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Florida Technical College debuts new culinary training space

The space is 14,300 square feet......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 25th, 2021

Work begins on advanced research center at BNY

The Pratt Institute, New York City College of Technology (City Tech) and the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation (BNYDC) are partnering to create a new  advanced research and applied learning facility in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Construction on the project, which received funding from the New York City Council, Brooklyn... The post Work begins on advanced research center at BNY appeared first on Real Estate Weekly. The Pratt Institute, New York City College of Technology (City Tech) and the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation (BNYDC) are partnering to create a new  advanced research and applied learning facility in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Construction on the project, which received funding from the New York City Council, Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams and New York State, is expected to be complete by early 2022. The Research Yard will connect faculty and students from both Pratt and City Tech with the Yard’s ecosystem of more than 500 businesses. The co-location of a public and private university facility within a community of businesses will create the opportunity for faculty and entrepreneurs to collaborate on industry-relevant research and new product development.  Students, faculty, and industry professionals will work together on research projects, sharing cutting-edge technology and equipment and co-producing finished projects. This unique partnership offers students the rare opportunity to build their professional networks to help them secure internships and jobs in the fields they’re interested in working in. The concept of a shared research facility between Pratt faculty, Brooklyn Navy Yard, and the community was originally conceived as the “Pratt Research Yard.” The initiative has since expanded and become a public/private partnership that is now called the “Research Yard of Pratt Institute, City Tech, and the Brooklyn Navy Yard,” or, informally, the Research Yard. The Research Lab will be located in Building 3 “In bringing two renowned academic institutions to a major job hub, the Research Yard will open doors for students by offering a hands-on learning environment,” said David Ehrenberg, President and CEO of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation. “This unique partnership is an extension of the Yard’s mission to create a pipeline of quality jobs, while also providing the experiential learning and skill building that make these jobs accessible to the local community. We look forward to starting work on this exciting project and welcoming a new generation to the Navy Yard.” “Building this advanced creative research facility just blocks from the Pratt campus and alongside the businesses and entrepreneurs at the Brooklyn Navy Yard is crucial for New York City, and especially for the Borough of Brooklyn. The Research Yard of Pratt Institute, City Tech, and the Brooklyn Navy Yard will further enable our research leaders to work with the local community on today’s important challenges,” said Pratt Institute President Frances Bronet. “We are deeply appreciative of the funding support we have received from the city and state, and with this latest investment from the City Council.” “Nearly half of our students live and work in Brooklyn and over 90% of our students reside in New York City.  The Research Yard will provide a seamless and braided experience for our students and faculty to work alongside local workforce talent and tech industries,” said City Tech’s Dean of the School of Technology & Design, Dr. Gerarda Shields. “Funding for the Research Yard is a testament to the NY City Council’s commitment of forwarding City Tech as a national engine of economic mobility in Downtown Brooklyn.” The Research Yard will be headquartered in a 27,000 s/f  space in the Navy Yard’s eleven-story Building 3, originally built in 1918 at the end of World War I. The space, which was configured as a traditional warehouse and fulfillment center, will be transformed by architectural firm Smith-Miller + Hawkinson, LLP into a 21st century industry-education research model supporting the creative economy. With Pratt consolidating and relocating all its research centers and accelerators to the Research Yard, the newly designed open plan facility will include fabrication labs as well as research areas for the study of robotics, information visualization, sustainability, community development, environmental sensing, design incubation in rural areas, and digital archeology, along with a number of accelerators.  The space will also house a facility for the New York City College of Technology (CUNY City Tech), where CUNY students and faculty will gain hands-on experience collaborating with industry professionals from the Yard’s ecosystem of more than 500 businesses, along with their peers from Pratt. A total of $6 million has been earmarked for the Research Yard, including $4.2 million from the New York City Council, with an additional $1.8 million coming from Pratt, the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the Brooklyn Borough President’s Office, and the Dormitory Authority of the State of New York (DASNY). At the same time, the facility will provide much-needed fabrication space for City Tech staff and students. The Research Yard will expand access for City Tech faculty and students to gain hands-on experience with cutting-edge technologies and the industry professionals that use them. By providing real-time feedback loops from learning to industry application, City Tech faculty and students will benefit from industry-immersed research and applied learning within an authentic work environment. Industry partners will benefit from an infusion of knowledge and research, while helping to invest in the development of a skilled pipeline of City Tech students who are equipped with the skills and experiences needed to fill entry-level roles at their businesses.  The Research Yard under City Tech will focus on the following technologies: Artificial Intelligence (AI), Collaborative Robot (Cobots) and Automation technology focuses on robotic solutions that make manufacturing and warehouses more efficient, cost-effective and safe with collaborative robots sharing workspace with people and allowing for products to be made with more precision than ever before. Building Performance and Digital Fabrication is a response to the need for more sustainable and energy efficient structures, now with the emphasis on healthy buildings in a pandemic era and beyond.  Digital fabrication has been embraced by both the architectural and engineering industries.  The Yard will enable faculty and students to utilize three types of digital fabrication methods: additive manufacturing, subtractive manufacturing and robotic manipulation. Remote Sensing Technology for a Climate Resilient Future requires accurate, precise data – and a lot of it.  With the assistance of drone technology, data can be collected real-time and with increased spatial, spectral and temporal resolution allowing for more accurate climate predictions. With Pratt research centers and accelerators housed at the facility, the Research Yard will support the local community in a variety of research initiatives. Pratt’s Consortium for Research and Robotics will incubate small businesses and expand its community engagement and corporate research partners, while local manufacturing members at the Navy Yard that are already part of the Pratt Center for Community Development’s Made in NYC initiative will extend this network. The Pratt Sustainability Center plans to create a GIVE/TAKE program overseen by students where art supplies and other materials can be recycled and reused by the community, and the Spatial Analysis and Visualization Initiative, which uses geographic information systems (GIS)-centered research as well as mapping, data, design and visualization to understand and empower urban communities. The centers that are being relocated to the Research Yard include: The Consortium for Research and Robotics (CRR) is a new model for collaboration, competition, and creativity with New York City’s largest industrial robot. Currently housed in the BNYDC, the CRR has unique facilities, professional and academic networks, and various other resources. The CRR will move from its current location to the PRY facility. Spatial Analysis and Visualization Initiative (SAVI) is a geographic information systems-focused research center that uses mapping, data and design to better understand urban communities. The lab provides technical solutions, and resources to nonprofit organizations that need to better understand their data to make informed decisions. In addition to engagement with BNYDC tenants, The Research Yard will connect Pratt and City Tech students, faculty and staff with the Brooklyn Navy Yard STEAM Center, a career and technical training high school for 11th and 12th grade students who come from eight Brooklyn public high schools. Alongside faculty, college and high school students will participate in research addressing real world problems ranging from sustainability in manufacturing processes, an important focus for the Navy Yard in adapting 20th-century industrial buildings for 21st-century uses. Inviting high school students to participate in this crucial research will allow students to improve the landscape of today as New York recovers from the toll of the pandemic while offering them pathways to become leaders in future resiliency efforts. The post Work begins on advanced research center at BNY appeared first on Real Estate Weekly......»»

