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FDA Bans Juul, Here"s How We Got Here

Juul once dominated the e-cigarette market. Now, the FDA has banned its products — but how did it come to this? The FDA banned Juul due to its role in the rise in youth vaping. Juul once controlled 75% of the national e-cigarette market. But from 2018 to 2021, Juul's value plunged from $38 billion to under $5 billion. Juul launched in 2015, and within two years on the market, its popularity skyrocketed. Cofounders Adam Bowen and James Monsees were hoping to create a satisfying alternative to cigarettes for adult smokers who wanted to quit. Instead, their product got a new generation hooked on nicotine.By 2018, over 3 million high schoolers were vaping, and Juul's market share increased by 160% within a year. The vaping giant was at an all-time high and seemed untouchable — until the FDA declared youth vaping an epidemic.Juul has since taken steps to reset its policy and advertising efforts, which have been accused of targeting teens for years. But after a long delay, the FDA announced a ban on Juul's products in June 2022. So how did it come to this?Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 23rd, 2022

Planned Parenthood could share personal data like the ZIP codes of abortion seekers with Google and Facebook, report says

Planned Parenthood's online scheduling tool can share data with third-parties including users' ZIP codes, IP addresses, and site behavior. Planned Parenthood said sharing data is important for its targeted advertising campaigns.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images Planned Parenthood's scheduling tool can share users' locations with Google, The Washington Post reports. Data on users' ZIP codes and the type of abortion they sought can flow to third parties. Facebook, TikTok, and Hotjar could also access user data, the report said. Detailed data on abortion seekers who use Planned Parenthood's online scheduling portal could be shared with Facebook, Google, TikTok, and Hotjar, according to an investigation by privacy app Lockdown Privacy reported by The Washington Post.Data shared with Google from Planned Parenthood's website can include the IP address, approximate ZIP codes, the type of abortion sought, and the particular clinic used by someone seeking an abortion. Planned Parenthood told the Washington Post that this data sharing is necessary for its targeted advertising efforts. However, privacy experts are raising the alarm over the potential for digital surveillance of abortion seekers, as abortion bans sweep parts of the US following the repeal of Roe v. Wade last week.Information such as user search history and IP addresses can be subject to judicial subpoenas in criminal cases. Abortion is now prohibited in 17 states, a number that is expected to grow as legislators react to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe, a 1973 ruling which protected abortion rights.A VICE report last month caused ripples after a reporter successfully purchased phone location data on people who visited abortion clinics from a data broker. Democrats have called on the FTC to more securely protect the personal data of people seeking abortions. Planned Parenthood did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment outside of normal business hours.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider2 hr. 1 min. ago

Who"s Still Buying Fossil Fuels From Russia?

Who's Still Buying Fossil Fuels From Russia? Despite looming sanctions and import bans, Russia exported $97.7 billion worth of fossil fuels in the first 100 days since its invasion of Ukraine, at an average of $977 million per day. So, which fossil fuels are being exported by Russia, and who is importing these fuels? The infographic below, via Visual Capitalist's Niccolo Conte and Govind Bhutada, tracks the biggest importers of Russia’s fossil fuel exports during the first 100 days of the war based on data from the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air (CREA). In Demand: Russia’s Black Gold The global energy market has seen several cyclical shocks over the last few years. The gradual decline in upstream oil and gas investment followed by pandemic-induced production cuts led to a drop in supply, while people consumed more energy as economies reopened and winters got colder. Consequently, fossil fuel demand was rising even before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which exacerbated the market shock. Russia is the third-largest producer and second-largest exporter of crude oil. In the 100 days since the invasion, oil was by far Russia’s most valuable fossil fuel export, accounting for $48 billion or roughly half of the total export revenue.   While Russian crude oil is shipped on tankers, a network of pipelines transports Russian gas to Europe. In fact, Russia accounts for 41% of all natural gas imports to the EU, and some countries are almost exclusively dependent on Russian gas. Of the $25 billion exported in pipeline gas, 85% went to the EU. The Top Importers of Russian Fossil Fuels The EU bloc accounted for 61% of Russia’s fossil fuel export revenue during the 100-day period. Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands—members of both the EU and NATO—were among the largest importers, with only China surpassing them.   China overtook Germany as the largest importer, importing nearly 2 million barrels of discounted Russian oil per day in May—up 55% relative to a year ago. Similarly, Russia surpassed Saudi Arabia as China’s largest oil supplier. The biggest increase in imports came from India, buying 18% of all Russian oil exports during the 100-day period. A significant amount of the oil that goes to India is re-exported as refined products to the U.S. and Europe, which are trying to become independent of Russian imports. Reducing Reliance on Russia In response to the invasion of Ukraine, several countries have taken strict action against Russia through sanctions on exports, including fossil fuels.  The U.S. and Sweden have banned Russian fossil fuel imports entirely, with monthly import volumes down 100% and 99% in May relative to when the invasion began, respectively. On a global scale, monthly fossil fuel import volumes from Russia were down 15% in May, an indication of the negative political sentiment surrounding the country. It’s also worth noting that several European countries, including some of the largest importers over the 100-day period, have cut back on Russian fossil fuels. Besides the EU’s collective decision to reduce dependence on Russia, some countries have also refused the country’s ruble payment scheme, leading to a drop in imports. The import curtailment is likely to continue. The EU recently adopted a sixth sanction package against Russia, placing a complete ban on all Russian seaborne crude oil products. The ban, which covers 90% of the EU’s oil imports from Russia, will likely realize its full impact after a six-to-eight month period that permits the execution of existing contracts. While the EU is phasing out Russian oil, several European countries are heavily reliant on Russian gas. A full-fledged boycott on Russia’s fossil fuels would also hurt the European economy—therefore, the phase-out will likely be gradual, and subject to the changing geopolitical environment. Tyler Durden Thu, 06/30/2022 - 06:55.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedge2 hr. 49 min. ago

Sen. Marco Rubio supported banning almost all abortions in a newly uncovered 2010 questionnaire

