of indigenous studies. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/24/2021 - 21:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 24th, 2021

Lone Star emerges as white-knight bidder for Japanese hotel chain Unizo

Japanese hotel chain.....»»

Category: topSource: reutersDec 22nd, 2019

Lone Star emerges as white knight bidder for Japanese hotel chain Unizo

Japanese hotel chain.....»»

Category: topSource: reutersDec 22nd, 2019

Virgil Abloh, Off-White founder and artist director of Louis Vuitton is dead at 41. Here"s a look at the life of the luxury designer.

Virgil Abloh is one of modern fashion's most popular designers, known for his efforts revolutionizing luxury streetwear. Virgil Abloh was one of the most popular designers of today.Victor VIRGILE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images) Virgil Abloh, 41, was one of modern fashion's most popular designers. He was known for being Louis Vuitton's menswear artistic director and the founder of Off-White. He died on November 28 after a two-year battle with a rare form of heart cancer.  Virgil Abloh, 41, died on Sunday after a two-year battle with a rare form of cancer. Abloh was regarded as one of the pioneers of high-end street fashion, or what he called the "post-streetwear movement," with roots in the classic streetwear that originated in hip-hop and skating culture. When the lines between luxury and streetwear were torn down, Abloh's influence was everywhere, from Balenciaga selling puffer jackets to Dior collaborating with Nike on limited edition Air Jordans to Louis Vuitton partnering with Supreme to Gucci working with legendary Harlem designer Dapper Dan.As Business Insider previously reported, Louis Vuitton named Abloh its artistic director for menswear in 2018. This made him one of the few Black people to ever lead a top fashion house, and the first Black American to lead a French one. Aside from Louis Vuitton, Abloh's own line, Off-White, established a reputable name for itself. Through Off-White, Abloh launched collaborations with partners such as Nike, Ikea, and even McDonald's. Keep reading to learn more about one of the most popular — and controversial — figures in the fashion industry. Virgil Abloh was one of the most popular designers in the modern age. Known for his line, Off-White, he was also the artistic director of Louis Vuitton's menswear.hoto by Victor Boyko/Getty ImagesVirgil Abloh gained prominence in the last decade with the rise of luxury streetwear, with some noting him as being the trend's pioneer. He was the founder of Off-White, one of the top luxury streetwear brands in the world. Aside from its own collections, the brand and Abloh collaborated with furniture store Ikea, water company Evian, luggage brand Rimowa, Jimmy Choo, Sunglass Hut, and even McDonald's. Abloh had 6.9 million followers on Instagram and was good friends with his often-creative partner Kanye West. His designs have been seen on everyone from Rihanna, Beyonce, and model Hailey Baldwin. Who is Virgil Abloh?Bennett Raglin / Stringer / Getty ImagesAbloh was born in Rockford, Illinois, on September 30, 1980. His parents were immigrants from Ghana, and his mother was a seamstress, while his father was the manager of a paint company. According to a previous article by Friedman, it was Abloh's mother who taught him how to sew. He attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he earned a BS in civil engineering in 2002. He then went on to receive a master's in architecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 2006.Matthew Sperzel / Contributor / Getty ImagesAccording to Vogue's Steff Yotka, the rumor is that, in 2002, on the day of Abloh's graduation from University of Wisconsin-Madison, he skipped his final critiques to meet with Kanye's then-manager John Monopoly. He told The Cut in 2017 that he didn't really know he could be a creative full-time. "I felt that a random Black kid from the suburbs of Chicago shouldn't be doing that," he said.In his senior year, he took his first art history class, in which he learned about the Renaissance and Italian painter Caravaggio. "It flipped my head backward," he continued. "I'd spent so much time thinking practical things."While finishing his master's degree at IIT, Abloh said, he saw a building that was under construction by renowned architect Rem Koolhaas. This helped spark his interest in fashion.Daniel Zuchnik/Getty ImagesIt was also during this time that he began to design his own clothes, and work on a blog known as The Brilliance. Source: The CutIn 2009, Abloh began a 6-month internship at Fendi in Rome alongside Kanye West.Kanye West (L) and Virgil Abloh (R)Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty ImagesLouis Vuitton CEO Michael Burke once told The New York Times that he was "impressed" with Abloh and West and how they "brought a whole new vibe to the studio and were disruptive in the best way."He then went on to say that Abloh brought in a "new vocabulary to describe something as old-school as Fendi." Burke added that he would be following Abloh's career.Source: The New York TimesIt was also around this time when Abloh and West began to be seen with the fashion crowds in Paris.Bertrand Rindoff Petroff/Getty ImagesAbloh and West were seen outside of a Comme des Garçons show in Paris, photographed by Tommy Ton for Style.com.Abloh told W magazine in 2017 that, at the time, they were just "a generation that was interested in fashion and weren't supposed to be there" and that they "saw this as our chance to participate and make current culture. In a lot of ways, it felt like we were bringing more excitement than the industry was."Source: VogueIn 2009, Abloh married his high school sweetheart, Shannon Sundberg.Virgil Abloh (L) and his wife, Susan Sundberg (R)Photo by Pierre Suu/Getty Images)They lived in Chicago with their two children. Source: Inside WeddingsIn 2010, West appointed Abloh as creative director of his creative agency, Donda.Peter White / Contributor / Getty ImagesSource: VogueThe following year, Abloh earned a Grammy nomination for his art direction of Kanye and Jay-Z's album, "Watch the Throne."Jay Z (L) and Kanye West (R)GUILLAUME BAPTISTE/AFP/GettyImages)Source: VogueIn 2012, Abloh opened his first brand, Pyrex Vision.Photo by Francois Durand/Getty ImagesAs reported by Yotka at Vogue, Abloh had simply taken deadstock Ralph Lauren shirts, screen printed his company's name on it along with the number 23, and sold them for $550 each. Source: VogueIn 2013, Abloh closed Pyrex and opened Off-White. The company is based in Milan, and focuses primarily on streetwear. Abloh defined the brand as "the gray area between black and white as the color Off-White."Jeremy Moeller / Contributor / Getty ImagesOff-White is known for its quotation marks around words, as pictured above. In an interview with W magazine, Abloh said he "loved" the idea that Off-White "can be questioned" and said he knew that one day, someone would "critique that Off-White is un-inspirational."The brand is sold at Selfridges and Bergdorf Goodman, and has been sold at Barneys and Colette. He also had boutiques in Tokyo, Beijing, New York City, and Hong Kong. In 2014, Abloh launched a women's wear line for Off-White, and began to show its collections during Paris Fashion Week.Christian Vierig / Contributor / Getty Images"The end goal is to modernize fashion and steer a [fashion] house because I believe in the modernization of these storied brands," he said in a 2017 interview with The Cut. He went on to say at a lecture at Columbia that "[Off-White is] not a brand ... it's a faux-luxury product."In 2015, Off-White was named a finalist for the prestigious LVMH Prize, although it lost to fellow designers Marques'Almeida and Jacquemus, respectively.Bertrand Rindoff Petroff / Contributor / Getty Images"Fashion is kinda a joke," he said in a 2017 interview with The Cut. "I don't get too bogged down in the clothes. For me, it's one big art project, just a canvas to show that fashion should have a brand that has someone behind it who cares about different contexts. Social things."That same year, Beyoncé wore one of his sweatshirts in a music video with Nicki Minaj. The year 2017 was monumental for Abloh: He announced a collaborative exhibition with artist Takashi Murakami at the Gagosian, opened his first New York store, collaborated with Warby Parker and Jimmy Choo, and released a shoe with Nike.Victor Boyko/Getty ImagesHe has also collaborated with artist Jenny Holzer for a political collection inspired by refugees, immigration, and Planned Parenthood. The exhibition with Murakami opened in October 2018. "Young architects can change the world by not building buildings," he said at a lecture at Columbia in 2017. "You don't have to be a designer to be a designer," is his contradictory credo.Source: Vogue, VogueIn 2017, Abloh won the British Fashion Award for Urban Luxe Brand.Stephane Cardinale/Getty ImagesSource: New York TimesIn 2018, Virgil was appointed artistic director of Louis Vuitton's menswear. He was also listed as one of Time's 100 Most Influential People in the World.TPN / Contributor / Getty Images"It is an honor for me to accept this position," he said in a statement announcing his appointment. "I find the heritage and creative integrity of the house are key inspirations and will look to reference them both while drawing parallels to modern times." Abloh also designed the outfit Serena Williams wore to the 2018 U.S. Open. This outfit, along with the look he designed for Beyoncé as a choice to wear on the cover of Vogue, was chosen to be on exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago.Source: GQ, Chicago Tribune, New York TimesIn 2019, Abloh was chosen to be on the board of the CFDA. He was also nominated for a CFDA Award for Menswear Designer of the Year, for his work with Off-White.Kristy Sparow / Contributor / Getty ImagesSource: CFDA, Footwear NewsThat same year, he gave an interview with Dazed magazine where he said that streetwear was "probably going to die soon."Matthew Sperzel/GC Images / Getty ImagesAs Business Insider previously reported, Abloh gave an interview with Dazed where he predicted that streetwear was going to die "soon.""In my mind, how many more T-shirts can we own," he told Dazed. "How many more hoodies, how many sneakers?"He then went on to say: "We're gonna hit this like, really awesome state of expressing your knowledge and personal style with vintage," he said. "There are so many clothes that are cool that are in vintage shops and it's just about wearing them."Abloh came under fire last year for only donating $50 dollars to help bail out protesters that were arrested during the George Floyd movement.Dominique Charriau/WireImage / Getty ImagesAbloh wrote on Instagram, "The Miami community ~ I'm crazy inspired. For kids in the streets that need a bail funds [sic] for George Floyd protests, ... If it heals your pain, you can have it."He then posted a screenshot of the $50 he donated to a bail fund. He made the donation after receiving backlash for attacking looters who broke into the store of one of his friends, designer Sean Wotherspoon. In a comment on Instagram regarding the looting, he said:"You see the passion blood sweat and tears Sean puts in for our culture. This disgusts me. to the kids that ransacked his store and RSVP DTLA, and all our stores in our scene just know, that product staring at you in your home/apartment right now is tainted and a reminder of a person I hope you aren't. We're apart of a culture together. Is this what you want?? When you walk past him in the future please have the dignity to not look him in the eye, hang your head in shame."However, Abloh's small donation sparked more backlash, as many people brought up the fact that $50 isn't even enough to buy a pair of socks from his brand Off White.It was also pointed out that the people were arrested for protesting police brutality against black men, such as Abloh. And he was then accused of not doing all he can to help out the Black community whose culture propelled him to fame. —jade bentil (@divanificent) June 1, 2020—Ourfa Zinali (@ourfazinali) June 1, 2020—Derek Guy (@dieworkwear) June 1, 2020 It was also noted that other celebrities, such as Chrissy Teigen, have donated as much as $200,000 to help protesters. In February 2020, New York Times Fashion Director Vanessa Friedman wrote an article asking if Abloh could be considered the "the Karl Lagerfeld for Millennials."New York Times Fashion Director Vanessa FriedmanSean Zanni / Contributor / Getty ImagesHigh-fashion Twitter quickly broke out into group discussions, and the conversation escalated once Abloh responded to Friedman, saying he would like to give a "lecture" on the article because "riffing online is far too low hanging fruit for such an easy and massive 'case & point."Freidman responded by simply saying, "Come do it at the Times Center."Abloh then sent Friedman an image from Joseph Beuys' 1974 art piece "I Like America and America Likes Me," in which the artist spent 8 hours with a coyote as a commentary on American society in the 1970s. Beuys said the coyote was America's spirit animal and that the piece commented on a nation divided along multiple lines, including the Vietnam War and relations between the majority and minority populations.Friedman's response: "Am I the coyote in this picture? Are you Beuys? Are these relevant questions?" Abloh did not directly respond to those questions of Friedman's. Friedman's question prompted a discussion and even a response from Abloh himself.Virgil Abloh was one of the most popular designers of today.Victor VIRGILE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)Friedman made a pretty compelling case as to why Abloh could at least, in some ways, be regarded as the "millennial" Karl Lagerfeld. Both, she wrote, made their marks "in part by embracing irony.""Like Mr. Lagerfeld he has made a community that can seem like a cult of personality around himself," she wrote. "Like Mr. Lagerfeld, he speaks in rolling sentences and is a pleasure to listen to, especially in a world where the most celebrated names often seem to be tying themselves up in knots at the prospect of answering a question." "Mr. Lagerfeld was criticized for doing too much, a lot of it not well enough, as is Mr. Abloh. So far, Mr. Abloh has proved himself best as a designer when building atop a foundation established by someone else," she continued. "His Vuitton is more interesting than his Off-White, which often seems like a pallid copy of other people's ideas, just as Mr. Lagerfeld's Chanel was more effective than his namesake label."Source: New York TimesStill, his influence on the industry cannot be denied.(L) Model Karlie Kloss, (C) Virgil Abloh, (R) Model Gigi HadidJulien M. Hekimian / Stringer / Getty ImagesAs Business Insider previously reported, many luxury houses followed in the streetwear foundation that Abloh helped build. Balenciaga was selling puffer jackets and chunky sneakers, while hoodies and oversized logos were everywhere.The "post-streetwear movement" saw Dior collaborating with Nike to make limited-edition Air Jordans, Louis Vuitton launching a collaboration with Supreme, and Gucci working with legendary Harlem designer Dapper Dan.The lines between streetwear and luxury were torn down; suddenly, they were one and the same. Aside from designing, Abloh was also a DJ, a creative and artistic director, and a social media influencer. He also had a collection of famous friends, and many people who aspire to dress, look, and be like him. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider20 hr. 39 min. ago

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene introduced a bill to award a Congressional Gold Medal to Kyle Rittenhouse

The Republican lawmaker's bill is highly unlikely to advance given the Democratic-controlled House and Senate. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA).Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene introduced a bill this week to award Kyle Rittenhouse with a Congressional Gold Medal. Rittenhouse was recently found not guilty after he fatally shot two people last summer during civil unrest in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Far-right figures have rallied around Rittenhouse and celebrated him as a "hero." GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene introduced a bill this week to award a Congressional Gold Medal to Kyle Rittenhouse, the 18-year-old who was recently found not guilty of murder after he fatally shot two people and injured a third during civil unrest in Kenosha, Wisconsin last summer.Greene introduced the bill on Tuesday, along with a summary that read: "To award a Congressional Gold Medal to Kyle H. Rittenhouse, who protected the community of Kenosha, Wisconsin, during a Black Lives Matter (BLM) riot on August 25, 2020." A Congressional Gold Medal is the highest award Congress can bestow on individuals for distinguished achievements. Past recipients include President George Washington, civil rights activist Rosa Parks and South African leader Nelson Mandela.Greene's bill is highly unlikely to advance given the Democratic-controlled House and Senate.Besides the legislation, Greene came to Rittenhouse's defense in a tweet on Monday, in which she attacked her former attorney Lin Wood, alleging he mistreated Rittenhouse during a short stint as his lawyer. "Lin should go to jail for what he did to Kyle," the Republican lawmaker tweeted. Wood rose to prominence last year as a pro-Trump lawyer who spread conspiracy theories in an attempt to overturn the 2020 presidential election results. A jury last week acquitted Rittenhouse of five charges related to the deadly shootings. He had pleaded not guilty and testified that he opened fire against the individuals out of self-defense.Greene adds to the growing chorus of far-right figures who have praised the verdict, rallying around Rittenhouse and celebrating him as a "hero.""May Kyle and his family now live in peace. Those who help, protect, and defend are the good guys. Kyle is one of good ones," Greene tweeted last week after the verdict was announced.Other Republican lawmakers, including Reps. Matt Gaetz of Florida, Paul Gosar of Arizona and Madison Cawthorn of North Carolina, have expressed interest in having Rittenhouse intern at their congressional offices. Rittenhouse also recently visited former President Donald Trump at his Mar-a-Lago club in West Palm Beach, Florida. Trump described him as a "really a nice young man" in an interview with Fox News anchor Sean Hannity on Tuesday. Some conservatives have called on President Joe Biden to publicly apologize to Rittenhouse after he was briefly featured in a 2020 campaign video in which Trump refused to condemn white supremacists and militia groups. During an interview with Fox News host Tucker Carlson on Monday, Rittenhouse accused Biden of "defaming" him.Biden reacted to the verdict last week, telling reporters: "I stand by what the jury has concluded. The jury system works and we have to abide by it.""While the verdict in Kenosha will leave many Americans feeling angry and concerned, myself included, we must acknowledge that the jury has spoken," Biden followed up in a written statement. "I ran on a promise to bring Americans together, because I believe that what unites us is far greater than what divides us. I know that we're not going to heal our country's wounds overnight, but I remain steadfast in my commitment to do everything in my power to ensure that every American is treated equally, with fairness and dignity, under the law."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 25th, 2021

Capitol Police officer rips the right-wing"s "hypocrisy" of calling Kyle Rittenhouse a "hero" while ignoring and insulting those who defended the Capitol

"Hypocrisy reeks," Harry Dunn tweeted, adding that Kyle Rittenhouse's emotions were praised while Capitol Police officers' emotions were mocked. U.S. Capitol Police Sgt. Harry Dunn testifies during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 27, 2021.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo A US Capitol Police officer excoriated the "hypocrisy" of prominent right-wing figures' response to the Kyle Rittenhouse verdict. Fox News' Laura Ingraham criticized LeBron James for having "mocked [Kyle Rittenhouse's] emotional testimony." But Ingraham mocked Dunn and other officers' harrowing January 6 testimonies as political performances. A Capitol Police officer said on Wednesday that it was "disheartening" to see prominent figures on the right hailing Kyle Rittenhouse as a "hero" and expressing sympathy for his emotional state, while mocking those who defended the Capitol during the deadly January 6 insurrection."Kinda disheartening to see how some prominent people, prop Kyle Rittenhouse up as a hero, yet the brave men and women who fought and defended the Capitol on 1/6 have to continue to fight just for the TRUTH to be told about that day," US Capitol Police Officer Harry Dunn tweeted."I have been called every name in the book since my testimony," he added, referring to his emotional July testimony to the January 6 House Select Committee, during which he repeatedly broke down in tears. "A political pawn, a sellout, a fake cop, a disgrace to the badge, Pelosi puppet, hell even a local Police Union put out a statement attacking me while I was running for Chairman of our Police Union.""Its sad to see some of the same people who said these things, praise Rittenhouse or just remain silent," Dunn continued. Fox News host Laura Ingraham "gave Sgt. Gonell, Michael Fanone and myself actor awards for showing emotion during our testimony.... But Rittenhouse??? #HypocrisyReeks"The day after Dunn, Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell, and Washington D.C. Metropolitan Police officers Michael Fanone and Daniel Hodges testified to the January 6 committee, Ingraham mocked their harrowing testimony as political performances.Ingraham slammed Gonell's testimony as the "best exaggerated performance," and gave Dunn "the award for blatant use of party politics when facts fail." She gave Fanone, who was nearly beaten to death by Trump supporters and suffered a heart attack from the encounter, the award for "best performance in an action role."But on her show last week following the Rittenhouse verdict, Ingraham criticized "billionaire celebrities" like LeBron James who "mocked the defendant's emotional testimony."Rittenhouse killed two people and wounded another during antiracism protests in Kenosha, Wisconsin, last year following the police shooting of Jacob Blake. Rittenhouse was acquitted on all five counts last week following a bitterly fought homicide trial that captured national attention.Several prominent right-wing pundits and hosts expressed sympathy for Rittenhouse during the trial, where he cried on the witness stand, and broke down in sobs and collapsed into his seat following his acquittal. One far-right group dubbed him "Saint Kyle," while some Republican lawmakers went as far as to jockey with one another to offer him internships in Congress.But antiracism activists and left-leaning hosts derided the verdict as another example of white vigilantism going unchecked and garnering sympathy.MSNBC's Joy Reid noted that the Rittenhouse trial "reminded a lot of people" of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearings in 2018. Kavanaugh "cried his way through the hearings," Reid said, adding, "His tears turned out to be more powerful. In America, there's a thing about both white vigilantism and white tears, particularly male white tears."Ingraham on her show last week insisted that "acquittal was the only verdict that made any sense.""But to the left, the acquittal of Rittenhouse only proves what they thought about America all along," Ingraham said as Fox played footage of Rittenhouse crying and collapsing in the courthouse. "That it's a horrible, awful, racist place where life is fundamentally unfair."A spokesperson for Fox did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 24th, 2021