Category: realestateSource: realestateweeklyOct 26th, 2021

Transcript: John Doerr

   The transcript from this week’s, MiB: John Doerr, Kleiner Perkins, is below. You can stream and download our full conversation, including the podcast extras on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Google, Bloomberg, and Acast. All of our earlier podcasts on your favorite pod hosts can be found here. ~~~ BARRY RITHOLTZ, HOST, MASTERS IN BUSINESS: This… Read More The post Transcript: John Doerr appeared first on The Big Picture.    The transcript from this week’s, MiB: John Doerr, Kleiner Perkins, is below. You can stream and download our full conversation, including the podcast extras on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, Google, Bloomberg, and Acast. All of our earlier podcasts on your favorite pod hosts can be found here. ~~~ BARRY RITHOLTZ, HOST, MASTERS IN BUSINESS: This week on the podcast, I have, yes, an extra special guest, John Doerr of the famed venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins is here to discuss all things venture capital and climate related. He has a new book out that’s really quite interesting. We talk about everything from crypto to Tesla to beyond me, to all of the opportunities that exist in order to help moderate and reduce carbon in the atmosphere and the potential climate crisis that awaits us if we don’t change our ways. So, Doerr is a venture capitalist. He invests money in order to generate a return. These aren’t just finger-wagging-be-green-for-green sake. He describes their venture fund which they put nearly a billion dollars into it 10 years ago and now, it’s worth over three billion. That’s how successful the returns have been. He describes the climate crisis as a multitrillion dollar opportunity. Yes, we need to do something in order to make sure we leave our children and grandchildren a habitable Earth. At the same time, there is a massive opportunity in everything from food to electrical grid, to transportation, on and on and on. It really is quite fascinating somebody like him sees the world from both perspectives, from the, hey, we want to make sure we have a habitable place to live but he can’t take off his VC hat and he sees just massive opportunities to do well by doing good. Really, a fascinating conversation. With no further ado, my interview with Kleiner Perkins’ John Doerr. ANNOUNCER: This is Masters in Business with Barry Ritholtz on Bloomberg Radio. RITHOLTZ: My extra special guest this week is John Doerr. He is the famed venture capitalists known for his work at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. The venture capital firm operates 32 funds. They’ve made more than 675 investments, including such early-stage funding for companies like Google, Twitter, Amazon and too many others to list. Doerr still holds a substantial stake in his initial investment in Google. His most recent book is “Speed & Scale: An Action Plan for Solving our Climate Crisis Now.” John Doerr, welcome to Bloomberg. JOHN DOERR, CHAIRMAN, KLEINER PERKINS: It’s thrilled to be here with you, Barry. Thank you. RITHOLTZ: And I’m thrilled to talk to you. Let’s go back to the early parts of your career before we start to get current. You originally joined Intel because you couldn’t land a gig as a venture capitalist. Tell us a little bit about that. DOERR: I came to Silicon Valley with no job, no place to live and incidentally, no girlfriend. The lady I’ve been dating decided I was too persistent and dumped me. So, I — my real goal was to win my way back into her heart and to join with some friends to start a company. I wanted to start a company and I heard that venture capital had something to do with that. So, I cold called all the venture capitalists and some of them returned my call in the mid-70s and they looked at my experience and uniformly included that I should go get a real job. That was their advice. I remember Dick Gramley (ph) said, we just backed a small new chip company called Intel, why don’t you interview for a job there, and I did. And lo and behold, unbeknownst to me, my former girlfriend, Ann Howland, now Ann Howland Doerr, has gotten a job at Intel. I got a job there and when I arrived that first summer day, I was surprised to see her there and she was not happy to see me. So, it took the rest of the summer to put our relationship back together again. But I love Intel, it was a dynamic place. They just invented the microprocessor and I’ve seriously considered abandoning my graduate education in business as it turns out to just stay at Intel. But I returned there after graduating and worked for, I guess, four or five years helping democratize computing as to get microprocessors used in everything from traffic lights to defibrillators, to nuclear resonance magnetic imaging systems, and it was all because I wanted to be part of new rapidly growing companies. RITHOLTZ: How did you work your way from Intel to venture investing? How did you find your way to Kleiner Perkins? DOERR: I got a phone call one day from a friend who said, hey, John, I just finished interviewing for job at a venture capital firm, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. It sounded to me like a law firm. I really didn’t know them. But he said, you should go interview there because what they want to add to their team is someone younger professional with a strong technical background, a good network in Silicon Valley, and a passion for startups. I think you and they would make a great fit. So, I didn’t — they ran an ad actually in the “Wall Street Journal” for this position which I didn’t see. But I called up, I interviewed and got a job there as an entry level professional, a gofer, I did everything. I carried people’s bags. I read business plans. But there was one important condition that I had and that is I made them promise that they would back me with my friends in starting a company. I went to work there because, honestly, I wasn’t interested in venture capital. I wanted to be an early ’80s entrepreneur. And they had — they agreed to that and pointed out that they had backed other young partners at Kleiner in writing business plans. Bob Swanson had written a business plan for Genentech that led to the whole biotech industry and Jimmy Treybig had done the same thing with Tandem Computers. My current partner, Brook Byers as the young partner at Kleiner wrote the business plan for hybrid tech. So, Eugene Kleiner and Tom Perkins were unusual and I’d even say mythic or epic figures in that they had technical backgrounds. They started their own companies and they felt that was part of what their venture capital firm ought to do. RITHOLTZ: So, here’s the key question, how come you never left Kleiner Perkins? Why didn’t you launch your own startup? DOERR: Well, I did. They backed me in doing it. The first was one called Silicon Compilers. I became the full-time CEO and founder of that with a Cal Tech professor, Carver Mead. RITHOLTZ: Sure. DOERR: Then as I worked with companies like Compaq, Sun Microsystems, they were growing really rapidly, I realized I was not at all qualified to advise these entrepreneurs. So, I took another 18-month leave of absence from Kleiner to run the desktop division of Sun and almost left Kleiner permanently to do that. But Ann and I wanted to start a family and she said, you know, you’re doing this Sun thing and keeping involved in Kleiner, it’s just not going to work, we have to make some choices here. And so, I left my operating role at Sun. But never gave up an interest in starting new companies and did that again at a later time with a company called @Home. You may remember that they … RITHOLTZ: Sure. DOERR: … standardized and commercialized the cable modem to access the Internet. Before the @Home venture, access to the Internet was really very slow and cable modem swept the United States and our company was key in making that happen. RITHOLTZ: So, I like this quote from you, “If you can’t invent the future, the next best thing is to fund it.” And so, I guess that helps to explain your move from Sun over back to Kleiner Perkins. DOERR: Exactly. It was Alan Kay, the Chief Scientist at Apple, who said the best way to predict the future is to invent it and while I’ve made some inventions, they’re modest, my better fortune has been to find amazing entrepreneurs, identify them and then help fund and accelerate their success. RITHOLTZ: Quite interesting. Amazon, Netscape, Applied Materials, Citrix, Intuit, Genentech, EA Sports, Compaq, Slack, Uber, Square, Spotify, Robinhood, that is just an amazing, amazing list of startups that you guys were fairly early investors in. Any of them stand out as uniquely memorable to you? DOERR: Well, two of the standouts got to be Amazon and Google, now, Alphabet, because, what are they, they’re two of the four or five most valuable companies in the world and I think both of them have profoundly changed the way that we live, communicate, educate, inform, conduct commerce, see the world. They both — what they both have in common is exceptional founders and really strong management teams who have a sense of urgency and a focus on either large new markets or large existing markets that deserved and have benefited from disruption. So, I remember when I was first offered a position at Kleiner Perkins, I told them that I thought it was kind of unfair that they would pay me to do the job. I would pay them for the privilege of working with these amazing entrepreneurs and founders. RITHOLTZ: So, when you’re thinking about putting money into the Amazon in the mid ’90s or Google in the late ’90s, at any point in that process, are you thinking, sure, these can become $2 trillion companies soon? DOERR: Well, I had no really good idea how big they could be. So, I put the question to Jeff Bezos and his response was, well, John, I don’t know but we’re going to get big fast. At that time, I kicked up something of a firestorm by proclaiming that the Internet had been under hyped and it might be the largest legal creation of wealth in our lifetimes. But I was more clear and explicit with Larry Page when I met with him and Sergey and I asked Larry, how big Google would get. I’ll never forget this, Barry. He responded to me without missing a beat, 10 billion, and I said, just to test myself, I said, surely, you mean market capitalization, don’t you, and he said, no, John, I mean revenues. We’re just beginning in the field of search and you cannot imagine how much better it’s going to get over time. And sure enough, he was, he was more than right. RITHOLTZ: To say the very least. So, let’s talk a bit about Google. You are known for introducing to both Larry and Sergey your concept of, OKRs, objectives and key results. What was the impact of that on Google? How did they respond to your suggestion on come up with objectives and come up with ways to measure your progress? DOERR: So, for everyone in your audience, objectives and key results or OKRs is a goalsetting system that Andy Grove invented at Intel and that’s because in the semiconductor industry, I’m a refugee from the semiconductor industry, you got to get tens of thousands of people to get lines that are a millionth of a meter, one micron wide, exactly right or nothing works, the chips fail. So, you need exceptional discipline, attention to detail, focus and execution. And so, Andy came up with the system. I was so enamored of it. When I left Intel, I took it everywhere I went from nonprofits to startups to large companies. The Gates Foundation in the nearly days, for example, how — they were — I mean, they were a very large nonprofit startup and an important one for the planet. So, I took Andy Grove’s system to Larry and Sergey, the founders of Google, in the very early days and I went through it with them and at the end of it asked them, so, guys, what you think, would you use this in growing Google, and Larry was — had no comment whatsoever. But Sergey, he was more like brilliant. I’d like to tell you, Barry, that he said, we love this, we’re going to adopt it wholeheartedly. Well, the truth of the matter is what he said was, we don’t have any better way to manage this Google company. So, we’ll give it a try, which I took as a ringing endorsement because what’s happened since then to this day, every Googler, every quarter, writes down her objectives and key results and publishes them for the entire company to see and interestingly, they never leaked. So, there’s 140,000 Googlers who are doing this four times a year. They’re graded. But at the end of each quarter, they’re swept aside because they’re not used for bonuses or promotions. They serve a higher purpose and that’s a collective social contract to get everybody focused and aligned and committed in tracking their progress to stretch for almost impossible to achieve goals. And I’m telling you this story because the same system that Andy Grove invented has now spread pretty broadly through the technology and other sectors of the economy and it’s at the heart of this plan that we have called speed and scale to deal with climate crisis. RITHOLTZ: Quite interesting. I want to stick with some of the early investments that you made and ask a really broad general question, how likely is it that a company you made in early stage investment in ends up looking like the company you thought you were investing in, meaning, how often do companies iterate or pivot into something totally different from what you thought you were getting involved with? DOERR: Well, I was going to say not often if it’s totally different. But if it’s meaningfully different, that happens all the time. And that’s why in the venture capital work that we do, it’s so important to back — to find fund and build a relationship with the right people because the people and the quality of the team is going to affect how they pivot, how they adapt their business plan to changing markets, changing technologies, changing opportunities. RITHOLTZ: Very interesting. So, you mentioned Amazon and Google as just uniquely memorable startups. What about some memorable ones that you thought would work out that didn’t or I know VCs love to talk about look how silly we are, we had an opportunity to invest in X and we passed and now X is fabulously successful, what stands out in that space? DOERR: Well, the standout in that space is the bad decision we made to invest in Fisker instead of in Tesla and at that time, they had similar strategies, which was to enter the electric vehicle market with high-end luxury, pretty expensive car and then to drive the cost of that vehicle down over time. Both companies were struggling to raise money. One of them had experienced executive from the automobile industry, fundamentally a designer by the name of Henrik Fisker as its founder and CEO. The other had Elon Musk who had no automobile industry experience but was determined to reinvent every part of the automotive car doing it more as a machine to run software than a collection of subsystems procured from the automobile industry. We made the wrong call and the rest is history. RITHOLTZ: That Fisker, that first Fisker car was just a gorgeous design and at that time, Tesla was taking old Lotus convertibles and filling them with laptop batteries. Between the two, it’s pretty easy to see how the Fisker opportunity really looked more intriguing than Tesla did way back when. How typical is that for the world of venture? DOERR: It happens all the time. RITHOLTZ: All the time. DOERR: That’s what makes the job of finding funding and accelerating the success of entrepreneurs hard. RITHOLTZ: To say the very least. So, there was just a new report that came out. It said, renewable energy in the U.S. has quadrupled over the past decade. So, we’re all good, right? There’s nothing else to worry about with the climate? DOERR: I wish that was true. I came to this project, this passion back in 2006 when Al Gore’s movie, you remember “An Inconvenient Truth” appeared. RITHOLTZ: Sure. DOERR: And I took my family and friends to see it and we came back for a dinner conversation and went around the table to see what people thought. When it came turn for my 16-year-old daughter Mary Doerr, she said, I’m scared and I’m angry. She said, dad, your generation created this problem, you better fix it. And, Barry, I was speechless, I had no idea what to say. So, I set out with partners at Kleiner Perkins to understand the extent of the climate crisis, even hired Al Gore as a partner and over time, over three funds, invested a third up to a half of the funds, total about $1 billion in some 70 climate ventures, most of which failed and, in fact, it’s hard, it’s very hard to grow a climate tech or green tech venture. It’s pretty lonely in the early days of doing that. And we almost lost all of our investments but we stood by these entrepreneurs and they produced companies like Beyond Meat or Enphase or the NEST smart thermostats and today are worth some $3 billion. But that was then, this is now. I think what’s important about now is we need way greater ambition and speed to avert catastrophic, irreversible climate crisis. I mean, the evidence is all around us. We’ve got devastating hurricanes and floods and wildfires and 10 million climate refugees. The IPCC says that if we don’t reduce our carbon emissions by 2030 by 55 percent, we will see global warming overshoot by more than 2°C, nearly 4°F. And the Paris accords, which were agreed to in 2015, if we were achieving them, it would still cause us to land at around 2°C. The bad news is we’re not close to achieving any of those goals. So, the latest report from the UN said this is a code red problem and I also see all problems as opportunities. Barry, I think this is going to be the greatest opportunity, human opportunity, social opportunity, economic opportunity for the 21st century. RITHOLTZ: So, let’s talk a little bit about that opportunity. You talked in the book about cutting emissions in half by 2030 and net zero by 2050 and you referenced six main areas of attack, transportation, the electrical grid, food, protecting nature, cleaning up industry, and then removing carbon from the atmosphere. Let’s talk a little bit about each of those because they’re all quite fascinating. We were talking about Tesla, how quickly do we think that we’re going to be past internal combustion engines with a fully electrified transportation network? DOERR: Well, that’s a great question and we can — I want to put this in context. Every year, we dump 59 gigatons of carbon, greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere as if it’s some kind of free and open sewer. And so, the book and the research behind it has built a plan in electrifying transportation and the other five for which each of the objectives has three to five key results. These are Andy Grove Intel style, very measurable specific steps in transportation. It says that electric vehicles will achieve parity, price performance parity with combustion engines in the U.S. by 2024. It says one of two new personal vehicles purchased worldwide are electric vehicles by 2030. So, what I’m trying to say is this is a global plan. RITHOLTZ: Right. DOERR: We’ve seen some nations of the world, some states like California say they’re going to ban the sale of internal combustion vehicles. And there’s also key results for buses, for trucks, for miles driven, for airplanes and maritime and this whole plan is available for free. You can download it at the website speedandscale.com. So, it’s pragmatic, it’s ambitious, it’s almost unachievable. It’s a total of 55 key results for the world, numeric time bound, and we’ve got to get after them all at once. We can’t take turns. We’re not going to achieve all of these, Barry. It’s — but if we fall short on one, we can make ground faster in others. Now, I don’t want to intimidate people by how big — how tall an order this is. The book also includes 35 stories from entrepreneurs and policymakers and leaders and innovators, leaders of indigenous tribes that describe in their own words their struggle, their successes, their journey to change the world. One of my favorites is of a cross-country team who got together to petition their school district to go to cleaner busses. They were sick and tired of running behind diesel buses with polluted air and it shows that something that I deeply believe and that is we’re fast running out of time. And so, yes, we need individuals to take individual action to eat less meat, use photovoltaic solar and buy an electric vehicle if you can afford it. But I’ve really written this book for the leader inside of everyone, their inner leader, and that’s their ability to influence others to act as a group like this cross-country team of runners in Maryland who got their school district to adopt electric buses. What the book shows is that we can get this job done but, as I said, we’re fast running out of time. RITHOLTZ: So, let’s talk a little bit about — by the way, the bus discussions in the book are quite fascinating not just because China leapt out to a big lead and have been very aggressively replacing diesel buses with electric buses but you helped fund an entrepreneur in the U.S. that’s gone around and has done a great job getting cities to purchase electric buses. The transportation grid is clearly an issue but as you point out, that’s only six gigatons. A bigger issue is the grid, the electric grid, which produces 21 gigatons of emissions. Tell us about what we need to do to decarbonize the electrical grid. DOERR: 100%, you’re right. If we move to electric vehicles but we still use coal to generate electricity, we won’t have reduced emissions. And the biggest opportunity is to decarbonize the grid and that’s to take today’s 24 gigatons of emissions mostly from goal, also natural gas to generate electricity. Take that 24 down to three gigatons. So, the first key result, the biggest of them, is to get 50 percent of our electricity from zero emission sources globally by 2025 and get it down to 38 percent — get a 90 percent by 2035. That would save us 16.5 gigatons. Simply put, we need to move to renewable sources like wind and solar and invest in longer-term durable storage so that we have reliable energy when the wind isn’t blowing and the sun isn’t shining. RITHOLTZ: So, let’s talk about that battery technology a little bit. We’ve seen a series of incremental improvements over time but nothing has been like an order of magnitude improvement. Will we be able to get there soon enough? Do we need a Manhattan project for batteries or are all those incremental improvements compounding and we’ll get there eventually? DOERR: Much of the improvement that is needed in all of these technologies is lowering their costs. And so, batteries today are still too expensive for electric vehicles in India and in China. They’re barely affordable in the U.S. marketplace. RITHOLTZ: Right. DOERR: And so, the book tells the story of QuantumScape, I’ll disclose, a public company that I’ve invested in and served on the board of, an entrepreneur by the name of Jagdeep Singh and he is going for a quantum improvement in batteries to more than double their energy density. The energy density of a battery is how much energy you’ll get out of it for a pound of weight of a battery and it’s especially important in electric vehicles because the most expensive part of the vehicle is the battery and it’s the heaviest part and you got use energy to move the weight around. So, if you double the energy density of a battery, you can get a three or four times systems improvement in the vehicle itself. I’m not expecting, I don’t think anyone is forecasting an order of magnitude improvement. We’ve seen considerable lowering costs of batteries over time. But the QuantumScape innovation, which is an all solid-state battery, would be a genuine breakthrough. RITHOLTZ: Let’s talk a little bit about food, another key source of emissions. How can we become more efficient in growing the food affecting the menu of what we eat and reducing enough food waste to make a difference? DOERR: There’s three big things t to do about food. The first is to reduce the meat and dairies in our diet and I’m not saying cut them out entirely but to replace some of that with delicious, healthy plant-based proteins. And the book tells a story of Beyond Meat and the crusade of its founder. He struggled and mortgaged his house to lead the revolution in plant-based protein. It turns out that there’s a billion cows on the planet. The book tells you their story as well. If they were a nation, it would be the third largest country in terms of the emissions. The second big thing to do about food is to reduce food waste. Globally, 30 percent of the food that we produce is wasted and taking some straightforward measures we think that can be reduced. Our goal is to reduce it to 10 percent of the food that we produce, particularly when you consider the population will grow to 10 billion by the end of the century. Finally, we got to get more efficient with how we grow food and we can, for example, apply fertilizer much more precisely with new technologies. All in all, the food sector is a way for us to reduce nine gigatons of emissions to two gigatons by 2050 or a net gain of seven out of the 59 gigatons that we got to drive to zero. RITHOLTZ: So, we’ve spent a lot of time talking about beef and agriculture generally. But let’s talk about commercial fishing, what’s the impact of our fishing practices on the health of the oceans and its ability to absorb carbon and reflect heat? DOERR: Well, over fishing together with over drilling and over development have released huge amounts of carbon from the ocean floor and life and if we prevented the destruction of mangroves and other ocean life, we could prevent a gigaton of emissions from entering the atmosphere every year. Our plan calls to eliminate deep sea bottom trawling, which is an especially destructive practice. Bottom trawling releases one and a half gigatons of CO2 equivalent emissions. It also calls for increasing the protection of oceans to 30 percent by 2030 and 50 percent by 2050. I want to call out, this is an area of climate ambition that Walmart is staking out an important and powerful leadership position. Not only that they said they’re going to have their supply chain be carbon neutral by 2040 but they are going to preserve, protect millions of acres of land and ocean water in the effort to become the first scale regenerative company. RITHOLTZ: Really, really interesting. So, very often, the average person listening to a conversation like this thinks, well, what can I do, I’m just one person. What’s the balance of responsibility between individuals on one side and government and institutions on the other? DOERR: We need all the forces in our economy, in our society to come together and work on this. We need innovators. We need entrepreneurs. We need policymakers. We need investors. We need to hear more from impassioned youth. In 2018, Greta Thunberg was a single high school student skipping school on Fridays. A year later, in 2019, in December, she organized a million-person march in a hundred cities around the world and specifically, she made the climate crisis atop two voting issue in the nations in Europe. Barry, it is not a top voting issue in the U.S. It is not a top issue in China or even in India. So, we have work to do and that’s one of our accelerants, the ways we get all this done faster and that’s to turn movements into specific actions. We really need individuals to lead others in powerful ways. That’s, for example, employees, pushing your employers to make net-zero commitment or shareholders and investors demanding changes in the board rooms. It turns out that changing the lightbulbs and eating less meat is important but we’ve got to go further. We’ve got to change our laws or even our lawmakers in order to avert this climate crisis. RITHOLTZ: Quite fascinating. I want to talk about some of the things you’ve said in the book that apply everywhere but are especially applicable to the climate crisis. Let’s start with, quote, “It seems every dozen years we witness magical ever-exponentially larger waves of innovation.” So, let’s start first with climate, how and where are those waves of innovation coming that’ll help ameliorate the climate crisis? DOERR: Well, the innovations are happening on many fronts, the material sciences, electrochemistry, biology. The opportunity that the climate transition to a clean energy the economy represents is the largest of our lifetime. It’s a bigger mobilization than even the effort of the allies to defeat the Nazi Axis in World War II. You’ll remember then, we shut down for four years all manufacturing of automobiles and appliances and instead, created 268,000 fighter aircrafts, 20,000 battleships. It was a monumental effort dealing with an existential threat. And that same level of innovation and ambition is required to win in this climate campaign. Other areas of breakthroughs or innovations, I’m even becoming a believer that we’ll see nuclear fusion. That’s the kind of clean energy that comes from the sun, practical within a decade. Concrete and steel that’s carbon free, long duration storage, the opportunities to reimagine and reinvent how we create, share, transmit and use energy in every facet of our lives is as big an opportunity as we’ll see in our lifetime. RITHOLTZ: So, let’s stay focused on that opportunity for a minute. This isn’t a charity or a foundation that’s doing this for free. When we look around, there are actual venture investments that you’ve been making successfully. So, you past on Tesla but somebody put money into Tesla. Wind turbines, solar, Beyond Meat is now public company. You are an early investor into that. You’re looking at this as more than just, hey, we have to do this in order to make sure that we don’t have a runaway greenhouse effect and Earth turns into Venus and becomes uninhabitable. But there are also very legitimate economic opportunities here also. Expound on those a little bit. DOERR: Well, there’s no better example than Tesla which had gone from a struggling company reliant on loans, thank you, United States taxpayers, to the sought most valuable company in the world. And by some measures, Elon Musk is the most — is the richest individual in the world. He took on huge risks and he delivered for his customers and shareholders, his country and his planet. And the best of the work that Elon has done is inspire, perhaps, through fear but certainly by example the rest of the automobile industry to accelerate their shift to clean and electric vehicles. So, this is, how I like to say, the mother of all markets. It’s a monster market. Batteries alone, the batteries to move from internal combustion vehicles to electric vehicles, are estimated to be $400 billion per year, Barry, for 20 years. We are going to — we must recreate all the infrastructure that we use to power out planet. RITHOLTZ: Let’s talk about something we haven’t gotten to when we were talking about those larger waves of innovation. Lots of folks are excited about blockchain and crypto and Web 3.0. But when we look at things like Bitcoin, it’s a big energy hog, how do we reconcile all the wealth that’s being created there with its massive electricity consumption? DOERR: Its electricity consumption is sustainable and so, we’re going to have to move to clean Bitcoin, green Bitcoin and we’ll get there by regulation, if not, by other market forces I would predict. Today, I believe that Bitcoin uses as much energy as the entire nation of Sweden. So, Bitcoin, I believe, is here to stay but it — we can’t fuel it through dirty electricity. RITHOLTZ: You mentioned concrete earlier and I also read in the book that you want to end single-use plastics. What does the world of material science promised us for replacing things in those spaces? How do you replace concrete? How do you replace single-use plastic? DOERR: Concrete is probably the hardest problem of all because in the production of the concrete, you almost must create carbon emissions. We can reduce the energy use to make concrete. There are some concrete innovations that absorb the CO2 into the material. But that’s an area where we need more innovation. What was your second area? RITHOLTZ: Single-use plastics. DOERR: Single-use plastics. The plan calls for the banning and really the replacement of single-use plastics. The banning of single-use plastics and in general to replace plastics with compostable materials that can be recycled and I am confident that with investment and entrepreneurial work, we can get that done. RITHOLTZ: So, we haven’t really talked about pulling carbon out of the atmosphere. I get the sense from some people that they’re expecting some technological magic bullet that’s going to solve climate change. Tell us about how we can remove carbon from the atmosphere and is there a magic bullet coming. DOERR: The speed and scale plan calls for us to remove 10 gigatons of carbon dioxide per year. I emphasize remove. This will be gigatons of CO2 emissions that we were not able to eliminate, we were not able to cut, we were not able to slash. They’ll be some uses of aviation fuel as an example or other stubborn carbon. Two approaches to this, one of which is to innovate around nature-based ways of removing CO2. For example, growing greater kelp forest in the oceans. But the other that has captured a lot of attention is called direct air capture or that’s engineered removal of carbon. Think of them as kind of mechanical trees and this technology works today but only at small scale. It sucks the CO2 out of the air. It requires a lot of electricity in order to do that. And so, it’s very expensive today, some $600 per ton. If we’ve got to remove five gigatons per year at $600 per ton, that’s $3 trillion a year and it’s hard to see how that’s affordable. So, entrepreneurs are hard at work to lower those costs and I hope they do. RITHOLTZ: So, there’s a quote I like from another venture capitalist who said venture capital properly deployed can solve the biggest problems, filling the void left by shrinking scientific ambitions of governments, foundations and international organizations. What are your thoughts on that approach? How crucial is venture capital to our future and can it replace these other entities? DOERR: Venture capital is crucial and it’s stepping up to the challenge. There will be an estimated $30 billion invested venture capital in climate technologies this year. Our plan calls for 50 billion this year. But venture capital is not going to get this job done on its own. We need government-funded research and development to grow in the U.S. alone to 40 billion a year. Other countries have got to triple their funding. We need project financing. We need philanthropic investing. Jeff Bezos’ commitment of $10 billion to the Bezos Earth Fund is the largest philanthropic commitment to climate crisis that we’ve ever witnessed or enjoyed. There’s really four accelerators that will get this job done. One of them is investing. Another is innovation, the work of entrepreneurs. But I think the hardest are going to be to turn our movements into actions so we get the politics and the policy correct because it’s going to take a massive, collective, coordinated effort to achieve our ultimate OKR and that’s to take 59 gigatons of emissions to net zero by 2050. RITHOLTZ: That’s an ambitious target and if we miss that target, what are the ramifications? DOERR: We’ll leave our kids and our grandkids an uninhabitable planet. We’ll see the Arctic sea ice surely melts away. We’ll have — estimates are up to a billion climate refugees. There’s 10 million of them already. Hundreds of millions of people will starve. It’s unthinkable. And so, we must get this done. RITHOLTZ: So, let me turn this back to what’s going on in the world of venture now. When the early decades of you work at Kleiner Perkins was into a very friendly IPO market, how much does timing matter broadly, meaning, hey, if there’s an exit available, if there’s a big IPO market that makes it more likely people are going to invest in these companies and have a successful exit. Tell us a little bit about timing. DOERR: Well, investors, myself included, will stop at nothing to copy success. So, the timing of today’s markets for climate technologies whether it’s Tesla or Rivian or better batteries or Beyond Meat, it’s good and I would say in the long run, it’s going to continue to be good because the size of the markets and the need, the economic need, the opportunity, and the planetary pressures. RITHOLTZ: So, if a younger venture capitalist or a newfound venture fund came to you and ask for advice, what would you tell them about this opportunity? DOERR: There’s so many different venture firms and strategies. I would say to them that this is the greatest opportunity with 21st century that they should be strategic about their contribution. Is it to work with early-stage entrepreneurs and removing technical risks or at the other extreme, is it to be smart and sharp about project financing? But the overall costs of the transition from a dirty fossil economy to a clean new energy economy is $4 trillion per year, per year. That sounds like a big number until you compare it with the cost of dirty energy, the social cost, the disruption, the premature deaths. One in five deaths are premature due to carbon pollution. Those come in at about $10 billion per year. So, it’s literally cheaper to save the Earth than it is to ruin it. RITHOLTZ: And there’s just seems to be endless amounts of cash pouring into the venture capital sector. Arguably, it’s never been higher. What are your thoughts on this? Does it worry you? What’s the driver of all this money sloshing around? DOERR: Some people say that we’re experiencing a bubble, a bubble in fintech or Bitcoin or climate technologies. I see it very differently. I think it’s a boom and historically, whether it was the advent of transcontinental railroads or the automobiles, we saw booms which led to full employment, overinvestment, rapid innovation. And, no, not all those car companies survive. But I think the same will be true of the other fields of innovation. I think one of the things that gives me great hope is the power of human ingenuity. We got ourselves into these specs and, Barry, I’m betting, we’re going to figure our way out. RITHOLTZ: So, what do you say to people who sort of posture Silicon Valley’s best days are behind it? Do you have a response to any of those folks? DOERR: I think they’re wrong. I think provided we deal with this existential threat, the climate crisis, and that is not guaranteed, but provided we do that and we get a 50% reduction in the next decade, I think we’re on track for a wonderful, prosperous, healthy planet. RITHOLTZ: Can I tell you and I should have mentioned this earlier but I read a ton of books for the show and I found the book really quite fascinating and it’s pretty obvious to me that an engineer was behind this. There’s just a lot of great slides and charts and graphs and it’s not just all texts. Parts of it are narrative and parts of it are historical and it reminds me of a well-made slide deck. So, nice job on the book. DOERR: Well, thanks for sharing that. I want to send you a bound version of the book if you’ll email me your physical mailing address. There’s one other thing — other story I might tell you about the book. RITHOLTZ: Sure. DOERR: I was talking the other day with a reader, a mom who told me that every night, she takes two or three pages of the book and she reads them together with her daughter and then they talk about together what that means for the world her daughter is going to inherit, and I thought, wow, that’s the use of the book I never imagined and one that I’m honestly proud of. RITHOLTZ: How — it looks like this was the work of a lot of different people. How did you end up researching and writing this? DOERR: We talked to hundred different leaders in the field, policymakers, researchers, modelers, activists and from those, selected some 35 stories. We ended up with a thousand different data points that we needed to verify and collected those into 500 end notes, which are in the book. And I did it with an amazing small team of three or four on research and writing stuf. I’m an engineer as you know and so I’m not so good with words and I had the benefit of a writing team that helped make this much more readable. RITHOLTZ: Well, it shows, you can see the book is a fast read. I sat down with a bunch of stickies and highlighter and found myself just plowing through chapter after chapter. It was a relatively quick read and very easy to put down and then pick back up again. Each chapter is very distinct and you’ve really laid out a plan to prevent climate catastrophe from taking place. So, thank you for that. DOERR: One thing I want to make sure your audience know is this, they can get a free infographic, it’s a single poster-sized piece of paper that has on both sides of it all the objectives, all the key results, all the measures. And it’s reassuring for people who are fearful that there is a plan and that if we do these things, we can find a way to a habitable planet. That’s what we’ve got to do. RITHOLTZ: So, I know I only have you for a limited amount of time. Let me jump to my favorite questions that I ask all of my guests starting with tell us what you’ve been streaming these days, give us your favorite Netflix or Amazon Prime or whatever podcast you’re listening to. DOERR: So, I haven’t had time for streaming on Netflix. I’ve been doing research, reading books and papers on the climate crisis itself. But getting this word out, I’ve listened to a — I’ve started listening to a couple of new podcast, John Heilemann’s Hell & High Water … RITHOLTZ: Sure. DOERR: … and Tim Ferriss Show, both of which, I think, have a distinctive imprint from their hosts (ph). RITHOLTZ: Tell us about your mentors who helped to shape your career. DOERR: So, the biggest influence on my life was my dad Lou Doerr, an engineer, entrepreneur and hero and I’ve been blessed by a number of mentors, perhaps most notable of them, Andy Grove, and what I learned from him at Intel prompted me to write a first book called “Measure What Matters” and that tells stories of a dozen different organizations using OKRs, which is what then I applied to the climate crisis. I would tell you Al Gore is a hero of mine. He’s wonderfully resolute man who’s impassioned, effective and funny. He and I talked regularly about the climate crisis. RITHOLTZ: Tell us about some of your favorite books, what are your all-time favorites and what are you reading right now. DOERR: So, my current reading, no surprise, is largely around the climate crisis. I love Elizabeth Colbert’s “Under a White Sky” which described climate futures. And two other books are “How to Avoid a Climate Disaster” by Bill Gates, very accessible book, and a profile — a new profile of Winston Churchill called “The splendid and the Vile.” RITHOLTZ: Two good recommendations. What sort of advice would you give to a recent college grad who wanted to pursue a career in venture investing? DOERR: I would say to her gain experience as an entrepreneur. I’d repeat the advice that I was given early in my career which was go get a real job in a real growing tech company and sharpen your skills in the real hard world of business economics and then take that experience to help other entrepreneurs succeed. RITHOLTZ: And our final question, what do you know about the world of venture investing today that you wish you knew 40 years ago? DOERR: I wish I knew 40 years ago how important the team is, the leadership of the team, the recruiting of the team, the growing of the team because in the end, it’s more than large market, it’s more than compelling technologies. It’s teams who know how to execute well. RITHOLTZ: Really, really fascinating stuff. Thanks, John, for being so generous with your time. We have been speaking with John Doerr. He is a partner at famed venture firm Kleiner Perkins and the author of the new book, “Speed and Scale: An Action Plan for Solving our Climate Crisis Now.” If you enjoy this conversation, be sure and check out all of our previous discussions. You can find those wherever you find your favorite podcast, iTunes, Spotify, Acast, wherever. We love your comments, feedback and suggestions. Write to us at mibpodcast@bloomberg.net. Sign up for my daily reads @ritholtz.com. Follow me on Twitter, @Ritholtz. I would be remiss if I do not thank our crack staff that helps with these conversations together each week, Michael Batnick is my head of research, Atika Valbrun is our project manager, Paris Wald is our producer, I’m Barry Ritholtz, you’ve been listening to Masters in Business on Bloomberg Radio.   ~~~   The post Transcript: John Doerr appeared first on The Big Picture......»»

Category: blogSource: TheBigPictureDec 6th, 2021

The rise of EFFY, a gay pro wrestler who overcame the odds — and slurs — to craft a lucrative personal brand

"People who would have screamed slurs were buying shirts," pro wrestler Taylor Gibson, who portrays EFFY, told Insider. He's made a career out of it. Independent wrestler Taylor Gibson, who goes by EFFY.Nick Karp Taylor Gibson is a professional wrestler who goes by EFFY, or the "Weapon of Sass Destruction." GIbson is known for his marketing and events, like EFFY's Big Gay Brunch, and having "Daddy" written across his butt in hot pink. Gibson hasn't signed with a major organization. He said that lets him control his character, who's anything but typical. EFFY is not your traditional professional wrestler. Not many in the scripted sport hold a public-relations degree and eight years of experience operating a shipping logistics company, nor have many come close to matching the charismatic, 229-pound, gay wrestler's digital-media savviness and its ensuing revenue. In 2020, despite the pandemic shutting down most live events, he reports earning a six-figure income off just his brand. EFFY — who's sometimes called the "Weapon of Sass Destruction," but whose real name is Taylor Gibson— finds himself among a new class of popular independent professional wrestlers: deliberately unsigned. Rather than ink a deal with leader World Wrestling Entertainment and its $4.3 billion market cap, or newcomer All Elite Wrestling and its $175 million TV deal signed with WarnerMedia in 2020, Gibson wants to control his destiny. Who is EFFY?Success in wrestling often boils down to connecting with the crowd. It requires charisma, entertaining in-ring prowess, and, today, the ability to keep fans hooked when the show isn't on. Gibson has found success doing just that. His online presence is filled with well-produced charismatic vignettes and posts that any social-media user could create at home, but none of it would matter without the ability to captivate in the ring. The job begins well before the opening bell. Entering to Elton John's "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road," decked in a spiked pink or purple leather jacket, the fishnet-clad wrestler regularly gets large crowds of straight men to chant what's written in hot pink across his butt: Daddy. Independent wrestler Taylor Gibson, who goes by EFFY.Nick KarpOnce in the ring, Gibson has received praise for matches with men, women, and nonbinary performers, as well as wrestling in traditional technical matches and extreme "deathmatches." For his efforts, Pro Wrestling Insider ranked him 95th on its list of the top 500 wrestlers for 2021. "I've always been a person who wants to poke people a little, but not in a bad way," he told Insider, saying the efforts help provoke perception-expanding private conversations at shows. Once, Gibson recalled a promoter saying he brought gay people to shows. "No," he said. "I bring in people who are learning how much fun it is to hang out with gay people."Becoming EFFYGibson's wrestling story began in 2012. Fresh out of college, he worked various jobs, including handling merchandise for touring bands like Hootie and the Blowfish. He also continued working on moving trucks, a position he had had since 16. Gibson enjoyed the physical labor as well as the connection made with customers while handling their valuables. In 2012, he took over a Two Men And A Truck franchise in Florida, managing a fleet of 13 trucks and 40 employees. Independent wrestler Taylor Gibson, who goes by EFFY.35.MMWrestling KevinAs his career grew, his struggles with his identity reached a breaking point. In 2013, he took a large dose of LSD, resulting in a five-day trip. During the experience, he recalled battling himself over career goals and dreams. Afterward, with a changed perspective, he felt compelled to pursue wrestling. But more importantly, he came out about his sexuality."This sounds crazy, but it was my motivation," he said. The business of EFFYAfter the revelation, Gibson added a year of two-hour drives and wrestling training to his work routine. He then began getting onto shows, relying on his PR degree to help boost the image of someone without a deep wrestling background. Once on shows, he didn't adhere to the old rules. He spoke up, something rookies are told not to do. Gibson said it rubbed some veterans the wrong way at first, but the energy translated into EFFY's in-ring persona. "It was a therapeutic way for me to get through who I was as a person," he said. The first few months were full of what wrestling continues to struggle with: prejudice, including slurs from some fans and disrespect from old-era thinking pros. While the culture is improving, Gibson isn't the ony person who's experienced that: In late September 2021, a transgender fan was said to have been attacked in the bathroom during popular California-based promotion Pro Wrestling Guerrilla's show. Independent wrestler Taylor Gibson, who goes by EFFY.Nick KarpDespite ongoing struggles across the industry, Gibson saw a change around his third or fourth month of work. "People who would have screamed slurs at me were buying shirts," Gibson said. "Dads who would have never wanted to talk to me, their kids only wanted EFFY stuff."In time, his social media presence grew, with recent tallies at 26,000 followers on Twitter, 17,500 on Instagram, and 7,600 on Twitch, a popular and sometimes lucrative streaming platform for its creators. Part of Gibson's Twitch appeal is the fan connection created through conversations, live watch-alongs, and glimpses into his personal life, often featuring boyfriend AJ and dog Cranberry. The following also led to the creation of more inclusive wrestling endeavors, including EFFY's Big Gay Brunch, a series of shows featuring LGBTQIA+ performers and allies. He launched the Wrestling is Gay merchandise line, with part of the proceeds benefitting Atlanta-area LGBTQ+ support organization Lost-n-Found Youth.The success continues to roll in. An hour after concluding our interview on September 24, 2021, Gibson defeated Matt Cardona to win the Internet Championship in Queens, New York. He dropped the title back to Cardona a few weeks later at their rematch in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Merchandising and the fan connectionMerchandising is a crucial component for Gibson's brand. He's expanded beyond shirts and photos, and is active on Cameo and other revenue-making streams. Independent wrestler Taylor Gibson, who goes by EFFY.35.MMWrestling KevinThe most standout of all may be the limited-edition Effy Award: a line of bronze busts featuring the wrestler in his spiked leather jacket. No qualifications other than having the available funds were required to "win" an award. The cheeky bit of unique wrestling merch also offered a certificate of authenticity, for an additional price. The statues were a hit, selling out soon after their release. Fans recorded acceptance speeches, touting the wins they'd given themselves, and took photos of their awards. Gibson streamed the results on Twitch. The campaign reflected his merchandising vision that thinks beyond revenue generation. He implores all brands, wrestling or otherwise, to consider how the product communicates with buyers and the excitement it produces.  Over the years, the connection formed and the resulting revenue showed Gibson that he could live off of his brand without signing with a major player. As one of the first to do so, Gibson urges others to follow suit by showing them how they can make money on their own — even when away from the ring. He believes that effort will further help propel and sustain the independent wrestling boom of the past five or so years.  With fan support and media distribution shifting, Gibson feels he can continue to make a positive impact on his own."I'm independent," he said. "I don't need permission from my boss. I don't need permission from the company."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 2nd, 2021

A college law professor who teaches critical race theory worries that educators are living through another "Red Scare"