Facing reelection in November, many Republicans such as Rubio haven't made promises about the types of abortion bans they'd work to nationalize. Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida is running for reelection in Florida.Graeme Jennings/Pool via AP Marco Rubio has never shied away from calling himself "pro-life." But as he seeks reelection he hasn't said which abortion ban a GOP-majority Senate should pursue.  Republicans have new openings on abortion restrictions now that Roe v. Wade is history. Like many Senate Republicans, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida says he's "pro-life" but has avoided calling for a national abortion ban in the wake of the Supreme Court's opinion overturning Roe v. Wade.Rubio, who is up for reelection in November, instead has championed his forthcoming bill that he says is "truly pro-life" because it would expand federal support during pregnancy and parenthood. But in a 2010 questionnaire, then-first-time US Senate candidate Rubio was far more explicit about the types of abortion restrictions he'd support.He backed a constitutional amendment to ban abortions unless a pregnancy is life-threatening, and said he'd support a bill to give spouses the right to be notified and intervene before an abortion.The questionnaire, from the National Pro-Life Alliance, asked whether Rubio would support 10 of their priorities. He replied "yes" to all of them.The questionnaire sheds some light into how Rubio views abortion, though his Senate record and public comments add more to the story.With the midterms less than five months away, Democrats are pressuring Senate Republicans to explain where precisely they stand on abortion. They hope the contrast on the issue will help them make inroads in places like Florida as they seek to expand their razor-thin majority. Now that the Supreme Court has overturned Roe, the 1973 decision that guaranteed a national right to abortion, the legality of abortion falls to state legislatures unless Congress overrides them with a national abortion guarantee or ban. Many Senate Republicans have avoided saying which ban, if any, they'll support.Twelve years after Rubio filled out the National Pro-Life Alliance questionnaire, he has followed through on some pledges.He cosponsored legislation to permanently prevent federal funds from paying for most abortions. Another bill he cosponsored would obligate doctors to give abortion pills to patients only in person, and not via telehealth video meetings or through the mail.Rubio hasn't made any comments that show he would no longer support the measures in the questionnaire, but also hasn't followed through on all the pledges from the form. For instance, while he agreed to support the Life at Conception Act, Rubio hasn't cosponsored the bill. ButRubio, who is Catholic, has said he believes life begins at conception. Rubio also has cosponsored bills not on the questionnaire. They included a bill that would ban abortion nationally after 20 weeks, and levy criminal penalties on doctors who don't comply, as well as legislation that would obligate doctors to get consent from parents for minors who travel across state lines for abortions. GOP senators haven't announced a national anti-abortion planRubio agreed with overturning Roe and has consistently opposed abortion. But he sidestepped a question from Insider in May asking which national abortion laws a Republican-controlled Senate should support. Speaking on Fox News' Sean Hannity Friday, Rubio stressed that now state legislatures could decide "whether they want to allow abortion, prohibit it, and how they want to regulate it." In Florida, a law is expected to take effect July 1 that will make abortions illegal after 15 weeks, with no exceptions for rape, incest, or human trafficking. It's not clear yet whether a Senate Republican majority would seek an all-out ban or a more incremental approach on abortion. The conservative House Republican Study Committee has endorsed a six-week ban while other House Republicans are eyeing a national 15-week ban, CNN reported. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said in May that a national abortion ban was "possible" but pledged he wouldn't do it through abolishing the filibuster, meaning lowering the voting threshold to pass major legislation to 51 votes. Still, coalescing behind legislation would tee up a bill for a future GOP president.The National Pro-Life Alliance didn't answer questions from Insider about which abortion restrictions it wanted candidates to support after Roe. Rep. Val Demings of Florida speaks before the introduction of then Vice Presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris during an early voting mobilization event at the Central Florida Fairgrounds on October 19, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. President Donald Trump won Florida in the 2016 presidential election.Photo by Octavio Jones/Getty ImagesDemocrats lean in on abortion rights In contrast to Republicans, most congressional Democrats unified behind the Women's Health Protection Act, which would make abortion legal in all states and undo most restrictions. Rubio opposed the bill in May, calling it "radical and outrageous" because it allows for undefined "health" exemptions to abortions late in a pregnancy.Rep. Val Demings of Florida, the frontrunner to be Rubio's Democratic opponent in November, voted for the bill. She also voted for a spending bill that eliminated the Hyde Amendment, a rider that blocks the federal government from paying for most abortions. Demings called for eliminating the filibuster in a USA Today column last year. When she was asked about the Supreme Court in a 2020 PBS interview she said it was"incumbent upon us to use every tool within our authority to right a wrong."But Demings didn't sign onto a House bill last year to increase the number of Supreme Court justices from nine to 12. On Tuesday, her campaign told Insider she doesn't support a court expansion. Demings also told reporters last month that she supports abortion until viability and afterward only "when it threatens the health of the woman, the mother." The Demings campaign is also going on offense on abortion. A new website accuses Rubio of having a "Radical Agenda for Women" and posted his National Pro-Life Alliance questionnaire. Her campaign has accused Rubio of opposing legal abortion even in cases of rape or incest. Asked about this in a 2015 CNN interview, Rubio said he personally believed "you do not correct one tragedy with a second tragedy."It's not yet clear whether abortion rights will be the lighting-rod issue that Democrats hope will help them keep or gain seats in November. They still have to contend with Biden's sagging approval ratings, and voters are struggling with high costs of everyday needs, from food to gas.Rubio focused on a "pro-family" approachMost Republicans did unite on an abortion bills under then-President Donald Trump, voting on a bill that dealt with botched, late-pregnancy abortions and another that would have nationally banned abortions after 20 weeks.The bills failed but Rubio voted for both while Demings voted against both. It's possible Republicans could resurface these bills or go further under pressure from anti-abortion advocates. Last week, Rubio introduced a framework for his forthcoming legislation, the Providing for Life Act. The document includes bills he has introduced before and doesn't address nationalizing abortion restrictions. Among other provisions, the bill would increase the child tax credit he pushed to double in 2017 and extend it to cover the time during pregnancy. It also would make the adoption tax credit fully refundable, require biological fathers to pay at least half of pregnancy-related medical costs, and takes from legislation he introduced in 2018 that would allow new parents to withdraw early from their Social Security in order to help fund paid leave. "Our work is far from over," Rubio wrote in the Washington Examiner on the Roe decision. "We can and must do more for unborn children and their mothers. What we need is a pro-life plan for post-Roe America."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider15 hr. 17 min. ago

Uber, Nike, Lyft, Disney, JP Morgan and others vow to help employees access abortions after Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade: "We must keep up the fight"