10 Things in Politics: Progressives fume over Fed

And a district attorney says the suspect in the Wisconsin parade deaths was released on "inappropriately low" bail weeks ago. Welcome back to 10 Things in Politics. Sign up here to receive this newsletter. Plus, download Insider's app for news on the go — click here for iOS and here for Android. Send tips to bgriffiths@insider.com.Programming note: We're off the rest of the week for Thanksgiving. We hope you and your family have a wonderful holiday.Here's what we're talking about:Biden backing Powell to chair the Fed is another stiff arm to progressive DemocratsThe suspect in the Wisconsin parade deaths was released on what a district attorney called 'inappropriately low' bail weeks agoRural Democrats are freaking out about their party's apathy toward flyover-state voters entering the 2022 midtermsSen. Elizabeth Warren and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images (Warren) and Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images (Powell).1. ON YOUR LEFT?: President Joe Biden handed another setback to a group of progressive lawmakers with his decision to renominate Jerome Powell to lead the Federal Reserve. Biden said he made his pick to bolster the Fed's independence and provide certainty to markets. But his decision further rankles many progressives who have begun to criticize the administration as being too centrist in its approach.Here's what else you need to know:Progressives tried for months to derail Powell's second term: A group of House Democrats including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib wrote to the White House about what they viewed as Powell's failures to address the climate crisis and economic inequality. Sen. Elizabeth Warren deemed Powell a "dangerous man" for his handling of financial-sector regulation.Powell is expected to breeze through his confirmation: Powell, a Republican, was initially nominated by President Donald Trump and is expected to receive broad bipartisan support for a second term, The New York Times reports.Powell's renomination is the latest setback for progressives: The White House and congressional leadership forced liberal lawmakers to stomach a $1.75 trillion social-spending bill after promising a $3.5 trillion plan for months. Biden has ignored the progressive push to cancel student debt. And the president has been unable to move Congress to pass a $15-an-hour federal minimum wage or take sweeping action on voting rights.Key quote: "And this is where I have sounded the alarm, because what really dampens turnout is when Democrats make promises that they don't keep," Ocasio-Cortez told The New York Times of how "demoralizing" the process of passing Biden's spending plan had been for many. Ocasio-Cortez said if Democrats didn't pass the Build Back Better plan soon, then leaders would struggle to get progressives' votes on other legislation.2. A look at Democrats' plan to win back rural America: Ahead of crucial midterm elections next year, RuralVote.org, the super PAC run by the former Iowa congressional candidate J.D. Scholten, criticized the three major Democratic campaign arms for their lack of investment in what they argued was a key voting bloc, according to a memo obtained exclusively by Insider. In the memo, Scholten called for "year-round on-the-ground organizing to help with party infrastructure and candidate recruitment" as well as a nationwide rural voter-outreach plan and rural messengers. Read more about how rural Democrats are freaking out following Virginia's elections.Community members mourned during a candlelight vigil in Cutler Park on Monday after a car plowed through a holiday parade in Waukesha, Wisconsin.Cheney Orr/ Reuters3. District attorney says suspect in Wisconsin parade deaths was released on "inappropriately low" bail weeks ago: Darrell E. Brooks posted a $1,000 cash bail on November 11, releasing him from custody in connection to a November 2 domestic-related incident. Brooks now faces five counts of first-degree intentional homicide after the police identified him as the SUV driver who plowed through a Christmas parade in the small city of Waukesha, Wisconsin, killing five people and injuring 48 others, including children. The Milwaukee County district attorney's office said it had launched a review into what happened. Here's what else we're starting to learn about the lead-up to the deadly event.4. Lawmakers subpoena Roger Stone and Alex Jones: The House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol issued new subpoenas for people including Stone, a longtime Trump ally. Stone says he had no prior knowledge that anything illegal was about to take place. More on where the investigation into the insurrection stands.5. RNC pays more than $121,000 toward Trump's legal bills: The Republican National Committee defended the party's decision to cover some of the former president's legal bills, The Washington Post reports. The RNC said it was "entirely appropriate" for it to defend the "leader of our party." The funding is related to a yearslong investigation by the Manhattan district attorney's office into the Trump Organization and the former president's business dealings. More on how the RNC is helping Trump amid New York's criminal investigation.Related: New York prosecutors are investigating whether the Trump Organization broke the law by offering dramatically different valuations of the same properties6. Kyle Rittenhouse lashes out at Biden: "Mr. President, if I could say one thing to you, I would urge you to go back and watch the trial and understand the facts before you make a statement," Rittenhouse told Fox News' Tucker Carlson of Biden calling him a white supremacist. Rittenhouse was referring to a clip Biden tweeted out after a 2020 presidential debate. More on the news.We watched Tucker Carlson's January 6 documentary so you don't have to.7. Trial in Ahmaud Arbery's killing is nearing an end: Prosecutors plan to wrap up their closing arguments later this morning before the disproportionately white jury will be handed the closely watched case over Arbery's killing while out for a jog, the Associated Press reports. Travis McMichael, one of the accused, who grabbed guns and pursued Arbery, previously testified that he did so in self-defense. Defense attorneys closed by arguing that McMichael and his father, Greg, were trying to make a legal citizen's arrest. Here's where things stand before the jury begins its deliberations.8. There's more reported information about China's hypersonic weapons test: The hypersonic weapon China tested this summer, alarming US military leaders, fired something off midflight while inside the atmosphere somewhere over the South China Sea, the Financial Times reported, citing people familiar with the intelligence. China has denied testing a weapon, saying it tested reusable spaceflight technology, but US military leaders have described the test differently in public comments. More on what some leaders have compared to the Soviet launch of the Sputnik satellite during the Cold War.9. Trump-backed Senate candidate suspends campaign: The Republican Sean Parnell suspended his closely watched run in Pennsylvania after a judge in Butler County awarded Parnell's wife, Laurie Snell, primary custody and sole legal custody of their three children. In recent months, Parnell's candidacy had faced scrutiny over allegations — which he vehemently denied — that he abused his estranged wife and children. More on the news about the now-former front-runner.LeBron James.Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Images10. LeBron James has been suspended for the first time in his NBA career: James will be forced to sit out one game after an ugly altercation during Sunday's Lakers-Pistons game, the Associated Press reports. The league says the Lakers star is being suspended for "recklessly hitting" Detroit's Isaiah Stewart while the pair jostled for position during a free throw. Stewart will be suspended for two games. More on the fallout.Today's trivia question: The presidential turkey pardon is a beloved and uniquely weird part of our modern Thanksgiving. But which president spared a raccoon from the Thanksgiving table? Email your answer and a suggested question to me at bgriffiths@insider.com.Yesterday's answer: Senate Republicans led the opposition to the Treaty of Versailles in November 1919, causing the deal to become the first peace treaty to ever be rejected by the chamber.Thank you for reading! That's all until next week. Happy Thanksgiving!Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 23rd, 2021

New York prosecutors are investigating whether the Trump Organization broke the law by offering dramatically different valuations of the same properties

One property was valued to lenders at a number more than 30 times what the Trump Organization said it was worth in tax documents. A taxi passes by Trump Tower, the headquarters of the Trump Organization, in New York City on Wednesday, July 14, 2021AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey New York prosecutors are investigating the Trump Organization's history of claiming dramatically different valuations of its properties.  The company valued several properties up to 30 times more for potential lenders than for tax officials, The Washington Post reported. The differences in evaluations may amount to tax, bank, or insurance fraud, experts say. The Manhattan district attorney and New York attorney general are investigating several instances in which the Trump Organization provided government officials and potential lenders vastly different valuations of its properties.The prosecutors are said to be presenting the evidence at a second special grand jury they empaneled in Manhattan for their long-running investigation into the Trump Organization's finances. Investigations appear to be focusing their efforts on at least four of former President Donald Trump's properties: an office building at 40 Wall Street in Manhattan; a golf club in Rancho Palos Verdes, California; an estate called Seven Springs in Westchester County, New York; and a golf club in Briarcliff Manor, New York.Trump's company valued these properties up to 30 times more depending on who the numbers were provided to, according to documentation obtained by The Washington Post. In 2012, the Trump Organization told tax officials the Manhattan office building was worth just $16.7 million. But just a few months prior, the company had valued the same building at a staggering $527 million in a document provided to possible lenders, The Post reported. In another instance in 2013, the Trump Organization told county tax officials that its California golf club was worth $900,000. But in 2014, as the company was seeking a massive tax deduction through a conservation easement, it said the same property was worth at least $25 million. It was in Trump's financial interest to inflate the value of the land when asking for an easement, which limits commercial use of the land, because it would amount to a larger tax break.Prosecutors are investigating whether the different valuations amount to crimesManhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. obtained reams of documentation from the Trump Organization from subpoenas in 2020. The documentation may include tax forms, as well as communications between company officials and third-party tax preparers that can shed light on how the company came to the different property evaluations.Along with the office of New York Attorney General Letitia James — a Democrat who recently announced her bid for governor — Vance is said to be weighing whether the differences in property evaluation amounted to tax, bank, or insurance fraud. James is also running a concurrent civil investigation that may result in a lawsuit against the company.Jeff Robbins, a former attorney for the US Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations and federal prosecutor overseeing money-laundering probes, previously told Insider that keeping two sets of books could indicate the Trump Organization broke financial laws."Inconsistency is not a crime. The intent to defraud is a crime," Robbins told Insider. "What a prosecutor is going to be looking at is: Did Trump seek to defraud the government of the United States with respect to the valuation of assets and the paying of taxes? Was there an intent to defraud banks?"Michael Cohen, Trump's longtime former "fixer" and attorney, told Congress in 2019 that Trump regularly inflated his wealth and the value of his assets to insurers and lenders and then turned around and undervalued his assets to pay less in taxes. Cohen was sentenced to three years in federal prison in 2018 for violating campaign finance laws to help Trump during the 2016 election, lying to Congress, and other financial crimes.Prosecutors are also examining whether Trump Organization executives avoided paying taxes by illegally accepting tax-free perks like apartments and the use of company cars. In July, another grand jury empaneled by the Manhattan district attorney's and New York attorney general's offices indicted the Trump Organization on charges of criminal tax fraud, alleging it operated a 15-year scheme helping top executives evade income taxes. The grand jury also charged the Trump Organization's longtime Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg, alleging he oversaw the scheme and personally evaded income taxes on about $1.7 million in perks he received from the company. Trump has broadly dismissed the investigations and accused Democrats of digging around in search of crimes. Earlier this year, he called the New York inquiries "a continuation of the greatest political Witch Hunt in the history of the United States."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 22nd, 2021

The northernmost town in the US won"t see sunlight for another 66 days — here"s what it"s like to live and work in Utqiagvik, Alaska

Local business owners told Insider what it's like to work in America's northernmost town in Alaska — from $98 laundry detergent to hunting whales. Without the sun, temperatures drop substantially — Utqiagvik is below freezing for 160 days out of the year.Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post via Getty Images Utqiaġvik, Alaska is the northernmost town in the US, overlooking the Arctic Ocean.  "Polar night" begins this week, plunging the town's residents into 66 days of 24-hour darkness. Local business owners told Insider what it's like to work in the region — from $98 laundry detergent to hunting whales.  When Myron McCumber talks about life in Alaska, he talks in terms of "the lower 48," a saying used by locals to describe the continental US. "Alaskans tend to be pretty independent thinkers," he told Insider. "We see ourselves as separate from and still belonging to the United States."Myron and his wife, Susan McCumber, run Latitude 71, a 12-room bed and breakfast in Utqiagvik, Alaska. Their guests range from Brazilian tourists chasing the northern lights to local oil rig workers.  Along Utqiagvik's coast is a welcome sign that reads "America's northernmost city" above a blue and white illustration of a whale tail. Home to just over 4,000 people, Utqiagvik goes by many names, including "the rooftop of the world" and "ground zero for climate change."Starting this week, the town will enter "polar night" and plunge into 66 days of 24-hour darkness. Without the sun, temperatures drop substantially. Utqiagvik is below freezing for 160 days out of the year. While tourists plan visits around the cosmic phenomena, the locals of Utqiagvik continue their daily lives, Myron said — just without the sun. "It's dark when you come home at lunch," he described. "You turn your headlights on at noon to drive home ... that would be a little different for most people living in the lower 48."Year-round, running a business in Utqiagvik comes with its own set of challenges. Namely, food. "It's $14 for a gallon of milk," Myron told Insider. "A box of Tide laundry pods is like $98. A case of water that you get from Walmart for $6 — here it's $48." In order to afford meals for hotel guests, the McCumbers travel four to five times a year to Anchorage, where groceries are slightly cheaper. The hauls are then stored in Latitude 71's six freezers and two refrigerators. "We bring in 1,000 to 1,500 pounds of food and supplies like toilet paper," Myron said. "An 18-pack of paper towels here is $58. In Anchorage, that would be about $24." "With the sea ice not being here as much, we don't see the seals and the walrus and the polar bear," Myron McCumber told Insider.David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty ImagesThe majority of North Slope residents are Iñupiat Alaska Natives, who have inhabited the polar region for thousands of years. The Iñupiat have historically survived the harsh climate through subsistence hunting of whale, caribou, walrus, seal, and bird.With grocery prices so high, hunting is still an important part of living in Utqiagvik. Each Spring, the community gathers during "Nalukataq" to celebrate a successful whale-hunting season. But climate change has made hunting harder than ever, Myron told Insider. In 2017, the temperature in Utqiagvik rose so fast that an algorithm flagged the data as "unreal" and removed it from the government's database. "With the sea ice not being here as much, we don't see the seals and the walrus and the polar bear," he said. "It's changing migration patterns for animals and birds — so all of that has a big impact on subsistence hunters, which is a lot of the population here."Most of Utqiagvik is immune to the lower 48's commercialization — except for the local Subway."There are 4,500 people here and there's only five other restaurants," its owner, John Masterson, told Insider, adding that Subway is the only place in Utqiagvik whose menu doesn't include pizza, hamburgers, or Chinese food. Despite the fact that a foot-long steak and cheese sandwich costs $16.99, Masterson said the store broke "every Subway sales record" there was. "We sold over 1,000 sandwiches the first day and over almost 10,000 sandwiches in the first week," Masterson said. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 20th, 2021

9 places to buy alcohol online in 2021 and get it delivered in time for the holidays

If you want to get alcohol delivered right to your door, here are the best places to shop whether you want liquor, wine, beer, or Japanese sake. Prices are accurate at the time of publication. Here's how to get alcohol delivered right to your door whether it's your favorite wine, beer, or spirit. Check your state's laws before you shop, and be sure an adult who is 21 years or older can sign for the package. This content is intended for readers 21+. Please drink responsibly. If you or anyone you know is dealing with alcohol abuse, get help. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357) provides a free, confidential, 24/7, treatment referral, and information service.Trying to carry two bottles of wine, a handle of whiskey, a six-pack of beer, and some bitters to stock our bar cart might as well be an Olympic sport. But the task of buying alcohol doesn't have to be so strenuous, and for anyone who can't or doesn't want to go outside to the store, there's always alcohol delivery. We've broken down how to buy alcohol online and the best places to order from whether you're into spirits, wine, or beer. Some can get you your alcohol within a couple of hours of ordering, while others may have set shipping schedules. One thing to keep in mind with any alcohol delivery service is that each state has its own laws. Alabama, Oklahoma, and Utah have outright bans on booze deliveries to private citizens. In almost all other states, wine deliveries are perfectly legal, though they will require a signature from an adult who's 21 or older in most places. Check the National Conference of State Legislatures' Direct Shipment of Alcohol Statutes page for the most updated information.Here are the best places to buy alcohol online:The best place to buy wine online: Wine.comThe best place to buy indie wine online: NakedWines.comThe best place to buy sake online: TippsyThe best place to buy beer online: Craft CityThe best on-demand alcohol delivery: DrizlyThe best place to buy alcohol gifts: ReserveBarThe best spirits subscription: FlaviarThe best wine subscription: WincThe best beer subscription: Beer of the Month ClubThe best place to buy wine onlineWine.com/InstagramWine.com boasts the world's largest online wine selection, letting you find your old favorites, discover new wines, and shop collectible and boutique wines. There's no shortage of choice at Wine.com, where you can shop by varietal and region, or browse various curated lists and deals. You can also pick up gift baskets, glassware, and other wine accessories to supplement your bottles. Each product page features helpful winemaker notes, reviews from trusted critics like James Suckling, and additional information about the vineyard. There's also a live wine expert chat function in case you need extra help. In addition to home delivery, the site offers order pickup from more than 10,000 participating locations including Walgreens, Duane Reade, and Safeway. If you anticipate ordering often, get the annual $49 membership, which is called the StewardShip program, and gives you free shipping on every order for a full year with no purchase minimum.New customers can also take $20 off orders of $50+ with the code "GIVING20".Shipping cost: Varied and based on the number of bottles and the size and weight of your orderRead about more places to buy wine onlineItalian Wine Gift Set$49.99 FROM WINE.COMOriginally $64.00 | Save 22%The best place to buy indie wine onlineNakedWines/InstagramNakedWines.com lets you support independent winemakers around the world and you'll receive big discounts so you can stock your wine supply for less.If you're interested in getting to know the winemaker behind each of your bottles, you'll love NakedWines.com, which specializes in lifting up independent wine labels around the world. You can become an "Angel" who invests $40 a month directly in up-and-coming winemakers, and in return, you'll get wholesale prices (up to 60% off wine) and a free gift bottle every month. Even if you don't want to become an Angel, you can still shop the large variety of red, white, sparkling, rose, and sweet wine on the site and try the user-friendly filtering system. You can even browse winemaker profiles to hear directly from the source, read customer reviews, and easily shop all the wine from that maker. There's a generous welcome offer of $100 off your introductory case that includes six bottles of reds and whites. For future orders, there is a six-bottle minimum. Shipping cost: $10 for orders under $100. For orders $100 and more, delivery is free — except for Hawaii (+$70) and Alaska (+$130).Read our review of NakedWines.comQuevedo Family Touriga Nacional 2019$14.99 FROM NAKEDWINES.COMThe best place to buy Japanese sake onlineConnie Chen/Business InsiderTippsy is a great way to explore Japanese sake à la carte or through a monthly subscription box.If you've never drunk sake outside of a Japanese restaurant, you're missing out on a whole world of booze. And if part of the reason is that you're not sure what to order or what to pair it with, you might want to sign up for Tippsy. Tippsy is an online store for sake, and it keeps the category from being overwhelming with taste profiles, pairing suggestions, translations of Japanese labels and descriptions, and more. Bottles can be purchased a la carte or through a subscription that arrives one, two, or four times a year. Each box contains six 10-ounce bottles, and your first box comes with a Sake 101 guide with tasting notes, and suggestions on food pairings and even what temperatures to enjoy the sake. This is a great way to expand your palate and knowledge of alcohol without venturing out to a Japanese restaurant.  Currently, you can get $15 flat shipping on all orders, or earn free shipping if you order six or more bottles.Membership cost: Starting at $93/box for subscription, à la carte bottles starting at $10 — Jada Wong Read our review of TippsyTippsy Sake Box$99.00 FROM TIPPSYThe best place to buy beer onlineCraft City/InstagramCraft beer enthusiasts will be happy with Craft City's impressive inventory that tends towards smaller brewery labels. If you have a particular craft beer in mind — maybe you tried it while traveling or you bought it from a store once and never saw it again — chances are that Craft City carries it. It also happens to be a great place to buy other fizzy drinks, like craft kombucha and craft soda. You can enjoy the nation's best craft breweries, from more well-known names like Ballast Point and Allagash to labels you've never heard of. The nice thing is that you can buy single bottles rather than full packs, so you can create a fully customized beer stash. Some of the products include ratings from Beer Advocate and Rate Beer, plus each page tells you exactly how much stock is left and whether you need to act quickly to snatch up your favorites. There's also a cool Product Comparison tool if you're between two beers and want a side-by-side breakdown of their differences. Shipping cost: Based on your specific location, and generally, we found you'll pay between $10 to $16 for ground shipping. Read about more places to buy beer onlineMason Ale Works Cash Stout $13.99 FROM CRAFT CITYThe best on-demand alcohol deliveryDrizly/InstagramFor alcohol delivery within the hour, Drizly provides the most reliable, well-designed, and widely available service. Drizly works with your local liquor stores to get you wine, beer, spirits, and even mixers, snacks, and party supplies quickly. Delivery's free in New York City and only $5 in other areas. Drizly service is available in more than 220 markets nationwide. Stock and pricing really depend on your neighborhood retailer, but you should expect all the big brands and bar essentials, as well as more unique offerings such as craft brews, bottles from local distillers, and exclusive wines. They should cost you the retail price, or a little more, though Drizly also regularly runs deals and promotions to save you some money.Both the website and app are easy to use and you can look at your past purchases to make reordering a breeze. Delivery cost: Free in NYC and $5 elsewhereRead our comparison of Drizly, Minibar, and SauceyHornitos Reposado Tequila 1L$25.99 FROM DRIZLYThe best place to buy alcohol giftsReservebar/InstagramReserveBar is an online luxury spirit and wine store that carries rare bottles, gift sets, and fine drinkware. It's the perfect place to find top-shelf options for special occasions. ReserveBar is an online delivery platform offering everything from bottom- and middle-shelf wine and spirits to the very tippy-top, like Armand de Brignac Blanc de Blancs and Remy Martin Louis XIII.However, since it does charge a premium on common bottles and brands, we recommend going to other sites or your local liquor store for the bottom- and middle-shelf stuff and focusing instead on all the rare vintages and limited offerings — if you have the budget. You'll also find custom engravings, fancy crystal and barware sets, and gift baskets. If you ever want to make someone in your life — be it a partner, relative, or business contact — feel special, ReserveBar's the place to find the best boozy gift. Shipping cost: Shipping is $15-$35 for orders under $149. It's free on orders over $149 with the code SHIP149. Read our review of ReserveBarJohnnie Walker Blue Label$259.00 FROM RESERVE BARThe best spirits subscriptionFlaviar/InstagramFlaviar is an accessible starting point and community for people wanting to expand their experience with spirits, and it offers no shortage of member-exclusive features to dive into and explore.The world of fine and niche spirits can be overwhelming, especially if you're new to the scene. But if you're interested in trying small-batch whiskeys, vodkas, tequilas, and more, personalized spirits subscription service Flaviar is an excellent place to start.In addition to providing quality options (including rare bottles) at great prices, Flaviar also serves as an online community for fellow fans (600,000+ strong) to get together and talk about everything spirits-related. It carries more than 20,000 different spirits and every three months, members can pick out one full-size bottle and a curated Tasting Box filled with various samples. There are many other perks, including member reviews, articles about different spirits, cocktail recipes, and interviews with industry experts. Membership cost: $109 per quarter or $349 per yearRead our review of FlaviarFlaviar Annual Subscription$349.00 FROM FLAVIARThe best wine subscriptionConnie Chen/Business InsiderThe modern wine club model is nearly perfect in Winc's hands, from its large and on-trend bottle variety to its streamlined browsing and customer rating system.Winc is always updating its stock of wine, which it produces based on consumer interests and emerging trends. That means you'll always have something new to look forward to when you do your monthly wine shopping haul. Winc's site is easy to use and browse for different varietals and regions, and you can view member ratings and descriptions for each wine. We also love it because its wines are pretty affordable, ranging from $13 to $32 a bottle. Amateur wine enthusiasts can start with the Palate Profile, which will point them in the right direction of different wines to try. Membership isn't required to order from Winc, though it can save you some money if you regularly consume wine. Right now, new customers can take $20 off four bottles or more.Membership cost: $59.95/month, or order a minimum of three bottles starting at $13/bottle Read our review of WincRead more about the best online wine subscriptionsWinc Wine Subscription$24.95 FROM WINCOriginally $52.00 | Save 52%The best beer subscriptionBeer of the Month ClubBeer of the Month Club has more than 25 years of experience recommending craft beers and uses three criteria — quality, freshness, and variety — to curate its 12-packs. This club has been around since 1994 and is more than familiar with the best craft beers you should know about. Its panel members have some impressive experience up their sleeves, including over 100 collective years in the brewing industry and 500 beers rated every year to bring you only top-tier beers. Beer of the Month currently offers five different membership types: US Microbrewed, US and International Variety, Hop Heads Beer, International Beer, and Rare Beer. You'll get 12 bottles that represent two to four beer styles and breweries, plus profiles and tasting notes. The subscription is aimed at people who want to develop their taste in beer or simply find it too time-consuming to do the research and work themselves.Right now, you can save up to $30 off prepaid orders. Use the code "SAVE10" for $10 off a 4-shipment order, "SAVE15" for $15 off a prepaid 6-shipment order, and "SAVE30" for $30 off a prepaid 12-shipment order. Membership cost: $29.95-$38.95 a month, plus $15 shipping. Beer of the Month Club Subscription$31.95 FROM BEER OF THE MONTH CLUBCheck out our other great guidesWince FacebookThe best places to buy beer online, from local delivery services to monthly subscriptionsThe best places to buy alcohol online — from general online liquor stores to monthly wine delivery servicesThe best wine subscriptions we've triedThe best Champagne and sparkling wine you can buy onlineThe best drinking glassesThe best wine openers and corkscrewsThe best cocktail shakersThe best wine glassesRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytNov 19th, 2021