Teachers are worried about their future job prospects as new state laws are signed that restrict classroom lessons on race and diversity. Protesters and activists stand outside a Loudoun County Public Schools board meeting in Ashburn, Virginia on October 12, 2021.Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images A raft of bills restricting teaching on race and gender are emerging in state legislatures. The movement is raising concerns about a "chilling effect" on educators. One critical race theory professor likened it to a Red Scare. Tanya Katerí Hernández feels fortunate to be a tenured professor at Fordham University School of Law, a private Catholic institution in New York City that she said supports her teaching on critical race theory.But she told Insider she worries about what might happen if, for instance, her family needed her to move to another state where the laws involving her expertise are becoming hostile. She questions whether she could teach what she sees as the most important issues for her students to learn elsewhere without being fired. "That is sort of like living under a Red Scare, almost," she said, a reference to the McCarthy-era, Cold War hysteria when accusations of communist sympathies could end careers. "That's the closest that I can conceptualize it as."Hernández warns others entering the profession that they could be vulnerable, too.The topic of critical race theory — a college-level study of racial bias in US laws — has become contentious both for K-12 schools, where educators say it isn't taught, and for universities where it has been taught for decades. The academic theory has become a catchall for teaching about race, equity and diversity. Conservatives argue it divides people into groups of oppressors and victims. The conservative Legal Insurrection Foundation launched criticalrace.org to track CRT training at colleges and universities.This year, 54 bills have been introduced in 24 state legislatures to restrict teaching and training in schools, higher education and state agencies and institutions, according to a new study by PEN America, a literary and human rights organization. Most bills target discussions of race, gender, US history and banning "prohibited" or "divisive" concepts. By October 1, 11 had become law in nine states: Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Tennessee and Texas.Some of the laws are vague, Hernández said, and worded in a way in which you're not sure what it captures. "There's lots of discretion for any kind of interpretation," she said, "And that's certainly not a comfortable space for an educator to be trying to do their job in."Tanya Katerí Hernández teaches critical race theory at Fordham University School of Law in New York City.Courtesy of Fordham University School of Law'Completely untrue'Legislation considered "anti-CRT" isn't principally intended to prohibit the study of CRT, but a broader set of ideas at schools and universities, the PEN America study says. "In short: They are educational gag orders," the study says.The laws are already having an effect. Oklahoma City Community College suspended a course on race and ethnicity. Iowa State University professors received guidance on how to avoid "drawing scrutiny" for their teaching. A Texas K-12 administrator told teachers to balance Holocaust books with an "opposing" perspective.At the University of Florida, an associate professor filed a grievance alleging he was threatened with discipline if he used "critical race" in his curriculum and program design, the Tampa Bay Times reported.The National Education Association, which represents teachers and higher education faculty, is offering state-specific guidance to make sure educators know what the laws mean for their work. The union says the laws shouldn't undermine efforts to ensure all students "feel seen in the classroom and benefit from culturally-inclusive curricula and pedagogical tools that teach the historical facts about our country."In her advanced critical race theory course this semester, Hernández said the CRT controversy has been "the shadow lurking over a lot of the conversation." Many of the students find it a valuable analytical frame for approaching legal topics like voting rights or employment, but they're seeing a "constant onslaught in the news" about critical race theory.For some students, the attacks are proof of the value of what they're learning. Others are "almost sort of fearful," questioning whether they can talk about it publicly or write about it in op-eds. "It's very chilling," she said.  She has advised students exploring career paths in this space that they will be vulnerable in areas in the country where "censorship gag orders" have gained traction in state legislatures.Hernández, who is working on her third book in a series on racial discrimination and the civil rights struggle, has taught critical race theory for 25 years and she grew accustomed to blank stares from people when she explained her work because they didn't know the term.Now that people have heard about it in the news or on Saturday Night Live, she said, they are either curious or misinformed. "They think it's part of an anti-whiteness mode of analysis or a racial hate platform," she said, adding that that's "completely untrue."She describes it as an analysis of legal jurisprudence that examines how advances in civil rights laws were undermined and have in many ways led to disenchantment with a colorblind approach to dealing with racism. "It's a very specific framework for looking at law and the way in which it's deployed in society and how to better reform it," she said. While K-12 teachers may teach that Jim Crow laws existed to enforce racial segregation in the South after the Civil War, CRT looks at how obstruction to racial inclusion continues after Jim Crow laws ended, she said. "It looks at patterns and it looks at continuing legacies," she said.It's not coincidental, she said, that political operatives are funding attacks on critical race theory now after the murder of the Black man George Floyd by white police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis and the ensuing protests. The misinformation campaign is working well, she said, because it taps into racial anxiety and discomfort.Claims that teaching CRT is "unpatriotic" are "ironic," she said. Teaching students "the truth" about history and how to ask questions about making things better is "actually the most patriotic thing that one could do," she said.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 1st, 2021

When being a college law professor feels like living under a "Red Scare" at a time of critical race theory disinformation

"There's lots of discretion for any kind of interpretation," Tanya Katerí Hernández, a professor at Fordham University School of Law, says of new state laws restricting teaching on race and diversity. Protesters and activists stand outside a Loudoun County Public Schools board meeting in Ashburn, Virginia on October 12, 2021. -Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images A raft of bills restricting teaching on race and gender are emerging in state legislatures. The movement is raising concerns about a "chilling effect" on educators. One critical race theory professor likened it to a Red Scare. Tanya Katerí Hernández feels fortunate to be a tenured professor at Fordham University School of Law, a private Catholic institution in New York City that she said supports her teaching on critical race theory.But she told Insider she worries about what might happen if, for instance, her family needed her to move to another state where the laws involving her expertise are becoming hostile. She questions whether she could teach what she sees as the most important issues for her students to learn elsewhere without being fired. "That is sort of like living under a Red Scare, almost," she said, a reference to the McCarthy-era, Cold War hysteria when accusations of communist sympathies could end careers. "That's the closest that I can conceptualize it as."Hernández warns others entering the profession that they could be vulnerable, too.The topic of critical race theory — a college-level study of racial bias in US laws — has become contentious both for K-12 schools, where educators say it isn't taught, and for universities where it has been taught for decades. The academic theory has become a catchall for teaching about race, equity and diversity. Conservatives argue it divides people into groups of oppressors and victims. The conservative Legal Insurrection Foundation launched criticalrace.org to track CRT training at colleges and universities.This year, 54 bills have been introduced in 24 state legislatures to restrict teaching and training in schools, higher education and state agencies and institutions, according to a new study by PEN America, a literary and human rights organization. Most bills target discussions of race, gender, US history and banning "prohibited" or "divisive" concepts. By October 1, 11 had become law in nine states: Arizona, Arkansas, Idaho, Iowa, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Tennessee and Texas.Some of the laws are vague, Hernández said, and worded in a way in which you're not sure what it captures. "There's lots of discretion for any kind of interpretation," she said, "And that's certainly not a comfortable space for an educator to be trying to do their job in."Tanya Katerí Hernández teaches critical race theory at Fordham University School of Law in New York City.Courtesy of Fordham University School of Law'Completely untrue'Legislation considered "anti-CRT" isn't principally intended to prohibit the study of CRT, but a broader set of ideas at schools and universities, the PEN America study says. "In short: They are educational gag orders," the study says.The laws are already having an effect. Oklahoma City Community College suspended a course on race and ethnicity. Iowa State University professors received guidance on how to avoid "drawing scrutiny" for their teaching. A Texas K-12 administrator told teachers to balance Holocaust books with an "opposing" perspective.At the University of Florida, an associate professor filed a grievance alleging he was threatened with discipline if he used "critical race" in his curriculum and program design, the Tampa Bay Times reported.The National Education Association, which represents teachers and higher education faculty, is offering state-specific guidance to make sure educators know what the laws mean for their work. The union says the laws shouldn't undermine efforts to ensure all students "feel seen in the classroom and benefit from culturally-inclusive curricula and pedagogical tools that teach the historical facts about our country."In her advanced critical race theory course this semester, Hernández said the CRT controversy has been "the shadow lurking over a lot of the conversation." Many of the students find it a valuable analytical frame for approaching legal topics like voting rights or employment, but they're seeing a "constant onslaught in the news" about critical race theory.For some students, the attacks are proof of the value of what they're learning. Others are "almost sort of fearful," questioning whether they can talk about it publicly or write about it in op-eds. "It's very chilling," she said.  She has advised students exploring career paths in this space that they will be vulnerable in areas in the country where "censorship gag orders" have gained traction in state legislatures.Hernández, who is working on her third book in a series on racial discrimination and the civil rights struggle, has taught critical race theory for 25 years and she grew accustomed to blank stares from people when she explained her work because they didn't know the term.Now that people have heard about it in the news or on Saturday Night Live, she said, they are either curious or misinformed. "They think it's part of an anti-whiteness mode of analysis or a racial hate platform," she said, adding that that's "completely untrue."She describes it as an analysis of legal jurisprudence that examines how advances in civil rights laws were undermined and have in many ways led to disenchantment with a colorblind approach to dealing with racism. "It's a very specific framework for looking at law and the way in which it's deployed in society and how to better reform it," she said. While K-12 teachers may teach that Jim Crow laws existed to enforce racial segregation in the South after the Civil War, CRT looks at how obstruction to racial inclusion continues after Jim Crow laws ended, she said. "It looks at patterns and it looks at continuing legacies," she said.It's not coincidental, she said, that political operatives are funding attacks on critical race theory now after the murder of the Black man George Floyd by white police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis and the ensuing protests. The misinformation campaign is working well, she said, because it taps into racial anxiety and discomfort.Claims that teaching CRT is "unpatriotic" are "ironic," she said. Teaching students "the truth" about history and how to ask questions about making things better is "actually the most patriotic thing that one could do," she said.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 1st, 2021

The 100+ best early Cyber Monday deals to shop now: AirPods Pro, Instant Pot, Apple Watch, and more