Numerous US companies have gone public saying they'd front the costs for employees traveling to seek abortions. Protests spring up across the US as citizens react to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadeSarah Silbiger/CNN The US Supreme Court has struck down Roe v. Wade. Businesses have had months to grapple with the ramifications of this long-anticipated ruling. Even before the ruling, some companies had come out with public stances regarding the end of Roe. The Supreme Court has struck down Roe v. Wade, effectively cutting off abortion access in many parts of the US. The seismic ruling is set to reverberate throughout the country, including in the business world."We therefore hold that the Constitution does not confer a right to abortion," the majority of Supreme Court justices wrote in the decision, handed down Friday morning. "Roe and Casey must be overruled, and the authority to regulate abortion must be returned to the people and their elected representatives."Given the widespread implications for half the workforce in anti-abortion states, experts have said companies based in jurisdictions with abortion bans will face repercussions around recruitment and retention and even possible legal jeopardy.Before the ruling, some businesses began offering support for employees affected by the court's long-predicted decision. Others have remained largely silent on the issue.This story is developing. Check back for updates.AmazonAmazon has publicly said it'd cover costs for employees seeking abortions in states where the procedure were made illegal.AppleApple CEO Tim Cook has said the tech giant will cover employees who "travel out-of-state for medical care if it is unavailable in their home state."AT&TThe telecommunications giant said in a statement: "The health of our employees and their families is important to our company, and we provide benefits that cover the cost of travel for medical procedures that are not available within 100 miles of their home."Previous reporting from Insider found that AT&T contributed some $1.2 million to leaders backing abortion bans in the US. It is the single largest publicly traded company behind so-called trigger laws, or laws that will effectively ban abortion in several states given the Supreme Court's decision overturning Roe v. Wade.  Comcast-NBC UniversalThe media company confirmed with Variety that it offers travel benefits that cover medical services and procedures that aren't available in the employee's area for up to $4,000 per trip and three trips a year. CNN confirmed that abortion care is covered.Condé NastCondé Nast CEO Roger Lynch sent out an email to workers that says the company's "most powerful" response will be through its "distinct editorial lenses"—Oliver Darcy (@oliverdarcy) June 24, 2022Condé Nast has also announced that it will "assist covered employees and their covered dependents in obtaining access to reproductive care regardless of where they reside.""Today, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to abortion, allowing individual states to more aggressively regulate or ban the procedure altogether," CEO Roger Lynch wrote in a note to employees. "It is a crushing blow to reproductive rights that have been protected for nearly half a century."CVS"Ensuring access to safe, legal, high-quality health care is one of our most important priorities," the pharmacy giant said in a statement to Insider. "We will continue to provide colleagues, clients, and consumers with the flexibility to choose medical and pharmacy benefits to best suit their needs, including making out-of-state care accessible for our covered employees residing in states that have instituted laws that limit access in their state."Dick's Sporting GoodsDick's CEO Lauren Hobart posted on LinkedIn, saying she's protecting her employees'  health and well-being."In response to today's ruling, we are announcing that if a state one of our teammates lives in restricts access to abortion, DICK'S Sporting Goods will provide up to $4,000 in travel expense reimbursement to travel to the nearest location where that care is legally available. This benefit will be provided to any teammate, spouse or dependent enrolled in our medical plan, along with one support person," the retail CEO said."We recognize people feel passionately about this topic, and that there are teammates and athletes who will not agree with this decision. However, we also recognize that decisions involving health and families are deeply personal and made with thoughtful consideration," she addedDisneySpeaking on background, a Disney spokesperson said the company has "communicated directly" with its employees to "recognize the impact of the ruling." The company's travel benefit will cover pregnancy-related decisions, and the company re-emphasized its commitment to providing affordable healthcare for all employees, regardless of their locations.HP"As a company, we believe that it should be up to every single one of our employees to decide whether and when to start a family, whether that's choosing who they love and marry, taking paid time off if they are having a child, and having access to healthcare," HP CEO Enrique Lores tweeted on Friday. The information technology and hardware company said in a May statement that it would continue to support employees needed out-of-state reproductive care and would cover related travel expenses. IndeedThe careers platform said in a statement that: "Employees who are on Indeed insurance will be reimbursed for travel expenses for covered medical procedures that are unavailable where they live.""At Indeed, we believe that work needs women, and women need access to safe and affordable health care," the statement reads. "Anything that limits the freedom of women to make their own decisions about their health hurts them and society. Limiting access to safe and affordable health care will hit hardest in marginalized communities, especially people of color and those in lower income brackets."Johnson & JohnsonA spokesperson for the pharmaceutical and consumer-goods giant told Insider in a statement that the company offers reimbursement for US employees who need to travel for medical services not available within 100 miles of their home, which includes reproductive healthcare. "As the world's most broadly-based healthcare company, we strive to improve access and affordability, create healthier communities, and put health within reach for the people we serve," the spokesperson said. "We also believe healthcare decisions are best determined by individuals in consultation with their healthcare provider."JPMorgan ChaseIn response to the Roe ruling, the financial institution assured its workforce that it would pay for employees to travel to receive abortions, according to CNBC.KrogerA Kroger spokesperson told Insider that employees who use the company's health plan have access to "a comprehensive benefits package that includes quality, affordable health care and travel benefits up to $4,000 to facilitate access to quality care for several categories of medical treatments and a full range of reproductive health care services, including abortion and fertility treatments."Levi StraussIn a statement to Insider, a spokesperson from the clothing company highlighted the brand's donations to reproductive-rights nonprofits and said:"We stand strongly against any actions that hinder the health and well-being of our employees, which means opposing any steps to restrict access to the full range of reproductive health care, including abortion. Protection of reproductive rights is a critical business issue impacting our workforce, our economy, and progress toward gender and racial equity. Given what is at stake, business leaders need to make their voices heard and act to protect the health and well-being of our employees." Live NationIn an Instagram post, Live Nation pledged to cover the travel expenses for employees who need access to women's healthcare services, and bail expenses for employees arrested while protesting peacefully. A post shared by Live Nation Concerts (@livenation)  LyftThe rideshare company promised legal support for drivers at risk of lawsuits for driving passengers to abortion appointments. "We believe access to healthcare is essential and transportation should never be a barrier to that access," a Lyft spokesperson told ABC News. "This decision will hurt millions of women by taking away access to safe, and private reproductive healthcare services."MetaMeta said in a statement that it plans to reimburse travel expenses for employees who need to access out-of-state reproductive care.In a post on Facebook, longtime Meta COO Sheryl Sandberg posted about the Supreme Court's decision."I grew up hearing stories from my mom about what women in our country went through before Roe," she wrote. "My Mom had a friend who left the country to get a safe abortion. Most women could not afford to do this; some had back-alley abortions, which led all too often to serious health complications and sometimes even death. All women knew that they could possibly face impossible choices between controlling their futures and their health and breaking the law."Sandberg went on to write, "I never thought my mom's past would become my daughters' futures. I cannot believe that I'm going to send my three daughters to college with fewer rights than I had. The Supreme Court's ruling jeopardizes the health and the lives of millions of girls and women across the country."The "Lean In" author wrote that the new ruling "threatens to undo the progress women have made in the workplace.""It will make it harder for women to achieve their dreams," she wrote. "And it will disproportionately impact women with the fewest resources. This is a huge setback. For ourselves, our daughters, and every generation that follows, we must keep up the fight. Together, we must protect and expand abortion access."!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider15 hr. 17 min. ago

After Roe, people seeking abortion face long travel, steep costs. Grassroots organizations are stepping in to help.