Buchanan: Kyle Rittenhouse, Both Right And Righteous

Buchanan: Kyle Rittenhouse, Both Right And Righteous Authored by Patrick J. Buchanan via buchanan.org (emphasis ours), And what were the motives and goals of Joseph Rosenbaum, the child rapist and ex-con, and Anthony Huber, who wielded the skateboard? What were they doing in Kenosha, if not helping to sustain a criminal riot to destroy property Rittenhouse had come to defend? In judging the actions of Kyle Rittenhouse, set aside for the moment Wisconsin law under which he is being tried, and consider the natural law, the moral law, the higher law written on the human heart. In terms of values demonstrated and the deeds done that night that Rittenhouse shot the three men who attacked him, who was on the righteous side? Consider what Rittenhouse did that night of Aug. 25, 2020, and why. Watching on television the nightly riots in Kenosha, Wisconsin, a town 20 miles from his home in Antioch, Illinois, that he knew well, Rittenhouse decided to go to Kenosha to protect property that embattled police had been unable to defend during the riots. For protection, he picked up the AR-15 that he kept in Kenosha. Toward midnight, Rittenhouse was confronted by Joseph Rosenbaum, an ex-con twice his age. Rosenbaum threatened Rittenhouse, backed him into a corner and tried to grab the barrel of his rifle. When a shot rang out nearby, Rittenhouse shot four times within a single second. When Rosenbaum fell, Rittenhouse took off running, looking for the police to turn himself in, with a mob in hot pursuit. Out of that mob, an assailant hit him in the head, knocking his hat off. Rittenhouse fell on the street. Another rioter jumped, kicked and stomped his head on the concrete pavement. Another hit him in the head with a skateboard. Another man confronted him with a loaded pistol and aimed it at Rittenhouse’s face from a few feet away. Rittenhouse shot and killed Anthony Huber, who had hit him with the skateboard and was grabbing his gun barrel, and wounded the man holding the gun to his face. When Rittenhouse shot both men, he was still on the ground. While Rittenhouse’s decision to go to Kenosha may have been unwise, it was also unselfish and, indeed, brave. He was risking his life in a riot to defend another man’s property and do his civic duty in a situation of lawlessness. He could have stayed home, as almost everyone in Kenosha did that night, while their city was burned and pillaged. And what were the motives and goals of Joseph Rosenbaum, the child rapist and ex-con, and Anthony Huber, who wielded the skateboard? What were they doing in Kenosha, if not helping to sustain a criminal riot to destroy property Rittenhouse had come to defend? “Why was he there? I have no answer. I ask myself that question every day,” said Rosenbaum’s fiancee about that night. Again, whatever one thinks of Rittenhouse’s entering a volatile situation, he emerges as one of the good guys. His actions were taken for commendable goals, whereas his assailants’ purposes were to engage in a criminal rampage and riot. This is why Rittenhouse is being so fiercely defended. People sense that whatever he did, the 17-year-old went to Kenosha to do the right thing. Those who believe the Black Lives Matter-antifa riots were justified are the ones who want Rittenhouse to spend the rest of his life in prison — for shooting rioters who were threatening and attacking him for interfering with their crimes. Sensing Rittenhouse has the country behind him, media efforts have been mounted to find a racial element in Rittenhouse’s motivation. President Joe Biden implied that the Kenosha shootings were the work of white supremacists. The president’s statement was as ignorant as it was malicious. Rittenhouse is white. All three men he shot are white. His defense attorney and the prosecutor are white. The trial judge is white. Only Rosenbaum is recorded as having used the N-word that night during what was billed as a BLM protest for racial justice. Under Wisconsin law, the issue comes down to self-defense. Did Rittenhouse fire his AR-15 because he believed, with reason, that he might suffer death or serious bodily harm if he did not? Or did he provoke the rioters into attacking him so he could run up a body count, as the prosecution alleges? Shooting the individual who put the loaded pistol in Rittenhouse’s face was surely self-defense. And, according to testimony, Rosenbaum and Huber both sought to grab the barrel of the AR-15 to pull it away, in which case Rittenhouse would have been at their mercy, and possibly dead. The judge has expanded the range of charges of which Rittenhouse may be convicted, giving the jury a menu of lesser charges if they do not believe that Rittenhouse was guilty of “intentional homicide.” The prosecution has described Rittenhouse as an “active shooter,” calling to mind the Las Vegas gunman who massacred dozens of people at a music concert by firing from his hotel room. But a 17-year-old running from a mob and shooting while sitting on the ground and being attacked scarcely fits the description of an “active shooter.” Kyle Rittenhouse used his rifle to protect someone else’s property and his own life. He was both righteous and in the right. They were in the wrong. Tyler Durden Fri, 11/19/2021 - 13:05.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytNov 19th, 2021

What is Vegan Wine? An Essential Guide for Plant-Based Wine Lists

Increasing interest from wine drinkers has inspired wineries to certify their wines as vegan. Here are some to savor Outspoken Italian winery owner Sebastiano Cassia Castiglioni is a wine pioneer in the plant-based food movement. He turned vegetarian at age 15, eventually went fully vegan, and more than a decade ago extended that commitment to Querciabella, his now-organic and biodynamic Chianti Classico family estate. “I didn’t want to be part of the way conventional agriculture devastates the environment and abuses animals,” he says. “We removed all animal products from every aspect of our winemaking process, including the vineyards. You don’t need them to make great wine.” The proof is in his reds and pricy white, which have steadily become livelier, more vibrant, and more intense. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] As everyone knows, the plant-based trend is booming. In the U.S., sales of vegan groceries, such as replacements for milk and meat, grew 27% from 2020 to 2021, according to data from Spins, a wellness-focused technology company, and the nonprofit Good Food Institute. U.K. supermarket chain Sainsbury’s recent Future of Food report predicted that fully 25% of the country’s population will be vegan or vegetarian by 2025. Health concerns are one reason, eco-consciousness is another. The U.K.’s Vegan Society says the diet will reduce your food carbon footprint by up to 50%. In May, one of New York’s top restaurants, Eleven Madison Park, announced that its food menu would go almost entirely vegan. You may be wondering how wines fit into a philosophy that opposes eating meat, dairy, and eggs and tries to avoid the exploitation of animals. It’s just fermented grape juice, right? Isn’t that automatically vegan? Well, not necessarily. Here’s what you need to know: Some winemakers still use traditional animal-derived “fining” agents such as egg whites, gelatin, or casein (derived from milk) to clarify the liquid, reduce bitterness, or bind and extract excess tannins in red wines, leaving behind softer ones. The agents are removed before bottling, but their use is still a vegan no-no. Today, animal-free alternatives, such as bentonite, a form of clay, are more commonly used. But it’s hard to identify which wines use what, since neither the EU nor the U.S. requires ingredients or winemaking processes to be listed on labels. Just because a wine is organic, biodynamic, natural, or kosher doesn’t mean it’s also vegan. One hint: If the front or back label says the wine is unfined, it’s vegan friendly—if you define vegan as simply not introducing animal products into the wine itself. Helpfully, major retailers in the U.K., like Bibendum, now publish the names of these vegan wines online. The Barnivore Vegan Alcohol Directory lists more than 5,000, but it isn’t always up to date. Increasing interest from wine drinkers has inspired wineries to certify their wines as vegan, entitling them to put an official trademark on their back labels. Larry Stone, co-founder of Lingua Franca, says the top Oregon winery did it “because it’s important to so many people to verify our wines have no animal by-products.” (All those in the list below are certified.) But there’s a big catch to all this. The definition of vegan wine is blurry, with certification covering only what happens to wines after the grapes have been harvested. The European Vegetarian Union doesn’t give its V-label to bottled wines sealed with beeswax. But it does certify producers that fertilize vines with animal manure, something that those embracing a wider vegan philosophy than just dietary choices object to. Such traditional biodynamic practices, such as burying a cow horn filled with manure, are considered non-vegan. Querciabella’s completely animal-free, vineyard-to-glass approach isn’t the norm for wineries with vegan certification. Still, the U.S.’s first all-vegan wine subscription club and online wine shop, veganwines.com, claims to ensure that its winemakers aren’t using any animal by-products, from soil to bottle. When in doubt, consult a winery’s website or call it for further information. A few restaurants are beginning to identify vegan-friendly wines on their lists with some sort of symbol (such as a green leaf, or sometimes just the letters V or Veg). Gautier Soho in London, which transitioned to an all-vegan menu in June, offers only vegan wines. New York’s Eleven Madison Park, which drew wide attention for the plant-based menu it debuted in June, doesn’t quite describe itself as “vegan.” The wine list, which features several Bordeaux châteaux that fine with egg whites, such as Château d’Armailhac, is decidedly not vegan. Wine director Watson Brown says his goal is not to adjust the wine program but to offer the highest quality wines possible; he says many are inherently vegan but not necessarily labeled so. When consumers request a vegan wine, sommeliers steer guests to regions and producers that don’t fine their wines. You don’t have to learn a new set of rules to match vegan wine and food. Mushroom risotto works just as well with a vegan pinot noir as with a conventional one. There are two main principles. Since vegan food doesn’t include butter or animal fat, wines with less oak, alcohol, and tannin tend to match best. Texture and cooking methods are all-important. Roasted beets or grilled cabbage both taste great with red wines. Nine Certified Vegan Wines to Savor Sparkling NV Champagne Leclerc-Briant Brut Reserve This revived Champagne house, noted for such quirky innovations as aging Champagnes 60 meters below sea level and maturing wine in a barrel lined with gold, has a long biodynamic history. This non-vintage cuvée is bold and intense, with aromas of golden delicious apples and fresh croissants. White 2019 Babich Headwaters Organic Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc Pure and vibrant, this white comes with orange blossom aromas and tangy citrus and herbal flavors. The winery claims its grapes aren’t touched by animal-based fertilizers or sprays. Serve with salads or asparagus. 2020 Miguel Torres Cordillera de los Andes Chardonnay Grapes from northern Chile’s cool Limari Valley go into this fine-boned, spicy-smoky white from eco-conscious producer Torres. It’s crisp and savory, with a ripe, creamy texture that pairs well with vegetarian risotto. 2017 Domaine Wachau Riesling Terrassen Federspiel An entry-level white from one of Austria’s top large estates, this bright, fresh, dry Riesling exudes a zesty lime and peachy fruitiness. It makes a top partner to a cauliflower curry. Rosé 2020 Chateau Sainte Marguerite Love Provence Rose Salmon-colored and delicate, this refreshing, silky-textured organic cru classé rosé is a blend of mostly grenache and cinsault. Pair it with Vietnamese vegan spring rolls or a tofu tortilla. Red 2019 CVNE Organic Rioja This new wine from an historic Spanish producer has bold fruit flavors and a mineral finish, ideal with a bean or lentil chili. 2016 Querciabella Chianti Classico This super-classic, polished Chianti from an exceptional vintage has pure tart cherry flavors and rose petal aromas. Try this with grilled vegetables, and look also for the outstanding Chianti Riserva and expensive pricy white, Batar. 2018 Lingua Franca Avni Pinot Noir The winery’s pinots have been vegan since the second vintage, 2017. This one is fragrant and juicy—especially delicious with earthy mushroom dishes or roasted beets. 2019 Vietti Barbera d’Asti Loaded with fruit and energy, this bright, tangy red from a top producer has the kind of acidity that goes well with tomatoes. Try this one with vegan pizza. 2016 Avignonesi Vino Nobile di Montepulciano Savory, rich, and suave, with dark berry and tobacco aromas, this wine comes from a Tuscan estate that is also certified as biodynamic. It’s a good match for baked eggplant......»»