Black Friday has ended, but you can shop early Cyber Monday deals now. Save big at Amazon, Walmart, Target, Best Buy, Nordstrom, and more. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Alyssa Powell/InsiderWe're hours away from Cyber Monday — the even more explicitly online-focused version of Black Friday — and it's historically fetched some of the sales weekend's lowest prices. While it officially begins November 29, many retailers are holding early Cyber Monday sales or continuing Black Friday deals right now.Cyber Monday is a particularly great time to shop for tech, smart home, and gift cards — though stock is typically much more limited than Black Friday. Acting fast is key to getting a good deal, so it's important to know what you're shopping for ahead of time. Don't worry if you see the dreaded "out of stock" symbol — other retailers might have the product you wanted in stock with a similar deal, and we've seen discounts come back throughout the event, sometimes on the same day. To keep up with discounts without spending all day sleuthing, bookmark this page and check back throughout the day; we'll do the heavy lifting for you.At Insider Reviews, we test products all year and track their price history so we can give you solid buying advice during big shopping events like Cyber Monday. Tons of deals are available now on products we love and trust, and we're highlighting the best ones below.Best Cyber Monday 2021 tech dealsBeats Solo ProIf you’re a fan of the vibrant light blue these Solo Pro headphones come in, this is a nice price for a brand new pair. Down to $170, this isn’t a rare price for them by any means, but it’s a great value for what you’re getting.$184.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $299.95 | Save 38%$99.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $149.00 | Save 34%Apple AirPods ProThe Apple AirPods Pro look and sound better than previous-generation AirPods. Plus, they have noise cancellation built right into them and integrate perfectly with other Apple devices. $179.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $249.99 | Save 28%$189.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $249.99 | Save 24%$189.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $249.99 | Save 24%$159.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $249.00 | Save 36%$209.00 FROM B&HOriginally $249.00 | Save 16%Roku Streambar 2020Too much clutter under the TV? The interesting Roku Streambar combines all of the features of a Roku 4K player with a compact soundbar.$79.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$79.98 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$99.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $129.99 | Save 24%Google Nest Hub (2nd gen)The Google Nest Hub is a smart display with a unique Sleep Sensing feature to help you monitor your sleep habits. $49.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $99.99 | Save 50%$49.98 FROM WALMARTOriginally $99.98 | Save 50%$49.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 50%Apple Watch Series 7Much more than a timepiece, the Apple Watch can also be used for keeping track of workouts, making phone calls, sending text messages, setting timers and alarms, counting calories, and more.$379.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $399.00 | Save 5%$379.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $399.00 | Save 5%$399.00 FROM APPLEApple Watch SE (40mm, GPS)With a recent Apple processor and many of the same features as the Series 7, the Apple Watch SE is a great budget-friendly option.$219.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $279.00 | Save 21%$279.00 FROM APPLESamsung Galaxy Watch 4 (40mm)The Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 is the obvious choice for Android users looking for a comprehensive, quality, premium smartwatch experience. However, it's a shame that the ECG feature is limited specifically to Samsung phone owners. $199.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%$199.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%$199.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%MasterClass 2-for-1 membershipGet two MasterClass subscriptions for the price of one! Each subscription gets you access to all of MasterClass, so you can watch or sample unlimited celebrity and expert-led classes across a wide range of topics.$180.00 FROM MASTERCLASSOriginally $360.00 | Save 50%Sony WH-1000XM4Sony's WH-1000XM4 are our go-to pair of headphones when we look for a balance of sound quality and noise-cancelling performance.$248.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%$248.00 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%$249.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%Bose QuietComfort 45The QuietComfort 45 have a refreshed design with improved noise cancelling and better battery life.$279.00 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM BOSEOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%Apple AirPods (3rd Gen)Apple's third-generation AirPods offer longer battery life, a MagSafe charger, water resistance, and support for spatial audio. $169.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $179.00 | Save 5%$179.00 FROM APPLE$179.00 FROM BEST BUY$174.98 FROM WALMART$154.99 FROM MICRO CENTEROriginally $179.99 | Save 14%Apple Airpods (2nd Generation)You’ll need to pick up your pair from your local Micro Center, but this is a solid deal price for the second-generation Apple AirPods. You can often find them discounted as low as $120, making this extra $5 drop noteworthy. $104.99 FROM MICRO CENTEROriginally $129.99 | Save 19%$114.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 12%$114.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $129.99 | Save 12%$119.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $129.99 | Save 8%Apple MacBook Air (M1)The latest MacBook Air released in late 2020 gains Apple's new M1 processor, which brings impressively fast performance and long battery life, for under $1,000, making it the best Apple laptop overall.$899.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $999.99 | Save 10%$999.00 FROM APPLE$899.00 FROM B&HOriginally $999.00 | Save 10%Apple MacBook Pro with M1 Processor (13-inch, 8GB RAM, 256GB)Apple's latest MacBook Pro with the M1 processor is leaps and bounds beyond its predecessor, but the Intel MacBook Pro still has some tricks.$1199.00 FROM B&HOriginally $1299.00 | Save 8%$1299.00 FROM APPLELG 65-inch C1 OLED 4K TVLG’s C1 is one of the best 4K TVs you can buy. The OLED panel delivers incredible image quality with an infinite contrast ratio. This deal price matches the lowest we’ve seen so far.$1796.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $2499.98 | Save 28%$1796.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $2499.98 | Save 28%Samsung 65-inch Q60A QLED 4K TVSamsung's Q60A is the company's less expensive lineup of premium QLED TVs. $849.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $999.99 | Save 15%Amazon Fire TV 50" Omni SeriesAmazon launched its own smart TVs in fall 2021 and the Omni Series boasts features like hands-free Alexa support and video calling along with the latest Fire TV software.$359.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $509.99 | Save 29%Amazon Echo (4th Gen)The latest Echo speaker from Amazon takes on a spherical design for more effective room-filling audio. $59.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%$59.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%$59.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K MaxThe Fire TV Stick 4K is designed to be 40% more powerful than Fire TV Stick 4K. It also adds Wi-Fi 6 support.$34.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%$34.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%$34.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%Ring Video Doorbell (2020)The latest affordable Video Doorbell model from Ring features 1080p recording and improved motion tracking. It's a great deal if you're looking to start adding smart devices to your home. Orders made now will be fulfilled in 6 to 7 weeks.$79.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 20%Google Nest Cam Outdoor Battery (2021) Elegant design, reliable performance, and wireless battery power make the Nest Cam Outdoor a tempting option to add peace of mind and checking in on your home's exterior when you're away. $149.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $179.99 | Save 17%$149.99 FROM GOOGLEOriginally $179.99 | Save 17%$149.99 FROM BED BATH & BEYONDOriginally $179.99 | Save 17%$149.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $179.99 | Save 17%$198.00 FROM AMAZONAmazon All-New KindleThe Kindle allows users to download hundreds, if not thousands, of books straight to the device. This model has a front light that makes it better-suited for night time reading.$49.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $89.99 | Save 44%Vizio Elevate 5.1.4 SoundbarVizio's Elevate soundbar offers a 5.1.4 Dolby Atmos experience with performance that rivals many full-fledged home theater systems.$798.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $1099.99 | Save 27%$799.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $1099.99 | Save 27%Yamaha YAS-209 SoundbarYamaha's YAS-209 offers great sound, Amazon Alexa support, and well-balanced functionality for a reasonable price. $299.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $349.99 | Save 14%$299.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $349.95 | Save 14%Logitech C922x Pro Stream WebcamYou'll also want a decent webcam and mic if you want to be seen on screen, and provide commentary for your gaming.$74.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 25%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 20%GoPro Hero 10 BlackThis video and still camera has similar capabilities to larger variants, while maintaining the small go-anywhere form-factor it's known for.$349.98 FROM GOPROOriginally $499.99 | Save 30%Best Cyber Monday 2021 kitchen dealsNespresso Vertuo Next Deluxe Coffee and Espresso MakerA truly versatile machine, the Nespresso Vertuo Next uses capsules to make both coffee and espresso in a variety of cup or carafe sizes.$126.75 FROM TARGETOriginally $169.99 | Save 25%Breville Joule Sous VideThis nimble, compact machine heats water quickly, can work in a wide range of vessels, and is operated entirely through a helpful app.$159.94 FROM AMAZONOriginally $199.95 | Save 20%$159.96 FROM BREVILLEOriginally $199.95 | Save 20%Instant Pot Air Frying Lid, 6 QuartsIf you already own an Instant Pot and are looking to add air fryer functionality, this lid will do the trick. It's compatible with Smart Wi-Fi 60, Smart Bluetooth, Duo Evo Plus 6, Duo Evo Plus 60, Duo SV 60 or Max 60 models. $49.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $89.99 | Save 44%KitchenAid KFC3516ER 3.5 Cup Food ChopperThe KitchenAid KFC3516ER 3.5 Cup Food Chopper is ideal and convenient for small prepping needs. The size makes it easy to store away or keep on your counter, and the Cyber Monday price makes it easy on your wallet. $39.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $54.99 | Save 27%$39.99 FROM KITCHENAIDOriginally $54.99 | Save 27%Ninja Professional Plus Food ProcessorThe Ninja Professional Plus makes food prep fast and easy with presets for chopped vegetables, shredded cheese, more.$79.98 FROM KOHLSOriginally $119.99 | Save 33%DrinkMate Beverage Carbonation MakerIf you'd like to add fizz to more than just water, consider the Drinkmate Beverage Carbonation Maker, which can carbonate everything from juice to wine.$79.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $95.93 | Save 17%Ninja Foodi 5-in-1 Indoor Grill with Air Fryer, Roast, Bake & DehydrateThe Ninja Foodi 5-in-1 has five functions, including grill, bake, and dehydrate. Its temperatures range between 105°F to 500°F, giving it a lot of versatility in cooking options. Many of the parts are dishwasher safe for easier cleanup. $169.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $229.99 | Save 26%$199.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%Vitamix Explorian BlenderThe renewed Vitamix Explorian is pre-owned, but every bit as good as new and comes with a 90-day Amazon Renewed Guarantee on top of a 3-year full warranty.$289.95 FROM TARGETOriginally $449.99 | Save 36%$289.95 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $345.99 | Save 16%Instant Pot Duo Plus Pressure Cooker BundleThis bundle is a Target exclusive, and it includes an extra silicone egg rack and stainless steel steam rack for your pressure cooking needs. It’s only $60 right now — an excellent value for such a multifunctional kitchen appliance.$59.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 54%Our Place Always PanOur Place's Always Pan is multi-functional nonstick pan that's taken the internet by storm. It promises to replace eight different pieces of cookware in your kitchen. It can function as a steamer, saute pan, frying pan, and more. $99.00 FROM OUR PLACEOriginally $145.00 | Save 32%Cuisinart Chef's Classic 17-Piece Hard-Anodized Cookware SetThis nonstick set includes nine different pans, lids to match, and a steamer for a total of 17 pieces. $219.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $399.99 | Save 45%Keurig K-Mini Single Serve Coffee MakerThe slim 6- to 12-ounce coffee maker will fit neatly on any kitchen counter and save energy with the auto-off feature after brewing.$49.99 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $79.98 | Save 37%$89.99 FROM TARGETBest Cyber Monday 2021 home dealsEva-Dry Wireless Mini DehumidifierThis Eva-Dry dehumidifier measures 9 x 8.25 x 2.88 inches and works well for spaces up to 48 square feet. It uses silica beads to absorb moisture and has an absorbing capacity of six ounces. It’s also convenient because you only need to recharge it every four weeks. (It plugs into a wall outlet.)$14.97 FROM AMAZONOriginally $24.95 | Save 40%Molekule Air PurifierThis unit is popular among expert reviewers with its simple, portable design and quiet operation. We previously included the Molekule Air in our guide because it has multiple operation modes and can eradicate pollutants down to the nanoscopic level. However, at almost $800 plus $130 per year for filters, it's more than most people want to pay for an air purifier that isn't particularly powerful. We think there are better models at a lower price point.$479.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $799.00 | Save 40%$799.00 FROM MOLEKULEAeroGarden SproutA smaller option from AeroGarden's lineup, the Sprout lets you grow up to three plants in its narrow footprint. It's down to $70 with promo code SUMMER20 through May 31, a rare and excellent deal direct from AeroGarden.$49.95 FROM AEROGARDENOriginally $99.95 | Save 50%$49.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.95 | Save 50%Chewy Pet ProductsFor Cyber Monday, Chewy is offering $30 off purchases of $100 or more. This is only for select products, including food, treats, beds, and more.$70.00 FROM CHEWYOriginally $100.00 | Save 30%Dyson Outsize Absolute+The Dyson Outsize Absolute+ is ideal for whole home, deep cleaning with its full-size dustbin and large cleaner head. $799.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $899.99 | Save 11%Dyson V8 AbsoluteBuilt with a soft roller head for hard floors and a motorized cleaner head for carpets, the Dyson V8 Absolute handles all surfaces efficiently.$399.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $449.99 | Save 11%Dyson Cyclone V10 AbsoluteEquipped with a sensor to detect the difference between carpets and hard floors, the Cyclone V10 Absolute is the perfect vacuum cleaner for any room in the house. We've seen it go for as low as $350 before (it's usually $550), but during Black Friday and Cyber Monday, you'll get it for $400 while supplies last.$499.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $549.99 | Save 9%Drinkwell Two-Gallon Pet FountainThis two gallon pet drinking fountain is the perfect accessory to make sure your dog or cat (or both) are drinking enough water.$59.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $74.95 | Save 20%Eufy BoostIQ RoboVac 15C MAXQuiet, slim, and powerful, the eufy RoboVac 15C Max is a solid investment if you're looking for a robot vacuum. It's already very affordable at retail price, but you can also often find it on sale, making it an even better deal.$169.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $279.99 | Save 39%$169.99 FROM EUFYOriginally $249.99 | Save 32%iRobot Roomba i3+ (3550) Robot VacuumThe i3+ costs considerably more than your average robot vacuum, but it also does a lot more than the average robot vacuum. It develops personalized cleaning schedules and empties itself. $399.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM IROBOTOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $565.47 | Save 29%$399.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo T8 AIVI Robot VacuumThe  Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo Pro Mopping System thoroughly cleans floors as opposed to pushing a wet cloth around. When paired with the Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo T8 AIVI Robot Vacuum, the two make easy work of time-consuming chores.$499.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $749.99 | Save 33%$799.99 FROM BEST BUYBissell SpinWave Robot VacuumThe Bissell SpinWave Robot Vacuum picked up all the pet hair on carpet in our tests and has a great assortment of mop attachments and accessories. The company is also committed to helping homeless pets and helps them find loving homes. $249.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $399.99 | Save 38%$299.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $399.99 | Save 25%Dewalt Atomic 20-Volt Max Compact Drill/Impact Combo Kit This 20-Volt MAX Brushless Compact 2-Tool Combo Kit includes 1 cordless Drill/Driver, 1 cordless Impact Driver, two 20-Volt MAX Lithium Ion Batteries, 1 charger, and a carrying bag. $149.00 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $229.00 | Save 35%Best Cyber Monday 2021 gaming dealsNintendo Switch Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Digital Download)The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild was released for the Nintendo Switch in 2017, but still remains one of the best Switch games out there. Right now, a physical copy is selling for $40, which is a solid price on this rarely discounted game.$35.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%Nintendo Switch Fire Emblem: Three Houses"Fire Emblem: Three Houses" is a turn-based war strategy game that encourages you to build relationships with your soldiers and master your tactics on the battlefield. $35.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$35.00 FROM GAMESTOPOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$35.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$59.99 FROM BEST BUYNintendo eShop $50 Gift CardThe Nintendo eShop is the best place to shop for digital copies of Nintendo's games. This gift card is the perfect gift or investment for anyone with a Nintendo Switch. Better still, Nintendo's eShop offers several sales throughout the year. This means, patient shoppers can double their savings.$45.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $50.00 | Save 10%$50.00 FROM BEST BUY$45.00 FROM NEWEGGOriginally $50.00 | Save 10%Xbox Game Pass for PC (3-Month Membership)Typically, you can get a 3-month Game Pass subscription for $30. Right now, it's only $20, a solid deal. This is the PC version, which gets you EA Play, exclusive member discounts, and unlimited to access to over 100 games. $1.00 FROM MICROSOFTOriginally $29.99 | Save 97%$19.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $29.99 | Save 33%$19.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $29.99 | Save 33%PlayStation Plus 12-Month SubscriptionPlayStation Plus allows gamers to play online, nets them special discounts in the PlayStation Network store, and subscribers get free games each month that remain available as long as the PlayStation Plus subscription is active. $36.99 FROM CDKEYSOriginally $59.99 | Save 38%$39.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%$39.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%Microsoft Xbox Series S|X Wireless ControllerThis latest-gen Xbox gamepad is the best Microsoft has ever made, and during Cyber Monday, shoppers can save $20 on this recently released controller.$49.99 FROM MICROSOFTOriginally $59.99 | Save 17%$54.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 8%$49.00 FROM GAME STOPOriginally $54.99 | Save 11%$52.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 12%Death Loop for PlayStation 5“Death Loop” is an unusual first-person shooter that challenges players to escape a day-long time loop by assassinating specific targets. The game is a great pick for fans of spy movies, sci-fi, and creative gunplay.$29.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%Call of Duty Vanguard for PlayStation 4The latest Call of Duty game is now on sale for $20 off, just a few weeks after its release.$39.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 35%$44.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $59.99 | Save 25%Call of Duty Vanguard for PlayStation 5The latest Call of Duty game is now on sale for $15 off for PlayStation 5 just a few weeks after its release.$54.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $69.98 | Save 21%Nintendo Mario Kart Live: Home Circuit Nintendo Switch Set EditionYou can use a Nintendo Switch to control this real-life Mario Kart toy, and watch Mario or Luigi’s perspective as they zoom around your home.$88.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $99.99 | Save 11%$99.99 FROM BEST BUYLogitech G305 Lightspeed Wireless Gaming MouseCompact and portable, the Logitech G305 is great to take on the go. It's best if you prefer smaller mice and right now it's only $40, a great price drop from a typical selling price of $50.$29.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%$29.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $48.97 | Save 39%Nintendo Switch Ring Fit Adventure"Ring Fit Adventure" for the Nintendo Switch uses the exclusive "Ring-Con" attachment and a leg strap to track movement and provide resistance for workouts. The game also includes an adventure mode. Right now, it's selling for $55 at Target and Amazon, $25 off its usual price and the lowest price we've ever seen on this game.$54.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $79.98 | Save 32%$54.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $80.00 | Save 33%$79.98 FROM BEST BUY$79.98 FROM TARGETBest Cyber Monday 2021 streaming dealsHulu Monthly Subscription (Deal)Save a huge 85% on an ad-supported Hulu subscription for an entire year. That amounts to just 99 cents per month. This deal is live until Monday, November 29. $0.99 FROM HULUOriginally $6.99 | Save 86%Philo TVIf you want your streaming service to cost less per month than a single trip for the family to Starbucks, Philo TV is made with you in mind.$5.00 FROM PHILOOriginally $25.00 | Save 80%Disney Plus Free Trial with Amazon Music UnlimitedNew Amazon Music Unlimited subscribers can get six months of Disney Plus for free when they sign up. Current Music Unlimited members can get three months of Disney Plus. Music Unlimited costs $8 a month for Prime members or $10 a month without Prime.$0.00 FROM AMAZONAmazon Prime Video Channel Add-OnsPrime Video subscribers can choose from a variety of channel-add ons including Starz, Showtime, Paramount+, AMC+, Discovery+, and more.$0.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $10.99 | Save 91%YouTube PremiumYouTube Premium lets you stream videos and music on YouTube without any ads. The service also features exclusive programs.FREE FROM YOUTUBEOriginally $11.99 | Save 100%Best Cyber Monday 2021 health & fitness dealsTheragun PROThe Theragun Pro is our top pick: a powerful, customizable, and durable massager that's worth every bit of its $600 price tag. $399.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.00 FROM THERABODYOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%Fitbit LuxeThe Fitbit Luxe is the company's latest fitness band that comes with a sleek design and advanced health features like stress management and the ability to measure heart rate variation.$99.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $149.99 | Save 33%$99.95 FROM FITBITOriginally $149.94 | Save 33%$99.95 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $149.94 | Save 33%Fitbit Charge 4The Charge 4 hits a budget-friendly price point while offering stellar activity tracking in a smaller footprint than a smartwatch.$135.94 FROM AMAZONOriginally $149.94 | Save 9%$69.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $149.94 | Save 54%Mirror from lululemonThis isn't just a mirror. It's a cardio class, it's a yoga studio, it's a boxing ring, it's your new personal trainer, and it's so much more. For Cyber Monday, Mirror is on sale for $500 with the code "CYBERMONDAY20"$995.00 FROM MIRROROriginally $1495.00 | Save 33%Hydro Flask 32-Ounce Wide Mouth This bottle has all the hallmark features of a Hydro Flask water bottle — 12-24 hours of temperature retention, powder color coating that won't chip or fade with time, a silicone twist top — with the very convenient wide mouth for easy pouring and drinking.$33.71 FROM HYDRO FLASKOriginally $44.95 | Save 25%Amazon HaloAmazon's Halo fitness tracker can analyze the tone of your voice to help you understand how you sound to others.$54.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 45%LifeSpan TR1200i Folding TreadmillThe TR1200i is the baby sister of our top pick for a folding treadmill, the TR300i, with fewer built-in training programs and fewer fancy features like manual instead of digital buttons. But it's nearly the same size, has the same motor, and the same shock absorption — but for significantly cheaper.$899.00 FROM LIFESPANOriginally $1199.00 | Save 25%Best Cyber Monday 2021 style & beauty dealsDyson Airwrap Complete StylerDyson Airwrap Complete Styler is engineered for multiple hair types and styles. Featuring Coanda air styling and propelled by the Dyson digital motor, users can curl, wave, smooth and dry with no extreme heat.$399.99 FROM NEW EGGOriginally $499.99 | Save 20%$549.95 FROM DYSON$549.99 FROM BEST BUY$549.00 FROM AMAZONL.L.Bean Wicked Good Slippers - Men'sThis shearling-lined, leather-bottom slipper is one of the best men's slippers we've ever tried.$75.65 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $89.00 | Save 15%L.L.Bean Wicked Good Shearling-Lined Slides - Women'sThese ridiculously-cozy, shearling-lined slides are easy to slip on and off, and keep your feet toasty around the house.$67.15 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $79.00 | Save 15%L.L.Bean Toddlers' Wicked Good SlippersEverything we love about L.L.Bean's Wicked Good Slippers — but mini. These shearling-lined, leather-soled booties will keep kid's feet, sizes 3-10, toasty around the house and in a stroller.$33.96 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $39.95 | Save 15%Lululemon Hooded Define JacketA fan-favorite, now with a hood. Between the technical fabric and a do-anything fit, it's easy to see why this one's a hit. Right now you can save up to 50% on this versatile piece, but sizes are selling out quickly. $64.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $128.00 | Save 50%Lululemon Wunder Under High-Rise TightLululemon is, in many ways, the genesis of athleisure, so it's not surprising that the company has an edge in the space.$69.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $98.00 | Save 30%Lululemon Metal Vent Breathe Short SleeveLululemon Metal Vent Breathe Short Sleeve $49.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $78.00 | Save 37%Bombas Women's Gripper Slipper (Sherpa Lined) 2-PackA mix between socks and slippers, Bombas' Gripper Slippers include a cozy sherpa lining and sole grippers to prevent slips. $72.95 FROM BOMBASOriginally $96.00 | Save 24%Columbia Men's Lake 22 Down Hooded JacketThis water-resistant jacket is stocked with 650-fill power down insulation, zippered hand pockets, and a structured hood to keep you zipped up and toasty through any winter weather.$69.98 FROM COLUMBIAOriginally $140.00 | Save 50%Adidas Climacool VentoThe Adidas Climacool Vento features a highly breathable mesh upper to help keep your feet cool.$98.00 FROM ADIDASOriginally $140.00 | Save 30%Nike Adapt Auto MaxThe Nike Adapt Auto Max uses advanced technology to automatically form to your foot without laces.$259.98 FROM NIKEOriginally $400.00 | Save 35%Nike Space Hippie 01The Nike Space Hippie 01 is made from 50% recycled materials and features a lightweight, track-inspired look.$77.56 FROM NIKEOriginally $130.00 | Save 40%Crocs Classic Clog (Unisex)The shoe that really started it all, the Classic Clog is comfortable, breathable, and easy to slip on whenever. With over 20 fun colors to choose from, you can’t go wrong.$39.99 FROM CROCSOriginally $49.99 | Save 20%$27.55 FROM AMAZONDagne Dover Indi Diaper BackpackDagne Dover's Indi Diaper Backpack adds a stylish neutral flair while holding every basic essential.$160.00 FROM DAGNE DOVEROriginally $200.00 | Save 20%Everlane Glove Boot ReKnitEverlane's Glove Boot is a sleek boot made with stretchy, sustainable knit fabric and a walkable heel for all-day comfort. $46.00 FROM EVERLANEOriginally $115.00 | Save 60%OutdoorVoices The Exercise DressOutdoorVoices makes a few of our favorite athleisure items, and they're another example of a company that can balance form and function.$75.00 FROM OUTDOORVOICESOriginally $100.00 | Save 25%Rough Linen St. Barts Linen RobeThe Rough Linen St. Barts Robe is made from top-notch linen that offers a light feel and a cool, casual look.$131.93 FROM ROUGH LINENOriginally $167.00 | Save 21%Kiehl's Since 1851 Avocado Nourishing Hydration MaskWinter is coming, and Kiehls' Avocado Mask is here to provide your skin with hydration all season long. This nourishing treatment infuses your face with avocado and evening primrose oils, offering sumptuous moisture after just one use. Plus, it's green tint is a total throwback. You can save 50% on a jar during Black Friday sale. $21.50 FROM MACY'SOriginally $45.00 | Save 52%Giorgio Armani Lip Magnet Liquid LipstickA liquid lip color that gives you a super matte look, but it's so light it feels like a lip stain. The formula is highly pigmented, smudge-resistant, and comfortable on your lips.$19.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $38.00 | Save 50%Nike Sportswear Essential Fleece PantsMade from soft fleece material, these sweats are perfect for everyday comfort.$48.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $60.00 | Save 20%Thread & Supply Double Breasted PeacoatThis peacoat from Thread & Supply is a classic with a twist. The oversized buttons extend up the lapel to the collar, giving you the option to bundle up if necessary. And if you don't love it in black, never fear — you can save 31% on this coat in black, camel, or light gray. $39.90 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $58.00 | Save 31%True & Co. True Body Triangle Convertible Strap BraletteThe convertible straps on this wireless bra can be worn either straight or crisscrossed, and the smooth material appears invisible under clothes.$30.80 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $44.00 | Save 30%Spanx Faux Leather LeggingsMade with the same level of support as its signature shapewear but with a little extra stretch, these leggings are designed to not only make you look great but feel great, too. $78.40 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $98.00 | Save 20%$78.40 FROM SPANX Originally $98.00 | Save 20%Lululemon Wunder Under High-Rise TightLululemon is, in many ways, the genesis of athleisure, so it's not surprising that the company has an edge in the space.$69.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $98.00 | Save 30%Chaps Mens Long Sleeve Button DownMade from an easy-to-care-for cotton blend and a dose of stretch, this men's button-down shirt will keep you looking polished all day.$19.98 FROM WALMARTOriginally $60.00 | Save 67%Nine West Car Coat CardiganThi cozy topper is part coat, part cardigan, and will keep you warm all winter. Save an extra 15% on this cardigan with the code ENJOY15 at checkout.$35.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $60.00 | Save 40%When is Cyber Monday?Cyber Monday falls on the Monday after Black Friday every year. In 2021, the shopping event will land on November 29.As a continuation of sorts to Black Friday, Cyber Monday gives shoppers another opportunity to save on tech, home goods, clothing, and more that you might've missed while digesting Thanksgiving dinner. Unlike Black Friday, though, Cyber Monday is entirely online.What time does Cyber Monday start?Cyber Monday officially begins at 12 a.m. ET on November 29. That said, the event is expected to carry over many deals from Black Friday, so some discounts are already available.What is Cyber Monday?Cyber Monday began as the online version of Black Friday, where online retailers offered big discounts to match their brick-and-mortar counterparts. Now, Cyber Monday is one of the biggest shopping days of the year, often surpassing even Black Friday in terms of revenue and sales. Previously, the main distinction between Black Friday and Cyber Monday was that Black Friday focused on in-store sales and Cyber Monday on online sales. But as shopping habits have increasingly favored the internet, shoppers can look forward to a very online-focused Cyber Monday and Black Friday. Cyber Monday offers a great opportunity to save on all your holiday gifts. How long do Cyber Monday sales last? Though Cyber Monday sales once took place on Monday only, we've seen them extend to longer and longer durations, with a handful lasting through the rest of the week. However, the best discounts we see are in limited supply and expire soon after they become available.What's better, Black Friday or Cyber Monday?With more and more buyers shopping online, the debate over which shopping holiday wins, is practically moot. Both events will be held predominantly online, and more than a few deals overlap. In fact, many Black Friday deals become Cyber Monday deals when the dates change. If possible, buyers should shop on both holidays. We've seen different products receive better discounts on each day, and the deals that each retailer offers will vary. Generally speaking, consumers shopping for big-ticket items, such as laptops, TVs, and kitchen appliances, can expect more opportunities on Black Friday. Shoppers looking for last year's models, smart home gadgets, digital subscriptions, and gift cards will likely find more luck during Cyber Monday.What should I buy during Cyber Monday?If a retailer offers Black Friday deals, it's a near guarantee that it will offer Cyber Monday deals, too. Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and Walmart are some noteworthy retailers that we know will participate in the shopping event, with deals across many product categories.We will likely see massive discounts on some of our favorite direct-to-consumer products during Cyber Monday, such as retail startups like Leesa and Brooklinen. For some online stores, Cyber Monday (or Cyber Week) will be one of the few times of the year when their products see major markdowns.Will there be Cyber Monday shipping delays?Shipping delays and shopping holidays are inextricably linked, so there's always a risk of late deliveries.To help you avoid the shipping crunch and get your stuff sooner, several retailers, including Walmart, Target, and Best Buy, offer in-store pickup and contactless curbside pickup. This means shoppers can grab their orders at a nearby location, provided that the retailer has it in stock. Best Cyber Monday deals we saw last yearLast year, we saw a lot of great sales on Cyber Monday ranging from sitewide discounts to specific products. Everything from home and kitchen, to subscription services were on sale during last year's annual savings event.Here are a few of the best Cyber Monday deals from 2020.  Philips Sonicare DiamondClean Classic Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush was $179 from Kohl's, originally $229.FujiFilm Instax Mini 11 Camera Bundle was $70 from Kohl's on Cyber Monday last year, originally $120.Keurig K-Supreme Single Serve K-Cup Pod Coffee Maker was $84 from Target on Cyber Monday last year, originally $140.How we select the best Cyber Monday dealsWe only choose products that meet our high standard of coverage, and that we've either used ourselves or researched carefully.We compare the prices among top retailers such as Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and Walmart and only include the deals that are better than all others offered (not including promotional discounts that come from using certain credit cards).All deals are at least 20% off, with the occasional exception for products that are rarely discounted or provide an outsized value.Read more about how the Insider Reviews team evaluates deals and why you should trust us.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 28th, 2021

100+ early Cyber Monday deals you can shop now: AirPods Pro, Roku, Vitamix, and more