The cost of an abortion can range from $350 to $1,500 — not counting travel. Without help, some women will be "forced to make dangerous choices," one advocate said. Reproductive rights activists hold signs in New York City.ED JONES/AFP via Getty Images The Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, causing abortion access to be cut off in some states. Insider spoke with representatives of two reproductive-justice organizations. They spoke about the challenges facing individuals seeking out abortions. Now that the US Supreme Court has crushed Roe v. Wade, residents in over a dozen states may have to travel — hundreds of miles in some cases— to receive abortion care.Many of those individuals will turn to local organizations for support. These organizations — abortion funds, support networks, and other reproductive rights-focused groups — are getting inundated with requests for assistance, and also interest from prospective donors and volunteers infuriated with the Supreme Court's rulings.Thirteen US states have trigger laws — or legislation created to take effect immediately after the fall of Roe. Other states are slated to introduce abortion bans or near-bans.The cost of an abortion can range from $350 to $1,500, depending on factors like location and the type of abortion procedure. For people traveling long distances, costs can quickly skyrocket."The longer you don't have access to care, the more exponentially expensive abortion care costs," Jordyn Close, the board chair of abortion fund Women Have Options Ohio, told Insider. Close said that this week alone, Women Have Options Ohio has raised nearly $400,000 in pledges.  WHO/O provides financial assistance to patients directly and also distributes money to clinics throughout the Buckeye State. The Columbus Dispatch reported that abortion remains legal up to six weeks of pregnancy in Ohio, which advocates say is not long enough for most people to recognize the signs of a pregnancy.   "There are so many clients for whom having to pay out of pocket would mean they can't afford groceries," said Sarah Moeller, the director of resource development for abortion-care support organization The Brigid Alliance. "They can't pay their rent, they can't pay their bills or they'll be forced to make dangerous choices in order to get the care that they need."The Brigid Alliance is a staff-run organization that funds and arranges every element of a client's "abortion itinerary," pairing patients with coordinators who work to arrange all abortion-related accommodations. Moeller said that the average cost per itinerary is over $1,000.Abortion funds and other organization often step in to help individuals with the costs associated with abortions. The Brigid Alliance provides stipends for meals and childcare reimbursements, as well. WHO/O also helps pay for childcare, transportation, and doula services."Some people are traveling long distance by plane," Moeller said. "Some people prefer to drive in a personal vehicle, especially during COVID surges. Whether we're booking a plane ticket or sending cash for somebody to pay for gas, hotels, and parking, it has an effect on the total cost of the itinerary."Facing a possible major loss on the recruitment and retention fronts, numerous private businesses have pledged to reimburse employees seeking abortion care. Both Close and Moeller told Insider that their organizations have not received any inquiries from businesses looking to support employees seeking abortions. Members of the public have also taken to social media to advocate for abortion access.  Both Moeller and Close recommended that would-be activists get involved with the established network of abortion funds and support providers, rather than attempting to venture out on their own, in order to avoid possible privacy and security risks."I don't think that a lot of people know that there is a network of abortion funds and practical support funds that already exist. I didn't know that abortion funds existed when I had my abortion in 2015," Close said. "You can get involved with your local orgs that are already doing this work. We're just trying to get the word out that you don't have to re-create the wheel."'A huge undertaking'But even with an established network of interconnected organizations, individuals living in states that have barred abortion access are feeling isolated after the Supreme Court's ruling."I have a lot of support emotionally and financially, and I am very lucky to have such," Taylor Byrd, a single mother living in Arkansas, told Insider. "Even with that, if I was suddenly in a position to where I needed, or even wanted, an abortion, the financial toll it would have on myself, my family, my household, is honestly unimaginable. The closest state that is still seeing patients is in Kansas." Byrd listed the costs of travel — plane ticket costs, gas prices —lost revenue from missing days of work, and the costs of childcare as significant hurdles."It would be such a huge undertaking, I don't even feel like it's something I can plan for as an emergency," she said.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider20 hr. 49 min. ago

Live updates: Here"s what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates say

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Here's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 29th, 2022