Category: topSource: timeNov 19th, 2021

The 7 best rice cookers we tested in 2021

If you eat rice often, a rice cooker is an invaluable tool, since cooking rice on the stove can be finicky. Here are the best rice cookers of 2021. Su-Jit Lin/InsiderTable of Contents: Masthead Sticky I researched 30 and tested 15 rice cookers to find the seven best. A lesser-known product by Yum Asia delivered flawless results across all four tests, besting well-loved brands. Read more about how the Insider Reviews team tests kitchen products.  If you've ever tasted "plain" rice and thought it was boring, I have a revelation for you: it may not be the rice. It might just be how you cooked it. Rice a staple food for countless cultures around the world, and not for nothing. It's inexpensive, filling, nutritious, and rich with subtle nuances, layers of flavor, and lovely distinctive fragrances — when prepared properly. And for that, you need a good rice cooker.Growing up in a Chinese-American family, rinsing rice for the family cooker was probably the first kitchen task I was ever given, even before I ever stirred cake batter. And having been raised in my parents' Chinese restaurant, where commercial rice cookers were an integral part of the business, it's no surprise I grew up sensitive to what constitutes good, acceptable, and bad rice. The princess and the pilaf, essentially; a pickiness I've leveraged as a food writer, product reviewer, and author of several rice cooker references and guides.However, none I've written have been as comprehensive as this one right here, for which I researched 30 rice cookers, home-tested a whopping 15, and distilled it down to the seven best based on grain type, preparation, and other factors important to both Eastern and Western rice aficionados.Here are the best rice cookers you can buy in 2021Best rice cooker overall: Yum Asia Panda 3.5-Cup Mini Rice CookerBest budget rice cooker: Aroma ARC-1126SBL 20-Cup SmartCarb MulticookerBest mini rice cooker: Black + Decker 3-Cup Rice CookerBest large capacity rice cooker: Zojirushi Neuro Fuzzy Rice CookerBest rice cooker for long-grain rice: Zojirushi UMAMI Micom Rice Cooker & Warmer NL-GAC10Best rice cooker for brown rice: Cuckoo CR-0632F 6-Cup Multifunctional Micom Rice CookerBest rice cooker for porridge: Aroma MTC-8008 Professional 8-Cup ChampagneBest rice cooker overallSu-Jit Lin/InsiderThe Panda 3.5-Cup Mini Rice Cooker from lesser-known brand Yum Asia blew me away with flawless rice through every test.Rice capacity (uncooked): 3.5 cupsRice capacity (cooked): about 7 cupsFuzzy Logic: YesPros: Detachable power cord, clear easy-view display, straightforward operation, sleek design, compact footprint, precision settings, 24-hour keep warm setting, included extra accessoriesCons: Top doesn't detach for cleaning, strong spring-back in the lid, inner pot markings are not high-contrast, only one set of water lines, quick rice setting is only for white riceThere's so much to love about this unassuming little powerhouse, it's hard to know where to start. Right out of the box, its tidy design and thoughtful details — like an included steamer basket and ladle; a handle on the measuring cup; and glossy magazine-style guide — earned immediate points. A detachable cord for neat self-storage, built-in carrying handle, minimal but easy-to-understand display, built-in spatula holder, and well-considered cook settings made it clear that functionality was a focus. The fact that it had different programs for long- or short-grain rice as well as brown rice, porridge, quick and slow cooking, steam, and even cake functions spoke to precision, which it delivered during my testing.  It cooked all four rice types perfectly — a remarkable feat. Every grain was well defined and evenly cooked all the way through. Every batch was moist but not wet; gemmy but not dry; sweet and aromatic. The only test in which the rice lost structure was as a porridge, which is to be expected, as you trade texture for extruded flavor. I loved that the countdown timer for the Keep Warm setting began right away by the minute, while most others only track time by the hour. The Keep Warm setting was gentle and the rice resisted developing any hard crustiness. Even better, as a small- to medium-capacity cooker, it's quick about its job, taking around half an hour for white rice, just under an hour for brown, and an hour and a half for porridge.Best budget rice cookerSu-Jit Lin/InsiderDespite being an older model (and one I've used for years), the Aroma SmartCarb Multicooker outperformed more expensive models in texture and taste.Rice capacity (uncooked): 10 cupsRice capacity (cooked): 20 cupsFuzzy Logic: NoPros: SmartCarb feature, large capacity, many included accessories, sauté-then-simmer capability, Keep Warm countdown begins immediately, eight one-touch programs, available in smaller 12-cup sizeCons: Non-removable lid is hard to clean, components like steamer vent and condensation catcher tend to pop off, condensation catcher eventually leaks, inner pot prone to scratching and denting, stainless steel SmartCarb basket is not nonstick, big for smaller householdsThis jack-of-all-trades multicooker has certainly mastered one: chewy, toothsome rice that retains its fragrance and flavor. It boasts a variety of other capabilities, including the Aroma brand's trademarked sauté-then-simmer technology and its headlining SmartCarb ability, which elevates the rice above the cooking water after boiling, preventing the starchy water from being reabsorbed and therefore cutting the carbohydrate content. (This feature sounds too good to be true, and unfortunately, it is. The rice texture ends up being too soft and grains blown out on this setting.)This model earned its ranking as the best budget workhorse for the quality and taste of its regularly cooked rice, a task at which it aces. This is even more notable as it's a more old-fashioned cooker, a "dumb" one despite having "smart" in the name. Unlike the other advanced cookers ruling this list, it's not a micom (microcomputerized) appliance. By relying on sensors that trigger "done" via the sudden temperature spike as the last of the water evaporates, rice (especially brown rice) comes out on just the right side of al dente. On the other hand, the fluctuations of the Fuzzy Logic micom cookers, which dynamically adjust the temperature as the rice cooks, actually have a tendency to overcook brown rice.White rice is ready to eat as soon as you crack open the lid, sweet and steam-cooked rather than boiled. And if you want to wait a bit, its 12-hour Keep Warm function does its job well for about three hours before the steam catcher traps more moisture than it returns to the rice.Best mini rice cookerSu-Jit Lin/InsiderIf you just need a cheap monotasker for one or two people, this bargain buy from Black + Decker is just right.Rice capacity (uncooked): 1.5 cupsRice capacity (cooked): 3 cupsFuzzy Logic: NoPros: Really inexpensive, detachable clip-on lid, just the basics, cooks quicklyCons: Looks flimsy, design creates boil-over and burn risk, hard to read water markings, outer body gets very hot, rice hardens quickly and is hard to scoop out, no Keep Warm timer, no display at all, no audible notificationsBeating out much pricier and much more advanced mini models, this child's toy-looking, basic one-setting, one-button, entry-level rice cooker resulted in surprisingly acceptable rice. The quality of its results came nowhere near any of the others on this list, but for a household of one that's short on storage space and long on thrift, this utilitarian mono-tasker does its job cheerfully and quickly. It relies on an old-fashioned temperature trip sensor to determine when the rice is done; the only audio cue you'll get is the flip of the switch as it changes from Cooking to Keep Warm settings. Like with other "dumb" rice cooker models, it's important to be patient and give the rice at least 15 minutes of resting time before it really is ready. If you try to eat the rice right away, you'll find it still quite wet and undercooked. Give it that rest, though, and your patience will be rewarded with sweet, chewy medium-grain rice that offers that lovely semi-translucent, gemmy look. We had less successful results with other types of rice: long-grain rice got soft but at least avoided mushiness; and brown rice was flavorful but on the under-done side. Its minuscule size also comes with natural cons. It accommodates only a mere 1.5-cup maximum of raw rice, which doesn't give you a whole lot of room to maneuver, especially while rinsing the rice since the inner pot was roughly the size of my (small) fist. There are also a few burn risks in the design: the lightweight inner pot makes it unstable, forcing you to grip it when scooping out rice, and the vent in the lid concentrates the steam in a sharp plume. However, I did appreciate the clip-on feature of the detachable lid, and the fun of being able to monitor the status of the rice visually through the glass top. Its ease of cleaning and the end taste of the rice is how it won over other small options.Best large capacity rice cookerSu-Jit Lin/InsiderThe gold standard of rice cookers, the legendary Zojirushi Neuro Fuzzy is now available in double its original capacity.Rice capacity (uncooked): 10 cupsRice capacity (cooked): 20 cupsFuzzy Logic: YesPros: Precision settings for nearly every type of rice, detachable inner lid and rounded nonstick inner pot for easy cleaning, well-marked guidelines, choice of textures for customizable riceCons: Looks dated with its huge buttons, so many choices can feel overwhelming for inexperienced users, brown rice cooks too soft Though we tested the 5.5 cup version, the larger 10 cup model of this classic cooker is identical in everything but size, with thoughtful design and usability details that make it incredibly intuitive.The retractable cord, for instance, is such a simple but brilliant solution, as is the dual-sided rice paddle holder, soft-open lid, and easy-grip handles on the sides of the inner pot. In fact, I could devote an entire paragraph to this inner pot, which has a rounded bottom that makes rinsing the grains, scooping the cooked rice, and cleaning up a breeze. The pot also features high-contrast water markings for different types of rice to ensure precision.Most importantly, though, is how good the rice comes out and how it maintains that level of quality for hours after the rice is done. Rice porridge emerged glistening in a thick, pleasantly tacky suspension, soft but retaining a hint of a bite. Medium-grain rice comes out absolutely beautifully — chewy, polished, pearly, fully formed, uniformly cooked, and with a lovely enhanced sweetness few other cookers could match. The long-grain rice was fragrant, fully distinct, evenly cooked, but fluffy with unmatched airiness.In both white rice tests, the rice was better after 24 hours on Keep Warm than fresh-cooked rice from some of the other cookers, with minimal deterioration and no clumping or crust. The brown rice setting was its only underperformer due to the program's long cook time, which made the rice soft and blown out.Best rice cooker for long-grain riceSu-Jit Lin/InsiderThe Zojirushi UMAMI Micom Rice Cooker & Warmer NL-GAC10 is a stylish cooker and a bit of a splurge, but you assuredly get what you pay for, especially if you primarily cook long-grain rice.Rice capacity (uncooked): 5.5 cupsRice capacity (cooked): 11 cupsFuzzy Logic: YesPros: Sleek design, easy to read display, easy to use, clearly marked water lines for nearly all programs, hyper-specific settings, compact footprint, removable inner lid, extended Keep Warm, sturdy handle, detachable cord, included steamer basket, ambidextrous spatula holderCons: Keep Warm countdown doesn't start right away, so many choices can feel overwhelming for inexperienced users, brown rice cooks too soft This microcomputerized (micom) cooker has incredibly precise and detailed cooking settings. I appreciated the jasmine rice setting, a nod to the delicate structure of this long-grain cultivar. The batch I made on this setting was perfect from the get-go, with distinct, intact grains that were chewy and only got sweeter with time on the Keep Warm setting. The batch even held strong for over 66 hours without any significant degradation. It also performed remarkably with medium grains, too. They came out flawless: chewy, gem-like, moist, airy, and with no soggy or wet spots, retaining their character for 14 hours. The UMAMI setting that gives this model its name extends soaking and steaming to coax out more sweetness and subtleties in the rice. However, I do not advise using it on brown rice. The extended cook made it soft, wet, and blown out.Best rice cooker for brown riceSu-Jit Lin/InsiderSmart rice cookers tend to overthink and therefore overcook brown rice, but the Cuckoo CR-0632F 6-Cup Multifunctional Micom Rice Cooker nailed the cook on this tough grain.Rice capacity (uncooked): 6 cupsRice capacity (cooked): 12 cupsFuzzy Logic: YesPros: Keep Warm timer starts immediately, My Mode features for personalized flavor and textures, attractive coffee-colored inner pot, longer power cord, built-in spatula holder, cleans easilyCons: Overcooks white rice, significant bounce-back in lid operation, water line markings are hard to read, no handle, condensation catcher can leakWith all this talk of soaking brown rice, you'd think that the cookers who do it longest would make the best. I did. But after extensive testing, I found that extended soaking broke down the bran a bit too much, resulting in a mushier bite rather than the firm, gemmy one that comes with perfect rice. Plus, you lose the popcorn element that's so distinctive to brown rice — one of the greatest pleasures of it.  With this cooker, though, a propensity for cooking softer, mushier white rice benefited its brown rice execution. Although there's a hint of hot-heat scorch to the rice if you eat it as soon as it's done, it mellows after a few minutes of resting to a pleasant toasted nutty richness. This cooker blooms the grains visibly, but stops short of any blow-out. It breaks down the bran just enough to make it more easily digestible without compromising the chew. Every bite of brown rice from this cooker showcased the best qualities of this type of rice. Grains remained fully distinct, avoiding any kind of clumping, crusting, or wetness for a shocking 50 hours on Keep Warm. Plus, it also has a setting for GABA rice, a sprouted variety of brown rice with purported nutritional benefits. Get this cooker if brown rice is your primary pick, and just use less water than marked on the occasions you make white rice.Best rice cooker for porridgeSu-Jit Lin/InsiderIf you're partial to a thick, pureed porridge with country-style lumps, the low and slow cook of the Aroma MTC-8008 Professional 8-Cup Champagne model will give you what you want. Rice capacity (uncooked): 8 cupsRice capacity (cooked): 16 cupsFuzzy Logic: YesPros: Elegant design, thick inner pot, reheat feature, cake and soup features, turbo convection, detachable inner lid, many accessories, high-contrast markings, two-year warrantyCons: Drips and holds onto a lot of condensation, lid rebounds heavily, rice dries out faster than most on Keep Warm settingIn this cooker, soft lumps of broken down rice grains settle at the bottom and reattach to one another if undisturbed, providing pleasant glutinous bites reminiscent of underdeveloped mochi. Working this bottom layer back results in a creamy finished product in a luxuriously thick liquid suspension, which formed as the starches were gradually extruded into the rice water. While the grains broke down significantly, the nuances of the high-quality short-grain rice used weren't lost. All of the flavor elements become concentrated into what became not a mush, but a smooth slurry.  Porridge is best slightly cooled, in my opinion, getting sweeter and more textured, and the near suctioning power of the condensation and steam catcher of this cooker keeps it from getting watered down. Unfortunately, this characteristic is what caused it to perform very poorly in keeping other rice types warm. It catches and holds onto a lot of moisture, which gathers annoyingly in the inner lid and pours into the channel around the inner pot. This is likely why all of the batches of solid rice cooked very wet and patchily, and needed to be tossed after cooking to better distribute the remaining water. Its turbo convection power is supposed to help it cook more evenly, but we didn't find that to be the case. However, the rice is decent and this is the best pick if you prioritize porridge or congee.What else we testedSu-Jit Lin/InsiderWe tested more than a dozen rice cookers, and while many were able to do an adequate job, there were inherent design or performance flaws that made them less recommended. What else we recommend and why:GreenLife Go Grains Rice Cooker ($49.99): It's hard not to like a cooker this cartoon-cute, plus it's one of the only tiny rice cookers featuring micom Fuzzy Logic. Unfortunately, it consistently cooked every type of rice too dry and condensation puddled up around the rim, which made for a bothersome cleanup. It was a close call between this and the Black & Decker for best small capacity rice cooker, but ultimately, the cleanup decided it. Instant Pot Zest 8-Cup Rice Cooker ($39.00): Powered by a cult-favorite brand but using the traditional boil-and-steam method as opposed to pressure, this multicooker seemed initially promising. It yielded wet rice, which is a quirk folks can learn to work with by customizing their water fill, but the nuances of sweetness were lost in a flat boiled taste. However, it's a great size and a budget buy for entry-level cookers.What we don't recommend and why:Tiger JAX-S18U-WY 10-Cup Micom Rice Cooker & Warmer ($139.95): White rice cooked in this oversized model quickly degraded in structure. Obvious hot spots made results even more inconsistent. Minor inconveniences such as a freestanding rice spatula holder that created clutter and a fixed inner lid showed inadequate attention to detail. Hamilton Beach Advanced Multi-Function Fuzzy Logic 37570 ($109.99): Unlike the others, this micom rice cooker had a great visual chart that allowed you to track the progress of your rice. A shame, then, that the machine had the most uneven, haphazard cook of all of the products tested, yielding a soggy lower layer, dry and crusty top layer, and mushy grains in the center of the bowl. JINGTIEDA Small Rice Cooker Portable ($79.99): A tidy design with more digital features than most cookers of similar size, this rice cooker performed acceptably with long-grain rice but undercooked medium-grain rice. Its biggest flaw was a Keep Warm setting that made the rice hard, dehydrated, and inedible in mere hours. COMFEE Asian Style Programmable Multi-Cooker ($57.09): There was no getting away from having to constantly stir and manipulate the rice in this cooker; it cooked to various textures in layers, making for incredibly inconsistent batches. The bottom was always soggy and the top too dry, while the opposite was true for brown rice, which scalded. Our rice cooker testing methodologySu-Jit Lin/InsiderOver the course of over a month, I tested 13 rice cookers and evaluated them using the criteria:Cooking riceRegardless of the type of rice or preparation, I tested one measure above the minimum. For example, if the lowest marker was for 1 cup of raw rice, I tested with 2 cups; if it was for 2 cups, I tested with 3. I chose these measurements since cooking the minimum would increase the likelihood of a dry batch and maxing out the capacity would result in a wetter one.White rice: I used each rice cooker to prepare medium-grain Nishiki white rice to test liquid penetration and Thai jasmine rice to test flavor and structural preservation. Every batch was hand-rinsed five times and none were soaked prior to cooking. Brown rice: Rice cookers that performed well at white rice advanced to a final round where I tested mixed grain brown rice, a blend of brown medium-grain and brown jasmine, using the default brown rice setting.Porridge: For the rice cookers that offered this specific setting, I tested authentic Koshihikari short-grain rice for porridge/congee.Cook timeAlthough some rice cookers were equipped with Quick Rice functions, I ignored these in favor of the traditional preparation time to keep the test results fair. The faster the rice cooker could do its job on a standard setting without compromising the structure of the grains, the better.Keep Warm functionI taste-tested each batch of rice immediately after cooking, 30 minutes after cooking, then longer intervals of hours — up to 66 hours after cycle completion — to investigate how well the cooker protected the rice against crusting, yellowing, or hardening.DesignIn this all-encompassing criterion, I took note of everything from overall aesthetic to user experience, including controls, ease of use and cleaning, and overall look and feel. Functional necessities such as a carrying handle, delay timer, rice spatula holder, and bonus accessory materials were also major plusses.What to consider when buying a rice cookerSu-Jit Lin/InsiderAll rice cookers will cook rice, plain and simple. But the best rice cookers will have certain default features that will extract the most out of every grain. Here's what to look for in a rice cooker:Lid: Airtight, sealed tops help the aroma of fragrant rice types like jasmine and basmati bloom, as well as prevent rice from drying out on the Keep Warm setting.Smart functions: Micom, or microcomputerized rice cookers, are best for those who don't limit their pantries to just one type or preparation of rice. These smart rice cookers have different settings for each type of rice, so that you get consistent results each time. All Fuzzy Logic-marked rice cookers are equipped with this technology.Features: In an advanced rice cooker, audible indicators and digital countdowns make cooking even more effortless. Removable inner lids are also a great feature for easy cleaning. A spatula holder minimizes mess, and easy-to-grip handles simplify clean up even further. Finally, high contrast, water line markers will save a lot of frustration and help to guarantee success. Extras: Some rice cookers only come with a rice cup and paddle. Others include steamer baskets, ladles, spatula holders, scrapers, and other extras. If you're planning to use your rice cooker as an all-in-one cooking device, you may want to look for a model that contains extras.Capacity: A mere half rice cup of raw rice, three ounces, is considered one serving, with a yield of a full cup of cooked rice. A tiny, single-serving rice cooker might be fine if you're cooking for just one, but if you're cooking for a family, you'll want a rice cooker that makes at least 5 cooked cups of rice.Rice cooker safety tipsRice cookers are immensely easy to operate and even safer than cooking rice on a stovetop. That said, as with all small electronic appliances, you'll want to play it safe with some basic guidelines:"Dishwasher safe" typically only applies to the inner pot and accessory items. Never, ever immerse the outer electronic casing of the cooker in water.When grabbing the lid or standing near an active rice cooker, never put your hand or face over the steam vent. The concentrated direct blast can cause real injury.Remember that the inner pot is meant to retain heat. When you're done cooking, give it time to cool down before you handle it, and approach it with hand protection to avoid burn risk.If the cooker doesn't come with a spatula holder, it might be tempting to leave the rice paddle in with the rice. Don't. Rce paddles and accessories are often made of plastic, which can melt or leach plastics with extended and direct contact with heat.Because rice cookers work with so much moisture, it's important to keep them clean to avoid mold and bacterial breeding. Clean out the steam vent and condensation catchers after every use or prepare to be grossed out in the not very distant future. Wash out the inner pot right away and let it fully dry before storing it back in the cooker. And while that's airing out, leave the lid open to let any trapped or pooled moisture evaporate. Guaranteed that even if you wipe the moats, there will be some droplets hiding in the seams and linings you'll want to provide a chance to dissipate.Rice cooker FAQsSu-Jit Lin/InsiderIs a rice cooker worth it? What are its benefits?According to millions of Asians around the world: yes. It's more of a necessity to most Asian households than even a blender or toaster oven, saving significant time, labor, and babysitting over what for many families is a daily chore.It also saves even more time with cleanup, since the nonstick interiors take scrubbing out of the equation, and scorching, too. And while its name might hint at uni-tasking, digital rice cookers take on many uses with aplomb. Even the most basic ones can boil and steam simultaneously. With the more advanced, you can cook yogurt, oatmeal, stew, baby food, and even cake.What is the benefit of using a rice cooker instead of my stove?Rice is extremely absorbent and therefore sensitive to even minuscule variation in water-to-grain proportions, plus sticky to boot, so making rice on a stovetop can be tricky and requires more hands-on work. A rice cooker fully automates the process, so you can just add rice and water, press the cook button, and come back whenever you like to perfectly cooked rice.Can a rice cooker be used as a slow cooker?If it has a slow cooker function, absolutely! Just mind that because those models tend to be airtight; the lining might hold onto the flavor of what you're making, so be sure to clean and air it out thoroughly. We don't recommend attempting to slow cook in a rice cooker without a slow cooker function, however. Can I use a regular measuring cup?It's not recommended. Measuring cups that come with rice cookers are usually 2 ounces less than a standard one cup measure, and typically sized to match the markings on the inner pot of the rice cooker.Incremental measurements can make a noticeable difference when it comes to cooking rice, and if you use a conventional cup measure, the ratios will be off and affect the success of your end result. Hold onto the one that comes with your cooker, and just store it in the inner pot with its accessories to keep it on hand. But if you do happen to misplace it, a standard ¾-cup measure should do the trick with comparable results.How long can I keep rice in a rice cooker?Generally, rice is best consumed 15-45 minutes after cooking. However, that eating window may not work for everyone (or you might have extra you want to save and keep ready for the next meal). Most rice cookers — even the most elementary one-button ones — come equipped with a Keep Warm function that keeps your rice at a food safe temperature for hours after cooking.Ideally, cooked rice should be kept at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or higher on the Keep Warm setting. Different models can maintain that temperature for different amounts of time. The best rule of thumb is to use a thermometer to confirm that the rice is, in fact, being held above 140 degrees.However, keep in mind that the higher the temperature, the higher the risk of dry-out. Many hours spent on Keep Warm causes flavors to dissipate, too. Most manufacturers report 12 hours as the maximum rice should be kept in a rice cooker on the Keep Warm setting.What is the best way to store cooked rice?Allow it to cool and store in an airtight container, then consume it within six days; the extended shelf life if it's stored properly.To buy more time, you can also freeze it, but make sure you cool, package, and freeze it within an hour after cooking to avoid bacterial growth. Bacteria can live through the freezing process, living in suspension only to multiply once you heat back up, picking up right where it left off.What is the best way to reheat cooked rice?When reheating, reconstitute the grains with a sprinkle of water, then cover and microwave. One serving in a bowl will take as little as 35 seconds this way. For bigger batches, some advanced rice cookers have a "reheat" function (many of our top picks do). If not, you can also choose to steam the rice. Can I make rice in an Instant Pot or multicooker?If your household eats rice regularly, it's worthwhile to invest in a dedicated rice cooker that will last you for years. However, rice cookers can be quite expensive and may not be the best option if you only cook or eat rice occasionally. Multicookers like the Instant Pot can be a good alternative if you want a foolproof way to make rice once in a while. They provide excellent value and help maximize storage space by doing the job of more than one small appliance. Most usually have at least one setting for rice and can produce acceptable results.What is Fuzzy Logic?Fuzzy Logic-equipped rice cookers are microcomputerized (micom, for short) rice cookers that have smart settings that allow them to make micro-adjustments dynamically to the temperature and humidity during the cooking process. The most basic rice cookers rely on a one-button switch to cook and will automatically flip via spring mechanism to Keep Warm once the inner plate detects that all water has been absorbed into the rice grains. Fuzzy Logic, on the other hand, allows for more flexibility so that you can set preferences and programs for specific textures and functions. For example, jasmine rice cooks differently than medium-grain rice, which cooks differently than porridge. Fuzzy Logic allows for this variability.These presets are not perfect for all types of rice and preferences (see our note on brown rice in our best budget recommendation), but they're ideally suited for folks who like to change up their grains.Check out our other comprehensive kitchen appliance guidesJames Brains/InsiderThe best Instant Pot and electric pressure cookersThe best toaster ovensThe best air fryersThe best vacuum sealersThe best food processorsThe best ice cream makersThe best Crock-Pot slow cookersRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 18th, 2021

The Rittenhouse Case Proves The Establishment Wants To Bring Back Star Chamber Tyranny