Black Friday has ended, but you can shop early Cyber Monday deals now. Save big at Amazon, Walmart, Target, Best Buy, Nordstrom, and more. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Alyssa Powell/InsiderCyber Monday is the online shopping-focused sibling to Black Friday, and the event brings equally great discounts and sales straight to you. It's going live on November 29, but many retailers are holding early Cyber Monday sales or continuing Black Friday deals through the weekend.Historically, the event has always been a great time to shop for tech, smart home, and gift cards — though stock is typically very limited. Acting fast is key to getting a good deal, so it's important to know what you're shopping for ahead of time. Don't worry if you see the dreaded "out of stock" symbol — other retailers might have the product you wanted in stock with a similar deal, and we've seen discounts come back throughout the event, sometimes on the same day.At Insider Reviews, we test products all year and track their price history so we can give you solid buying advice during big shopping events like Cyber Monday. Tons of deals are available now on products we love and trust, and we're highlighting the best ones below.The best Cyber Monday deals available nowBest Cyber Monday 2021 tech dealsApple AirPods ProThe Apple AirPods Pro look and sound better than previous-generation AirPods. Plus, they have noise cancellation built right into them and integrate perfectly with other Apple devices. $159.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $249.99 | Save 36%$189.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $249.99 | Save 24%$189.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $249.99 | Save 24%$159.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $249.00 | Save 36%$209.00 FROM B&HOriginally $249.00 | Save 16%Roku Streambar 2020Too much clutter under the TV? The interesting Roku Streambar combines all of the features of a Roku 4K player with a compact soundbar.$79.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$79.98 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$99.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $129.99 | Save 24%Google Nest Hub (2nd gen)The Google Nest Hub is a smart display with a unique Sleep Sensing feature to help you monitor your sleep habits. $49.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $99.99 | Save 50%$49.98 FROM WALMARTOriginally $99.98 | Save 50%$49.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 50%Apple Watch Series 7Much more than a timepiece, the Apple Watch can also be used for keeping track of workouts, making phone calls, sending text messages, setting timers and alarms, counting calories, and more.$379.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $399.00 | Save 5%$379.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $399.00 | Save 5%$399.00 FROM APPLEApple Watch SE (40mm, GPS)With a recent Apple processor and many of the same features as the Series 7, the Apple Watch SE is a great budget-friendly option.$219.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $279.00 | Save 21%$279.00 FROM APPLEOriginally $279.00 | Save 0%Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 (40mm)The Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 is the obvious choice for Android users looking for a comprehensive, quality, premium smartwatch experience. However, it's a shame that the ECG feature is limited specifically to Samsung phone owners. $199.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $279.99 | Save 29%$199.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%$199.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%MasterClass 2-for-1 membershipGet two MasterClass subscriptions for the price of one! Each subscription gets you access to all of MasterClass, so you can watch or sample unlimited celebrity and expert-led classes across a wide range of topics.$180.00 FROM MASTERCLASSOriginally $360.00 | Save 50%Sony WH-1000XM4Sony's WH-1000XM4 are our go-to pair of headphones when we look for a balance of sound quality and noise-cancelling performance.$248.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%$248.00 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%$249.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%Bose QuietComfort 45The QuietComfort 45 have a refreshed design with improved noise cancelling and better battery life.$279.00 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM BOSEOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%Apple AirPods (3rd Gen)Apple's third-generation AirPods offer longer battery life, a MagSafe charger, water resistance, and support for spatial audio. $149.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $179.00 | Save 16%$179.00 FROM APPLE$179.00 FROM BEST BUY$174.98 FROM WALMART$154.99 FROM MICRO CENTEROriginally $179.99 | Save 14%Apple Airpods (2nd Generation)You’ll need to pick up your pair from your local Micro Center, but this is a solid deal price for the second-generation Apple AirPods. You can often find them discounted as low as $120, making this extra $5 drop noteworthy. $104.99 FROM MICRO CENTEROriginally $129.99 | Save 19%$114.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 12%$109.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $129.99 | Save 16%$119.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $129.99 | Save 8%Apple MacBook Air (M1)The latest MacBook Air released in late 2020 gains Apple's new M1 processor, which brings impressively fast performance and long battery life, for under $1,000, making it the best Apple laptop overall.$899.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $999.99 | Save 10%$999.00 FROM APPLE$899.00 FROM B&HOriginally $999.00 | Save 10%Apple MacBook Pro with M1 Processor (13-inch, 8GB RAM, 256GB)Apple's latest MacBook Pro with the M1 processor is leaps and bounds beyond its predecessor, but the Intel MacBook Pro still has some tricks.$1199.00 FROM B&HOriginally $1299.00 | Save 8%$1299.00 FROM APPLELG 65-inch C1 OLED 4K TVLG’s C1 is one of the best 4K TVs you can buy. The OLED panel delivers incredible image quality with an infinite contrast ratio. This deal price matches the lowest we’ve seen so far.$1796.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $2499.98 | Save 28%$1796.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $2499.98 | Save 28%Samsung 65-inch Q60A QLED 4K TVSamsung's Q60A is the company's less expensive lineup of premium QLED TVs. $849.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $999.99 | Save 15%Amazon Fire TV 50" Omni SeriesAmazon launched its own smart TVs in fall 2021 and the Omni Series boasts features like hands-free Alexa support and video calling along with the latest Fire TV software.$359.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $509.99 | Save 29%Amazon Echo (4th Gen)The latest Echo speaker from Amazon takes on a spherical design for more effective room-filling audio. $59.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%$59.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%$59.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K MaxThe Fire TV Stick 4K is designed to be 40% more powerful than Fire TV Stick 4K. It also adds Wi-Fi 6 support.$34.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%$34.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%$34.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%Ring Video Doorbell (2020)The latest affordable Video Doorbell model from Ring features 1080p recording and improved motion tracking. It's a great deal if you're looking to start adding smart devices to your home. Orders made now will be fulfilled in 6 to 7 weeks.$79.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 20%Google Nest Cam Outdoor Battery (2021) Elegant design, reliable performance, and wireless battery power make the Nest Cam Outdoor a tempting option to add peace of mind and checking in on your home's exterior when you're away. $149.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $179.99 | Save 17%$198.00 FROM AMAZON$149.99 FROM GOOGLEOriginally $179.99 | Save 17%$149.99 FROM BED BATH & BEYONDOriginally $179.99 | Save 17%$149.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $179.99 | Save 17%Amazon All-New KindleThe Kindle allows users to download hundreds, if not thousands, of books straight to the device. This model has a front light that makes it better-suited for night time reading.$49.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $89.99 | Save 44%Vizio Elevate 5.1.4 SoundbarVizio's Elevate soundbar offers a 5.1.4 Dolby Atmos experience with performance that rivals many full-fledged home theater systems.$798.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $1099.99 | Save 27%$799.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $1099.99 | Save 27%Yamaha YAS-209 SoundbarYamaha's YAS-209 offers great sound, Amazon Alexa support, and well-balanced functionality for a reasonable price. $299.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $349.99 | Save 14%$299.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $349.95 | Save 14%Logitech C922x Pro Stream WebcamYou'll also want a decent webcam and mic if you want to be seen on screen, and provide commentary for your gaming.$74.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 25%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 20%GoPro Hero 10 BlackThis video and still camera has similar capabilities to larger variants, while maintaining the small go-anywhere form-factor it's known for.$349.98 FROM GOPROOriginally $499.99 | Save 30%Best Cyber Monday 2021 kitchen dealsNespresso Vertuo Next Deluxe Coffee and Espresso MakerA truly versatile machine, the Nespresso Vertuo Next uses capsules to make both coffee and espresso in a variety of cup or carafe sizes.$126.75 FROM TARGETOriginally $169.99 | Save 25%Breville Joule Sous VideThis nimble, compact machine heats water quickly, can work in a wide range of vessels, and is operated entirely through a helpful app.$159.94 FROM AMAZONOriginally $199.95 | Save 20%$159.96 FROM BREVILLEOriginally $199.95 | Save 20%Instant Pot Air Frying Lid, 6 QuartsIf you already own an Instant Pot and are looking to add air fryer functionality, this lid will do the trick. It's compatible with Smart Wi-Fi 60, Smart Bluetooth, Duo Evo Plus 6, Duo Evo Plus 60, Duo SV 60 or Max 60 models. $49.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $89.99 | Save 44%KitchenAid KFC3516ER 3.5 Cup Food ChopperThe KitchenAid KFC3516ER 3.5 Cup Food Chopper is ideal and convenient for small prepping needs. The size makes it easy to store away or keep on your counter, and the Cyber Monday price makes it easy on your wallet. $39.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $54.99 | Save 27%$39.99 FROM KITCHENAIDOriginally $54.99 | Save 27%Ninja Professional Plus Food ProcessorThe Ninja Professional Plus makes food prep fast and easy with presets for chopped vegetables, shredded cheese, more.$79.98 FROM KOHLSOriginally $119.99 | Save 33%DrinkMate Beverage Carbonation MakerIf you'd like to add fizz to more than just water, consider the Drinkmate Beverage Carbonation Maker, which can carbonate everything from juice to wine.$79.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $95.93 | Save 17%Ninja Foodi 5-in-1 Indoor Grill with Air Fryer, Roast, Bake & DehydrateThe Ninja Foodi 5-in-1 has five functions, including grill, bake, and dehydrate. Its temperatures range between 105°F to 500°F, giving it a lot of versatility in cooking options. Many of the parts are dishwasher safe for easier cleanup. $199.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $229.99 | Save 13%$199.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%Vitamix Explorian BlenderThe renewed Vitamix Explorian is pre-owned, but every bit as good as new and comes with a 90-day Amazon Renewed Guarantee on top of a 3-year full warranty.$289.95 FROM TARGETOriginally $449.99 | Save 36%$289.95 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $345.99 | Save 16%Instant Pot Duo Plus Pressure Cooker BundleThis bundle is a Target exclusive, and it includes an extra silicone egg rack and stainless steel steam rack for your pressure cooking needs. It’s only $60 right now — an excellent value for such a multifunctional kitchen appliance.$59.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 54%Our Place Always PanOur Place's Always Pan is multi-functional nonstick pan that's taken the internet by storm. It promises to replace eight different pieces of cookware in your kitchen. It can function as a steamer, saute pan, frying pan, and more. $99.00 FROM OUR PLACEOriginally $145.00 | Save 32%Cuisinart Chef's Classic 17-Piece Hard-Anodized Cookware SetThis nonstick set includes nine different pans, lids to match, and a steamer for a total of 17 pieces. $219.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $399.99 | Save 45%Keurig K-Mini Single Serve Coffee MakerThe slim 6- to 12-ounce coffee maker will fit neatly on any kitchen counter and save energy with the auto-off feature after brewing.$89.99 FROM TARGET$49.99 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $79.98 | Save 37%Best Cyber Monday 2021 home dealsEva-Dry Wireless Mini DehumidifierThis Eva-Dry dehumidifier measures 9 x 8.25 x 2.88 inches and works well for spaces up to 48 square feet. It uses silica beads to absorb moisture and has an absorbing capacity of six ounces. It’s also convenient because you only need to recharge it every four weeks. (It plugs into a wall outlet.)$14.97 FROM AMAZONOriginally $24.95 | Save 40%Molekule Air PurifierThis unit is popular among expert reviewers with its simple, portable design and quiet operation. We previously included the Molekule Air in our guide because it has multiple operation modes and can eradicate pollutants down to the nanoscopic level. However, at almost $800 plus $130 per year for filters, it's more than most people want to pay for an air purifier that isn't particularly powerful. We think there are better models at a lower price point.$479.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $799.00 | Save 40%$799.00 FROM MOLEKULEAeroGarden SproutA smaller option from AeroGarden's lineup, the Sprout lets you grow up to three plants in its narrow footprint. It's down to $70 with promo code SUMMER20 through May 31, a rare and excellent deal direct from AeroGarden.$49.95 FROM AEROGARDENOriginally $99.95 | Save 50%$49.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.95 | Save 50%Chewy Pet ProductsFor Cyber Monday, Chewy is offering $30 off purchases of $100 or more. This is only for select products, including food, treats, beds, and more.$70.00 FROM CHEWYOriginally $100.00 | Save 30%Dyson Outsize Absolute+The Dyson Outsize Absolute+ is ideal for whole home, deep cleaning with its full-size dustbin and large cleaner head. $799.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $899.99 | Save 11%Dyson V8 AbsoluteBuilt with a soft roller head for hard floors and a motorized cleaner head for carpets, the Dyson V8 Absolute handles all surfaces efficiently.$399.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $449.99 | Save 11%Dyson Cyclone V10 AbsoluteEquipped with a sensor to detect the difference between carpets and hard floors, the Cyclone V10 Absolute is the perfect vacuum cleaner for any room in the house. We've seen it go for as low as $350 before (it's usually $550), but during Black Friday and Cyber Monday, you'll get it for $400 while supplies last.$499.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $549.99 | Save 9%Drinkwell Two-Gallon Pet FountainThis two gallon pet drinking fountain is the perfect accessory to make sure your dog or cat (or both) are drinking enough water.$59.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $74.95 | Save 20%Eufy BoostIQ RoboVac 15C MAXQuiet, slim, and powerful, the eufy RoboVac 15C Max is a solid investment if you're looking for a robot vacuum. It's already very affordable at retail price, but you can also often find it on sale, making it an even better deal.$169.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $279.99 | Save 39%$169.99 FROM EUFYOriginally $249.99 | Save 32%iRobot Roomba i3+ (3550) Robot VacuumThe i3+ costs considerably more than your average robot vacuum, but it also does a lot more than the average robot vacuum. It develops personalized cleaning schedules and empties itself. $399.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM IROBOTOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $565.47 | Save 29%$399.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo T8 AIVI Robot VacuumThe  Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo Pro Mopping System thoroughly cleans floors as opposed to pushing a wet cloth around. When paired with the Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo T8 AIVI Robot Vacuum, the two make easy work of time-consuming chores.$499.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $749.99 | Save 33%$799.99 FROM BEST BUYBissell SpinWave Robot VacuumThe Bissell SpinWave Robot Vacuum picked up all the pet hair on carpet in our tests and has a great assortment of mop attachments and accessories. The company is also committed to helping homeless pets and helps them find loving homes. $249.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $399.99 | Save 38%$299.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $399.99 | Save 25%Dewalt Atomic 20-Volt Max Compact Drill/Impact Combo Kit This 20-Volt MAX Brushless Compact 2-Tool Combo Kit includes 1 cordless Drill/Driver, 1 cordless Impact Driver, two 20-Volt MAX Lithium Ion Batteries, 1 charger, and a carrying bag. $149.00 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $229.00 | Save 35%Best Cyber Monday 2021 gaming dealsNintendo Switch Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Digital Download)The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild was released for the Nintendo Switch in 2017, but still remains one of the best Switch games out there. Right now, a physical copy is selling for $40, which is a solid price on this rarely discounted game.$35.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%Nintendo Switch Fire Emblem: Three Houses"Fire Emblem: Three Houses" is a turn-based war strategy game that encourages you to build relationships with your soldiers and master your tactics on the battlefield. $35.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$35.00 FROM GAMESTOPOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$35.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$59.99 FROM BEST BUYNintendo eShop $50 Gift CardThe Nintendo eShop is the best place to shop for digital copies of Nintendo's games. This gift card is the perfect gift or investment for anyone with a Nintendo Switch. Better still, Nintendo's eShop offers several sales throughout the year. This means, patient shoppers can double their savings.$45.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $50.00 | Save 10%$50.00 FROM BEST BUY$45.00 FROM NEWEGGOriginally $50.00 | Save 10%Xbox Game Pass for PC (3-Month Membership)Typically, you can get a 3-month Game Pass subscription for $30. Right now, it's only $20, a solid deal. This is the PC version, which gets you EA Play, exclusive member discounts, and unlimited to access to over 100 games. $1.00 FROM MICROSOFTOriginally $29.99 | Save 97%$19.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $29.99 | Save 33%$19.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $29.99 | Save 33%PlayStation Plus 12-Month SubscriptionPlayStation Plus allows gamers to play online, nets them special discounts in the PlayStation Network store, and subscribers get free games each month that remain available as long as the PlayStation Plus subscription is active. $36.99 FROM CDKEYSOriginally $59.99 | Save 38%$39.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%$39.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%Microsoft Xbox Series S|X Wireless ControllerThis latest-gen Xbox gamepad is the best Microsoft has ever made, and during Cyber Monday, shoppers can save $20 on this recently released controller.$49.99 FROM MICROSOFTOriginally $59.99 | Save 17%$54.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 8%$49.00 FROM GAME STOPOriginally $54.99 | Save 11%$52.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 12%Death Loop for PlayStation 5“Death Loop” is an unusual first-person shooter that challenges players to escape a day-long time loop by assassinating specific targets. The game is a great pick for fans of spy movies, sci-fi, and creative gunplay.$29.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%Call of Duty Vanguard for PlayStation 4The latest Call of Duty game is now on sale for $20 off, just a few weeks after its release.$39.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 35%$44.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $59.99 | Save 25%Call of Duty Vanguard for PlayStation 5The latest Call of Duty game is now on sale for $15 off for PlayStation 5 just a few weeks after its release.$54.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $69.98 | Save 21%Nintendo Mario Kart Live: Home Circuit Nintendo Switch Set EditionYou can use a Nintendo Switch to control this real-life Mario Kart toy, and watch Mario or Luigi’s perspective as they zoom around your home.$88.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $99.99 | Save 11%$99.99 FROM BEST BUYLogitech G305 Lightspeed Wireless Gaming MouseCompact and portable, the Logitech G305 is great to take on the go. It's best if you prefer smaller mice and right now it's only $40, a great price drop from a typical selling price of $50.$29.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%$29.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $48.97 | Save 39%Nintendo Switch Ring Fit Adventure"Ring Fit Adventure" for the Nintendo Switch uses the exclusive "Ring-Con" attachment and a leg strap to track movement and provide resistance for workouts. The game also includes an adventure mode. Right now, it's selling for $55 at Target and Amazon, $25 off its usual price and the lowest price we've ever seen on this game.$54.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $79.98 | Save 32%$54.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $80.00 | Save 33%$79.98 FROM BEST BUY$79.98 FROM TARGETBest Cyber Monday 2021 streaming dealsHulu Monthly Subscription (Deal)Save a huge 85% on an ad-supported Hulu subscription for an entire year. That amounts to just 99 cents per month. This deal is live until Monday, November 29. $0.99 FROM HULUOriginally $6.99 | Save 86%Philo TVIf you want your streaming service to cost less per month than a single trip for the family to Starbucks, Philo TV is made with you in mind.$5.00 FROM PHILOOriginally $25.00 | Save 80%Disney Plus Free Trial with Amazon Music UnlimitedNew Amazon Music Unlimited subscribers can get six months of Disney Plus for free when they sign up. Current Music Unlimited members can get three months of Disney Plus. Music Unlimited costs $8 a month for Prime members or $10 a month without Prime.$0.00 FROM AMAZONAmazon Prime Video Channel Add-OnsPrime Video subscribers can choose from a variety of channel-add ons including Starz, Showtime, Paramount+, AMC+, Discovery+, and more.$0.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $10.99 | Save 91%YouTube PremiumYouTube Premium lets you stream videos and music on YouTube without any ads. The service also features exclusive programs.FREE FROM YOUTUBEOriginally $11.99 | Save 100%Best Cyber Monday 2021 health & fitness dealsTheragun PROThe Theragun Pro is our top pick: a powerful, customizable, and durable massager that's worth every bit of its $600 price tag. $399.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%$399.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.00 FROM THERABODYOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%23andMe Ancestry + Health KitThe 23andMe DNA Ancestry + Health Kit tells you which illnesses you're predisposed to and gives you a full look at your ancestry.$99.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $199.00 | Save 50%$99.00 FROM 23ANDMEOriginally $199.00 | Save 50%Fitbit LuxeThe Fitbit Luxe is the company's latest fitness band that comes with a sleek design and advanced health features like stress management and the ability to measure heart rate variation.$99.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $149.99 | Save 33%$99.95 FROM FITBITOriginally $149.94 | Save 33%$99.95 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $149.94 | Save 33%Mirror from lululemonThis isn't just a mirror. It's a cardio class, it's a yoga studio, it's a boxing ring, it's your new personal trainer, and it's so much more. For Cyber Monday, Mirror is on sale for $500 with the code "CYBERMONDAY20"$995.00 FROM MIRROROriginally $1495.00 | Save 33%Hydro Flask 32-Ounce Wide Mouth This bottle has all the hallmark features of a Hydro Flask water bottle — 12-24 hours of temperature retention, powder color coating that won't chip or fade with time, a silicone twist top — with the very convenient wide mouth for easy pouring and drinking.$33.71 FROM HYDRO FLASKOriginally $44.95 | Save 25%Amazon HaloAmazon's Halo fitness tracker can analyze the tone of your voice to help you understand how you sound to others.$54.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 45%LifeSpan TR1200i Folding TreadmillThe TR1200i is the baby sister of our top pick for a folding treadmill, the TR300i, with fewer built-in training programs and fewer fancy features like manual instead of digital buttons. But it's nearly the same size, has the same motor, and the same shock absorption — but for significantly cheaper.$899.00 FROM LIFESPANOriginally $1199.00 | Save 25%Best Cyber Monday 2021 style & beauty dealsTarte Tartelette Full Bloom Amazonian Clay Eyeshadow PaletteFrom shimmery to matte options, the Tartelette Full Bloom Amazonian Clay includes 28 limited-edition shades to wear for any occasion. $52.00 FROM KOHL'SDyson Airwrap Complete StylerDyson Airwrap Complete Styler is engineered for multiple hair types and styles. Featuring Coanda air styling and propelled by the Dyson digital motor, users can curl, wave, smooth and dry with no extreme heat.$399.99 FROM NEW EGGOriginally $499.99 | Save 20%$549.95 FROM DYSON$549.99 FROM BEST BUY$549.00 FROM AMAZONL.L.Bean Wicked Good Slippers - Men'sThis shearling-lined, leather-bottom slipper is one of the best men's slippers we've ever tried.$75.65 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $89.00 | Save 15%L.L.Bean Wicked Good Shearling-Lined Slides - Women'sThese ridiculously-cozy, shearling-lined slides are easy to slip on and off, and keep your feet toasty around the house.$67.15 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $79.00 | Save 15%L.L.Bean Toddlers' Wicked Good SlippersEverything we love about L.L.Bean's Wicked Good Slippers — but mini. These shearling-lined, leather-soled booties will keep kid's feet, sizes 3-10, toasty around the house and in a stroller.$33.96 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $39.95 | Save 15%Lululemon Hooded Define JacketA fan-favorite, now with a hood. Between the technical fabric and a do-anything fit, it's easy to see why this one's a hit. Right now you can save up to 50% on this versatile piece, but sizes are selling out quickly. $64.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $128.00 | Save 50%Lululemon Wunder Under High-Rise TightLululemon is, in many ways, the genesis of athleisure, so it's not surprising that the company has an edge in the space.$69.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $98.00 | Save 30%Lululemon Metal Vent Breathe Short SleeveLululemon Metal Vent Breathe Short Sleeve $49.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $78.00 | Save 37%Bombas Women's Gripper Slipper (Sherpa Lined) 2-PackA mix between socks and slippers, Bombas' Gripper Slippers include a cozy sherpa lining and sole grippers to prevent slips. $72.95 FROM BOMBASOriginally $96.00 | Save 24%Columbia Men's Lake 22 Down Hooded JacketThis water-resistant jacket is stocked with 650-fill power down insulation, zippered hand pockets, and a structured hood to keep you zipped up and toasty through any winter weather.$69.98 FROM COLUMBIAOriginally $140.00 | Save 50%Adidas Climacool VentoThe Adidas Climacool Vento features a highly breathable mesh upper to help keep your feet cool.$98.00 FROM ADIDASOriginally $140.00 | Save 30%Nike Adapt Auto MaxThe Nike Adapt Auto Max uses advanced technology to automatically form to your foot without laces.$286.63 FROM NIKEOriginally $400.00 | Save 28%Nike Space Hippie 01The Nike Space Hippie 01 is made from 50% recycled materials and features a lightweight, track-inspired look.$77.58 FROM NIKEOriginally $130.00 | Save 40%Crocs Classic Clog (Unisex)The shoe that really started it all, the Classic Clog is comfortable, breathable, and easy to slip on whenever. With over 20 fun colors to choose from, you can’t go wrong.$39.99 FROM CROCSOriginally $49.99 | Save 20%$27.55 FROM AMAZONDagne Dover Indi Diaper BackpackDagne Dover's Indi Diaper Backpack adds a stylish neutral flair while holding every basic essential.$160.00 FROM DAGNE DOVEROriginally $200.00 | Save 20%Everlane Glove Boot ReKnitEverlane's Glove Boot is a sleek boot made with stretchy, sustainable knit fabric and a walkable heel for all-day comfort. $46.00 FROM EVERLANEOriginally $115.00 | Save 60%OutdoorVoices The Exercise DressOutdoorVoices makes a few of our favorite athleisure items, and they're another example of a company that can balance form and function.$75.00 FROM OUTDOORVOICESOriginally $100.00 | Save 25%Rough Linen St. Barts Linen RobeThe Rough Linen St. Barts Robe is made from top-notch linen that offers a light feel and a cool, casual look.$131.93 FROM ROUGH LINENOriginally $167.00 | Save 21%Kiehl's Since 1851 Avocado Nourishing Hydration MaskWinter is coming, and Kiehls' Avocado Mask is here to provide your skin with hydration all season long. This nourishing treatment infuses your face with avocado and evening primrose oils, offering sumptuous moisture after just one use. Plus, it's green tint is a total throwback. You can save 50% on a jar during Black Friday sale. $21.50 FROM MACY'SOriginally $45.00 | Save 52%Giorgio Armani Lip Magnet Liquid LipstickA liquid lip color that gives you a super matte look, but it's so light it feels like a lip stain. The formula is highly pigmented, smudge-resistant, and comfortable on your lips.$19.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $38.00 | Save 50%Nike Sportswear Essential Fleece PantsMade from soft fleece material, these sweats are perfect for everyday comfort.$48.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $60.00 | Save 20%Thread & Supply Double Breasted PeacoatThis peacoat from Thread & Supply is a classic with a twist. The oversized buttons extend up the lapel to the collar, giving you the option to bundle up if necessary. And if you don't love it in black, never fear — you can save 31% on this coat in black, camel, or light gray. $39.90 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $58.00 | Save 31%True & Co. True Body Triangle Convertible Strap BraletteThe convertible straps on this wireless bra can be worn either straight or crisscrossed, and the smooth material appears invisible under clothes.$30.80 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $44.00 | Save 30%Spanx Faux Leather LeggingsMade with the same level of support as its signature shapewear but with a little extra stretch, these leggings are designed to not only make you look great but feel great, too. $78.40 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $98.00 | Save 20%$78.40 FROM SPANX Originally $98.00 | Save 20%Lululemon Wunder Under High-Rise TightLululemon is, in many ways, the genesis of athleisure, so it's not surprising that the company has an edge in the space.$69.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $98.00 | Save 30%Chaps Mens Long Sleeve Button DownMade from an easy-to-care-for cotton blend and a dose of stretch, this men's button-down shirt will keep you looking polished all day.$19.98 FROM WALMARTOriginally $60.00 | Save 67%Nine West Car Coat CardiganThi cozy topper is part coat, part cardigan, and will keep you warm all winter. Save an extra 15% on this cardigan with the code ENJOY15 at checkout.$35.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $60.00 | Save 40%When is Cyber Monday?Cyber Monday falls on the Monday after Black Friday every year. In 2021, the shopping event will land on November 29.As a continuation of sorts to Black Friday, Cyber Monday gives shoppers another opportunity to save on tech, home goods, clothing, and more that you might've missed while digesting Thanksgiving dinner. Unlike Black Friday, though, Cyber Monday is entirely online.What time does Cyber Monday start?Cyber Monday officially begins at 12 a.m. ET on November 29. That said, the event is expected to carry over many deals from Black Friday, so some discounts are already available.What is Cyber Monday?Cyber Monday began as the online version of Black Friday, where online retailers offered big discounts to match their brick-and-mortar counterparts. Now, Cyber Monday is one of the biggest shopping days of the year, often surpassing even Black Friday in terms of revenue and sales. Previously, the main distinction between Black Friday and Cyber Monday was that Black Friday focused on in-store sales and Cyber Monday on online sales. But as shopping habits have increasingly favored the internet, shoppers can look forward to a very online-focused Cyber Monday and Black Friday. Cyber Monday offers a great opportunity to save on all your holiday gifts. How long do Cyber Monday sales last? Though Cyber Monday sales once took place on Monday only, we've seen them extend to longer and longer durations, with a handful lasting through the rest of the week. However, the best discounts we see are in limited supply and expire soon after they become available.What's better, Black Friday or Cyber Monday?With more and more buyers shopping online, the debate over which shopping holiday wins, is practically moot. Both events will be held predominantly online, and more than a few deals overlap. In fact, many Black Friday deals become Cyber Monday deals when the dates change. If possible, buyers should shop on both holidays. We've seen different products receive better discounts on each day, and the deals that each retailer offers will vary. Generally speaking, consumers shopping for big-ticket items, such as laptops, TVs, and kitchen appliances, can expect more opportunities on Black Friday. Shoppers looking for last year's models, smart home gadgets, digital subscriptions, and gift cards will likely find more luck during Cyber Monday.What should I buy during Cyber Monday?If a retailer offers Black Friday deals, it's a near guarantee that it will offer Cyber Monday deals, too. Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and Walmart are some noteworthy retailers that we know will participate in the shopping event, with deals across many product categories.We will likely see massive discounts on some of our favorite direct-to-consumer products during Cyber Monday, such as retail startups like Leesa and Brooklinen. For some online stores, Cyber Monday (or Cyber Week) will be one of the few times of the year when their products see major markdowns.Will there be Cyber Monday shipping delays?Shipping delays and shopping holidays are inextricably linked, so there's always a risk of late deliveries.To help you avoid the shipping crunch and get your stuff sooner, several retailers, including Walmart, Target, and Best Buy, offer in-store pickup and contactless curbside pickup. This means shoppers can grab their orders at a nearby location, provided that the retailer has it in stock. Best Cyber Monday deals we saw last yearLast year, we saw a lot of great sales on Cyber Monday ranging from sitewide discounts to specific products. Everything from home and kitchen, to subscription services were on sale during last year's annual savings event.Here are a few of the best Cyber Monday deals from 2020.  Philips Sonicare DiamondClean Classic Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush was $179 from Kohl's, originally $229.FujiFilm Instax Mini 11 Camera Bundle was $70 from Kohl's on Cyber Monday last year, originally $120.Keurig K-Supreme Single Serve K-Cup Pod Coffee Maker was $84 from Target on Cyber Monday last year, originally $140.How we select the best Cyber Monday dealsWe only choose products that meet our high standard of coverage, and that we've either used ourselves or researched carefully.We compare the prices among top retailers such as Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and Walmart and only include the deals that are better than all others offered (not including promotional discounts that come from using certain credit cards).All deals are at least 20% off, with the occasional exception for products that are rarely discounted or provide an outsized value.Read more about how the Insider Reviews team evaluates deals and why you should trust us.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 28th, 2021

112 early Cyber Monday deals you can shop now: AirPods Pro, Roku, Google Nest, and more