Here"s what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates say

From packing the court to offering grants for out-of-state travel, here are measures advocates and lawmakers have recommended after the reversal of Roe v. Wade. US President Joe Biden attends the first day of the G7 leaders' summit, at Bavaria's Schloss Elmau castle, in Kruen, Germany, Sunday, June 26, 2022.Lukas Barth/Pool Photo via AP The Supreme Court ended the federal right to an abortion by overturning Roe v. Wade last week.  President Joe Biden condemned the decision, calling on Congress to act and citizens to vote. Here are the measures abortion advocates have called on Biden to implement since Roe was overturned.  As the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. On Friday, Biden said the Court's decision would "literally take America back 150 years" and that his administration will aggressively defend Americans' rights to receive abortion pills through the mail or to travel across state lines to receive care. The president called on Congress to act, despite Democrats' failures to codify abortion rights into federal law. He also called on Americans to vote in the midterms in November. "Let me be very clear and unambiguous: The only way we can secure a women's right to choose, the balance that existed, is for Congress to restore the protections of Roe v. Wade as federal law," he said. "No executive action from the president can do that."While Biden has said his "administration will use all of its appropriate lawful powers" to help Americans retain access to abortion,  lawmakers and advocates have called on the president to implement the following measures since Roe was overturned. Expand the Supreme CourtActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022 in Washington, DC.Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeDemocrats and abortion-rights activists have demanded Biden administration to expand the Supreme Court and add justices to balance the conservative majority. Over 50 House Democrats co-signed a 2021 bill to expand the Court to 13 justices. While the number of justices on the Supreme Court has been nine since 1869, it historically ranged between five and 10 justices. There is no limit to number of justices on the high court in the Constitution,and Congress has the power to decide its size. The last major attempt to expand the court, under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, failed in Congress.White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before," she said. "That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing.Declare a 'public health and national emergency'Activists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesSenators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota called on Biden to  "declare a public health emergency" after the Supreme Court ruling."We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote in an op-ed for the New York Times.Members of the Congressional Black Caucus authored a letter to Biden ahead of the Court's final decision, calling on the president "to use every tool at your disposal to protect fundamental reproductive rights and abortion access." "The effects of this decision on the lives and health of Black women and pregnant people will be devastating and require an urgent and whole-of-government response," said the letter signed by Reps. Ayanna Pressley, Cori Bush, Barbara Lee, and nearly two dozen others."Declaring a public health emergency and national emergency will allow your Administration to utilize additional flexibilities and deploy resources where necessary," they added. "In this unprecedented moment, we must act urgently as if lives depend on it because they do."Establish abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez joins abortion-rights activists as they demonstrate following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in Washington on June 24, 2022.Jacquelyn Martin/APRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday demanded Biden create abortion clinics on federal lands while speaking at a protest in New York. "There are also actions at President Biden's disposal that he can mobilize," Ocasio-Cortez said. "I'll start with the babiest of the babiest of the baby steps: Open abortion clinics on federal lands in red states right now. Right now."However, Vice President Kamala Harris said that putting abortion clinics on federal lands is "not right now what we are discussing" in the administration. The proposition would face logistical hurdles like the longstanding Hyde Amendment, which bars federal funds from directly funding abortion services through programs like Medicaid and Title X. A White House official told Insider that the proposal could be a risk to "women and providers who are not federal employees could be potentially be prosecuted."Offer federal support or grants for those traveling out of state for abortion careAbortion access is a confusing patchwork across the US, with each state in charge of its own rules.In total, eight states have banned abortion since the Supreme Court ruling on June 24, but courts have temporarily blocked abortion bans in Louisiana and Utah, allowing patients to receive care in the meantime. Experts have pointed out that many Americans will be forced to travel across state lines to access abortions. States like Illinois — which share borders with states that immediately implemented bans on abortion after the Supreme Court ruling — are bracing for an influx of people to cross their state lines.Biden said he intends to fight to protect an individual's right to travel across state lines to get abortion care, but he hasn't gone as far as offering federal support to people who have to travel."If any state or local official, high or low, tries to interfere with a woman's exercising her basic right to travel, I will do everything in my power to fight that deeply un-American attack," Biden said last Friday in his address following the ruling.Lisa Gilbert, executive vice president of the non-profit Public Citizen, told Insider that the Biden administration could establish grants for people who need to travel to get abortion care. "State by state there will be different requirements and limitations, so the cost of traveling to a place where you can get this care is part of the issue," Gilbert told Insider. "So figuring out ways to assist, providing grants or other mechanisms for funding to reach women who need to travel would be a thing for them to consider."Any actions the administration takes would again have to be in compliance with the Hyde Amendment, which prohibits the use of federal funds for abortion care. Provide easier access to abortion medicationBoxes of the drug mifepristone line a shelf at the West Alabama Women's Center in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on Wednesday, March 16, 2022.Allen G. Breed, File/APGilbert added that the Biden administration could also loosen restrictions on prescribing the abortion pill. In December, the US Food and Drug Administration lifted a measure that required patients to visit a clinic or doctor in person in order to obtain mifepristone, one of the drugs used in a medical abortion, The New York Times reported.  "The federal government could help make abortion medication easier to access, the abortion pill," Gilbert said. "They've already made it easier for women to get abortion pills by mail or prescribed through telemedicine, but they can also change the guidelines to allow any medical provider to write a prescription for the medication and could expand where you can get it, to which pharmacies it could be gotten at. So that's a pretty straightforward thing that would be wonderful to see."Help people understand abortion laws state by state as well as their rightGilbert said one of the biggest ways the Biden administration can help is "just helping people understand abortion law." "This sort of patchwork that I was describing is going to be a huge problem. It's state-by-state, and it's going to be evolving very regularly, we would imagine," Gilbert said. "So making sure that the administration is being helpful on that front."While laws on abortion access vary state by state, conservative states like Texas and Oklahoma have enacted vigilante abortion laws that encourage citizens to report those who they think have assisted in providing an abortion. On Saturday, one day after the Supreme Court's ruling, the Department of Health and Human Services issued a guide to help people "know your rights" on reproductive care. "People can find the info from the federal government. They've set up a website already, and so just making sure that that's updated and that people know about it and that they can get the information that they need," Gilbert said. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Live updates: Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available after the fall of Roe v. Wade, top US health official says

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. The Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortions

With the Supreme Court having overturned Roe v. Wade, state courts are emerging as key battlegrounds in the fight over abortion laws. People attend an abortion-rights protest at the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on June 24, 2022.Rick Bowmer/AP Courts in three states have so far blocked state-level abortion bans after Roe was overturned.  Judges in Louisiana and Utah temporarily blocked those states' "trigger laws" banning abortion. Here's where abortion access currently stands and where judges have blocked bans.  The Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday. Here's where abortion access currently stands, and where courts have temporarily blocked abortion bans so far:!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Pharmacies Rationing Purchases Of Emergency Contraception Pills Amid Soaring Demand Post-Roe

Pharmacies Rationing Purchases Of Emergency Contraception Pills Amid Soaring Demand Post-Roe Authored by Katabella Roberts via The Epoch Times, Retail giants CVS Health Corp. and Walmart Inc. have announced that they will be limiting the number of purchases of emergency contraceptive pills amid increased demand following the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Drugstore chain Rite Aid Corp. is also limiting purchases of the “Plan B One-Step” morning-after pill, which is typically taken within 72 hours after a woman engages in unprotected sex or after birth control failure. Plan B works by temporarily delaying ovulation or the release of an egg from the ovary, effectively preventing a pregnancy from happening. The pills are not the same as medication abortion pills, which require a prescription and involve administering the medicines mifepristone and misoprostol to terminate a pregnancy. CVS was limiting purchases of over-the-counter emergency contraceptives to three per customer, while Walmart limited pills available to four or six per customer, The Wall Street Journal reported. “Walmart had some pills available without limits, but only in cases where they wouldn’t ship until next month,” according to The Wall Street Journal. A CVS spokesperson told The Epoch Times: “We have ample supply of Plan B and Aftera across all of our CVS Pharmacy stores and CVS.com. To ensure equitable access and consistent supply on store shelves, we’ve implemented a temporary purchase limit of three on these products.” A Rite Aid spokesperson told Bloomberg that it is limiting purchases of Plan B to three per customer due to increased demand. The Epoch Times has contacted Walmart and Rite Aid for comment. Growing Demand Walgreens Boots Alliance, the holding company that owns the Walgreens drugstore chain, initially had a limit in place for the pills on its website too, according to The Wall Street Journal, but a spokesperson said the restriction was an error and would be corrected while an investigation is being conducted into why and how that happened. Limits on the amount that can be purchased come as the pills were in short supply or out of stock the morning of June 27 across major retailer websites amid an uptick in purchases following the Supreme Court decision to overturn the 1973 precedent that legalized abortion in the United States. The court, in a 6–3 ruling, upheld a Mississippi law that bans abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy and overturned Roe v. Wade, handing the power back down to states when it comes to making the rules around abortion laws. Following the ruling, abortion bans in Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, and Alabama went into immediate effect, and more states are expected to ban or severely restrict abortions in the near future. The Supreme Court decision caused mixed reactions across the country, with proponents, including South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry, and former Vice President Mike Pence praising the move. However, pro-abortion demonstrations quickly formed across the country, including outside the homes of the Supreme Court justices. Planned Parenthood Federation of America, which has filed lawsuits in Idaho, Utah, and Kentucky to block those states’ total abortion bans, has urged women not to stockpile emergency contraception. “Keep in mind that stockpiling or hoarding emergency contraception can limit the ability of people in your community” to get it, Planned Parenthood spokeswoman Megan N. Freeland told The New York Times. Tyler Durden Tue, 06/28/2022 - 14:30.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJun 28th, 2022