The Rittenhouse Case Proves The Establishment Wants To Bring Back Star Chamber Tyranny Authored by Brandon Smith via Alt-Market.us, One of the most interesting stories from the early days leading up to the American Revolution involves the events surrounding the Boston Massacre. On March 5th, 1770 the Stamp Act had just been repealed but British Soldiers were ever present in Boston as a show of force against the “rowdy” colonists. The British government, in order to save face, implemented the Townshend Acts instead as a means to continue taxing the colonies (without representation, of course). Anger was growing in the streets. The presence of the Red Coats in the city added to the public fury and protests were sparked. One such protest was raging in front of the Custom House on King Street over a disagreement between wig maker Henry Knox and a soldier. The argument grew into what was later described as a riot. Allegedly, the crowd became violent and started throwing objects at the soldiers. One of the soldiers let off a shot and then someone yelled “Fire!”, causing all the Red Coats to shoot into the crowd killing five of them and injuring others. The colonial justice system could have chosen to use their position to railroad the soldiers in question and make an ideological example out of them. Instead, in the first trial of Captain John Preston, ample legal representation was given (the lawyer was John Adams, who would later become the 2nd President of the US), along with a fair trial. Adams’ position that the soldiers believed they were under imminent danger of bodily harm convinced the jury and a not-guilty verdict was given for the majority of the soldiers, with manslaughter charges for two of them. Adams felt that his victory in the defense of the British soldiers was actually a victory for the colonies and ultimately the Revolution. You see, the British looked upon the colonials as “insurrectionists” and barbarians. They did not think that a fair trial for a soldier in the colonies was even possible. By proving them wrong with grace, logic and objectivity, Adams and the jury destroyed a common lie perpetuated by the monarchy and the British establishment. The colonies had more honor than the British did. This lack of honor among the British establishment became evident before and during the Revolutionary War when the “Star Chamber” became the defacto law of the monarchy in the colonies. The Star Chamber was an elitist-operated “justice system” or tribunal originally designed so that the British aristocracy was assured a fair trial whenever they actually faced a criminal charge. In other words, it was a special court for the power elites that was separate and superior to the courts used for average peasants. Publicly, it was also presented as a means for commoners to redress grievances against aristocrats, but it was well understood that the Star Chamber would rarely go against the nobility UNLESS they had also offended the king. If they went against the king, they would be black-bagged like anyone else. During the unrest in the colonies, however, the Star Chamber was used in a different manner; it became a weapon to crush dissent among subjects that spoke out against the empire and sowed the seeds of “sedition”. The dreaded court was highly secretive and the public was often obstructed from its proceedings. Its rulings were overseen by the establishment rather than a jury and in many cases those people being charged were never given a chance to defend themselves. They were sentenced before they ever entered a courtroom, if they entered a courtroom at all. Silence was often considered an admission of guilt rather than a right of the accused. Punishments were brutal, including torture and imprisonment under the worst possible conditions. The death penalty was not allowed, but the court would instead place defendants in conditions so horrible that they tended to die on their own. All of this was justified under the claim that every person charged was treasonous, and therefore they did not deserve a fair trial among their peers. After the war was over and the British were defeated, the Founding Fathers drafted large portions of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights in order to counter and prevent the same abuses they saw under the Star Chamber. The 5th Amendment in particular was directly inspired as a way to stop Star Chamber-like abuses of court power. But lets leap ahead to current day, where we find that the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, now nearing its end, has beyond anything else revealed a vicious intention by the establishment to bring back the oppression of the Star Chamber through the media manipulated court of public opinion, mob rule as well as violations of well established constitutional law. The political left could have chosen the path of reason, allowing justice to take its natural course through a display of objectivity and fairness as John Adams and the colonials did during the Boston Massacre trial. They have instead chosen to take the same route as the British, motivated by a “win at any cost” mentality, using lies, strategic omissions, censorship and threats of mob violence to turn the Rittenhouse trial into a political proxy war. Here are just a handful of examples that show the establishment and the media are seeking to undermine centuries of normal constitutional protections including the right of self defense… The Kenosha “Peaceful Protest” Misdirection First, lets be clear that the media’s handling of the entire Kenosha incident was corrupt from the very beginning. Aside from refusing to call the riots that erupted what they were – RIOTS, the media has also consistently mischaracterized the police shooting as brutality against black suspect Jacob Blake. Blake, crippled by the incident, has been painted as a “victim and hero” in the news. In reality, Blake had a warrant out for his arrest including trespassing, disorderly conduct and sexual assault. The police were made aware of this before they attempted to detain him. Blake also had a history of resisting arrest, and of course attempted to do so again in Kenosha. Videos clearly show Blake trying to march away from officers and jump back into his vehicle. The media claimed Blake was unarmed, yet he is also clearly holding a karambit style knife in the same videos, which the police ordered him to drop and he refused. The Wisconsin DOJ confirmed that Blake was armed and Blake himself admitted to having the knife. Officers were already on edge as Blake tried to reach into his car, or use his car to get away, or possibly use the car as a weapon. Frankly, Blake’s history and behavior at the scene make him a criminal, not a hero or a victim. All this information was readily available within about a day of the event. The media attempted to hide these FACTS surrounding his shooting from the public and deliberately sowed seeds of unrest. And the ignorant and reactionary people within the BLM movement ate up the propaganda. When violence broke out, the media portrayed the riots as “peaceful protests” for “racial justice”. Even though, just as with George Floyd, there was no evidence whatsoever that racial motivations had anything to do with it. The riots were based on lies from beginning to end, and this false narrative has bled into and tainted the handling of the Kyle Rittenhouse case – For even if Rittenhouse was defending himself from attackers, the attackers are still presented as the “good guys” because they were fighting for “racial justice”, which again, is simply not true. The Kid Defending Himself Was Actually The Villain Because He Defended Himself? The prosecution in the Rittenhouse case should have watched the widely available video evidence (and the secret FBI evidence) and seen that without a shadow of a doubt Rittenhouse was defending himself from an unprovoked attack by an unhinged mob. It is no coincidence that every person Rittenhouse was forced to shoot had a violent criminal record, including Joseph Rosenbaum who had multiple convictions for pedophilia including 11 counts of child molestation. These people were chasing Rittenhouse because they intended to do him harm just as they had done others harm. The media and the prosecution offer a bizarrely disconnected view, in which Kyle Rittenhouse “provoked” the mob into attacking him simply because he was there and because he had a firearm. Multiple witnesses and FBI surveillance footage indicate Joseph Rosenbaum chased and then attacked Rittenhouse, trying to take his rifle by force, which was why he was shot. But this does not matter in the Star Chamber. Lead Prosecutor Thomas Binger openly argued that Rittenhouse ‘lost his right to self defense because he was carrying a gun.’ Binger apparently overlooks the fact that one of Rittenhouse’s attackers, Gaige Grosskreutz, had a gun (illegally due to his felony record) and admitted in court that he ran at Rittenhouse with the weapon pointed at him when Rittenhouse shot him. But somehow, only Kyle’s gun was the cause of the violence and all his attackers were responding to the threatening presence of his weapon? This has been the overarching crux of the prosecution’s case as well as the media narrative: They say Rittenhouse should be treated as an “active shooter” and that the leftist mob was leaping into action, bravely trying to stop him. This does not translate at all when we watch the video of the event; it is clear that Rittenhouse is being pursued by the mob and and they attack him from behind, causing him to fall to the ground. Only then does he defend himself with the rifle against his attackers, including Anthony Huber who tried to bash Kyle’s head in with a skateboard and Grosskreutz who ran at him with a Glock. To clarify, because this may not be a widely understood factor, if someone is trying to get away from you, you cannot attack them and then legally claim “self defense” was your motive. Only police officers have the right to physically detain a person who is trying to escape. Also, if Rittenhouse was an “active shooter” you would think he would have fired belligerently into the crowd, but he did not; he only fired on the people trying to hurt him. The prosecution and media narratives are a blatant attack on the right of self defense in general. In closing arguments, the prosecution argued that Rittenhouse was a “coward” that should have used his fists to fight off the angry mob instead of using his rifle; displaying a clear intent to attack not just Rittenhouse, but overall gun rights. The case itself is obviously politically slanted against Rittenhouse because he is a conservative. Had this been a leftist shooting a mob of conservatives under the same circumstances at the Jan 6th riot I doubt it would have ever gone to trial. The implications of this are far reaching. If Rittenhouse is found guilty despite all the evidence to the contrary, the assertion will then be that self defense is no longer a protected right for anyone with the wrong politics. It will be seen as open season on conservatives at any such events in the future and all defense law will come into question, especially any defense law that involves gun rights. The 5th Amendment Attack And The Strategy Of Subverting A Trial Various establishment institutions have been trying to undermine the 5th Amendment and the right to remain silent for decades now. Once again, we saw this evidenced in the Rittenhouse trial when prosecutors sought to attack the defendant on potential evidence that was ostensibly dismissed before the trial by the judge. The prosecution asked questions related to the evidence anyway. The judge removed the jury from the room and then chastised Binger, who then proceeded to question Rittenhouse’s right to remain silent on the issue. This may seem to be overly complicated legal jousting, but this action by the prosecution was an aggressive attempt to taint the jury with misconceptions of the defendant as a violent “vigilante” rather than the victim of a mob attack. Also, questioning a defendant’s right to remain silent is belligerent to say the least. But beyond that, the faux pas by the prosecution could have led to an immediate mistrial declared. Keep in mind that the prosecution had already suffered numerous failures and the case was going downhill for them. I suspect that this may have been an attempt by Binger to deliberately cause a mistrial and to retry Rittenhouse at a later date, undoing his many mistakes and getting another opportunity to bury Rittenhouse despite his innocence. This is how the Star Chamber begins – When you can be tried over and over again until the establishment gets the outcome they wanted. Furthermore, if the right to remain silent comes into question, then any refusal to answer questions could become an assumed admission of guilt. Silencing The Alternative Media And Obstructing Honest Reporting Perhaps the most blatant act by the establishment has been to use Big Tech to censor various elements and observations of the Rittenhouse trial. Facebook and Twitter have been policing Rittenhouse related posts, and YouTube blocked the majority of independent streamers covering the live closing arguments of the case. The mainstream media has completely avoided any mention of this decision, but of course they would; it makes them the only source for case coverage and their narrative the only narrative. And how about that thermal surveillance evidence from the FBI that only saw the light of day in the middle of the trail? Withholding evidence is a direct obstruction of justice but also a direct attempt to undermine public insight into the case. The narrative is easier to fabricate if one filters out any evidence that contradicts it. This control of the narrative has led to widespread disinformation in the Rittenhouse case. There are still many leftists out there that actually think the people Kyle shot were black and that Rittenhouse is a “racist.” The media has asserted for the past year that Rittenhouse’s self defense was somehow related to “white supremacy.” Media hacks like CNN’s Don Lemon have also insinuated that the judge in the case is biased and possibly racist. The media has asserted that if Rittenhouse is not found guilty that riots will erupt once again to provide punishment where the courts “failed.” If riots do explode, it will be because of the misleading and poisonous lies constantly spread by the same mainstream media. But let’s think about the consequences of this for a moment… The Star Chamber is an ideal tyrannical tool, but the establishment and leftists do not have it in hand yet. They want it badly, and their behavior during the Rittenhouse case makes this clear. I REPEAT: The Star Chamber is not upon us yet, but it is coming soon if these people get their way. Rule by the mob goes well beyond the effects of the Star Chamber, but this could be by design. Think of it this way: Say Rittenhouse is found Not Guilty, and BLM mobs burn down Kenosha in response. Future courts and future juries in similar cases might then decide it’s easier to ignore facts and evidence so that mob violence is avoided and the leftists are appeased. The Star Chamber will return because it will be seen as a preferable alternative to national riots. The Star Chamber will become a mechanism for the “greater good” and the establishment will get what it wanted all along. This cannot be allowed to happen. The Rittenhouse trial does not represent a singular shooting event and an isolated case for self defense, it represents a fulcrum point for the very fabric of our society and what justice will actually mean in the years to come. If an obviously innocent kid is convicted of murder merely because of his political beliefs, or if the mob is allowed to burn and destroy swaths of a city because the verdict is Not Guilty, then every effort the Founding Fathers made to stop the creation of another Star Chamber will be erased. *  *  * If you would like to support the work that Alt-Market does while also receiving content on advanced tactics for defeating the globalist agenda, subscribe to our exclusive newsletter The Wild Bunch Dispatch.  Learn more about it HERE. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/17/2021 - 23:40.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 18th, 2021

The 22 most popular books readers are sharing on TikTok, from historical fiction to YA romance novels

From tearjerkers like "They Both Die at the End" to fantasy romances like "A Court of Thorns and Roses," these are the most popular books on TikTok. From tearjerkers like "They Both Die at the End" to fantasy romances like "A Court of Thorns and Roses," these are the most popular books on TikTok.Amazon; TikTok; Rachel Mendelson/InsiderWhen you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. On TikTok, readers share their favorite buzzworthy book recommendations under #BookTok. Here are some of the most popular book recommendations from TikTokers. For more book recs, check out our review of the TikTok-famous YA novel "All the Bright Places." You can find just about everything on TikTok nowadays, from 15-second dances to unsolicited legal advice. Unsurprisingly, it can also be a great place to find your next read. Under the hashtags #BookTok, #BookRecommendations, or simply #Books, users share in-depth review videos, quick lists of favorites, and aesthetically pleasing bookshelf tours to share their favorite book recommendations.   To gather the titles on this list, we watched countless BookTok videos and collected the indisputable favorites from readers on TikTok. Most of the titles that circulate BookTok are gripping and exciting reads that almost any reader would love, from nail-biting thrillers to action-packed fantasy novels. The 22 most popular books on TikTok: 'They Both Die At The End' by Adam SilveraAmaozn"They Both Die At The End" by Adam Silvera, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $8.37TikTokers regularly challenge readers to read "They Both Die At The End" from cover to cover in a single sitting — a feat that's easier than it sounds as soon as you start the book. This heartbreaking young adult novel takes place in a dystopia where people receive a phone call just after midnight on the last day of their lives. When Mateo's phone rings with the dreaded message, he searches for someone with whom he can spend his final hour and meets Rufus.'It Ends With Us' by Colleen HooverAmazon"It Ends With Us" by Colleen Hoover, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $9.47Colleen Hoover is known for her absolutely captivating psychological thrillers like "It Ends With Us" and "Verity," which are both hugely popular on TikTok. "It Ends With Us" follows Lily, who meets a handsome neurosurgeon named Ryle. Though Ryle has an aversion to relationships, he is willing to make an exception for Lily. When questions begin to arise about their relationship as a man from the past emerges, this book becomes unputdownable.'Legend' by Marie LuAmazon"Legend" by Marie Lu, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.68June is a 15-year-old prodigy being groomed as a warrior by the Republic's military, unlikely to cross paths with Day (the country's most wanted criminal) until he becomes a prime suspect for the murder of June's brother. While June seeks revenge, Day is in his own race for his family's survival when the two discover the shocking truth behind the events that brought them together.'The Midnight Library' by Matt HaigAmazon"The Midnight Library" by Matt Haig, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $13.29When Nora feels stuck in life with nowhere to turn, she finds herself in a dreamlike library, where each book on the infinite shelves can transport her to a parallel version of her life, had she made other choices. This fascinating sci-fi/fantasy read has spurred countless discussions on TikTok about whether its message is more inspirational or existential.'The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo' by Taylor Jenkins ReidAmazon"The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo" by Taylor Jenkins Reid, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $9.42"The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo" is an incredible historical fiction novel that reads like a dramatic celebrity interview. Years after her retirement, Hollywood megastar Evelyn Hugo is ready to tell all the details of her crazy life story to one little-known reporter. Known for her seven husbands, Evelyn finally tells the true stories of each marriage and her true love — the story the tabloids never found.'The Song of Achilles' by Madeline MillerAmazon"The Song of Achilles" by Madeline Miller, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.35In this mythical retelling set during the Trojan War, Patroclus is exiled to Phthia after a terrible misunderstanding and meets the prince Achilles. As their friendship turns romantic, Achilles is called to fight in the war against Troy with a terrible prophecy ahead of him.'Such A Fun Age' by Kiley ReidAmazon"Such a Fun Age" by Kiley Reid, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.36One night, when someone calls security on Emira Tucker in a grocery store, they accuse the young Black woman of kidnapping the white toddler she's babysitting. Though the child's mother, Alix Chamberlain, is determined to make things right, an old video brings up someone from her past, setting Alix and Emira on a journey to discover more about themselves and each other than they could have ever known.'From Blood and Ash' by Jennifer L. ArmentroutAmazon"From Blood and Ash" by Jennifer L. Armentrout, available at Amazon, $18.32"From Blood and Ash" is a sexy, action-packed fantasy about Poppy, a Maiden who must live under strict rules until the day of her Ascension. When she sneaks out to meet with a Royal Guard named Hawke, they quickly fall for each other as Poppy begins to unravel the shocking secrets of her kingdom in this novel that ends with a cliffhanger so jarring, readers can't help but immediately reach for the sequel. 'A Little Life' by Hanya YanagiharaAmazon"A Little Life" by Hanya Yanagihara, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $14.99Cherished amongst TikTokers for its emotional and poetic prose, "A Little Life" is an award-winning novel about four friends who move to New York from a small Massachusetts town. As the decades pass, their friendships grow and change yet all seem to be centered around their friend June, still haunted by his traumatic past.'Shatter Me' by Tehereh MafiAmazon"Shatter Me" by Tehereh Mafi, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $8.48Juliette is a 17-year-old with a fatal touch, jailed for murder 264 days ago when she last accidentally touched and killed someone. In this dystopia, people are dying and beginning to rise against the governing Reestablishment, who decides Juliette might be the perfect weapon to fight a rising rebellion.'A Court of Thorns And Roses' by Sarah J. MaasAmazon"A Court of Thorns and Roses" by Sarah J. Maas, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.80TikTok readers cannot stop talking about this steamy fantasy series that began as a "Beauty and the Beast" retelling. When Feyre accidentally kills a faerie, she's dragged to a magical kingdom by a masked captor. Closely guarded, secrets of the faerie lands begin to emerge as Feyre's resentment towards her captor melts from anger to romantic passion.'The Unhoneymooners' by Christina LaurenAmazon"The Unhoneymooners" by Christina Lauren, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $8.44When everyone at Ami's wedding falls ill with food poisoning except maid-of-honor Olive and best man Ethan, the offer to take the newlywed's all-expense-paid honeymoon seems amazing — if Olive and Ethan didn't despise each other. Agreeing to avoid each other, the two run into Olive's new boss on the island and fall into an elaborate lie that might just bring them closer together.'Red, White, and Royal Blue' by Casey McQuistonAmazon"Red, White, and Royal Blue" by Casey McQuiston, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $9.97First Son Alex Diaz has a sworn enemy: Prince Henry of Britain. When the tabloids catch the two teens in an argument, their PR teams decide the best course of action is to stage a fake friendship, which slowly turns into a real one with romantic feelings. When Alex's mom decides to run for re-election, Alex knows that his relationship could ruin her campaign and the boys must decide how much they're willing to risk to be together. 'Shadow and Bone' by Leigh BardugoAmazon"Shadow and Bone" by Leigh Bardugo, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.82"Shadow and Bone" is the first book in not only its own magical trilogy, but the first book in the Grishaverse created by Leigh Bardugo, a hugely popular fantasy universe amongst readers on TikTok. Loved for its unpredictable characters and heightened audiobook experience, this book follows Alina Starkov, a teenage orphan in Ravka, who harnesses a previously unknown power to save her best friend and unwittingly makes herself a target.'The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue' by V.E. SchwabAmazon"The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue" by V.E. Schwab, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $14In 1714, Addie LaRue was a teenager about to be married off to a man she did not love when she struck a cursed deal to live forever yet be forgotten by everyone she met. In this genre-bending novel, Addie's story spans centuries and continents until the day she finally meets someone who remembers her.'We Were Liars' by E. LockhartAmazon"We Were Liars" by E. Lockhart, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $5.98This is a quick, young adult thriller that uses a fragmented narration to build suspense. Cadence and her family spend their summers on a private island where the cousins regularly go on troublesome adventures — until two summers ago, when something tragic happened and changed everything for their family forever.'The Hating Game' by Sally ThorneAmazon"The Hating Game" by Sally Thorne, available at Amazon, $14.39In their shared office space, Lucy Hutton and Joshua Templeman are caught in a series of tense games of one-upmanship, now intensified as they're both up for a promotion. When the tension turns steamy and the two share a kiss in the elevator, Lucy begins to wonder if she's ever hated Joshua after all.'The Inheritance Games' by Jennifer Lynn BarnesAmazon"The Inheritance Games" by Jennifer Lynn Barnes, available at Amazon, $9.89Avery Grambs is just trying to graduate high school when she's mysteriously bestowed an inheritance from billionaire Tobias Hawthorne, a puzzle-loving man she's never even heard of. The catch is Avery must move into his secret passage-filled mansion with Tobias' family: A puzzle to be solved, and a game she'll have to survive.'The House in the Cerulean Sea' by T.J. KluneAmazon"The House in the Cerulean Sea" by T.J. Klune, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $15.06Linus Baker is a caseworker at the Department in Charge of Magical Youth, overseeing extraordinary children who live in government-sanctioned orphanages. When Linus is sent on a highly classified mission to check on a home with six dangerous children, he meets the most fascinating and wonderful group of magical kids, cared for by a charming gentleman with more burning secrets than Linus could imagine.'The Cruel Prince' by Holly BlackAmazon"The Cruel Prince" by Holly Black, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.9910 years ago, Jude and her sisters were stolen away to the High Court of Faerie, detested as humans in a magical faerie land. Desperate to be accepted, Jude must defy the Prince for a chance to win a place at the Court and soon finds herself deeply entangled in a web of violence and deception.'Red Queen' by Victoria AveyardAmazon"Red Queen" by Victoria Aveyard, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $6.98In the "Red Queen" literary universe, the world is divided into Red and Silver: commoners and the magical elite. When Mare Barrow escaped her impoverished Red home to work in the Silver Palace, she and the Silvers discover she has a powerful magical ability of her own, hiding her in plain sight and declaring her a long-lost Silver princess. As she quietly works to help the Red Guard bring down the Silver elite, Mare knows one misstep could easily mean her death.'All The Bright Places' by Jennifer NivenAmazon"All The Bright Places" by Jennifer Niven, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.48Theodore Finch and Violet Markey are each looking for an escape when they meet on the ledge of their school's bell tower. Paired together for a school project, the duo set to discover the natural wonders of their state and instead discover the escape they'd been searching for in each other's company. You can check out a more detailed review of "All The Bright Places" here. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 17th, 2021

The 22 most popular books on TikTok, from historical fiction to YA romance novels