Black Friday has ended, but you can shop early Cyber Monday deals now. Save big at Amazon, Walmart, Target, Best Buy, Nordstrom, and more. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Alyssa Powell/InsiderCyber Monday is the online-focused sibling to Black Friday, and the event brings equally great discounts and sales straight to you. It's coming November 29, but many retailers are holding early Cyber Monday sales or continuing Black Friday deals through the weekend.Tons of deals are available now, and we're highlighting the best ones below. Here at Insider Reviews, we test products all year and track their price history so we can give you solid buying advice during big shopping events like Cyber Monday.Historically, the event has always been a great time to shop for tech, smart home, and gift cards — though stock is typically very limited. Acting fast is key to getting a good deal, so it's important to know what you're shopping for ahead of time.Below, we rounded up some of the best early Cyber Monday deals available now, plus answers to any questions you might have before the event.The best Cyber Monday deals available nowBest Cyber Monday 2021 tech dealsApple AirPods ProThe Apple AirPods Pro look and sound better than previous-generation AirPods. Plus, they have noise cancellation built right into them and integrate perfectly with other Apple devices. $169.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $249.99 | Save 32%$189.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $249.99 | Save 24%$189.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $249.99 | Save 24%$159.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $249.00 | Save 36%$209.00 FROM B&HOriginally $249.00 | Save 16%Roku Streambar 2020Too much clutter under the TV? The interesting Roku Streambar combines all of the features of a Roku 4K player with a compact soundbar.$79.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$79.98 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$99.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $129.99 | Save 24%Google Nest Hub (2nd gen)The Google Nest Hub is a smart display with a unique Sleep Sensing feature to help you monitor your sleep habits. $49.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $99.99 | Save 50%$49.98 FROM WALMARTOriginally $99.98 | Save 50%$49.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 50%Apple Watch Series 7Much more than a timepiece, the Apple Watch can also be used for keeping track of workouts, making phone calls, sending text messages, setting timers and alarms, counting calories, and more.$379.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $399.00 | Save 5%$379.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $399.00 | Save 5%$399.00 FROM APPLEApple Watch SE (40mm, GPS)With a recent Apple processor and many of the same features as the Series 7, the Apple Watch SE is a great budget-friendly option.$219.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $279.00 | Save 21%$279.00 FROM APPLEOriginally $279.00 | Save 0%Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 (40mm)The Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 is the obvious choice for Android users looking for a comprehensive, quality, premium smartwatch experience. However, it's a shame that the ECG feature is limited specifically to Samsung phone owners. $199.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $279.99 | Save 29%$199.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%$199.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%MasterClass 2-for-1 membershipGet two MasterClass subscriptions for the price of one! Each subscription gets you access to all of MasterClass, so you can watch or sample unlimited celebrity and expert-led classes across a wide range of topics.$180.00 FROM MASTERCLASSOriginally $360.00 | Save 50%Sony WH-1000XM4Sony's WH-1000XM4 are our go-to pair of headphones when we look for a balance of sound quality and noise-cancelling performance.$248.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%$248.00 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%$249.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%Bose QuietComfort 45The QuietComfort 45 have a refreshed design with improved noise cancelling and better battery life.$279.00 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM BOSEOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%Apple AirPods (3rd Gen)Apple's third-generation AirPods offer longer battery life, a MagSafe charger, water resistance, and support for spatial audio. $154.99 FROM MICRO CENTEROriginally $179.99 | Save 14%$179.00 FROM APPLE$149.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $179.00 | Save 16%$179.00 FROM BEST BUY$174.98 FROM WALMARTApple Airpods (2nd Generation)You’ll need to pick up your pair from your local Micro Center, but this is a solid deal price for the second-generation Apple AirPods. You can often find them discounted as low as $120, making this extra $5 drop noteworthy. $104.99 FROM MICRO CENTEROriginally $129.99 | Save 19%$114.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 12%$109.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $129.99 | Save 16%$119.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $129.99 | Save 8%Apple MacBook Air (M1)The latest MacBook Air released in late 2020 gains Apple's new M1 processor, which brings impressively fast performance and long battery life, for under $1,000, making it the best Apple laptop overall.$899.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $999.99 | Save 10%$999.00 FROM APPLE$899.00 FROM B&HOriginally $999.00 | Save 10%Apple MacBook Pro with M1 Processor (13-inch, 8GB RAM, 256GB)Apple's latest MacBook Pro with the M1 processor is leaps and bounds beyond its predecessor, but the Intel MacBook Pro still has some tricks.$1199.00 FROM B&HOriginally $1299.00 | Save 8%$1299.00 FROM APPLELG 65-inch C1 OLED 4K TVLG’s C1 is one of the best 4K TVs you can buy. The OLED panel delivers incredible image quality with an infinite contrast ratio. This deal price matches the lowest we’ve seen so far.$1796.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $2499.98 | Save 28%$1796.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $2499.98 | Save 28%Samsung 65-inch Q60A QLED 4K TVSamsung's Q60A is the company's less expensive lineup of premium QLED TVs. $849.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $999.99 | Save 15%Amazon Fire TV 50" Omni SeriesAmazon launched its own smart TVs in fall 2021 and the Omni Series boasts features like hands-free Alexa support and video calling along with the latest Fire TV software.$359.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $509.99 | Save 29%Amazon Echo (4th Gen)The latest Echo speaker from Amazon takes on a spherical design for more effective room-filling audio. $59.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%$59.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%$59.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K MaxThe Fire TV Stick 4K is designed to be 40% more powerful than Fire TV Stick 4K. It also adds Wi-Fi 6 support.$34.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%$34.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%$34.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%Ring Video Doorbell (2020)The latest affordable Video Doorbell model from Ring features 1080p recording and improved motion tracking. It's a great deal if you're looking to start adding smart devices to your home. Orders made now will be fulfilled in 6 to 7 weeks.$79.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 20%Amazon All-New KindleThe Kindle allows users to download hundreds, if not thousands, of books straight to the device. This model has a front light that makes it better-suited for night time reading.$49.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $89.99 | Save 44%Vizio Elevate 5.1.4 SoundbarVizio's Elevate soundbar offers a 5.1.4 Dolby Atmos experience with performance that rivals many full-fledged home theater systems.$798.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $1099.99 | Save 27%$799.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $1099.99 | Save 27%Yamaha YAS-209 SoundbarYamaha's YAS-209 offers great sound, Amazon Alexa support, and well-balanced functionality for a reasonable price. $299.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $349.99 | Save 14%$299.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $349.95 | Save 14%Logitech C922x Pro Stream WebcamYou'll also want a decent webcam and mic if you want to be seen on screen, and provide commentary for your gaming.$74.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 25%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 20%GoPro Hero 10 BlackThis video and still camera has similar capabilities to larger variants, while maintaining the small go-anywhere form-factor it's known for.$349.98 FROM GOPROOriginally $499.99 | Save 30%Best Cyber Monday 2021 kitchen dealsNespresso Vertuo Next Deluxe Coffee and Espresso MakerA truly versatile machine, the Nespresso Vertuo Next uses capsules to make both coffee and espresso in a variety of cup or carafe sizes.$126.75 FROM TARGETOriginally $169.99 | Save 25%Breville Joule Sous VideThis nimble, compact machine heats water quickly, can work in a wide range of vessels, and is operated entirely through a helpful app.$159.94 FROM AMAZONOriginally $199.95 | Save 20%$159.96 FROM BREVILLEOriginally $199.95 | Save 20%Instant Pot Air Frying Lid, 6 QuartsIf you already own an Instant Pot and are looking to add air fryer functionality, this lid will do the trick. It's compatible with Smart Wi-Fi 60, Smart Bluetooth, Duo Evo Plus 6, Duo Evo Plus 60, Duo SV 60 or Max 60 models. $49.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $89.99 | Save 44%KitchenAid KFC3516ER 3.5 Cup Food ChopperThe KitchenAid KFC3516ER 3.5 Cup Food Chopper is ideal and convenient for small prepping needs. The size makes it easy to store away or keep on your counter, and the Cyber Monday price makes it easy on your wallet. $39.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $54.99 | Save 27%$39.99 FROM KITCHENAIDOriginally $54.99 | Save 27%Ninja Professional Kitchen System BlenderThe Ninja Professional Kitchen System is a powerful blender that transforms into a food processor or a personal blender with just the swap of an attachment.$199.99 FROM TARGETNinja Professional Plus Food ProcessorThe Ninja Professional Plus makes food prep fast and easy with presets for chopped vegetables, shredded cheese, more.$79.98 FROM KOHLSOriginally $119.99 | Save 33%Zojirushi Virtuoso Plus BreadmakerThis bread machine kneads thoroughly, bakes evenly, and, unlike many of its competitors, turns out standard-sized loaves. $359.99 FROM BED BATH & BEYOND$359.99 FROM ABTDrinkMate Beverage Carbonation MakerIf you'd like to add fizz to more than just water, consider the Drinkmate Beverage Carbonation Maker, which can carbonate everything from juice to wine.$79.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $95.93 | Save 17%Ninja Foodi 5-in-1 Indoor Grill with Air Fryer, Roast, Bake & DehydrateThe Ninja Foodi 5-in-1 has five functions, including grill, bake, and dehydrate. Its temperatures range between 105°F to 500°F, giving it a lot of versatility in cooking options. Many of the parts are dishwasher safe for easier cleanup. $199.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $229.99 | Save 13%$199.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%Vitamix Explorian BlenderThe renewed Vitamix Explorian is pre-owned, but every bit as good as new and comes with a 90-day Amazon Renewed Guarantee on top of a 3-year full warranty.$289.95 FROM TARGETOriginally $449.99 | Save 36%$289.95 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $345.99 | Save 16%Instant Pot Duo Plus Pressure Cooker BundleThis bundle is a Target exclusive, and it includes an extra silicone egg rack and stainless steel steam rack for your pressure cooking needs. It’s only $60 right now — an excellent value for such a multifunctional kitchen appliance.$59.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 54%Our Place Always PanOur Place's Always Pan is multi-functional nonstick pan that's taken the internet by storm. It promises to replace eight different pieces of cookware in your kitchen. It can function as a steamer, saute pan, frying pan, and more. $99.00 FROM OUR PLACEOriginally $145.00 | Save 32%Cuisinart Chef's Classic 17-Piece Hard-Anodized Cookware SetThis nonstick set includes nine different pans, lids to match, and a steamer for a total of 17 pieces. $219.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $399.99 | Save 45%Keurig K-Mini Single Serve Coffee MakerThe slim 6- to 12-ounce coffee maker will fit neatly on any kitchen counter and save energy with the auto-off feature after brewing.$89.99 FROM TARGET$49.99 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $79.98 | Save 37%Best Cyber Monday 2021 home dealsEva-Dry Wireless Mini DehumidifierThis Eva-Dry dehumidifier measures 9 x 8.25 x 2.88 inches and works well for spaces up to 48 square feet. It uses silica beads to absorb moisture and has an absorbing capacity of six ounces. It’s also convenient because you only need to recharge it every four weeks. (It plugs into a wall outlet.)$14.97 FROM AMAZONOriginally $24.95 | Save 40%Molekule Air PurifierThis unit is popular among expert reviewers with its simple, portable design and quiet operation. We previously included the Molekule Air in our guide because it has multiple operation modes and can eradicate pollutants down to the nanoscopic level. However, at almost $800 plus $130 per year for filters, it's more than most people want to pay for an air purifier that isn't particularly powerful. We think there are better models at a lower price point.$479.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $799.00 | Save 40%$799.00 FROM MOLEKULEAeroGarden SproutA smaller option from AeroGarden's lineup, the Sprout lets you grow up to three plants in its narrow footprint. It's down to $70 with promo code SUMMER20 through May 31, a rare and excellent deal direct from AeroGarden.$49.95 FROM AEROGARDENOriginally $99.95 | Save 50%$49.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.95 | Save 50%Chewy Pet ProductsFor Cyber Monday, Chewy is offering $30 off purchases of $100 or more. This is only for select products, including food, treats, beds, and more.$70.00 FROM CHEWYOriginally $100.00 | Save 30%Dyson Outsize Absolute+The Dyson Outsize Absolute+ is ideal for whole home, deep cleaning with its full-size dustbin and large cleaner head. $799.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $899.99 | Save 11%Dyson V8 AbsoluteBuilt with a soft roller head for hard floors and a motorized cleaner head for carpets, the Dyson V8 Absolute handles all surfaces efficiently.$399.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $449.99 | Save 11%Dyson Cyclone V10 AbsoluteEquipped with a sensor to detect the difference between carpets and hard floors, the Cyclone V10 Absolute is the perfect vacuum cleaner for any room in the house. We've seen it go for as low as $350 before (it's usually $550), but during Black Friday and Cyber Monday, you'll get it for $400 while supplies last.$499.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $549.99 | Save 9%Drinkwell Two-Gallon Pet FountainThis two gallon pet drinking fountain is the perfect accessory to make sure your dog or cat (or both) are drinking enough water.$59.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $74.95 | Save 20%Eufy BoostIQ RoboVac 15C MAXQuiet, slim, and powerful, the eufy RoboVac 15C Max is a solid investment if you're looking for a robot vacuum. It's already very affordable at retail price, but you can also often find it on sale, making it an even better deal.$169.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $279.99 | Save 39%$169.99 FROM EUFYOriginally $249.99 | Save 32%iRobot Roomba i3+ (3550) Robot VacuumThe i3+ costs considerably more than your average robot vacuum, but it also does a lot more than the average robot vacuum. It develops personalized cleaning schedules and empties itself. $399.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM IROBOTOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $565.47 | Save 29%$399.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo T8 AIVI Robot VacuumThe  Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo Pro Mopping System thoroughly cleans floors as opposed to pushing a wet cloth around. When paired with the Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo T8 AIVI Robot Vacuum, the two make easy work of time-consuming chores.$499.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $749.99 | Save 33%$799.99 FROM BEST BUYBissell SpinWave Robot VacuumThe Bissell SpinWave Robot Vacuum picked up all the pet hair on carpet in our tests and has a great assortment of mop attachments and accessories. The company is also committed to helping homeless pets and helps them find loving homes. $249.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $399.99 | Save 38%$299.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $399.99 | Save 25%Dewalt Atomic 20-Volt Max Compact Drill/Impact Combo Kit This 20-Volt MAX Brushless Compact 2-Tool Combo Kit includes 1 cordless Drill/Driver, 1 cordless Impact Driver, two 20-Volt MAX Lithium Ion Batteries, 1 charger, and a carrying bag. $149.00 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $229.00 | Save 35%Best Cyber Monday 2021 gaming dealsLogitech G305 Lightspeed Wireless Gaming MouseCompact and portable, the Logitech G305 is great to take on the go. It's best if you prefer smaller mice and right now it's only $40, a great price drop from a typical selling price of $50.$29.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%$29.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $48.97 | Save 39%Nintendo Switch Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Digital Download)The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild was released for the Nintendo Switch in 2017, but still remains one of the best Switch games out there. Right now, a physical copy is selling for $40, which is a solid price on this rarely discounted game.$35.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%Nintendo Switch Fire Emblem: Three Houses"Fire Emblem: Three Houses" is a turn-based war strategy game that encourages you to build relationships with your soldiers and master your tactics on the battlefield. $35.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$35.00 FROM GAMESTOPOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$35.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$59.99 FROM BEST BUYNintendo eShop $50 Gift CardThe Nintendo eShop is the best place to shop for digital copies of Nintendo's games. This gift card is the perfect gift or investment for anyone with a Nintendo Switch. Better still, Nintendo's eShop offers several sales throughout the year. This means, patient shoppers can double their savings.$45.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $50.00 | Save 10%$50.00 FROM BEST BUY$45.00 FROM NEWEGGOriginally $50.00 | Save 10%Xbox Game Pass for PC (3-Month Membership)Typically, you can get a 3-month Game Pass subscription for $30. Right now, it's only $20, a solid deal. This is the PC version, which gets you EA Play, exclusive member discounts, and unlimited to access to over 100 games. $1.00 FROM MICROSOFTOriginally $29.99 | Save 97%$19.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $29.99 | Save 33%$19.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $29.99 | Save 33%PlayStation Plus 12-Month SubscriptionPlayStation Plus allows gamers to play online, nets them special discounts in the PlayStation Network store, and subscribers get free games each month that remain available as long as the PlayStation Plus subscription is active. $36.99 FROM CDKEYSOriginally $59.99 | Save 38%$39.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%$39.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%Microsoft Xbox Series S|X Wireless ControllerThis latest-gen Xbox gamepad is the best Microsoft has ever made, and during Cyber Monday, shoppers can save $20 on this recently released controller.$49.99 FROM MICROSOFTOriginally $59.99 | Save 17%$54.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 8%$49.00 FROM GAME STOPOriginally $54.99 | Save 11%$52.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 12%Death Loop for PlayStation 5“Death Loop” is an unusual first-person shooter that challenges players to escape a day-long time loop by assassinating specific targets. The game is a great pick for fans of spy movies, sci-fi, and creative gunplay.$29.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%Call of Duty Vanguard for PlayStation 4The latest Call of Duty game is now on sale for $20 off, just a few weeks after its release.$39.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 35%$44.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $59.99 | Save 25%Logitech G305 Lightspeed Wireless Gaming MouseCompact and portable, the Logitech G305 is great to take on the go. It's best if you prefer smaller mice and right now it's only $40, a great price drop from a typical selling price of $50.$29.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%$29.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $48.97 | Save 39%Nintendo Switch Ring Fit Adventure"Ring Fit Adventure" for the Nintendo Switch uses the exclusive "Ring-Con" attachment and a leg strap to track movement and provide resistance for workouts. The game also includes an adventure mode. Right now, it's selling for $55 at Target and Amazon, $25 off its usual price and the lowest price we've ever seen on this game.$79.98 FROM TARGET$54.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $79.98 | Save 32%$54.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $80.00 | Save 33%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYBest Cyber Monday 2021 streaming dealsHulu Monthly Subscription (Deal)Save a huge 85% on an ad-supported Hulu subscription for an entire year. That amounts to just 99 cents per month. This deal is live until Monday, November 29. $0.99 FROM HULUOriginally $6.99 | Save 86%Philo TVIf you want your streaming service to cost less per month than a single trip for the family to Starbucks, Philo TV is made with you in mind.$5.00 FROM PHILOOriginally $25.00 | Save 80%Disney Plus Free Trial with Amazon Music UnlimitedNew Amazon Music Unlimited subscribers can get six months of Disney Plus for free when they sign up. Current Music Unlimited members can get three months of Disney Plus. Music Unlimited costs $8 a month for Prime members or $10 a month without Prime.$0.00 FROM AMAZONAmazon Prime Video Channel Add-OnsPrime Video subscribers can choose from a variety of channel-add ons including Starz, Showtime, Paramount+, AMC+, Discovery+, and more.$0.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $10.99 | Save 91%YouTube PremiumYouTube Premium lets you stream videos and music on YouTube without any ads. The service also features exclusive programs.FREE FROM YOUTUBEOriginally $11.99 | Save 100%Best Cyber Monday 2021 health & fitness dealsTheragun PROThe Theragun Pro is our top pick: a powerful, customizable, and durable massager that's worth every bit of its $600 price tag. $399.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%$399.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.00 FROM THERABODYOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%Fitbit LuxeThe Fitbit Luxe is the company's latest fitness band that comes with a sleek design and advanced health features like stress management and the ability to measure heart rate variation.$99.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $149.99 | Save 33%$99.95 FROM FITBITOriginally $149.94 | Save 33%$99.95 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $149.94 | Save 33%Mirror from lululemonThis isn't just a mirror. It's a cardio class, it's a yoga studio, it's a boxing ring, it's your new personal trainer, and it's so much more. For Cyber Monday, Mirror is on sale for $500 with the code "CYBERMONDAY20"$995.00 FROM MIRROROriginally $1495.00 | Save 33%Hydro Flask 32-Ounce Wide Mouth This bottle has all the hallmark features of a Hydro Flask water bottle — 12-24 hours of temperature retention, powder color coating that won't chip or fade with time, a silicone twist top — with the very convenient wide mouth for easy pouring and drinking.$33.71 FROM HYDRO FLASKOriginally $44.95 | Save 25%Amazon HaloAmazon's Halo fitness tracker can analyze the tone of your voice to help you understand how you sound to others.$54.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 45%LifeSpan TR1200i Folding TreadmillThe TR1200i is the baby sister of our top pick for a folding treadmill, the TR300i, with fewer built-in training programs and fewer fancy features like manual instead of digital buttons. But it's nearly the same size, has the same motor, and the same shock absorption — but for significantly cheaper.$899.00 FROM LIFESPANOriginally $1199.00 | Save 25%Best Cyber Monday 2021 style & beauty dealsMadewell The Perfect Vintage JeanWith their waist-accentuating high rise and tapered legs, these are "mom jeans"...if your mom was a '90s supermodel. Plus, they're made of denim that has an old-school look and a touch of give for a perfectly broken-in feel.$80.50 FROM MADEWELLOriginally $115.00 | Save 30%Tarte Tartelette Full Bloom Amazonian Clay Eyeshadow PaletteFrom shimmery to matte options, the Tartelette Full Bloom Amazonian Clay includes 28 limited-edition shades to wear for any occasion. $52.00 FROM KOHL'SDyson Airwrap Complete StylerDyson Airwrap Complete Styler is engineered for multiple hair types and styles. Featuring Coanda air styling and propelled by the Dyson digital motor, users can curl, wave, smooth and dry with no extreme heat.$399.99 FROM NEW EGGOriginally $499.99 | Save 20%$549.95 FROM DYSON$549.99 FROM BEST BUY$549.00 FROM AMAZONL.L.Bean Wicked Good Slippers - Men'sThis shearling-lined, leather-bottom slipper is one of the best men's slippers we've ever tried.$75.65 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $89.00 | Save 15%L.L.Bean Wicked Good Shearling-Lined Slides - Women'sThese ridiculously-cozy, shearling-lined slides are easy to slip on and off, and keep your feet toasty around the house.$67.15 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $79.00 | Save 15%L.L.Bean Toddlers' Wicked Good SlippersEverything we love about L.L.Bean's Wicked Good Slippers — but mini. These shearling-lined, leather-soled booties will keep kid's feet, sizes 3-10, toasty around the house and in a stroller.$33.96 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $39.95 | Save 15%Lululemon Hooded Define JacketA fan-favorite, now with a hood. Between the technical fabric and a do-anything fit, it's easy to see why this one's a hit. Right now you can save up to 50% on this versatile piece, but sizes are selling out quickly. $64.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $128.00 | Save 50%Lululemon Wunder Under High-Rise TightLululemon is, in many ways, the genesis of athleisure, so it's not surprising that the company has an edge in the space.$69.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $98.00 | Save 30%Lululemon Metal Vent Breathe Short SleeveLululemon Metal Vent Breathe Short Sleeve $49.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $78.00 | Save 37%Bombas Women's Gripper Slipper (Sherpa Lined) 2-PackA mix between socks and slippers, Bombas' Gripper Slippers include a cozy sherpa lining and sole grippers to prevent slips. $72.95 FROM BOMBASOriginally $96.00 | Save 24%Columbia Men's Lake 22 Down Hooded JacketThis water-resistant jacket is stocked with 650-fill power down insulation, zippered hand pockets, and a structured hood to keep you zipped up and toasty through any winter weather.$69.98 FROM COLUMBIAOriginally $140.00 | Save 50%Adidas Climacool VentoThe Adidas Climacool Vento features a highly breathable mesh upper to help keep your feet cool.$98.00 FROM ADIDASOriginally $140.00 | Save 30%Nike Adapt Auto MaxThe Nike Adapt Auto Max uses advanced technology to automatically form to your foot without laces.$286.63 FROM NIKEOriginally $400.00 | Save 28%Nike Space Hippie 01The Nike Space Hippie 01 is made from 50% recycled materials and features a lightweight, track-inspired look.$77.58 FROM NIKEOriginally $130.00 | Save 40%Crocs Classic Clog (Unisex)The shoe that really started it all, the Classic Clog is comfortable, breathable, and easy to slip on whenever. With over 20 fun colors to choose from, you can’t go wrong.$39.99 FROM CROCSOriginally $49.99 | Save 20%$27.55 FROM AMAZONDagne Dover Indi Diaper BackpackDagne Dover's Indi Diaper Backpack adds a stylish neutral flair while holding every basic essential.$160.00 FROM DAGNE DOVEROriginally $200.00 | Save 20%Everlane Glove Boot ReKnitEverlane's Glove Boot is a sleek boot made with stretchy, sustainable knit fabric and a walkable heel for all-day comfort. $46.00 FROM EVERLANEOriginally $115.00 | Save 60%OutdoorVoices The Exercise DressOutdoorVoices makes a few of our favorite athleisure items, and they're another example of a company that can balance form and function.$75.00 FROM OUTDOORVOICESOriginally $100.00 | Save 25%Rough Linen St. Barts Linen RobeThe Rough Linen St. Barts Robe is made from top-notch linen that offers a light feel and a cool, casual look.$131.93 FROM ROUGH LINENOriginally $167.00 | Save 21%Kiehl's Since 1851 Avocado Nourishing Hydration MaskWinter is coming, and Kiehls' Avocado Mask is here to provide your skin with hydration all season long. This nourishing treatment infuses your face with avocado and evening primrose oils, offering sumptuous moisture after just one use. Plus, it's green tint is a total throwback. You can save 50% on a jar during Black Friday sale. $21.50 FROM MACY'SOriginally $45.00 | Save 52%Giorgio Armani Lip Magnet Liquid LipstickA liquid lip color that gives you a super matte look, but it's so light it feels like a lip stain. The formula is highly pigmented, smudge-resistant, and comfortable on your lips.$19.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $38.00 | Save 50%Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow DefinerThere's a reason why Anastasia Beverly Hills' Brow Definer is a favorite among beauty editors. The angled applicator allows you to sketch on hair-like strokes, providing you with a natural-looking fill every single time. The Definer is on sale during Nordstrom's Black Friday sale, and it's one of the best prices we've seen for this cult-favorite product. You can shop it in every color for just $16. $23.00 FROM NORDSTROMNike Sportswear Essential Fleece PantsMade from soft fleece material, these sweats are perfect for everyday comfort.$48.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $60.00 | Save 20%Thread & Supply Double Breasted PeacoatThis peacoat from Thread & Supply is a classic with a twist. The oversized buttons extend up the lapel to the collar, giving you the option to bundle up if necessary. And if you don't love it in black, never fear — you can save 31% on this coat in black, camel, or light gray. $39.90 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $58.00 | Save 31%True & Co. True Body Triangle Convertible Strap BraletteThe convertible straps on this wireless bra can be worn either straight or crisscrossed, and the smooth material appears invisible under clothes.$30.80 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $44.00 | Save 30%Spanx Faux Leather LeggingsMade with the same level of support as its signature shapewear but with a little extra stretch, these leggings are designed to not only make you look great but feel great, too. $78.40 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $98.00 | Save 20%$78.40 FROM SPANX Originally $98.00 | Save 20%Lululemon Wunder Under High-Rise TightLululemon is, in many ways, the genesis of athleisure, so it's not surprising that the company has an edge in the space.$69.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $98.00 | Save 30%Chaps Mens Long Sleeve Button DownMade from an easy-to-care-for cotton blend and a dose of stretch, this men's button-down shirt will keep you looking polished all day.$19.98 FROM WALMARTOriginally $60.00 | Save 67%Nine West Car Coat CardiganThi cozy topper is part coat, part cardigan, and will keep you warm all winter. Save an extra 15% on this cardigan with the code ENJOY15 at checkout.$35.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $60.00 | Save 40%When is Cyber Monday?Cyber Monday falls on the Monday after Black Friday every year. In 2021, the shopping event will land on November 29.As a continuation of sorts to Black Friday, Cyber Monday gives shoppers another opportunity to save on tech, home goods, clothing, and more that you might've missed while digesting Thanksgiving dinner. Unlike Black Friday, though, Cyber Monday is entirely online.What time does Cyber Monday start?Cyber Monday officially begins at 12 a.m. ET on November 29. That said, the event is expected to carry over many deals from Black Friday, so some discounts will likely already be available before that time.What is Cyber Monday?Cyber Monday began as the online version of Black Friday, where online retailers offered big discounts to match their brick-and-mortar counterparts. Now, Cyber Monday is one of the biggest shopping days of the year, often surpassing even Black Friday in terms of revenue and sales. Previously, the main distinction between Black Friday and Cyber Monday was that Black Friday focused on in-store sales and Cyber Monday on online sales. But as shopping habits have increasingly favored the internet, shoppers can look forward to a very online-focused Cyber Monday and Black Friday. Cyber Monday offers a great opportunity to save on all your holiday gifts. How long do Cyber Monday sales last? Though Cyber Monday sales once took place on Monday only, we've seen them extend to longer and longer durations, with a handful lasting through the rest of the week. However, the best discounts we see are in limited supply and expire soon after they become available.What's better, Black Friday or Cyber Monday?With more and more buyers shopping online, the debate over which shopping holiday wins, is practically moot. Both events will be held predominantly online, and more than a few deals overlap. In fact, many Black Friday deals become Cyber Monday deals when the dates change. If possible, buyers should shop on both holidays. We've seen different products receive better discounts on each day, and the deals that each retailer offers will vary. Generally speaking, consumers shopping for big-ticket items, such as laptops, TVs, and kitchen appliances, can expect more opportunities on Black Friday. Shoppers looking for last year's models, smart home gadgets, digital subscriptions, and gift cards will likely find more luck during Cyber Monday.What should I buy during Cyber Monday?If a retailer offers Black Friday deals, it's a near guarantee that it will offer Cyber Monday deals, too. Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and Walmart are some noteworthy retailers that we know will participate in the shopping event, with deals across many product categories.We will likely see massive discounts on some of our favorite direct-to-consumer products during Cyber Monday, such as retail startups like Leesa and Brooklinen. For some online stores, Cyber Monday (or Cyber Week) will be one of the few times of the year when their products see major markdowns.Will there be Cyber Monday shipping delays?Shipping delays and shopping holidays are inextricably linked, so there's always a risk of late deliveries.To help you avoid the shipping crunch and get your stuff sooner, several retailers, including Walmart, Target, and Best Buy, offer in-store pickup and contactless curbside pickup. This means shoppers can grab their orders at a nearby location, provided that the retailer has it in stock. Best Cyber Monday deals we saw last yearLast year, we saw a lot of great sales on Cyber Monday ranging from sitewide discounts to specific products. Everything from home and kitchen, to subscription services were on sale during last year's annual savings event.Here are a few of the best Cyber Monday deals from 2020.  Philips Sonicare DiamondClean Classic Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush was $179 from Kohl's, originally $229.FujiFilm Instax Mini 11 Camera Bundle was $70 from Kohl's on Cyber Monday last year, originally $120.Keurig K-Supreme Single Serve K-Cup Pod Coffee Maker was $84 from Target on Cyber Monday last year, originally $140.How we select the best Cyber Monday dealsWe only choose products that meet our high standard of coverage, and that we've either used ourselves or researched carefully.We compare the prices among top retailers such as Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and Walmart and only include the deals that are better than all others offered (not including promotional discounts that come from using certain credit cards).All deals are at least 20% off, with the occasional exception for products that are rarely discounted or provide an outsized value.Read more about how the Insider Reviews team evaluates deals and why you should trust us.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 28th, 2021