Live updates: What Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said at their confirmation hearings

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. What the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

The economic impact for women in states where abortion rights will be restricted or banned is going to be severe

The Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade. Women in states that likely will ban abortion are already paid less and have fewer protections. Abortion rights activists participate in a Bans Off Our Bodies rally at the U.S. Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images The Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade will have a negative economic effect on women and employers. People in states with abortion bans may have to take a flight to get access to abortion services. Workers in those states tend to already earn less, and have fewer worker protections and access to healthcare. For almost 50 years, Americans had the constitutional right to an abortion. That ended on June 24, when the Supreme Court overturned Roe v Wade.There are 13 states with so-called "trigger laws" that will quickly ban — or at least severely restrict — abortions.States with abortion bans or restrictions, as well as those that are likely to ban abortion in the near future, tend to have fewer economic protections for working women than other states, making a harsher burden on people seeking abortions. With these bans, women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Some of the trigger-law states, like Missouri and South Dakota, imposed bans right after the Supreme Court decision. At least seven seven states so far have banned abortion, according to reporting from The New York Times. Louisiana is one of the trigger-law states where law took effect following the ruling, but was temporarily blocked by a judge. Utah, another trigger-law state, also has its abortion ban temporarily blocked. Other states already had limits on abortions in place prior to the Supreme Court's ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, or are likely to put in place bans now that the ruling is final. According to Guttmacher Institute research before the ruling, there are 26 states that "are certain or likely to ban abortion."Those states also tend to pay their workers less than states with legally-enshrined abortion access, have fewer union protections, and have higher rates of incarceration, according to an analysis from the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute in May."We know from previous economic research that people who are already facing economic insecurity or types of economic marginalization or disadvantage are hit the hardest by lack of bodily autonomy," Kate Bahn, the director of labor market policy and chief economist at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, told Insider.Mason previously told Insider that women "who are already economically vulnerable" will be "most impacted" by abortion bans. This includes "women of color, hourly wage workers, workers without paid sick leave or time off," Mason added.Abortion restrictions have "disproportionate and unequal impact" on "people who are already marginalized and oppressed," according to Herminia Palacio, president and CEO of Guttmacher Institute. That includes "Black and Brown communities, other people of color, people with low incomes, young people, LGBTQ communities, immigrants and people with disabilities."In states with restrictions or outright bans, women will have to travel to get access to abortion services. Flights, hotels, and other expenses together will mean it can get expensive to have an abortion. Some employers have said they will cover travel expenses or offer travel reimbursements."The lack of access to the full range of reproductive health care services in the states, including abortion care, will have a devastating effect on women's short-and-long-term earnings and income, job security and career advancement, and increase the likelihood they will become impoverished," Mason said in a statement after Friday's ruling.Women were already making less in states with trigger laws, and that won't change!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Live updates: US military will continue to provide abortions in some cases

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. US military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Biden administration bans Russian gold imports

The U.S. Treasury Department has banned the importation of Russian gold as part of sanctions agreed upon by President Biden and other leaders at the G7......»»

Category: topSource: foxnewsJun 28th, 2022

Facebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Roe v. Wade decision, reports say

Users told the AP and Vice that their posts were taken down within minutes. Meta said it has policies around selling pharmaceuticals on its platforms. People attend an abortion-rights protest at the Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.P Photo/Rick Bowmer, File The Associated Press and Vice found that Facebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills. The AP noted that posts about selling guns and weed were untouched, however. Meta said it was following policies about selling pharmaceuticals on its platforms. Facebook and Instagram started removing posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the Associated Press and Vice reported.The AP reported that some posts and memes that explained how women can get abortion pills by mail without breaking state laws were removed from the platforms almost instantly after the Supreme Court decision was announced.The term "abortion pills" refers to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol. The first halts progesterone production, which is needed for a pregnancy to grow, and the second causes the uterus to expel pregnancy tissue, as Insider's Anna Medaris reported. The pills are also used to treat some conditions like Cushing disease and stomach ulcers.It is not yet clear what the impact of Roe's overturning has on abortion pills, even as 13 states have trigger laws that lead to abortion bans. The FDA authorizes their use for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy, and the US government lifted a ban on mail-order abortion pills in April 2021.An Instagram post published minutes after the court ruling, which said "DM me if you want to order abortion pills, but want them sent to my address instead of yours," was swiftly removed, the AP reported. The outlet said it was "within moments."Another person who wrote on Facebook, "I will mail abortion pills to any one of you. Just message me," was later barred from the platform, Vice reported.The unnamed person told Vice: "I posted it at 11 a.m. and was notified within a minute that it was removed. I was not notified until I tried to post later that I was banned for it."The AP and Vice said they shared their own posts on abortion pills to see what would happen.Vice tried to post "abortion pills can be mailed" on Facebook, and was told seconds later that it violated Facebook policies on buying, selling, or exchanging medical or non-medical drugs.The AP also wrote on Facebook, "If you send me your address, I will mail you abortion pills," and the post was removed within one minute, the outlet reported.The AP reporter then made the exact same post two more times, replacing the words "abortion pills" with the words "a gun" and then "weed." Those posts were not removed, the AP said.Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.Meta told the AP that it had policies that meant guns, alcohol, and pharmaceuticals cannot be sold though its platforms, but did not explain why the posts offering to sell a gun and weed were not removed."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Meta spokesperson Andy Stone said in a Monday tweet."We've discovered some instances of incorrect enforcement and are correcting these," he added, without specifying what they were.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJun 28th, 2022