From tearjerkers like "They Both Die at the End" to fantasy romances like "A Court of Thorns and Roses," these are the most popular books on TikTok. From tearjerkers like "They Both Die at the End" to fantasy romances like "A Court of Thorns and Roses," these are the most popular books on TikTok.Amazon; TikTok; Rachel Mendelson/InsiderWhen you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. On TikTok, readers share their favorite buzzworthy book recommendations under #BookTok. Here are some of the most popular book recommendations from TikTokers. For more book recs, check out our review of the TikTok-famous YA novel "All the Bright Places." You can find just about everything on TikTok nowadays, from 15-second dances to unsolicited legal advice. Unsurprisingly, it can also be a great place to find your next read. Under the hashtags #BookTok, #BookRecommendations, or simply #Books, users share in-depth review videos, quick lists of favorites, and aesthetically pleasing bookshelf tours to share their favorite book recommendations.   To gather the titles on this list, we watched countless BookTok videos and collected the indisputable favorites from readers on TikTok. Most of the titles that circulate BookTok are gripping and exciting reads that almost any reader would love, from nail-biting thrillers to action-packed fantasy novels. The 22 most popular books on TikTok: 'They Both Die At The End' by Adam SilveraAmaozn"They Both Die At The End" by Adam Silvera, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $8.37TikTokers regularly challenge readers to read "They Both Die At The End" from cover to cover in a single sitting — a feat that's easier than it sounds as soon as you start the book. This heartbreaking young adult novel takes place in a dystopia where people receive a phone call just after midnight on the last day of their lives. When Mateo's phone rings with the dreaded message, he searches for someone with whom he can spend his final hour and meets Rufus.'It Ends With Us' by Colleen HooverAmazon"It Ends With Us" by Colleen Hoover, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $9.47Colleen Hoover is known for her absolutely captivating psychological thrillers like "It Ends With Us" and "Verity," which are both hugely popular on TikTok. "It Ends With Us" follows Lily, who meets a handsome neurosurgeon named Ryle. Though Ryle has an aversion to relationships, he is willing to make an exception for Lily. When questions begin to arise about their relationship as a man from the past emerges, this book becomes unputdownable.'Legend' by Marie LuAmazon"Legend" by Marie Lu, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.68June is a 15-year-old prodigy being groomed as a warrior by the Republic's military, unlikely to cross paths with Day (the country's most wanted criminal) until he becomes a prime suspect for the murder of June's brother. While June seeks revenge, Day is in his own race for his family's survival when the two discover the shocking truth behind the events that brought them together.'The Midnight Library' by Matt HaigAmazon"The Midnight Library" by Matt Haig, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $13.29When Nora feels stuck in life with nowhere to turn, she finds herself in a dreamlike library, where each book on the infinite shelves can transport her to a parallel version of her life, had she made other choices. This fascinating sci-fi/fantasy read has spurred countless discussions on TikTok about whether its message is more inspirational or existential.'The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo' by Taylor Jenkins ReidAmazon"The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo" by Taylor Jenkins Reid, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $9.42"The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo" is an incredible historical fiction novel that reads like a dramatic celebrity interview. Years after her retirement, Hollywood megastar Evelyn Hugo is ready to tell all the details of her crazy life story to one little-known reporter. Known for her seven husbands, Evelyn finally tells the true stories of each marriage and her true love — the story the tabloids never found.'The Song of Achilles' by Madeline MillerAmazon"The Song of Achilles" by Madeline Miller, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.35In this mythical retelling set during the Trojan War, Patroclus is exiled to Phthia after a terrible misunderstanding and meets the prince Achilles. As their friendship turns romantic, Achilles is called to fight in the war against Troy with a terrible prophecy ahead of him.'Such A Fun Age' by Kiley ReidAmazon"Such a Fun Age" by Kiley Reid, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.36One night, when someone calls security on Emira Tucker in a grocery store, they accuse the young Black woman of kidnapping the white toddler she's babysitting. Though the child's mother, Alix Chamberlain, is determined to make things right, an old video brings up someone from her past, setting Alix and Emira on a journey to discover more about themselves and each other than they could have ever known.'From Blood and Ash' by Jennifer L. ArmentroutAmazon"From Blood and Ash" by Jennifer L. Armentrout, available at Amazon, $18.32"From Blood and Ash" is a sexy, action-packed fantasy about Poppy, a Maiden who must live under strict rules until the day of her Ascension. When she sneaks out to meet with a Royal Guard named Hawke, they quickly fall for each other as Poppy begins to unravel the shocking secrets of her kingdom in this novel that ends with a cliffhanger so jarring, readers can't help but immediately reach for the sequel. 'A Little Life' by Hanya YanagiharaAmazon"A Little Life" by Hanya Yanagihara, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $14.99Cherished amongst TikTokers for its emotional and poetic prose, "A Little Life" is an award-winning novel about four friends who move to New York from a small Massachusetts town. As the decades pass, their friendships grow and change yet all seem to be centered around their friend June, still haunted by his traumatic past.'Shatter Me' by Tehereh MafiAmazon"Shatter Me" by Tehereh Mafi, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $8.48Juliette is a 17-year-old with a fatal touch, jailed for murder 264 days ago when she last accidentally touched and killed someone. In this dystopia, people are dying and beginning to rise against the governing Reestablishment, who decides Juliette might be the perfect weapon to fight a rising rebellion.'A Court of Thorns And Roses' by Sarah J. MaasAmazon"A Court of Thorns and Roses" by Sarah J. Maas, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.80TikTok readers cannot stop talking about this steamy fantasy series that began as a "Beauty and the Beast" retelling. When Feyre accidentally kills a faerie, she's dragged to a magical kingdom by a masked captor. Closely guarded, secrets of the faerie lands begin to emerge as Feyre's resentment towards her captor melts from anger to romantic passion.'The Unhoneymooners' by Christina LaurenAmazon"The Unhoneymooners" by Christina Lauren, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $8.44When everyone at Ami's wedding falls ill with food poisoning except maid-of-honor Olive and best man Ethan, the offer to take the newlywed's all-expense-paid honeymoon seems amazing — if Olive and Ethan didn't despise each other. Agreeing to avoid each other, the two run into Olive's new boss on the island and fall into an elaborate lie that might just bring them closer together.'Red, White, and Royal Blue' by Casey McQuistonAmazon"Red, White, and Royal Blue" by Casey McQuiston, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $9.97First Son Alex Diaz has a sworn enemy: Prince Henry of Britain. When the tabloids catch the two teens in an argument, their PR teams decide the best course of action is to stage a fake friendship, which slowly turns into a real one with romantic feelings. When Alex's mom decides to run for re-election, Alex knows that his relationship could ruin her campaign and the boys must decide how much they're willing to risk to be together. 'Shadow and Bone' by Leigh BardugoAmazon"Shadow and Bone" by Leigh Bardugo, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.82"Shadow and Bone" is the first book in not only its own magical trilogy, but the first book in the Grishaverse created by Leigh Bardugo, a hugely popular fantasy universe amongst readers on TikTok. Loved for its unpredictable characters and heightened audiobook experience, this book follows Alina Starkov, a teenage orphan in Ravka, who harnesses a previously unknown power to save her best friend and unwittingly makes herself a target.'The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue' by V.E. SchwabAmazon"The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue" by V.E. Schwab, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $14In 1714, Addie LaRue was a teenager about to be married off to a man she did not love when she struck a cursed deal to live forever yet be forgotten by everyone she met. In this genre-bending novel, Addie's story spans centuries and continents until the day she finally meets someone who remembers her.'We Were Liars' by E. LockhartAmazon"We Were Liars" by E. Lockhart, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $5.98This is a quick, young adult thriller that uses a fragmented narration to build suspense. Cadence and her family spend their summers on a private island where the cousins regularly go on troublesome adventures — until two summers ago, when something tragic happened and changed everything for their family forever.'The Hating Game' by Sally ThorneAmazon"The Hating Game" by Sally Thorne, available at Amazon, $14.39In their shared office space, Lucy Hutton and Joshua Templeman are caught in a series of tense games of one-upmanship, now intensified as they're both up for a promotion. When the tension turns steamy and the two share a kiss in the elevator, Lucy begins to wonder if she's ever hated Joshua after all.'The Inheritance Games' by Jennifer Lynn BarnesAmazon"The Inheritance Games" by Jennifer Lynn Barnes, available at Amazon, $9.89Avery Grambs is just trying to graduate high school when she's mysteriously bestowed an inheritance from billionaire Tobias Hawthorne, a puzzle-loving man she's never even heard of. The catch is Avery must move into his secret passage-filled mansion with Tobias' family: A puzzle to be solved, and a game she'll have to survive.'The House in the Cerulean Sea' by T.J. KluneAmazon"The House in the Cerulean Sea" by T.J. Klune, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $15.06Linus Baker is a caseworker at the Department in Charge of Magical Youth, overseeing extraordinary children who live in government-sanctioned orphanages. When Linus is sent on a highly classified mission to check on a home with six dangerous children, he meets the most fascinating and wonderful group of magical kids, cared for by a charming gentleman with more burning secrets than Linus could imagine.'The Cruel Prince' by Holly BlackAmazon"The Cruel Prince" by Holly Black, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $10.9910 years ago, Jude and her sisters were stolen away to the High Court of Faerie, detested as humans in a magical faerie land. Desperate to be accepted, Jude must defy the Prince for a chance to win a place at the Court and soon finds herself deeply entangled in a web of violence and deception.'Red Queen' by Victoria AveyardAmazon"Red Queen" by Victoria Aveyard, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $6.98In the "Red Queen" literary universe, the world is divided into Red and Silver: commoners and the magical elite. When Mare Barrow escaped her impoverished Red home to work in the Silver Palace, she and the Silvers discover she has a powerful magical ability of her own, hiding her in plain sight and declaring her a long-lost Silver princess. As she quietly works to help the Red Guard bring down the Silver elite, Mare knows one misstep could easily mean her death.'All The Bright Places' by Jennifer NivenAmazon"All The Bright Places" by Jennifer Niven, available at Amazon and Bookshop, from $7.48Theodore Finch and Violet Markey are each looking for an escape when they meet on the ledge of their school's bell tower. Paired together for a school project, the duo set to discover the natural wonders of their state and instead discover the escape they'd been searching for in each other's company. You can check out a more detailed review of "All The Bright Places" here. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 17th, 2021

THEN AND NOW: How fast-food menus have changed over time

The menus at McDonald's, Burger King, Chick-fil-A, In-N-Out, White Castle, Taco Bell, and Popeyes once looked totally different. In-N-Out in the 1960s.In-N-Out Fast-food restaurant menus, from McDonald's to Chick-fil-A, have changed over the years. Some menu changes brought about astronomical sales.  However, others outraged customers to the point of social media rants and even violence. When the McDonald brothers opened their first restaurant, it served barbecue food.The exterior of a McDonald's drive-in fast-food restaurant, which advertises 15-cent hamburgers, Chicago, Illinois.Hulton Archive/Getty ImagesAt the original McDonald's Bar-B-Q restaurant in San Bernardino, California, customers could pull up to the restaurant for carhop service. Future locations would switch to the walk-up model to order from the restaurant's large menu.In 1948, the McDonald brothers reduced the restaurant's offerings down to just nine items to make their Speedee Service system even more efficient.McDonald's menu.Tim Boyle/Getty ImagesThe new menu included hamburgers, cheeseburgers, soft drinks, milk, coffee, potato chips, and a slice of pie for dessert. In 1949, potato chips were swapped with french fries and McDonald's began selling milkshakes.The addition of milkshakes to the McDonald's menu in 1949 would completely shift the future of the chain.McDonald's milkshake cups in the McDonald's museum.Ralf-Finn Hestoft/Corbis/Getty ImagesThe new item, called Triple Thick Milkshakes, was made using a Multimixer.After Multimixer salesman Ray Kroc visited the original McDonald's brothers to sell them more mixers, he became intrigued with the business. He would go on to purchase the small business and become the tycoon and leader of the fast-food giant for 30 years.Today, McDonald's still serves milkshakes, as well as McFlurries.In 1965, McDonald's introduced the Filet-O-Fish sandwich nationwide.An ad for the Filet-O-Fish.Mike Blake/ReutersAccording to Smithsonian Magazine, it was created in 1962 by Lou Groen, a McDonald's franchise owner in Cincinnati, Ohio, after he realized hamburger sales were declining on Fridays during the season of Lent.Groen then decided to create a sandwich featuring fish instead of beef. Three years later, it was made available nationwide and has remained on McDonald's menus ever since.McDonald's added the now-iconic Big Mac to its menu in 1967.Product shot of a McDonald's Big Mac hamburger in 1977.Henry Groskinsky/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty ImagesThe first "Big Mac" featured a triple-decker burger and sold for 45 cents. Initially, there was a lot of deliberation over what the iconic burger would be named. However, Esther Glickstein Rose, a 21-year-old secretary for the company's advertising department in 1967, had the winning name: "Big Mac." Despite the name originally being ridiculed, according to the AP, it's now known as one of "the best-known product names of all time."Chicken McNuggets were added to menus in 1983.McDonald's Chicken McNuggets.Irene Jiang / Business InsiderAccording to USA Today, many diners in the 1980s were looking to reduce their fat intake and were shaking up their diets by introducing more lean protein and poultry and cutting out red meat. For McDonald's, adding chicken to their menu was a no-brainer.In 2020, McDonald's added a spicy version of its chicken nuggets to menus, and they quickly sold out.As a result of the coronavirus pandemic and trying to streamline its operations, McDonald's limited its menu.McDonald's drive-through during the coronavirus pandemic.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinMcDonald's stopped serving all-day breakfast and removed its chicken tenders, grilled chicken sandwich, a few burgers, and salads from menus nationwide."To simplify operations in our kitchens and for our crew, and ensure the best possible experience for our customers, we are working with our franchisees and local restaurants to focus on serving our most popular choices and will begin temporarily removing some items from the menu," Bill Garrett, McDonald's senior vice president of operations, said in a statement to Business Insider.While some items, like the Bacon McDouble, are back, others were permanently cut from the menu.McDonald's is also experimenting with celebrity collaborations in a bid to reach Gen Z customers.McDonald's Saweetie meal.Erin McDowell/Insider/Jerritt Clark/Getty ImagesRapper Travis Scott's collaboration with the chain was a huge success — so much so that McDonald's reported it was experiencing burger shortages as people clamored to try it. About a month after the release of the Travis Scott meal collab, McDonald's launched another partnership with reggaeton star J Balvin.Since then, McDonald's has partnered with South Korean boy band BTS and rapper Saweetie on meal collaborations, which both included limited-edition sauces.McDonald's has also brought back some fan-favorite, nostalgic menu items.McDonald's McRib.PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty ImagesThe infamous McRib sandwich first appeared on McDonald's menus in 1981. After four years of lackluster sales, it was removed from the chain's menu. However, in 1989, the McRib returned. Until 2005, the item could be found on many McDonald's menus worldwide and is a staple at locations in Germany and Luxembourg. In 2012, the McRib made its return to some menus after years of fan requests. However, just as quickly as it came, it disappeared. McDonald's brought the McRib back for a limited time in 2020, and it's now available to order again.Plant-based menu items could be the future of McDonald's.McDonald's PLT.McDonald'sOn November 9, 2020, McDonald's announced it would officially be venturing into the world of plant-based meat products. The chain said it is developing the "McPlant," a lineup of plant-based burgers, "chicken," and more meat-free menu items. The McPlant was rolled out at just eight US restaurants on November 3, 2021, as part of a test run."It's not a matter of if McDonald's will get into plant-based," CEO Chris Kempczinski said, according to Business Insider. "It's a matter of when."Burger King opened its doors in Jacksonville, Florida, in 1953, as "Insta-Burger King."An early Burger King restaurant.Burger KingThe chain, which quickly grew to be the second-largest fast-food chain in the country, behind McDonald's, served 18-cent flame-broiled burgers, milkshakes, and fries.In 1957, Burger King released its signature burger, the Whopper.Burger King Whopper.ReutersThe Whopper was 37 cents compared to Burger King's original burger, which cost 18 cents. The Whopper came with sauce, cheese, lettuce, pickles, and tomato, all piled on top of a larger patty.Today, Burger King still broils and flame-grills its burgers.More recently, Burger King revolutionized its menu with the addition of the Impossible Whopper, a meat-free version of its iconic sandwich.Close-up of Burger King menu board with an advertisement for the Impossible Whopper.Smith Collection/Gado/Getty ImagesBurger King's Impossible Whopper was hugely successful for the chain. According to CNN, Burger King reported a 10% increase in sales following the launch of the Impossible Burger in 2019.However, while the burger is plant-based, Burger King received criticism after a customer sued the company for serving a burger that's not actually 100% vegan. Since the patties are cooked on the same grills as traditional meat burgers, they may come into contact with meat by-products. Burger King responded saying the chain never advertised the burger as vegan or promised to cook them in a particular way.The Dwarf Grill in Hapeville, Georgia, opened in 1946. It would eventually become what we now know as Chick-fil-A.Dwarf Grill menu.Business Insider/Hayley PetersonThe business, owned and operated by founder Truett Cathy, started off by selling standard items like waffles, breakfast foods, sandwiches, and burgers. However, everything changed when Chick-fil-A created its original chicken sandwich in 1964.Chick-fil-A chicken sandwich.Shutterstock/rblfmrAccording to Chick-fil-A, Cathy tested hundreds of recipes for the original chicken sandwich before landing on a winner — a fried chicken fillet with two pickles on a toasted butter bun.Though Chick-fil-A has expanded immensely since then, the chicken sandwich has remained virtually the same.In 1989, Chick-fil-A added a grilled chicken sandwich to its menu.Chick-fil-A grilled chicken club sandwich.Hollis JohnsonIntroduced as a "health-conscious option" for Chick-fil-A customers, Cathy introduced the original grilled chicken sandwich alongside the deluxe grilled chicken sandwich, which included the same pickle-juice-marinated grilled chicken, pickles, and white bun, along with lettuce and tomato.In 1993, Chick-fil-A added the grilled chicken club sandwich to its menu. Then, in 2017, the chain announced it would be releasing a gluten-free bun option.Today, the menu has more than 40 different menu items, but you certainly won't find burgers.Chick-fil-A restaurant.Mark Lennihan/Associated PressThe menu is continually shifting gears to appeal to customers, but the chain's most famous item is undoubtedly still its original chicken sandwich.In-N-Out became California's first drive-thru hamburger stand when it opened in 1948.In-N-Out in the 1960s.In-N-OutIn 1958, In-N-Out replaced its bottled drinks with fountain service, offering customers beverages like Pepsi Cola, Nesbitt Orange, and Hires Root Beer. According to In-N-Out, a 12-ounce soda cost just 10 cents at the time.In 1961, In-N-Out added "animal style" burgers to its menu.In-N-Out animal style burger.Erin McDowell/InsiderThe first Animal Style burger hit menus as a response to overwhelming customer requests. The recipe is still the same today as it was in the 1960s — a mustard-cooked beef patty, lettuce, tomato, pickles, extra spread, and grilled onions.In 1963, In-N-Out began serving its famous Double-Double burger.Double-Double burger on the menu.Irene Jiang/Business InsiderIn 1975, In-N-Out began serving milkshakes. A few years later, In-N-Out opened its first location with a dining room in Ontario, California.However, while some new items have been added since 1948, the menu is still pretty similar to the original menu, offering basic fast-food items like burgers and fries.White Castle is regarded as the first fast-food hamburger chain in America. It opened its doors in 1921.White Castle.White CastleFounded by Billy Ingram as a family-owned business, the fast-food establishment originally sold 5-cent, small, square hamburgers by the sack. They would come to be known as "sliders."In 1943, White Castle would sell hot dogs and fried eggs instead of its iconic burgers as a result of the war's beef rationing.In 1962, White Castle began selling cheeseburgers.White Castle sliders on a grill.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesThis addition came 15 years after the chain secured a patent for its "holy" burgers — each burger is still grilled with five holes punched into it to add more flavor and help them cook faster.Today, White Castle still sells its iconic sliders.White Castle food.Hollis JohnsonThe sliders are also sold in grocery stores nationwide, meaning you can get your White Castle fix right at home. In 2018, White Castle revolutionized its menu by offering the plant-based Impossible Slider.Taco Bell offered just five menu items when it opened in 1962.Taco Bell's original menu, with its first franchisee, Kermit Becky.Taco BellEach item cost just 19 cents, and the menu featured traditional Mexican favorites like frijoles, tostadas, burritos, and tacos.In 1984, Taco Bell introduced the Taco Salad and Taco BellGrande and, in 2004, Taco Bell began selling Mountain Dew Baja Blast.In 2014, Taco Bell officially launched its breakfast menu nationwide.Taco Bell breakfast burrito.Hollis JohnsonIt was the brand's largest marketing campaign to date and has proven to be successful year over year.However, the coronavirus pandemic caused fast-food breakfast sales to plummet, leaving the future of breakfast foods at giants like Taco Bell and McDonald's uncertain.Today, Taco Bell has an expansive menu that offers a lot more than it did in the 1960s.Taco Bell menu.Irene Jiang / Business InsiderCountless different varieties of tacos and burritos make eating the entire menu a tall order.However, the menu has changed over the years.Taco Bell Cheesy Fiesta Potatoes.Diana G./YelpIn July 2020, the fast-food chain announced it would be removing 12 items from its menu, including fan-favorite items such as Cheesy Fiesta Potatoes, Nachos Supreme, and Loaded Grillers. Some fans were outraged by the decision to ax potatoes, calling it the chain's "worst idea to date."In September of that year, Taco Bell announced it would be dropping the fan-favorite Mexican Pizza from its newly streamlined menu starting November 5.However, potatoes have since returned to the Taco Bell menu, and new items like the grilled cheese burrito have been added. Popeyes first opened in 1972 as "Chicken on the Run" in the New Orleans suburb of Arabi, Louisiana.Popeyes restaurant in 2000.David McNew/Newsmakers/Getty ImagesThe restaurant originally served traditional, Southern-style fried chicken. However, after the restaurant faced lackluster sales for a few months, founder Alvin C. Copeland Sr. changed the restaurant's name to "Popeyes" and began selling spicy New Orleans-style chicken.In 1983, Popeyes began selling buttermilk biscuits.Popeyes restaurant.Brad Kemp / AP ImagesThe biscuits are now regarded as one of Popeyes' most iconic menu items and come with the chain's combo meals.Before its famous chicken sandwich hit the menu, Popeyes mainly sold fried chicken and seafood.A Popeyes restaurant takeout order menu is seen on February 21, 2017, in Miami, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesThe chain launched its Butterfly Shrimp Tackle Box in 2009, while Chicken Waffle Tenders and the Cajun Surf & Turf hit menus in 2013. Popeyes changed its direction — and, perhaps, the entire face of fast food — when it launched its now-famous chicken sandwich in 2019.A sign indicating that chicken sandwiches are sold out at a Boston Popeyes in 2019.Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe/Getty ImagesThe chicken sandwich was so popular, it quickly sent restaurants into chaos before selling out entirely in just two weeks. A few months later, the menu item finally returned, much to the satisfaction of chicken and fast-food lovers nationwide.Since then, Popeyes has also started experimenting with celebrity collaborations.The author holding the Megan Thee Stallion Popeyes chicken sandwich.Erin McDowell/InsiderOn October 19, Popeyes launched a new collaboration with rapper Megan Thee Stallion. The collab included a new iteration of its iconic chicken sandwich, which comes covered in limited-edition "Hottie" sauce, a slightly spicier version of sweet-and-sour sauce.When Insider's Erin McDowell tried the sandwich, she thought it was better than the original, although the sauce could have been spicier.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 16th, 2021