90+ Black Friday deals you can still get today: Dyson Airwrap, AirPods Pro, Roomba vacuums, and more

Black Friday is over, but you can still find deals just as good as Black Friday all over. Save on top buys from Walmart, Target, Nordstrom, and more. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Apple; Amazon; Target; Nordstrom; Kohl's; Rachel Mendelson/InsiderBlack Friday 2021 is over, but that doesn't mean it's too late to save big. Tech, home and kitchen, beauty and fashion, and health and fitness are all seeing huge discounts, making it a great chance to shop for gifts and big purchases. Insider Reviews works year-round to test products and track prices so we can offer expert buying advice during peak shopping periods like Black Friday and Cyber Monday.Plenty of retailers started offering big discounts before Black Friday, so don't be surprised if popular items like Apple's AirPods Pro headphones and Instant Pot pressure cookers begin to sell out as the holiday shopping weekend continues. That said, we've seen a few products go out of stock briefly only to return a few hours later.Below, we've selected the best deals we've found during the Black Friday 2021 weekend, with prices from multiple retailers so you can compare and choose. We'll be adding new deals to the list on a regular basis through Cyber Monday, November 29.Check out our comprehensive list of Black Friday sales across the net, from startups to retailers.You can also find the best deals at specific stores like Amazon, Target, Walmart, and Nordstrom.Here are 18 more Black Friday deals under $50 that are still up for grabs.Best Black Friday 2021 tech dealsApple AirPods ProThe Apple AirPods Pro look and sound better than previous-generation AirPods. Plus, they have noise cancellation built right into them and integrate perfectly with other Apple devices. $169.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $249.99 | Save 32%$189.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $249.99 | Save 24%$189.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $249.99 | Save 24%$209.00 FROM B&HOriginally $249.00 | Save 16%$399.99 FROM WALMARTRoku Streambar 2020Too much clutter under the TV? The interesting Roku Streambar combines all of the features of a Roku 4K player with a compact soundbar.$79.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$79.98 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 38%$99.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $129.99 | Save 24%Google Nest Hub (2nd gen)The Google Nest Hub is a smart display with a unique Sleep Sensing feature to help you monitor your sleep habits. $49.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $99.99 | Save 50%$49.98 FROM WALMARTOriginally $99.98 | Save 50%$49.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 50%Apple Watch Series 7Much more than a timepiece, the Apple Watch can also be used for keeping track of workouts, making phone calls, sending text messages, setting timers and alarms, counting calories, and more.$379.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $399.00 | Save 5%$379.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $399.00 | Save 5%$399.00 FROM APPLEApple Watch SE (40mm, GPS)With a recent Apple processor and many of the same features as the Series 7, the Apple Watch SE is a great budget-friendly option.$219.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $279.00 | Save 21%$279.00 FROM APPLEOriginally $279.00 | Save 0%Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 (40mm)The Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 is the obvious choice for Android users looking for a comprehensive, quality, premium smartwatch experience. However, it's a shame that the ECG feature is limited specifically to Samsung phone owners. $199.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $279.99 | Save 29%$199.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $249.99 | Save 20%$229.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $279.99 | Save 18%MasterClass 2-for-1 membershipGet two MasterClass subscriptions for the price of one! Each subscription gets you access to all of MasterClass, so you can watch or sample unlimited celebrity and expert-led classes across a wide range of topics.$180.00 FROM MASTERCLASSOriginally $360.00 | Save 50%Sony WH-1000XM4Sony's WH-1000XM4 are our go-to pair of headphones when we look for a balance of sound quality and noise-cancelling performance.$248.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%$248.00 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%$249.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $349.99 | Save 29%Bose QuietComfort 45The QuietComfort 45 have a refreshed design with improved noise cancelling and better battery life.$279.00 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM BOSEOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%$279.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $329.00 | Save 15%Apple AirPods (3rd Gen)Apple's third-generation AirPods offer longer battery life, a MagSafe charger, water resistance, and support for spatial audio. $154.99 FROM MICRO CENTEROriginally $179.99 | Save 14%$179.00 FROM APPLE$169.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $179.00 | Save 5%$179.00 FROM BEST BUY$174.98 FROM WALMARTApple Airpods (2nd Generation)You’ll need to pick up your pair from your local Micro Center, but this is a solid deal price for the second-generation Apple AirPods. You can often find them discounted as low as $120, making this extra $5 drop noteworthy. $104.99 FROM MICRO CENTEROriginally $129.99 | Save 19%$114.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 12%$114.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $129.99 | Save 12%$119.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $129.99 | Save 8%Apple MacBook Air (M1)The latest MacBook Air released in late 2020 gains Apple's new M1 processor, which brings impressively fast performance and long battery life, for under $1,000, making it the best Apple laptop overall.$899.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $999.99 | Save 10%$999.00 FROM APPLE$899.00 FROM B&HOriginally $999.00 | Save 10%Apple MacBook Pro with M1 Processor (13-inch, 8GB RAM, 256GB)Apple's latest MacBook Pro with the M1 processor is leaps and bounds beyond its predecessor, but the Intel MacBook Pro still has some tricks.$1199.00 FROM B&HOriginally $1299.00 | Save 8%$1299.00 FROM APPLELG 65-inch C1 OLED 4K TVLG’s C1 is one of the best 4K TVs you can buy. The OLED panel delivers incredible image quality with an infinite contrast ratio. This deal price matches the lowest we’ve seen so far.$1796.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $2499.98 | Save 28%$1796.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $2499.98 | Save 28%Samsung 65-inch Q60A QLED 4K TVSamsung's Q60A is the company's less expensive lineup of premium QLED TVs. $849.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $999.99 | Save 15%Amazon Fire TV 50" Omni SeriesAmazon launched its own smart TVs in fall 2021 and the Omni Series boasts features like hands-free Alexa support and video calling along with the latest Fire TV software.$359.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $509.99 | Save 29%Amazon Echo (4th Gen)The latest Echo speaker from Amazon takes on a spherical design for more effective room-filling audio. $59.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%$59.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%$59.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $99.99 | Save 40%Amazon Fire TV Stick 4K MaxThe Fire TV Stick 4K is designed to be 40% more powerful than Fire TV Stick 4K. It also adds Wi-Fi 6 support.$34.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%$34.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%$34.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $54.99 | Save 36%Ring Video Doorbell (2020)The latest affordable Video Doorbell model from Ring features 1080p recording and improved motion tracking. It's a great deal if you're looking to start adding smart devices to your home. Orders made now will be fulfilled in 6 to 7 weeks.$79.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 20%Amazon All-New KindleThe Kindle allows users to download hundreds, if not thousands, of books straight to the device. This model has a front light that makes it better-suited for night time reading.$49.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $89.99 | Save 44%Vizio Elevate 5.1.4 SoundbarVizio's Elevate soundbar offers a 5.1.4 Dolby Atmos experience with performance that rivals many full-fledged home theater systems.$798.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $1099.99 | Save 27%$799.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $1099.99 | Save 27%Yamaha YAS-209 SoundbarYamaha's YAS-209 offers great sound, Amazon Alexa support, and well-balanced functionality for a reasonable price. $299.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $349.99 | Save 14%$299.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $349.95 | Save 14%Logitech C922x Pro Stream WebcamYou'll also want a decent webcam and mic if you want to be seen on screen, and provide commentary for your gaming.$74.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 25%$79.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $99.99 | Save 20%Microsoft Surface Pro 7The Microsoft Surface Pro 7 is sleek and portable with excellent performance for on-the-go use — making it still the most premium 2-in-1 tablet to date.$999.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $1329.00 | Save 25%GoPro Hero 10 BlackThis video and still camera has similar capabilities to larger variants, while maintaining the small go-anywhere form-factor it's known for.$349.98 FROM GOPROOriginally $499.99 | Save 30%Best Black Friday 2021 kitchen dealsKitchenAid KFC3516ER 3.5 Cup Food ChopperThe KitchenAid KFC3516ER 3.5 Cup Food Chopper is ideal and convenient for small prepping needs. The size makes it easy to store away or keep on your counter, and the Cyber Monday price makes it easy on your wallet. $39.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $54.99 | Save 27%$39.99 FROM KITCHENAIDOriginally $54.99 | Save 27%Ninja Professional Kitchen System BlenderThe Ninja Professional Kitchen System is a powerful blender that transforms into a food processor or a personal blender with just the swap of an attachment.$99.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $199.99 | Save 50%Ninja Professional Plus Food ProcessorThe Ninja Professional Plus makes food prep fast and easy with presets for chopped vegetables, shredded cheese, more.$79.98 FROM KOHLSOriginally $119.99 | Save 33%Zojirushi Virtuoso Plus BreadmakerThis bread machine kneads thoroughly, bakes evenly, and, unlike many of its competitors, turns out standard-sized loaves. $217.99 FROM BED BATH & BEYONDOriginally $359.99 | Save 39%$359.99 FROM ABTDrinkMate Beverage Carbonation MakerIf you'd like to add fizz to more than just water, consider the Drinkmate Beverage Carbonation Maker, which can carbonate everything from juice to wine.$79.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $95.93 | Save 17%Ninja Foodi 5-in-1 Indoor Grill with Air Fryer, Roast, Bake & DehydrateThe Ninja Foodi 5-in-1 has five functions, including grill, bake, and dehydrate. Its temperatures range between 105°F to 500°F, giving it a lot of versatility in cooking options. Many of the parts are dishwasher safe for easier cleanup. $169.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $229.99 | Save 26%$209.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $249.99 | Save 16%Vitamix Explorian BlenderThe renewed Vitamix Explorian is pre-owned, but every bit as good as new and comes with a 90-day Amazon Renewed Guarantee on top of a 3-year full warranty.$289.95 FROM TARGETOriginally $449.99 | Save 36%$289.95 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $345.99 | Save 16%Instant Pot Duo Plus Pressure Cooker BundleThis bundle is a Target exclusive, and it includes an extra silicone egg rack and stainless steel steam rack for your pressure cooking needs. It’s only $60 right now — an excellent value for such a multifunctional kitchen appliance.$59.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $129.99 | Save 54%Our Place Always PanOur Place's Always Pan is multi-functional nonstick pan that's taken the internet by storm. It promises to replace eight different pieces of cookware in your kitchen. It can function as a steamer, saute pan, frying pan, and more. $99.00 FROM OUR PLACEOriginally $145.00 | Save 32%Cuisinart Chef's Classic 17-Piece Hard-Anodized Cookware SetThis nonstick set includes nine different pans, lids to match, and a steamer for a total of 17 pieces. $219.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $399.99 | Save 45%Keurig K-Mini Single Serve Coffee MakerThe slim 6- to 12-ounce coffee maker will fit neatly on any kitchen counter and save energy with the auto-off feature after brewing.$49.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $89.99 | Save 44%$49.99 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $79.98 | Save 37%Bodum Chambord French PressThe Bodum Chambord is about as timeless as French presses get. It's unfussy and operates smoothly, and replacement parts (screens, braces, etc.) are affordable and easily attainable. $25.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $38.00 | Save 34%Best Black Friday 2021 home dealsDyson Airwrap Complete StylerDyson Airwrap Complete Styler is engineered for multiple hair types and styles. Featuring Coanda air styling and propelled by the Dyson digital motor, users can curl, wave, smooth and dry with no extreme heat.$399.99 FROM NEW EGGOriginally $499.99 | Save 20%$549.00 FROM SEPHORA$549.95 FROM DYSON$549.99 FROM ULTA$549.99 FROM BEST BUY$549.00 FROM AMAZONChewy Pet ProductsFor Cyber Monday, Chewy is offering $30 off purchases of $100 or more. This is only for select products, including food, treats, beds, and more.$70.00 FROM CHEWYOriginally $100.00 | Save 30%Dyson Outsize Absolute+The Dyson Outsize Absolute+ is ideal for whole home, deep cleaning with its full-size dustbin and large cleaner head. $749.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $899.99 | Save 17%Dyson V8 AbsoluteBuilt with a soft roller head for hard floors and a motorized cleaner head for carpets, the Dyson V8 Absolute handles all surfaces efficiently.$399.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $449.99 | Save 11%Dyson Cyclone V10 AbsoluteEquipped with a sensor to detect the difference between carpets and hard floors, the Cyclone V10 Absolute is the perfect vacuum cleaner for any room in the house. We've seen it go for as low as $350 before (it's usually $550), but during Black Friday and Cyber Monday, you'll get it for $400 while supplies last.$499.99 FROM DYSONOriginally $549.99 | Save 9%Drinkwell Two-Gallon Pet FountainThis two gallon pet drinking fountain is the perfect accessory to make sure your dog or cat (or both) are drinking enough water.$59.95 FROM AMAZONOriginally $74.95 | Save 20%Brooklinen Luxe Core Sheet Set (Queen)If you take your sleep comfort seriously, the pampering touch and good looks of Brooklinen's Luxe Sheets will have you sleeping like a baby.$140.00 FROM BROOKLINENOriginally $175.00 | Save 20%$140.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $175.00 | Save 20%Eufy BoostIQ RoboVac 15C MAXQuiet, slim, and powerful, the eufy RoboVac 15C Max is a solid investment if you're looking for a robot vacuum. It's already very affordable at retail price, but you can also often find it on sale, making it an even better deal.$169.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $279.99 | Save 39%$169.99 FROM EUFYOriginally $249.99 | Save 32%iRobot Roomba i3+ (3550) Robot VacuumThe i3+ costs considerably more than your average robot vacuum, but it also does a lot more than the average robot vacuum. It develops personalized cleaning schedules and empties itself. $399.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM IROBOTOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%$399.99 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $565.47 | Save 29%$399.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%Shark ION Robot® Vacuum RV750This is one of the cheapest smart vacuums we've seen to date – this far out from the official launch of Walmart's sale. It's tough to imagine this getting much cheaper during the deals event, so it might be wise to act quickly.$143.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $299.99 | Save 52%Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo T8 AIVI Robot VacuumThe  Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo Pro Mopping System thoroughly cleans floors as opposed to pushing a wet cloth around. When paired with the Ecovacs Deebot Ozmo T8 AIVI Robot Vacuum, the two make easy work of time-consuming chores.$499.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $749.99 | Save 33%$799.99 FROM BEST BUYBissell SpinWave Robot VacuumThe Bissell SpinWave Robot Vacuum picked up all the pet hair on carpet in our tests and has a great assortment of mop attachments and accessories. The company is also committed to helping homeless pets and helps them find loving homes. $249.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $399.99 | Save 38%$299.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $399.99 | Save 25%Dewalt Atomic 20-Volt Max Compact Drill/Impact Combo Kit This 20-Volt MAX Brushless Compact 2-Tool Combo Kit includes 1 cordless Drill/Driver, 1 cordless Impact Driver, two 20-Volt MAX Lithium Ion Batteries, 1 charger, and a carrying bag. $149.00 FROM THE HOME DEPOTOriginally $229.00 | Save 35%Best Black Friday 2021 gaming dealsNintendo Switch Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Digital Download)The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild was released for the Nintendo Switch in 2017, but still remains one of the best Switch games out there. Right now, a physical copy is selling for $40, which is a solid price on this rarely discounted game.$35.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%Nintendo Switch Fire Emblem: Three Houses"Fire Emblem: Three Houses" is a turn-based war strategy game that encourages you to build relationships with your soldiers and master your tactics on the battlefield. $35.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$34.99 FROM GAMESTOPOriginally $59.99 | Save 42%$39.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%$39.88 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 34%Nintendo eShop $50 Gift CardThe Nintendo eShop is the best place to shop for digital copies of Nintendo's games. This gift card is the perfect gift or investment for anyone with a Nintendo Switch. Better still, Nintendo's eShop offers several sales throughout the year. This means, patient shoppers can double their savings.$45.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $50.00 | Save 10%$50.00 FROM BEST BUY$45.00 FROM NEWEGGOriginally $50.00 | Save 10%Xbox Game Pass for PC (3-Month Membership)Typically, you can get a 3-month Game Pass subscription for $30. Right now, it's only $20, a solid deal. This is the PC version, which gets you EA Play, exclusive member discounts, and unlimited to access to over 100 games. $1.00 FROM MICROSOFTOriginally $29.99 | Save 97%$19.98 FROM AMAZONOriginally $29.99 | Save 33%$19.98 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $29.99 | Save 33%PlayStation Plus 12-Month SubscriptionPlayStation Plus allows gamers to play online, nets them special discounts in the PlayStation Network store, and subscribers get free games each month that remain available as long as the PlayStation Plus subscription is active. $36.99 FROM CDKEYSOriginally $59.99 | Save 38%$39.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%$39.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 33%Microsoft Xbox Series S|X Wireless ControllerThis latest-gen Xbox gamepad is the best Microsoft has ever made, and during Cyber Monday, shoppers can save $20 on this recently released controller.$49.99 FROM MICROSOFTOriginally $59.99 | Save 17%$54.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 8%$49.00 FROM GAME STOPOriginally $54.99 | Save 11%$52.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 12%Death Loop for PlayStation 5“Death Loop” is an unusual first-person shooter that challenges players to escape a day-long time loop by assassinating specific targets. The game is a great pick for fans of spy movies, sci-fi, and creative gunplay.$29.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%Call of Duty Vanguard for PlayStation 4The latest Call of Duty game is now on sale for $20 off, just a few weeks after its release.$39.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $59.99 | Save 35%$44.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $59.99 | Save 25%Logitech G305 Lightspeed Wireless Gaming MouseCompact and portable, the Logitech G305 is great to take on the go. It's best if you prefer smaller mice and right now it's only $40, a great price drop from a typical selling price of $50.$29.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $59.99 | Save 50%$29.99 FROM WALMARTOriginally $48.97 | Save 39%Nintendo Switch Ring Fit Adventure"Ring Fit Adventure" for the Nintendo Switch uses the exclusive "Ring-Con" attachment and a leg strap to track movement and provide resistance for workouts. The game also includes an adventure mode. Right now, it's selling for $55 at Target and Amazon, $25 off its usual price and the lowest price we've ever seen on this game.$54.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $79.98 | Save 31%$54.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $79.98 | Save 31%$54.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $80.00 | Save 33%$54.99 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $79.98 | Save 31%Best Black Friday streaming dealsHulu Monthly Subscription (Deal)Save a huge 85% on an ad-supported Hulu subscription for an entire year. That amounts to just 99 cents per month. This deal is live until Monday, November 29. $0.99 FROM HULUOriginally $6.99 | Save 86%Philo TVIf you want your streaming service to cost less per month than a single trip for the family to Starbucks, Philo TV is made with you in mind.$5.00 FROM PHILOOriginally $25.00 | Save 80%Disney Plus Free Trial with Amazon Music UnlimitedNew Amazon Music Unlimited subscribers can get six months of Disney Plus for free when they sign up. Current Music Unlimited members can get three months of Disney Plus. Music Unlimited costs $8 a month for Prime members or $10 a month without Prime.$0.00 FROM AMAZONAmazon Prime Video Channel Add-OnsPrime Video subscribers can choose from a variety of channel-add ons including Starz, Showtime, Paramount+, AMC+, Discovery+, and more.$0.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $10.99 | Save 91%YouTube PremiumYouTube Premium lets you stream videos and music on YouTube without any ads. The service also features exclusive programs.FREE FROM YOUTUBEOriginally $11.99 | Save 100%Best Black Friday health & fitness dealsTheragun PROThe Theragun Pro is our top pick: a powerful, customizable, and durable massager that's worth every bit of its $600 price tag. $399.99 FROM TARGETOriginally $599.99 | Save 33%$399.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%$399.00 FROM THERABODYOriginally $599.00 | Save 33%23andMe Ancestry + Health KitThe 23andMe DNA Ancestry + Health Kit tells you which illnesses you're predisposed to and gives you a full look at your ancestry.$99.00 FROM AMAZONOriginally $199.00 | Save 50%$99.00 FROM 23ANDMEOriginally $199.00 | Save 50%AncestryDNA Genetic Ethnicity TestThe Ancestry DNA Origins + Ethnicity Test gets you access to the largest customer database, which means more detailed results and more family matches.$49.00 FROM ANCESTRYOriginally $99.00 | Save 51%$49.00 FROM WALMARTOriginally $99.00 | Save 51%Fitbit LuxeThe Fitbit Luxe is the company's latest fitness band that comes with a sleek design and advanced health features like stress management and the ability to measure heart rate variation.$99.99 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $149.99 | Save 33%$99.95 FROM FITBITOriginally $149.94 | Save 33%$99.95 FROM BEST BUYOriginally $149.94 | Save 33%Mirror from lululemonThis isn't just a mirror. It's a cardio class, it's a yoga studio, it's a boxing ring, it's your new personal trainer, and it's so much more. For Cyber Monday, Mirror is on sale for $500 with the code "CYBERMONDAY20"$995.00 FROM MIRROROriginally $1495.00 | Save 33%Hydro Flask 32-Ounce Wide Mouth This bottle has all the hallmark features of a Hydro Flask water bottle — 12-24 hours of temperature retention, powder color coating that won't chip or fade with time, a silicone twist top — with the very convenient wide mouth for easy pouring and drinking.$33.71 FROM HYDRO FLASKOriginally $44.95 | Save 25%Amazon HaloAmazon's Halo fitness tracker can analyze the tone of your voice to help you understand how you sound to others.$54.99 FROM AMAZONOriginally $99.99 | Save 45%LifeSpan TR1200i Folding TreadmillThe TR1200i is the baby sister of our top pick for a folding treadmill, the TR300i, with fewer built-in training programs and fewer fancy features like manual instead of digital buttons. But it's nearly the same size, has the same motor, and the same shock absorption — but for significantly cheaper.$899.00 FROM LIFESPANOriginally $1199.00 | Save 25%Best Black Friday style & beauty dealsDyson Airwrap Complete StylerDyson Airwrap Complete Styler is engineered for multiple hair types and styles. Featuring Coanda air styling and propelled by the Dyson digital motor, users can curl, wave, smooth and dry with no extreme heat.$399.99 FROM NEW EGGOriginally $499.99 | Save 20%$549.00 FROM SEPHORA$549.95 FROM DYSON$549.99 FROM ULTA$549.99 FROM BEST BUY$549.00 FROM AMAZONL.L.Bean Wicked Good Slippers - Men'sThis shearling-lined, leather-bottom slipper is one of the best men's slippers we've ever tried.$75.65 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $89.00 | Save 15%L.L.Bean Wicked Good Shearling-Lined Slides - Women'sThese ridiculously-cozy, shearling-lined slides are easy to slip on and off, and keep your feet toasty around the house.$67.15 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $79.00 | Save 15%L.L.Bean Toddlers' Wicked Good SlippersEverything we love about L.L.Bean's Wicked Good Slippers — but mini. These shearling-lined, leather-soled booties will keep kid's feet, sizes 3-10, toasty around the house and in a stroller.$33.96 FROM L.L.BEANOriginally $39.95 | Save 15%Lululemon Hooded Define JacketA fan-favorite, now with a hood. Between the technical fabric and a do-anything fit, it's easy to see why this one's a hit. Right now you can save up to 50% on this versatile piece, but sizes are selling out quickly. $64.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $128.00 | Save 50%Lululemon Wunder Under High-Rise TightLululemon is, in many ways, the genesis of athleisure, so it's not surprising that the company has an edge in the space.$69.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $98.00 | Save 30%Lululemon Metal Vent Breathe Short SleeveLululemon Metal Vent Breathe Short Sleeve $49.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $78.00 | Save 37%Bombas Women's Gripper Slipper (Sherpa Lined) 2-PackA mix between socks and slippers, Bombas' Gripper Slippers include a cozy sherpa lining and sole grippers to prevent slips. $72.95 FROM BOMBASOriginally $96.00 | Save 24%Columbia Men's Lake 22 Down Hooded JacketThis water-resistant jacket is stocked with 650-fill power down insulation, zippered hand pockets, and a structured hood to keep you zipped up and toasty through any winter weather.$69.98 FROM COLUMBIAOriginally $140.00 | Save 50%Levi's 501 Original Fit JeansA blank canvas for self-expression, featuring the iconic straight fit and signature button fly.$58.80 FROM LEVI'SOriginally $98.00 | Save 40%Adidas Climacool VentoThe Adidas Climacool Vento features a highly breathable mesh upper to help keep your feet cool.$98.00 FROM ADIDASOriginally $140.00 | Save 30%Nike Adapt Auto MaxThe Nike Adapt Auto Max uses advanced technology to automatically form to your foot without laces.$286.63 FROM NIKEOriginally $400.00 | Save 28%Nike Space Hippie 01The Nike Space Hippie 01 is made from 50% recycled materials and features a lightweight, track-inspired look.$77.58 FROM NIKEOriginally $130.00 | Save 40%Fenty Beauty Pro Filt'r Soft Matte Longwear FoundationFor a matte, but not stone-like complexion, try Fenty Pro Filt'r Soft Matte Longwear Foundation.$27.00 FROM SEPHORAOriginally $36.00 | Save 25%$27.00 FROM FENTYOriginally $36.00 | Save 25%Crocs Classic Clog (Unisex)The shoe that really started it all, the Classic Clog is comfortable, breathable, and easy to slip on whenever. With over 20 fun colors to choose from, you can’t go wrong.$39.99 FROM CROCSOriginally $49.99 | Save 20%$27.45 FROM AMAZONDagne Dover Indi Diaper BackpackDagne Dover's Indi Diaper Backpack adds a stylish neutral flair while holding every basic essential.$160.00 FROM DAGNE DOVEROriginally $200.00 | Save 20%Everlane Glove Boot ReKnitEverlane's Glove Boot is a sleek boot made with stretchy, sustainable knit fabric and a walkable heel for all-day comfort. $46.00 FROM EVERLANEOriginally $115.00 | Save 60%OutdoorVoices The Exercise DressOutdoorVoices makes a few of our favorite athleisure items, and they're another example of a company that can balance form and function.$75.00 FROM OUTDOORVOICESOriginally $100.00 | Save 25%Rough Linen St. Barts Linen RobeThe Rough Linen St. Barts Robe is made from top-notch linen that offers a light feel and a cool, casual look.$131.93 FROM ROUGH LINENOriginally $167.00 | Save 21%Kiehl's Since 1851 Avocado Nourishing Hydration MaskWinter is coming, and Kiehls' Avocado Mask is here to provide your skin with hydration all season long. This nourishing treatment infuses your face with avocado and evening primrose oils, offering sumptuous moisture after just one use. Plus, it's green tint is a total throwback. You can save 50% on a jar during Black Friday sale. $22.50 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $45.00 | Save 50%$22.50 FROM MACY'SOriginally $45.00 | Save 50%Giorgio Armani Lip Magnet Liquid LipstickA liquid lip color that gives you a super matte look, but it's so light it feels like a lip stain. The formula is highly pigmented, smudge-resistant, and comfortable on your lips.$19.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $38.00 | Save 50%Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow DefinerThere's a reason why Anastasia Beverly Hills' Brow Definer is a favorite among beauty editors. The angled applicator allows you to sketch on hair-like strokes, providing you with a natural-looking fill every single time. The Definer is on sale during Nordstrom's Black Friday sale, and it's one of the best prices we've seen for this cult-favorite product. You can shop it in every color for just $16. $16.10 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $23.00 | Save 30%Nike Sportswear Essential Fleece PantsMade from soft fleece material, these sweats are perfect for everyday comfort.$48.00 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $60.00 | Save 20%Thread & Supply Double Breasted PeacoatThis peacoat from Thread & Supply is a classic with a twist. The oversized buttons extend up the lapel to the collar, giving you the option to bundle up if necessary. And if you don't love it in black, never fear — you can save 31% on this coat in black, camel, or light gray. $39.90 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $58.00 | Save 31%True & Co. True Body Triangle Convertible Strap BraletteThe convertible straps on this wireless bra can be worn either straight or crisscrossed, and the smooth material appears invisible under clothes.$30.80 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $44.00 | Save 30%Spanx Faux Leather LeggingsMade with the same level of support as its signature shapewear but with a little extra stretch, these leggings are designed to not only make you look great but feel great, too. $78.40 FROM NORDSTROMOriginally $98.00 | Save 20%$78.40 FROM SPANX Originally $98.00 | Save 20%Lululemon Wunder Under High-Rise TightLululemon is, in many ways, the genesis of athleisure, so it's not surprising that the company has an edge in the space.$69.00 FROM LULULEMONOriginally $98.00 | Save 30%Chaps Mens Long Sleeve Button DownMade from an easy-to-care-for cotton blend and a dose of stretch, this men's button-down shirt will keep you looking polished all day.$19.98 FROM WALMARTOriginally $60.00 | Save 67%Nine West Car Coat CardiganThi cozy topper is part coat, part cardigan, and will keep you warm all winter. Save an extra 15% on this cardigan with the code ENJOY15 at checkout.$21.24 FROM KOHL'SOriginally $60.00 | Save 65%Black Friday 2021 FAQSWhat is Black Friday?Black Friday is an annual sales event that traditionally happens at the end of November, marking the beginning of the holiday shopping season. The savings event is one of the biggest shopping holidays of the year — sales are so high that the day can push a retailer into "the black," or solvency.We've been seeing noteworthy price drops for the entire month of November, with all-time lows cropping up more and more as the day gets closer.When is Black Friday 2021?Black Friday is always the Friday after Thanksgiving. This year, Black Friday fell on November 26. However, we're seeing Black Friday-caliber deals continue even after Black Friday.Retailers like Amazon, Walmart, and Best Buy have already kicked off their Black Friday sales, days before the holiday itself.What time did Black Friday start?Technically speaking, Black Friday started at 12:00 a.m. local time on November 26 for online retailers. However, Black Friday sales started whenever each retailer decided their deals will go live.A handful of retailers, like Walmart and Amazon, started early and have extended sales past Black Friday.What time do stores open on Black Friday weekend?Here are the opening times for the major retailers we're tracking throughout Black Friday weekend. Keep in mind that you can shop all the retailers below, plus others like Amazon, around the clock online.Apple: Varies by store, check store hours here.Bed Bath & Beyond: 6 a.m.Best Buy: 5 a.m.Dick's Sporting Goods: 5 a.m.The Home Depot: 6 a.m.Kohl's: 5 a.m.Lowe's: 6 a.m.Macy's: 6 a.m.Nordstrom and Nordstrom Rack: Varies by store, check store hours here.Sephora: Varies by store, check store hours here.Target: 7 a.m.Ulta Beauty: 6 a.m.Walmart: 5 a.m.How long do Black Friday sales last?Don't be fooled by the name that suggests Black Friday is a single day. It's most definitely not. It's more like a shopping season that begins in early November. There are still Black Friday deals available right now.What should you buy on Black Friday?Since it falls a few weeks before the gift-giving season, Black Friday provides excellent opportunities to buy and save on all your holiday gifts before the last-minute rush. It's nearly guaranteed that you'll get great value for your money on certain products during Black Friday weekend — but some items tend to see better discounts at other times of the year. If you go in knowing what you're looking for, you're less likely to be ripped off by a fancy-looking coupon or to spend money on products you don't need.Shoppers saw tons of great deals — including so-called "doorbusters" — online before and early on in Black Friday. During the event, prices drop to all-time lows, often beating out prices we see over the course of the year. The sale covers every product category: tech, home and kitchen, fashion, and smart home. This Black Friday, we've seen similar offers to the ones we saw on Amazon Prime Day, except more wide-ranging.We recommend focusing on the following product categories if you want the best deals: TVsSmart home devicesGaming consoles and video gamesKitchen appliancesHistorically, Black Friday has been a great time to purchase big-ticket electronics — especially larger TVs. Whether you're looking for a top-of-the-line Samsung set or LG OLED, or a budget-friendly TCL or Hisense model, Black Friday weekend still has several deals.Much like Amazon Prime Day, we saw tons of discounts on smart home products last Black Friday. Amazon Echo products dropped to their lowest prices ever, plus we saw several discounts and bundles on Google's recently released products.This Black Friday we have seen discounts on the latest Xbox and Playstation games. While we didn't see any markdowns on new consoles last year, we did see a few bundles crop up and we've seen more of them in 2021. If you're looking for a kitchen upgrade, Black Friday is a great time to shop. We saw big discounts on Instant Pot pressure cookers, KitchenAid appliances, pots and pans, plus everything else you'll want for the upcoming holiday season.Of course, the deals found during Black Friday are incredibly wide-ranging. There have also been several deals on diapers, toilet paper, and other household essentials.Is Black Friday or Cyber Monday better?It's complicated, and it matters less every year.For those unfamiliar, Cyber Monday traditionally comes three days after Black Friday, on Monday. However, we've seen Black Friday and Cyber Monday slowly merge and expand to a weeklong, or even a month-long affair. Different products receive better discounts on each day, and the deals that each retailer offers will vary.A good rule of thumb to follow: If you think you see a good deal, (e.g., one we recommend) create the order as soon as possible. While you can always cancel or return a product, it's impossible to take advantage of an inactive, or expired deal.Suppose you purchase a discounted product during Black Friday and see a more significant markdown at another retailer come Cyber Monday. Don't sweat it.You can ask the original storefront to match the price (some automatically refund you the difference), or you can return or cancel the order, then place a new order with a better price. Some orders won't even ship during the weekend, which makes it easy to cancel orders.For those who can shop in-person during Black Friday weekend, we've found that it's better to shop that way in these situations:For expensive productsFor major storesFor this year's productsWhat stores have Black Friday deals still? Outside of a few notable exceptions like REI, nearly every major retailer and direct-to-consumer company is offering markdowns during the event. We've seen deals from Walmart, Best Buy, Dell, Amazon, Adorama, Lowe's, The Home Depot, and more.As we do every Black Friday, we are sifting through all of the offers and rounding up the best deals from your favorite retailers.Are there be Black Friday shipping delays?Shipping delays and major shopping holidays go hand in hand, and this year is no exception. Supply chain issues are cropping up, but they probably won't ruin your Christmas. To be safe, try buying your gifts as early as possible to avoid stock issues. With so many deals rolling out early, that's easier than ever.When did Black Friday ads come out?Black Friday ad scans are now available, including Walmart, Kohl's, Macy's, Amazon, and Target. For the full list of available ads, check out the catalog compiled on BlackFriday.com.Best Black Friday Deals we saw last yearLast year, we rounded up the best Black Friday deals we could find. Some of the best deals we found discounted many products over 50% with hundreds of dollars in savings. Here are some of the best markdowns we saw last year. iRobot Roomba 675 robot vacuum was $179 on Amazon, originally $229.LG 75" 80 Series smart webOS TV was $999 at Best Buy, originally $1,499.Insignia 24-inch Fire TV was $100 from Amazon, originally $170.Lenovo smart clock was $35 from Best Buy, originally $80.Samsung 1TB internal SSD was $100 from Walmart, originally $280.How we select the best Black Friday dealsWe only choose products that meet our high standard of coverage and that we've either used ourselves or researched carefully.We'll compare the prices among top retailers such as Amazon, Best Buy, Target, and Walmart and include only the deals that are better than all others offered (not including promotional discounts that come from using certain credit cards). All deals will be at least 20% off, with the occasional exception for products that are rarely discounted or provide an outsize value.Read more about how the Insider Reviews team evaluates deals and why you should trust us.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytNov 27th, 2021