Abortion Clinics Start Closing After Roe v. Wade Ruling

Abortion Clinics Start Closing After Roe v. Wade Ruling Authored by Tom Ozimek via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), Abortion clinics in multiple states closed their doors on June 25 following the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and allow states to pass their own laws regulating access to abortion. An exam room sits empty in the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St Louis, Mo., on May 28, 2019. (Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images) Around half of the states are expected to press ahead with banning abortion after the high court’s landmark ruling, according to the Guttmacher Institute, while in a handful of states with so-called trigger laws, abortion has already become illegal. Abortion will either soon become—or already is—unlawful in at least 13 states, according to a tally by The Epoch Times: Idaho, North Dakota, Utah, Wyoming, South Dakota, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Texas. Bans in Mississippi and North Dakota will come into force when their respective attorneys general sign off, while Wyoming’s prohibition will take effect within days. Tennessee will have its ban applied in 30 days, while Idaho and Texas will see bans applied 30 days after the official judgment. Abortion has become illegal in the following states: Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, South Dakota, Missouri, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Utah. Clinics Close Alabama’s three abortion clinics stopped performing abortions as providers face prosecution under a law dating back to 1951. Staff at the Alabama Women’s Center for Reproductive Alternatives in Huntsville on Friday told women in the waiting room that they could not carry out any more abortions that day, though the women were given a list of out-of-state clinics still doing abortions. At an abortion clinic in Little Rock, Arkansas, the doors to the patient area shut as soon as the Supreme Court’s decision was formally announced. “No matter how hard we prepare for bad news, when it finally hits, it hits hard,” a nurse at the clinic told the BBC. An abortion clinic in New Orleans, Louisiana, one of three that performs the procedure in the state, was also shuttered on Friday. Legal Uncertainty Abortion clinics elsewhere—including Arizona, Texas, and West Virginia—stopped performing abortions for fear of prosecution based on laws that predate Roe v. Wade. In Texas, where trigger laws don’t go into effect for another month, providers suspended abortions while they seek legal advice on whether they are subject to an abortion ban based on laws passed in the 1920s. Texas Republican Attorney General Ken Paxton, who announced the statewide closure of his agency’s office on Friday “in honor of the nearly 70 million unborn babies killed in the womb since 1973,” warned in a letter that prosecutors could immediately choose to pursue criminal prosecutions based on earlier laws that were unenforceable while Roe v. Wade stood. Similarly, the existence of a 19th-century abortion ban in West Virginia led a clinic there to stop performing the procedure. Several providers in Arizona halted abortions on Friday as they seek to determine whether pre-statehood laws may be grounds for prosecution. Overall, repealing Roe v. Wade means that some 36 million women of reproductive age will lose access to abortion in their states, according to research from Planned Parenthood. Predictably, the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade has drawn mixed reactions, with demonstrators outside the Supreme Court voicing both indignation and jubilation. Tyler Durden Mon, 06/27/2022 - 22:35.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 27th, 2022

Letter writing campaign: Chicago pitches values over tax rates to CEOs in states facing post-Roe abortion bans

In the wake of the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, the city of Chicago fired off 300 letters Monday to CEOs in states facing abortion bans, pitching the city as a more welcoming business location.In the wake of the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, the city of Chicago fired off 300 letters Monday to CEOs in states facing abortion bans, pitching the city as a more welcoming business location......»»