Chris Christie says Trump initially refused to prepare for the 2020 debates: "I know how to do this. I"m already the president"

"What the fuck am I doing here?" Trump asked when his team gathered for debate prep, according to former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's new book. President Donald Trump participates in the final presidential debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden at Belmont University on October 22, 2020 in Nashville, Tennessee.Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Trump initially refused to prepare for the 2020 debates against Joe Biden, according to Chris Christie's new book. "What the fuck am I doing here?" Trump reportedly asked when he arrived at the first prep session. He added: "I know how to do this. I'm already the president." Then-President Donald Trump initially refused to prepare for the 2020 presidential debates against his Democratic rival Joe Biden because he didn't think he needed to, according to a new book by former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.Christie was the first 2016 Republican candidate to endorse Trump after dropping out, and he took on a leading role to prepare Trump for the 2020 debates. His book, "Republican Rescue: Saving the Party from Truth Deniers, Conspiracy Theorists, and the Dangerous Policies of Joe Biden," hit bookshelves on Tuesday."What the fuck am I doing here?" Trump reportedly asked when he walked into the first prep session in July 2020, which took place in a conference room at his New Jersey golf club. Christie joined other advisors, including former counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway and senior advisor Jared Kushner, for the session.After Christie reminded Trump that they had to prepare for the first debate against Biden, Trump brushed it off and questioned why he had to practice in the first place."Yeah, but why am I doing this?" Trump asked, according to Christie's book."So you'll be ready for Biden," Christie replied.Trump still resisted, saying, "I know how to do this. I'm already the president."He said it again, and more emphatically. "I'm the president! I already know how to do this!"Christie then urged Trump to reconsider his stance by handing him a stack of news reports and telling him that several incumbent presidents in recent history, from Ronald Reagan to Barack Obama, each lost their first debates when running for reelection."You, Mr. President, can make history by being the first incumbent president in the modern era to win the first debate," Christie told Trump.The argument seemed to break through."Hmm. All right. I'll look at it," Trump said, and left the room with the papers, according to Christie's book.Christie went on to write that although the first session was a "complete waste of time," Trump eventually agreed to participate in the prep sessions as long as they weren't called "mock debates.""'If you need to do a mock debate, you're weak,' I remembered [Trump] telling me four years earlier,'" Christie wrote. "This might be more effective, I thought."Trump's advisors ended up preparing him for the debates with lightning round-style questions in order to keep him focused and engaged, Christie wrote. But Trump's performance in the first debate against Biden still fell far short of what his team had hoped for.Trump interrupted Biden or moderator Chris Wallace at least 128 times in the debate, prompting Biden to issue an exasperated plea: "Would you just shut up, man?"In one of the most controversial moments of the night, Trump hesitated to condemn white supremacists and told the far-right extremist group Proud Boys to "stand back and stand by." Members of the group quickly seized on Trump's words and praised him in online forums.CNN's Dana Bash called the debate a "shitshow," with other news anchors and pundits offering similar critiques. Trump's interruptions were so frequent that they prompted the Commission on Presidential Debates to issue new rules saying it would mute candidates' microphones to ensure they had the space to make their arguments.Christie in his book described the 90-minute debate as a "disaster," "just awful," and "excruciating to sit through."A spokesperson for Trump did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 16th, 2021

The 6 best kitchen knives we tested in 2021

There's no need to have piles of knives or even sets of them. These knives are the only ones you need in your kitchen. Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky Putting your knife set together piecemeal is best, and a chef's knife is the only real essential. Wusthof's Classic Ikon 8" Chef's Knife is our favorite, but we also like Victorinox, Shun, and more. Read about how we test kitchen products at Insider Reviews. There may be no more important tool in your kitchen than your chef's knife. It is the one-stop-shop for all of your slicing, chopping, dicing, and trimming needs. Sure, there are other kitchen knives well worth their steel, but we can't stress this enough: if you're going to put your money into any one knife, or if you're considering buying a knife set, think about a single, high-quality chef's knife to start.While we do offer a guide to the best knife sets — and recommend some budget-friendly options like the Victorinox Fibrox Pro set (a staple in many commercial kitchens) — you can end up with a lot of filler pieces if you go the pre-packaged route. Everyone we've spoken with on the matter, from famed butcher Pat LaFrieda to late gourmand and chef Anthony Bourdain, has been quick to the point: most knife sets are a waste of money. And having knocked around enough commercial bars and kitchens myself, I can't agree more. Rarely do you see a chef, sous chef, or line cook, fiddling with anything but a chef's knife.For this guide, we focused on chef's knives for the reasons above, but we also ran through dozens of paring, boning, utility, and bread knives to recommend one of each of those as well. Here are the best kitchen knives of 2021Best kitchen knife overall: Wusthof Classic Ikon 8" Chef's KnifeBest all-purpose kitchen knife: Benchmade StationBest budget kitchen knife: Victorinox Fibrox Pro 8" Chef's KnifeBest paring knife: Victorinox 3.25" Straight Paring KnifeBest bread knife: Victorinox Fibrox Pro 10.25" Serrated Curved Bread KnifeBest utility knife: Shun Sora 6"Best chef's knife overallOwen Burke/InsiderHefty but balanced, The traditional German design of Wüsthof's Classic Ikon 8" Chef's Knife suits most hands and stands up to just about every kitchen task.Length: 6", 8", 10"Blade: High-carbon stainless steelHRC: 58Handle: Polyoxymethylene (POM)Pros: Great for chopping and dicing, agreeable handle for most, rust- and chip-resistantCons: Requires regular sharpeningThe Wüsthof Classic Ikon Chef's Knife is the most traditional western knife there is: It's big, it's heavy, and it's made with relatively soft, rust-, and chip-resistant stainless steel. As far as quality knives go, this is the knife we've found to handle the most difficult tasks while also still offering agility and precision.Before we go further, we should mention one caveat: Ahead of investing in a chef's knife, know that of all the kitchen knives you might purchase, it is the most personal choice you're going to have to make.No matter which knife you choose, your chef's knife is the one you'll rely upon most. It offers the most surface area for larger chopping and slicing jobs, and it also handles the most force for hardier root vegetables, meat, and poultry. Different designs might favor chopping and dicing over slicing (and vice-versa), but we like the only slightly rounded belly of the Wüsthof Classic Ikon, which strikes a happy medium for the two tasks.We also like the modified handle of the Ikon series knives in general, which isn't quite German, but not quite Japanese, either. It seems to be a hybrid of the two and fits most hands comfortably (we placed our top pick in several different palms).All in all, this is a great knife for the average household in which kitchen knives aren't generally taken care of, and no matter who gets a hold of this thing or what they do with or to it, you'll be able to bring it back up to snuff. That and the fact that it's a relatively thin and agile blade as far as German knives go make it the best all-around pick based on our testing.Best all-purpose kitchen knifeOwen Burke/InsiderIf you want just one knife in your kitchen, Benchmade's station knife is the perfect middle ground between a paring knife and a chef's knife.Pros: Great for everything from slicing and carving to chopping and dicing, guaranteed for lifeCons: Some might not like the handle (subjective)Before testing Benchmade's Station knife, we would have scoffed at the idea of anything other than a chef's knife being considered all-purpose. The Station knife's tip has the deftness of a paring knife, while its extremely wide heel chops and slices like a cleaver, and we haven't found anything we can't do well with it, apart from slice bread. We broke down whole chickens, chopped piles of potatoes, sliced a dozen tomatoes, minced garlic and shallots, and hulled strawberries with ease.Made in the USA, these knives are customizable. You can get the basic, but highest-quality 440C stainless steel, or the upgraded CPM-154 (Benchmade's take on 154CM, which is 440C stainless steel with added Molybendum to prevent chipping). You can also choose your handle, from an epoxy G10 (seven colors), a resin-infused paper called Richlite (three colors), and black carbon fiber. Plus, you can have the blade etched with laser-marking if you want something really one of a kind.Finally, Benchmade will clean, oil, adjust, and resharpen your knife for life, free of charge through their Lifesharp service — you just have to pay postage.Best budget chef's knifeOwen Burke/InsiderPopular in busy commercial kitchens and homes alike, Victorinox's Fibrox has a highly ergonomic handle and stands up to rough use like few others.Length: 7.9"Blade: High-carbon stainless steelHRC: 55Handle: Thermoplastic elastomers (TPE)Pros: Maneuverable, comfortable handle, decent edge retentionCons: Not razor-sharp straight out of the factory, takes some work to sharpen, not perfectly balanced Victorinox's entire Fibrox line is a favorite in commercial kitchens because its knives are among the few that can pass through numerous line cooks' hands and accidental trips through the dishwasher unscathed. The Fibrox Chef's Knife is budget-friendly, but it's also perfect for short-term rentals, first apartments, and more generally, people who don't necessarily want to spend time taking care of their kitchen tools. My kitchen sees a lot of "chefs," and for that reason, I have my knives squirreled away separately from the communal kitchen knives, which are entirely from Victorinox. This way, I don't have to worry about someone slicing a lemon and leaving an expensive knife on the counter, not only wet but coated in citric acid, or trying to pry open a lid via a Japanese blade, which is horrific to think about. And even though the Fibrox Chef's Knife has withstood the abuse mentioned above (and more), there's neither a single stain nor chip on it. Sure, it's a bit scratched (coarse sponges are terrible for stainless steel, but more on care below), but all I do is give it a sharpening every couple of months, which with diligence gets it sharper than it was from the factory, and it performs impressively.We also find it to be a little on the safer side thanks to the ultra-grippy Fibrox handle, which is easy to hold even when wet or greasy.Read more about the Fibrox line in our guide to the best knife sets (even though we generally don't recommend sets, this one is an exception).Best paring knifeOwen Burke/InsiderA paring knife is a simple tool for lighter tasks, and Victorinox's 3.25" Straight Paring Knife offers everything you need of it and nothing you don't.Length: 3.25"Blade: 440 stainless steelHRC: 58-60Handle: Thermoplastic elastomers (TPE)Pros: Resilient, relatively rust-proof, dishwasher-safeCons: Very lightweight, requires regular sharpeningYou really, really don't need to spend a fortune on a paring knife. We think Victorinox's 3.25" Straight Paring Knife does the job about as well as anything because it's not the blade you're going to rely on for heavier-duty tasks.  Hulling strawberries, slicing a small bit of garlic, and peeling and seeding fruit is about all you're going to use it for, and while they're not the most demanding tasks, this knife handles them every bit as well as you'd hope anything would. Sure, you can spend a lot more and get a weightier paring knife, but it's far from necessary.And while, again, it's about as cheap as any kitchen knife gets, it's also much more resilient than pricier picks. Years ago, one of our testers admitted to running it through the dishwasher regularly, and has found only one small speck of rust since. The only other issue that arises with this knife is that you'll have to sharpen it as regularly as our budget pick for a chef's knife. Depending upon how often you put it to work, that could range from every month to every few months. Otherwise, keep this knife clean and dry like any other and it will work and last like any other.Best bread knifeOwen Burke/InsiderA long, thin blade with shallow serrations makes the surprisingly affordable Victorinox Fibrox 10" Bread Knife a precise tool for slicing bread and more.Length: 10.25"Blade: 440 stainless steelHRC: 55Handle: Thermoplastic elastomers (TPE)Pros: Nicely weighted (for a budget-friendly knife), great gripCons: Not as heavy as top-of-the-line bread knives, not as sharp out of the factoryIt's debatable whether you want to spend much on a bread knife depending on how often you'll be using it, but Victorinox's Fibrox Bread Knife is a quality tool at a reasonable price. It withstands the same amount of rough use as the rest of our recommendations from that line, but thanks to the larger handle and longer blade it carries a little more weight than the more budget-friendly options we considered. In our tests, which involved slicing less-than-forgiving, homemade, no-knead bread, it fared as well as everything we tried until we reached the $200 range, which is an absurd price for a bread knife for most people. That pretty much settled it. We also can't lend enough praise to the Fibrox handles in general, which everyone seems to appreciate, and apart from their ergonomic qualities, instill a sense of security with their non-slip grips.Because this blade is not only thin but also only shallowly serrated, you won't have as much trouble sharpening it on your own as you would with, say, a deep-scalloped one that doesn't take to a simple pull-through sharpener as well. It also turns out that this knife isn't bad for slicing softer fruits and carving meat and poultry.If you're looking for something a little more on the affordable side, our previous pick (which we retested against this one) is the Mercer Culinary Millennia Wavy Edge 10-inch Wide Bread Knife. It has a slightly thicker blade and a deeper serration, so it's not going to be as precise, but it's got a similar handle and costs half the price.Best utility knifeOwen Burke/InsiderWith VG Max steel wrapped in layered Damascus steel, Shun's Classic 6" Utility Knife is sharper and retains a better edge than most German-style knives, and is perfect for trimming and more precise cuts.Length: 6"Blade: VG-Max Damascus steelHRC: 62Handle: Pakka (plastic and wood composite)Pros: Extremely sharp, great edge retention, rust-resistant, very well-balancedCons: Slightly brittle and easier to chip than German steel, small, D-shaped handle favors right-handersA utility knife needs to be extra sharp for more precise cuts and trimming without tearing foods, and Shun's Classic 6" Utility Knife uses VG-Max Damascus steel, effectively offering the best of both worlds between Japanese-style and German-style blades.Damascus steel is made by forging and hammering carbon-rich steel (in this case, VG-Max) at a low temperature, cranking up the heat, and then cooling it abruptly. The material is known for its flexibility and corrosion resistance, not to mention its signature swirly "damask" pattern that tends to woo one and all. While its beauty is something to behold, the important takeaway is that you get a knife that holds a stronger edge than carbon steel but flexes better than stainless steel. While we veered away from Japanese steel for our chef's knife top pick, and didn't recommend a Damascus or VG Max steel option because of the cost, a smaller utility knife from Shun makes that type of pricier steel more affordable.Apart from being remarkably more rust-resistant than other Japanese and Japanese-style knives we tried, this knife isn't so brittle that we've had trouble with chipping or dinging. Still, you'll want to keep it away from harder foods and surfaces, and especially bones. Where this knife shines is with smaller, in-between tasks where a chef's knife is overkill and a paring knife is painfully laborious. Think slicing tomatoes or dicing shallots. It's not a necessary knife for everyone, but behind those two knives and a bread knife, it's the next most important one for most kitchens. On that note, it did offer enough flexibility for me to not necessarily fillet, but skin and trim boneless meat. Shun's knives are made with a material known as Pakka wood, which is really a wood-and-plastic composite that looks an awful lot like walnut. Purists might cringe, but it gives the look without bringing along the worry of the handle splitting.If you're really averse to owning a Japanese knife for one reason or another (either the handle or the extra care required), look to the utility knife version of our top-recommended chef's knife, the 6" Wüsthof Ikon.What else we testedOwen Burke/InsiderEach of the knives below did their job, and any of them will suit your kitchen well; they just weren't our top choices for most people or budgets.Shun: Probably the most popular Japanese knife in the US, Shun offers relatively affordable VG- and Damascus-steel knives. Apart from recommending the brand's utility knife, one of my personal favorite knives is the 8" Chef's knife.Korin: Another mid-range Japanese knife similar to Shun, Korin is a favorite of Pat LaFrieda and Andrew Zimmern, and is competitive with Mac.J.A. Henckels: One of the veritable classics in German knives, J.A. Henckels' knives were a little thicker in the blade than our other picks, but you really can't go wrong here.Dexter-Russell: Similar to Victorinox's Fibrox series, Dexter-Russell offers a line of similarly iconic white-handled knives at a great price point, and which you'll find in commercial kitchens all over. We just found that the handles on the Fibrox knives are much grippier.Mac: This company makes an outstanding chef's knife, especially for the price. The only reason we couldn't recommend this as an overall pick was its delicacy. At the hands of most people, this knife isn't going to stay in great shape for long. If you care for your knives, on the other hand, we can't recommend it enough.Made In: These, like many other DTC-brand knives, are made with X50CrMoV15 steel and are a great deal for the price. Like the others, they didn't exactly wow us, but we found nothing really wrong with them, either. The rounded handle seems to work well with many hands.Material: These knives are made with "high-carbon" steel, but we wouldn't call it high-quality. They have a hybrid handle that should suit most hands, and they're easy enough to sharpen and perfectly serviceable knives.Misen: More X50CrMoV15 steel and a great deal for the price. These are extremely popular for a reason, and we like them plenty, too.Our Place: Another DTC brand making X50CrMoV15 steel blades, Our Place's knives are more than satisfactory. We liked the hybrid handle, but not as much as others. If the handle looks like it'll suit you, these are nicely designed and balanced knives.Steelport Knife Co.: This is a much fancier, carbon-steel option for someone who wants to invest in a gorgeous and impossibly sharp blade. We love it, but we also recognize that it requires care. Our kitchen knife testing methodologyOwen Burke/InsiderWe finely sliced tomatoes and onions with chef's knives, minced garlic and shallots with utility and paring knives, hulled strawberries with paring knives, and sliced hard-crusted no-knead bread with serrated slicing knives. We then dulled each blade by rapping them repeatedly on a glass cutting board (word to the wise, never use one of these) and returned to each knife's respective task to note any dulling or chipping.We also made sure to put each knife into as many different hands as possible, ranging from professional cooks to hobbyists.Lastly, we consulted a series of chefs, butchers, and metallurgists, including Chef Shola Olunloyo of Studio Kitchen, Pat LaFrieda, and Michael J Tarkanian, a professor of metallurgy at MIT.A word on Japanese knivesWe took Japanese knives out of the running for our top chef's knife pick. While they're a personal favorite, they're notoriously difficult to maintain, and therefore not suited for most kitchens. Simply put, if you're starting to invest in your kitchen knives, we don't want to recommend a fine knife that will easily be misused."High-carbon stainless steel" is a bit of a buzzword in reaction to the popularity of Japanese-style knives, which can attain notoriously sharper edges than their German-style counterparts. The delicacy of Japanese knives has to do with the hardness of the standard high-carbon stainless steel, which allows for a finer and sharper but proportionally brittler edge.Still, if you're the type of person who takes particularly good care of your tools (and aren't sharing a kitchen with someone who won't), you may prefer a Japanese knife. But know that they require meticulous cleaning and drying, as well as careful storage, or they'll end up with rusted and/or chipped blades.Other considerations:Edge retention: Our knife-testing process involved slicing fresh tomatoes and taking note of the ease with which each chef's knife handled the task. After we had sufficient data, we took each chef's knife to a glass cutting board and ran it over the surface 200 times. Some knives held their edge, others not so much. We looked at the edges after running the knives and noted if there were any visible changes. We then returned to the tomatoes, cutting a few more and seeing how much resistance we felt compared with the performance of the knives straight out of the packaging. Knives that held their edges passed on to further rounds of consideration.Alloy, and the HRC (hardness rating): We consulted several experts in the field, but the most informative source we encountered was Michael J Tarkanian, a professor of metallurgy at MIT. With his help, we were able to cut through the marketing and the scientific terminology behind different alloys and what allows a knife to retain an edge.We looked for a hardness rating of around 60 HRC, which offers great edge retention while still allowing for an edge of around 15 degrees (though up to 20 degrees, which is duller than 15, was still considered sufficient).Ergonomics: For a knife to work well, you have to be able to hold it comfortably in your hand. We asked several people to pick up knives and decide which ones were the easiest to grip; across the board, they went for the ones with heavier, rounded, almost bulbous handles.Balance: The weight of the handle and the blade is also somewhat critical. Pricier knives almost always offer better balance because that extra cost goes into using denser and often more desirable materials, like layered Damascus steel. A well-balanced knife with a good blade will cut through vegetables with minimal pressure, like our top pick from Wusthof. A not-so-well-balanced knife will take a little force to get started.Kitchen knife FAQsOwen Burke/InsiderHow do I choose a knife?The most important thing about a knife, and especially a chef's knife, is how it fits in your hand. So long as you spend at least $50 on a chef's knife, it's going to be sharp (and sharpenable) enough to get most any job done, and most of popular DTC brands are selling great entry-level knives for fair prices. Decide what kind of handle you want first. German-style knives are generally more molded to the palm with a pronounced butt end, while Japanese-style knives are almost uniformly cylindrical and smaller. Both designs work for everyone; it just depends on the feel you prefer and, to some degree, how you hold the knife.The type of steel you choose should be based on the kind of care you're (realistically) going to give your knife. If you don't envision yourself sharpening and perfectly drying and storing your knife after every use, German stainless steel (e.g., 440, 420) is going to be much more forgiving, though softer and quicker to dull.If you are a tool fanatic and know that you'll take good care of your knives and are also confident that they won't find their way into the wrong hands, carbon steel is a great pick because it's incredibly sharp. Just know that it's likely to rust and chip more easily.In between, you have VG-10 and VG-Max (proprietary to Shun, but about the same as VG-10), which have added alloys (tungsten, vanadium) that make them a little more stain-resistant and less brittle. They're great for those who want a Japanese-style knife without having to care so devoutly for it.Then there's Damascus steel, which is made by forging and hammering carbon-rich steel at a low temperature, cranking up the heat, and then cooling it abruptly. Damascus steel is known for its flexibility and corrosion resistance, and we recommend it, but be wary of too-good-to-be-true deals. A lot of manufacturers will etch the mesmerizing swirls into a blade without performing the time-consuming and expensive hammering process.Why (or why not) should I buy a knife set?In general, things that come in sets tend to involve compromised quality, and often contain filler pieces. In the case of knife sets, you're probably going to receive a bunch of knives and other gadgets (including a large woodblock) that you may never use. A lot of newer (and older) DTC brands recognize that consumers are growing wiser and learning that sets are generally a ripoff. As a result, there are lots of two- to five-piece sets on the market. If you're looking in the budget range, we're all for them, and we've pretty much tried them all. The steel is almost always the same quality, so choose based on the handle style you like.Otherwise, though, sets don't make a lot of sense for most people. Invest in a chef's knife, first and foremost, with which, by the way, you can tackle all of your kitchen tasks, minus maybe slicing bread. Next, a paring knife is probably the most sensible purchase, but since it's not doing a lot of the heavy work, we say go cheap. That said, feel free to spend what you'd like; there is something to be said for a weightier, sharper blade in the case of every knife.A slicing and/or bread knife may or may not be important to you depending upon whether or not you consume much bread or slice much meat. You can find one that does the job for as little as $20, or, again, the sky's the limit. For most people, we like the $40-$60 range.Beyond the above, you're getting into specific tasks most people don't really take on at home. Fillet knives, boning knives, santoku knives, and shears are all further considerations. Even if you want all of those knives, you're still likely better off purchasing them piecemeal. It'll be more affordable, and you'll also be able to budget so that you can put your money where it counts.GlossaryOwen Burke/InsiderHeal: The corner of the blade where the edge meets the bolster.Edge: The sharpened, business side of the blade.Tang: The part of the blade that runs to or through the handle. "Full-tang" is a common term, which means the blade steel is a single piece of steel that runs through the handle.Rivets: The pins holding the handle together (more common in German handles).Bolster: Above the heel, a spacer where the blade meets the handle, and an area to grab or choke up on when performing finer tasks.Tip: The pointy, or front end of the knife opposite the handle.High-carbon steel: Steel with at least 0.55% carbon content.Stainless steel: An alloy of iron, chromium, and sometimes other metals. This is a very general term, but it's the basic steel with which German knives are made.VG10, VG-Max: A high-carbon steel blended with tungsten and vanadium, and sometimes other metals to lend flexibility and rust resistance.Damascus Steel: A two-plus-millennia-old process, Damascus steel is made by forging and hammering carbon-rich steel at a low temperature, cranking up the heat, and then cooling it abruptly, repeatedly (generally dozens of times). Damascus steel is known for its flexibility and corrosion resistance while still retaining a superior edge, which is why it is traditionally (and famously) used for samurai swords.The best deals on kitchen knives from this guideBuying your knives piecemeal is our recommended way of outfitting your kitchen with cutlery; you get everything you need and want and no cheap "filler" items. Knives (and knife sets) only seem to go on sale sporadically, but as with many things, the best times to snoop around for deals are usually Amazon Prime Day, Black Friday, and Cyber Monday.Here are the best deals on our favorite kitchen knives.There are currently no deals on our recommended kitchen knives.Read more about how the Insider Reviews team evaluates deals and why you should trust us.Check out more related guidesToo many knives.Owen Burke/InsiderThe best knife setsThe best knife sharpenersThe best cutting boardsThe best knife blocksThe best bushcraft and survival knivesRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 15th, 2021