Category: topSource: chicagotribuneJun 27th, 2022

What To Expect In A Post-Roe World

What To Expect In A Post-Roe World Authored by Jonathan Turley, Below is my Hill column on what to expect in a post-Roe world. That world is already taking shape with states crafting their laws reflecting the values of their citizens from Colorado passing a law protecting the right to abortion up to the moment of birth to Louisiana banning all abortions except in limited circumstances. The fact is that most Americans are in the middle in this debate with more nuanced views than many political leaders. In the months to come, we will see if that view will prevail in the majority of states. Here is the column: In their historic ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, six Supreme Court justices noted that the nation was grappling with this deeply divisive issue in 1973 but that “Roe abruptly ended that political process.” The court has now declared that the future of abortion will rest with 330 million Americans rather than nine justices. As this matter returns to the states, it is striking to consider what has changed legally and socially in the past 50 years. The comparison may hold some interesting surprises for politicians who are now declaring, as did President Biden, that “this fall, Roe is on the ballot.” How little has changed If one looks solely at the alignment of states, surprisingly little has changed. In 1973, 30 states banned abortion at any stage of a pregnancy, with some exceptions for the health of the mother. In the Dobbs litigation of 2022, 26 states asked the court to overturn Roe and its successor, Casey. Thus, we remain deeply divided. Roughly 16 states are poised or expected to make abortion illegal immediately under so-called trigger laws. South Dakota, Louisiana and Kentucky have immediate prohibitions that will come into effect. Missouri claimed to be the first to declare all abortion as unlawful except for medical emergencies. Twenty-seven states have protections for abortion that are expected to continue. States like Colorado, New Jersey, Oregon and Delaware actually protected abortion without any limit on the stage of a pregnancy — guaranteeing the right up to just before time of birth. Internationally, only seven countries allow abortion after the 20th week. While many countries have decriminalized abortion, most are closer to Mississippi than Michigan in limiting abortion to the first or second trimester. How much has changed While Dobbs is a major reversal of a long-standing precedent, much has changed legally since 1973. After Roe, the Supreme Court continued to expand protections over lifestyles and intimate relations. In the parade of horribles that followed Friday’s release of the Dobbs ruling, politicians and pundits warned that the decision could undo cases protecting contraception, same-sex marriage and other rights. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Vice President Harris and other Democrats continue to claim that the court was taking the country back to the last century. The image of criminalized homosexuality, marriage bans and contraception limits is unnerving — but also untrue. In the Dobbs decision, the court’s majority expressly, repeatedly rejects the application of this holding to these other rights. Indeed, it is relatively rare to see the court go to this extent to proactively close off the use of a new case in future cases. The court said that “intimate sexual relations, contraception, and marriage” are not impacted by its holding because “abortion is fundamentally different, as both Roe and Casey acknowledged.” It noted that abortion is unique in dealing with “what those decisions called ‘fetal life’ and what the law now before us describes as an ‘unborn human being.’” The court repeatedly stressed that those claiming the country will be put into a legal Wayback Machine are simply using the opinion “to stoke unfounded fear that our decision will imperil those other rights.” It could not be more clear, as the court said, that “rights regarding contraception and same-sex relationships are inherently different from the right to abortion because the latter (as we have stressed) uniquely involves what Roe and Casey termed ‘potential life.’” The court and Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s concurrence repeat, almost mantra-like: “Nothing in this opinion should be understood to cast doubt on precedents that do not concern abortion.” Only Justice Clarence Thomas suggested that these other cases should be examined, yet even he stressed this opinion expressly rejects that application. Putting aside the legal changes, there are major technological changes since 1973 that will impact the post-Roe world. Roughly 60 percent of abortions today are carried out at home, not in clinics, using pills with mifepristone and misoprostol to abort a pregnancy. In 2021, the Food and Drug Administration permanently removed the in-person requirement for these prescriptions and allowed women to access the drugs via telehealth appointments and online pharmacies. It will be difficult for states to interfere with such prescriptions, particularly if the federal government protects such access. How we have changed The greatest change may be us. As this issue returns to the states for citizens to decide, we are a different country than we were in 1973. Great strides have been made in the advancement of women and a wider acceptance of people making decisions about their own lives and values. While we remain divided on abortion, the public seems far more moderate and unified than the leaders of either party. While some Democrats are voicing absolute views of abortion, and some Republicans are calling for total bans, most Americans hold a more nuanced view. In 1975, polling showed 54 percent supported abortion under some circumstances, with 21 percent saying it should be entirely legal; 22 percent said it should be illegal. According to recent polling by the Pew Research Center, only 8 percent of adults say abortion should be illegal without exception, while just 19 percent say abortion should be legal in all cases, without exception. Yet, polls also show that 65 percent of Americans would make most abortions illegal in the second trimester, and 80 percent would make most abortions illegal in the third trimester. These polls suggest that the majority of Americans will continue to live in states protecting abortion while citizens would support limits like the one in Mississippi. In Virginia, Gov. Glenn Youngkin (R) announced an effort to limit abortions to Mississippi’s 15-week standard but expressed a willingness to compromise on that cutoff date. In other words, there may be room for compromise as states work out their own approaches to abortion. Of course, none of the political or legal realities will likely penetrate the rage and rhetoric following the decision. Indeed, there is a tendency toward Roe revisionism. Roe supporters ignore that Roe’s constitutional rationale was always controversial, including among some liberals. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, for example, called the ruling “heavy-handed judicial activism” and felt the decision went too far. The original Roe actually died years ago when it was gutted by Casey in 1992 in its logic and tests. It was later the subject of 5-4 decisions that created a confusing muddle of what constituted “undue burdens.” Such revisionism is a natural part of grieving. In Shakespeare’s “Richard III,”the Queen Mother was asked how to deal with the hate of loss. She responds: “Think that thy babes were sweeter than they were; And he that slew them fouler than he is.” The same is true of Roe revisionism. Roe is now presented as inviolate and beyond question in its constitutional footing, while the opinion that slew it is presented as threatening every right secured since 1973. Our post-Roe world will not be written by Congress with the proposed federalization of Roe or another 50 years of conflicting court decisions. Instead, it will rest with citizens in 50 different states in coming years. The process just might surprise us. Tyler Durden Mon, 06/27/2022 - 21:15.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 27th, 2022

Chicago sends letters to hundreds of CEOs in states facing post-Roe abortion bans, pitching values over tax rates to lure businesses

In the wake of the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, the city of Chicago fired off 300 letters Monday to CEOs in states facing abortion bans, pitching the city as a more welcoming business location.In the wake of the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, the city of Chicago fired off 300 letters Monday to CEOs in states facing abortion bans, pitching the city as a more welcoming business location......»»

Category: topSource: chicagotribuneJun 27th, 2022

Pelosi says House Democrats are looking at legislation to protect personal data in reproductive apps and other actions post-Roe v. Wade

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wants Democrats to try to codify Roe v. Wade into federal law despite such efforts having previously failed. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images House Speaker Nancy Pelosi outlined her party's early legislative response to Roe v. Wade being overturned. Pelosi said the party will look at protecting sensitive reproductive health data and the right to travel. She also wants to try to codify Roe into law, but previous efforts to do so have failed. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Monday outlined House Democrats' legislative response to Roe v. Wade being overturned, saying her party is looking at codifying a federal right to an abortion.Pelosi outlined three areas that House Democrats are examining just days after the Supreme Court gutted federal abortion rights, overturning nearly over a half-century of precedent. These are: protecting sensitive data on reproductive health apps, making it clear that states cannot stop people from traveling to seek an abortion, and once again trying to pass a federal law guaranteeing a right to an abortion."While this extremist Supreme Court works to punish and control the American people, Democrats must continue our fight to expand freedom in America," Pelosi wrote in a letter to her Democratic colleagues. "Doing so is foundational to our oath of office and our fidelity to the Constitution."Pelosi does not outline the specific legislation under consideration, but some lawmakers already introduced bills on the topic. Rep. Sara Jacobs, a Democrat from California, introduced the "My Body, My Data Act" on June 2, which would task the Federal Trade Commission with enforcing a national privacy standard for period-tracking apps. A companion Senate bill has 11 lawmakers lined up behind it, but crucially, there are not yet any Senate Republicans that support it.Period tracking apps themselves have taken steps to try to protect user data, Insider previously reported.The lack of Republican support is vitally critical to any legislative action passing. The Senate filibuster effectively requires almost all legislation, including abortion rights, to have 60 votes. This means that Senate Democrats need to unanimously support any measure in addition to attracting 10 GOP senators into the fold. It's not a given that Democrats will unanimously line up behind abortion rights either. Sen. Joe Manchin, a central from West Virginia, thought that the party's bill to guarantee federal abortion rights, The Women's Health Protection Act, went too far. He joined almost all Senate Republicans in opposing it in May.Last week's Supreme Court decision doesn't make abortion illegal nationwide. Rather, the court ruled that states can now step in to determine what restrictions to impose, with at least eight states now having abortion bans three days after the ruling. Some Republican state lawmakers have made clear that they are not content with just effectively banning the procedure within their own borders. In Missouri, state Rep. Mary Elizabeth Coleman, who helped author the state's "trigger ban" without exceptions for rape and incest, has also pushed legislation that would allow private individuals to sue Missouri residents if they go outside of the state to get an abortion. Coleman wants to stop what she calls "abortion tourism.""It's one of those phrases that really describes what I think we're going to be seeing and certainly what we have already started to see, which is states that are really catering to providing abortions to residents of states that have no abortion access," Coleman told NPR. "And so there's a direct targeting that's taking place into pro-life states."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 27th, 2022