Playboy has recreated its Big Bunny private jet to bring celebrities and cultural icons together for fine dining in the sky - see inside

The plane will offer the same onboard glamour and sophistication inspired by the original Big Bunny plane. Playboy’s Big Bunny jet Playboy Enterprises Playboy has recreated its Big Bunny private jet to host high-profile celebrities and cultural icons. The plane will bring the same level of luxury and sophistication that its predecessor did in the 1970s. Guests can expect lavish seats and tableware as they enjoy a "once-in-a-lifetime dinner party in the sky." Playboy is one of the most recognizable brands in the entertainment industry, having been founded by Hugh Hefner in 1953 with a men's lifestyle and media magazine. Hugh Hefner with Playboy magazine Damian Dovarganes/Associated Press Source: CR Fashion Book Playboy rose to greater fame with the introduction of its iconic Playboy Bunnies sporting bunny ears, bow ties, fluffy bobtails, and corsets. Bunnies with NYC Playboy Club manager Tony Roma in 1966 Anthony Camerano/AP The bunnies worked as waitresses at Hefner's Playboy Clubs, the first of which opened in Chicago in 1960, that welcomed A-list celebrities and tourists. Since the start of Hefner's empire, over 25,000 corset-wearing bunnies have served drinks to patrons at the exclusive clubs. Bunnies at New York City Playboy Club John Lent/Associated Press Source: CR Fashion Book, I visited New York's new Playboy Club, where Playboy Bunnies serve drinks in their iconic costumes and members pay up to $100,000 a year — and it wasn't at all what I expected Part of Playboy's brand was its iconic Big Bunny jet, which flew through the late 1960s and early 1970s and quickly became one of the most recognizable private jets in the sky. The all-black DC-9 aircraft was once known as the "Mansion in the Sky." Hugh Hefner with Big Bunny jet Mirrorpix/Contributor/Getty Images Source: CR Fashion Book, Hollywood Reporter, See what it was like to fly on the 'Big Bunny,' Hugh Hefner's customized Playboy jet While the exterior of the jet was unique, it was the interior that impressed. Inside the 38-passenger lavish plane was a full kitchen, living room, luxury furniture, a state-of-the-art sound system, and bar. Hugh Hefner on Big Bunny jet Edward Kitch/Associated Press Source: CR Fashion Book, Hollywood Reporter There were also "Jet Bunnies" that served guests gourmet dishes like lobster and roast beef... Jet Bunnies serve gourmet meals onboard Playboy Enterprises And hosted dance parties onboard. Dance parties onboard Big Bunny Playboy Enterprises The plane carried famous individuals and was initially used to ferry passengers between Chicago and Los Angeles to record Playboy After Dark, Hefner's late-night talk show. Celebrities onboard included people like Elvis Presley, Cher, Frank Sinatra, and then-girlfriend Barbi Benton. Hugh Hefner and then-girlfriend Barbi Benton Dennis Oulds/Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images Source: CR Fashion Book, Hollywood Reporter However, the plane was short-lived. Hefner sold the jet in 1975 after six years of fun in the sky, but that would not be the last time the public could witness part of Hefner's legacy. Big Bunny jet Dennis Oulds/Stringer/Getty Images Source:  At the end of November 2021, Playboy's Big Bunny jet will take flight once again, bringing one-of-a-kind luxury and elegance to 35,000 feet. The company plans on hosting celebrities and cultural icons for "once-in-a-lifetime dinner parties in the sky." New Playboy Big Bunny Global Express jet Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny The new Big Bunny is a Bombardier Global Express private jet, and, like its predecessor, is painted black with the white silhouette bunny logo on the tail. Playboy intends the plane to serve as a "beacon of pleasure, luxury, style, and play." Rabbit Head logo on Big Bunny tail Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny The interior of the jet was designed by the company's creative team in partnership with International Jet Interiors. Team members on the project include Rachel Webber, Anna Ondaatje, Louis Terline, and Zach Glass. Big Bunny interior Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny The plane will offer the same onboard glamour and sophistication inspired by the original Big Bunny plane. Inside the jet, guests will find things like leather seating, Playboy archived artwork, fine china, and a dining room. Big Bunny jet interior Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny Specifically, guests can expect custom-dyed cognac crocodile-embossed leather wall coverings... Crocodile wall-coverings in the jet's bathroom Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny Emerald natural stone countertops... Emerald countertop Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny Custom herringbone carpeting... Big Bunny carpeting Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny Luxury sheepskin and leather pilot seats... Pilot seats and controls Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny A backgammon board... Backgammon board Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny And cashmere blankets sporting the jet's tail number, N950PB. Cashmere blanket and alcohol Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny The jet will also feature specially-made upholstered seats with the Rabbit Head logo... Upholstered seats with Rabbit Head logo Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny And deep green upholstered couches in the back of the cabin to make it feel like a private library. Green couches Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny One of the biggest appeals of the jet is its inflight dining. Drinks will be made at the "speakeasy-style pop-up bar" that emerges from the center of the cabin. Pop-up bar Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny Tableware includes hand-blown glassware made by Asp & Hand... Hand-blown glasses Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny Gold-trimmed porcelain plates... Gold-trimmed plates Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny And embroidered napkins with the tail number, N950PB. Embroidered napkins Playboy Enterprises As the centerpiece of its brand, the luxury jet has inspired apparel and accessories designed by Playboy's in-house creative team. The styles have been made in partnership with Creative Directors Philippa Price and Pilar Zeta. A 1970s sleek sartorial homage to the original Big Bunny's N950PB tail number Playboy Enterprises Pieces include puffer jackets, silk loungewear, and leather outfits, though the designs have not yet been released. Original Jet Bunny outfit from 1970 Playboy Enterprises "The new edition of Big Bunny will serve as a platform for Playboy to collaborate with culture-shaping creatives and celebrities to drive appeal for the eponymous lifestyle brand," the company said. Big Bunny interior Playboy Enterprises Source: Playboy, BigBunny While the guests onboard and the first route are still a secret, the Big Bunny's return will carry on Hugh Hefner's legacy and empire. Playboy’s Big Bunny jet Playboy Enterprises Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 14th, 2021

Why Wokeism Is A Religion

Why Wokeism Is A Religion Authored by Michael Shellenberger via Substack, Introducing the Taxonomy of Woke Religion Over the last year, a growing number of progressives and liberals have pointed to police killings of unarmed black men, rising carbon emissions and extreme weather events, and the killing of trans people as proof that the United States has failed to take action on racism, climate change, and transphobia. Others have pointed to the war on drugs, the criminalization of homelessness, and mass incarceration as evidence that little has changed in the U.S. over the last 30 years.  And yet, on each of those issues, the U.S. has made significant progress. Police killings of African Americans in our 58 largest cities declined from 217 per year in the 1970s to 157 per year in the 2010s. Between 2011 and 2020, carbon emissions declined 14 percent in the U.S., more than in any other nation, while just 300 people died from natural disasters, a more than 90 percent decline over the past century. Public acceptance of trans people is higher than ever. The total US prison and jail population peaked in 2008 and has declined significantly ever since. Just 4 percent of state prisoners, who are 87 percent of the total prison population, are in for nonviolent drug possession; just 14 percent are in for any nonviolent drug offense. And many large cities including Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle have effectively decriminalized public camping by homeless people.  Progressives respond that these gains obscure broad inequalities, and are under threat. Black Americans are killed at between two to three times the rate of white Americans, according to a Washington Post analysis of police killings between 2015 and 2020. Carbon emissions are once again rising as the U.S. emerges from the covid pandemic, and scientists believe global warming is contributing to extreme weather events. In 2020, Human Rights Campaign found that at least 44 transgender and non-gender conforming people were killed, which is the most since it started tracking fatalities in 2013, and already that number has reached 45 this year. Drug prohibition remains in effect, homeless people are still being arrested, and the U.S. continues to have one of the highest rates of incarceration in the world. But those numbers, too, obscure important realities. There are no racial differences in police killings when accounting for whether or not the suspect was armed or a threat (“justified” vs “unjustified” shooting). While carbon emissions will rise in 2021 there is every reason to believe they will continue to decline in the future, so long as natural gas continues to replace coal, and nuclear plants continue operating. While climate change may be contributing to extreme weather events, neither the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change nor another other scientific body predicts it will outpace rising resilience to cause an increase in deaths from natural disasters. Researchers do not know if trans people are being killed disproportionately in comparison to cis-gender people, if trans homicides are rising, or if trans people are being killed for being trans, rather than for some other reason. Twenty-six states have decriminalized marijuana, and California and Oregon have decriminalized and legalized, respectively, the possession of all drugs. Progressive District Attorneys in San Francisco, Los Angeles and other major cities have scaled back prosecutions against people for breaking many laws related to homelessness including public camping, public drug use, and theft. And yet many Americans would be surprised to learn any of the above information; some would reject it outright as false. Consider that, despite the decline in police killings of African Americans, the share of the public which said police violence is a serious or extremely serious problem rose from 32 to 45 percent between 2015 and 2020. Despite the decline in carbon emissions, 47 percent of the public agreed with the statement, “Carbon emissions have risen in the United States over the last 10 years,” and just 16 percent disagreed. Meanwhile, 46 percent of Americans agree with the statement, “Deaths from natural disasters will increase in the future due to climate change” and just 16 percent disagreed, despite the absence of any scientific scenario supporting such fears. And despite the lack of good evidence, mainstream news media widely reported that the killing of trans people is on the rise. The gulf between reality and perception is alarming for reasons that go beyond the importance of having an informed electorate for a healthy liberal democracy. Distrust of the police appears to have contributed to the nearly 30% rise in homicides after the 2020 Black Lives Matter protests last year, both by embolding criminals and causing a pull-back of police. A growing body of research finds that news media coverage of climate change is contributing to rising levels of anxiety and depression among children. And there is good reason to fear that misinformation about the killing of trans and non-gender conforming individuals contributes to anxiety and depression among trans and gender dysphoric youth. Social Media, NGOs, and the Death of God Why is that? Why does there exist such a massive divide between perception and reality on so many important issues? Part of the reason appears to stem from the rise of social media and corresponding changes to news media over the last decade. Social media fuels rising and unwarranted certainty, dogmatism, and intolerance of viewpoint diversity and disconfirmatory information. Social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram reward users for sharing information popular with peers, particularly extreme views, and punish users for expressing unpopular, more moderate, and less emotional opinions. This cycle is self-reinforcing. Audiences seek out views that reinforce their own. Experts seek conclusions, and journalists write stories, which affirm the predispositions of their audiences. It may be for these reasons that much of the news media have failed to inform their audiences that there are no racial differences in police killings, that emissions are declining, and that claims of rising trans killings are unscientific. Another reason may be due to the influence of well-funded advocacy organizations to shape public perceptions, particularly in combination with social media. Organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union, Human Rights Campaign, and Drug Policy Alliance have misled journalists, policymakers, and the public, about police killings, drug policy, and trans killings, often by simply leaving out crucial contextual information. The same has been true for climate activists, including those operating as experts and journalists, who withhold information about declining deaths from natural disasters, the cost of disasters relative to GDP growth, and declining U.S. emissions.  But neither of these explanations fully captures the religious quality of so much of the progressive discourse on issues relating to race, climate, trans, crime, drugs, homelessness, and the related issue of mental illness. A growing number of liberal, heterodoxical, and conservative thinkers alike use the word “woke” to describe the religiosity of so many progressive causes today. In his new book, Woke Racism, Columbia University linguist John McWhorter argues that Wokeism should, literally, be considered a religion. As evidence for his argument McWhorter points to commonly held myths, like the debunked claim that the American War of Independence was fought to maintain slavery, or that racial disparities in educational performance are due to racist teachers. He points to Woke religious fervor in seeking to censor, fire, and otherwise punish heretics for holding taboo views. And McWhorter suggests that, because Wokeism meets specific psychological and spiritual needs for meaning, belonging, and status, pointing out its supernatural elements is likely to have little impact among the Woke. But just because an ideology is dogmatic and self-righteous does not necessarily make it a religion, and so it is fair to ask whether Wokeism is anything more than a new belief system. There is no obviously mythological or supernatural element to Woke ideology, and its adherents rarely, if ever, justify their statements with reference to a god, or higher power. But a deeper look at Wokeism does, indeed, reveal a whole series of mythological and supernatural beliefs, including the idea that white people today are responsible for the racist actions of white people in the past; that climate change risks making humans extinct; and that a person can change their sex by simply identifying as the opposite sex. Woke Religion: A Taxonomy While reading McWhorter’s new book, I was surprised to discover many similarities between woke racism and apocalyptic environmentalism, which in Apocalypse Never I describe as a religion. Each offers an original sin as the cause of present-day evils (e.g., slavery, the industrial revolution). Each has guilty devils (e.g., white people, “climate deniers,” etc.) sacred victims (e.g., black people, poor islanders, etc.) and what McWhorter calls “The Elect,” or people self-appointed to crusade against evil (e.g., BLM activists, Greta Thunberg, etc.). And each have a set of taboos (e.g., saying “All lives matter,” criticizing renewables, etc.) and purifying rituals (e.g., kneeling/apologizing, buying carbon offsets, etc). I also saw parallels between woke racism, apocalyptic environmentalism, and victimology, which in San Fransicko I describe as a religion complete with the metaphysical (essentialist) view that people can be categorized as victims or oppressors, by nature of their identity or experience.  I reached out to a new friend, Peter Boghossian, a philosopher who recently resigned his post at Portland State University in response to Wokeist repression, and other experts in different Woke movements, and together we constructed a Woke Religion Taxonomy (below). It includes seven issue areas (Racism, Climate Change, Trans, Crime, Mental Illness, Drugs, and Homelessness) covered by Woke Racism, Apocalypse Never, San Fransicko, Peter’s research, and the writings of other critics of Wokeism. And it cuts across ten religious categories (Original Sin, Guilty Devils, Myths, Sacred Victims, The Elect, Supernatural Beliefs, Taboo Facts, Taboo Speech, Purifying Rituals, Purifying Speech). We were surprised by how straightforward it was to fill in each category, and by the fascinating similarities and differences between them.  We decided to publish the Woke Religion Taxonomy because it was helpful to our own understanding of Wokeism as a religion, and we felt it might help others. The Taxonomy identifies common myths and supernatural beliefs and helps explain why so many people continue to hold them, despite overwhelming evidence that they are false. We are under no illusion that the Taxonomy will reduce the power that Wokeism holds over true believers. But we also believe it will help orient those who are confused by its irrationalism, and are seeking an accessible overview. Finally, we are publishing it because we recognize that we might be wrong, either about matters of fact or classification, and hope it will encourage a healthy discussion and debate. As such, we have published it with the caveat that it is “Version 1.0” with the expectation that we will revise it in the future. Both Peter and I would like to stress that we have published the Taxonomy in service of the liberal and democratic project of social and environmental progress, which we believe to be under threat from Wokeism. We believe the U.S. is well-positioned to reduce police killings, crime, and carbon emissions; protect the lives and the mental health of trans, non-gender conforming, and cis-gender people; and better treat of the mentally ill and drug addicted. But doing so will require that Wokeism weaken its grip over the American psyche. As Peter writes, “bigotry and racial discrimination are real and they have no place in society. Yes, there is ongoing racism. Yes, there is ongoing homophobia. Yes, there is ongoing hatred of trans people. These are morally abhorrent and we all need to work together to bring about their end. The woke religion, however, is not the way to stop these moral horrors. It is making our shared problems more difficult to solve.” Click image for huge legible version. *  *  * Michael Shellenberger is a Time Magazine "Hero of the Environment,"Green Book Award winner, and the founder and president of Environmental Progress. He is author of just launched book San Fransicko (Harper Collins) and the best-selling book, Apocalypse Never (Harper Collins June 30, 2020). Subscribe To Michael's substack here Tyler Durden Sat, 11/13/2021 - 19:30.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 13th, 2021