Hackman, Square Mile head to Scotland for latest studio acquisition

Hackman Capital Partners and partner Square Mile Capital Management, announced the purchase of Wardpark Film and Television Studios, Scotland’s preeminent studio campus, located in Cumbernauld, Scotland. The transaction is the latest addition to a portfolio of the studio assets owned by the partners, in addition to their studio operating and... The post Hackman, Square Mile head to Scotland for latest studio acquisition appeared first on Real Estate Weekly. Hackman Capital Partners and partner Square Mile Capital Management, announced the purchase of Wardpark Film and Television Studios, Scotland’s preeminent studio campus, located in Cumbernauld, Scotland. The transaction is the latest addition to a portfolio of the studio assets owned by the partners, in addition to their studio operating and services affiliate, The MBS Group, a leader in studio services, equipment and technology.  The Wardpark staff will remain unchanged. The largest and only full-service studio in Scotland, Wardpark is centrally-located, approximately 20 minutes by car to either Glasgow or Edinburgh. The 14-acre campus offers approximately 200,000 s/f of studio space, including five sound stages, production offices, workshops, an external green screen area and ample parking. The studio is currently home to the sixth season of the hit TV series Outlander, produced by Sony Pictures Television and Left Bank Pictures for Starz. All previous seasons have also been filmed at the campus. “We’re thrilled to be adding Wardpark Film and Television Studios to our distinguished portfolio and excited to be entering the Scottish production market,” said Michael Hackman, Founder and CEO of Hackman Capital Partners. “Wardpark has been a strong catalyst for growth in the country’s creative sector, and Scotland has become an important filming destination for international content creators, thanks in part to its lush landscape and scenery and competitive tax credits, as well as its top talent pool.” Square Mile Capital CEO Craig Solomon added, “This acquisition of Wardpark Studios will prove to be a great addition to our partnership’s ownership and operating  platform of world-class studio properties. We look forward to participating in, and contributing to the further growth of the Scottish entertainment industry, as the global demand for high-quality film and TV content shows no sign of slowing.” Chairman and CEO of Wardpark Studios, Terry Thomson, said, “The creation of Wardpark Studios from a dormant industrial property to a best-in-class studio was not the work of one man, and I’d like to recognise the assistance of Left Bank Pictures; David Brown, my mentor and Producer of the first five seasons of Outlander; David Hodgkinson and the team at HKSD; and the support and encouragement of Isabel Davis of Creative Scotland. We are delighted to have Hackman Capital Partners and The MBS Group make their first venture into Scotland. Their experience in the film and television industry and their commitment to Scotland will ensure that Wardpark Studios continues to develop and provide secure employment for years to come.” “Scotland has a long history as a location for filmmaking, and todays’ announcement cements my ambition to further establish Scotland as one of the major global hubs for the production of film and high-end TV drama. The demand is unstoppable, but we have to compete in a global market to attract inward productions, and bringing HCP and MBS on board is the first step in the further growth of the industry in Scotland. It is my intention to now expand our investments in the Scottish screen sector in full collaboration with HCP and The MBS Group,” added Thomson. Jason Hariton, Chief Real Estate Officer of The MBS Group, said, “We are grateful for the opportunity to build upon Terry and his team’s vision, driving the growth of this great studio and investing in our production technology and equipment business throughout Scotland. Despite the pandemic, a record £5.9bn was spent in the UK on high-end film and TV productions this year – nearly doubling over the last five years – and the Scottish Government is working hard to capitalize on the sector’s growth, by bolstering inward investment with the aim to add 30,000 new creative industries jobs over the next five years. We are proud to now play a key part in this mission.” Scottish Cabinet Secretary for the Constitution, External Affairs and Culture, Angus Robertson, said, “This excellent news confirms the growing confidence in Scotland as a world-class, film- and TV-making destination. Wardpark Film and Television Studios play an important role in our vibrant and fast-growing screen industry, and Hackman Capital Partners and The MBS Group will further promote this first-class production facility to the international market.  “Scotland’s studios, including Wardpark, offer excellent training and apprenticeship opportunities to the many young people who are attracted to careers in production. Our investment in training through Screen Scotland and Skills Development Scotland continues to build up our reputation for world-class creative, technical and craft talent. We are committed to developing our screen infrastructure to capitalise on the unprecedented interest in bringing international productions to Scotland and to grow a sustainable creative economy,” added Robertson. Executive Director of Screen Scotland, Isabel Davis, said, “Wardpark Studios has led the surge in production from Scotland for many years now and remains at the forefront.  Its success is synonymous with local talent at every level, from the visionary entrepreneurship of Terry Thomson, to the world-class design of the studio itself, and the hundreds of highly skilled people who have worked on Outlander across six seasons. It has been, from the start, a phenomenal training ground for scores of new entrants to the valuable and fast-growing Scottish screen sector. “It’s great to see that Terry’s success story has caught the attention of a global player and we look forward to working with the Hackman Capital Partners, The MBS Group and the Wardpark team in pursuit of further growth for the Scottish film and TV industry,” Davis added. The post Hackman, Square Mile head to Scotland for latest studio acquisition appeared first on Real Estate Weekly......»»

Category: realestateSource: realestateweeklyNov 24th, 2021

Crypto Company Creates Architecture For A Self-Sovereign Economy

Crypto Company Creates Architecture For A Self-Sovereign Economy Authored by Joakim Book via BitcoinMagazine.com, In a moment of balance and strength, I felt my muscles stiffen, the pressure against my right triceps increasing. Flirting with gravity, I engaged my core like I had a hundred times before, raised my hips a little higher, and started angling my upper body towards my friend. I looked at him with a labored gaze before I remembered my many teachers' endless insistence that I smile. With equal part astonishment and equal part disbelief, he muttered that he could never possibly do that: "That's impossible. You are just so flexible!" The great mistake in that sentence is the word “are”: it took me five years to reach that yoga pose, and only in the last 12 months or so was I strong enough to finally experiment with the arm balance we were exploring. There was no static "are" involved, no fixed description that somehow belonged to my being or inscribed in my genome. Combining the balance, the strength, the flexibility, and the concentration required to hold my body in place was no mere accident or circumstance. For hours on end, day after day, week after week, I had put my money where my mouth was – or rather, body where my yoga mat was – and endured. I had put in the work that over time resulted in a body capable and strong enough to hold a complicated arm balance. What the Bitcoin network’s proof-of-work so neatly captures about reality is that nothing valuable in our world comes from nothing; nothing worth having can be had by the waving of magic wands. You must put real-world resources behind the computer network that powers bitcoin, for a randomized yet pre-programmed chance at receiving some new coins. “Let there be light,” said God allegedly – and nobody else ever. This isn’t just true in the ethereal world of digital money, but in probably every endeavor worth doing. Wherever I look these days, I see proof-of-work. The skills that people have acquired are their proof-of-work – long arduous hours before a computer coding, in a simulator trying to fly an airplane, in a baking hot sun laying bricks upon bricks, or in apprenticeships or training that teach you how to safely lay electrical wires or perform open-heart surgery. The humongous podcast catalogues that this or that podcaster has, or the astonishing output that certain writers have run up, are proof-of-work. The relationships people have cultivated, with their friends and families and lovers, are proof-of-work. All of them included different ingredients, came into existence in different ways and with different starting points, but all required nurturing to flourish. They exist, and flourish, because their participants have put work into them. All of us are given very different starting points in life, and sometimes another’s raw talents seem altogether unfair. That guy had a head start; this dude lucked out; that family had financial resources; those people had better genes. Often, we see ourselves as uniquely disadvantaged compared to someone else or some ideal life we might imagine that others lead. Even so, very few people can succeed with raw talent or ability alone: even the most talented basketball player needs hours and hours on that court; the baseball batter with the most perfect build needs to hone that hitting ability into perfection. Nobody gets anything for free, not even the Bitcoiners who stumbled onto the world’s best performing asset way before it was cool. They faced challenges of their own that us latecomers never had to: they doubted the entire project, more than once – every time something bad happened or their underdeveloped markets dropped 80%. They had to learn on their own, rather than follow podcasters and how-to guides for everything. They had to invent, circumvent, or build the technical and financial infrastructure that the rest of us take for granted today. Yes, the ones who grasped the importance of bitcoin in the early days, and put in the mental and practical work required, have been richly rewarded – but they also faced challenges to their diamond hands that the rest of us could hardly even imagine. Deep friendships don’t drop from the sky, but require long and hard work. Beyond the youthful relations that bloom during intense summers or first semesters at college, the enduring friendships we grown-ups have nurtured remain precisely because we maintain them. With our best friends, we've gone through rough patches, dealt with hard times, shared accomplishments, and put in the hours needed when either they wanted it or we needed it. Soul mates, lifelong companions, and other idealized descriptions of love require even higher amounts of devotion and negotiation. They take time to develop, and not just days and weeks and years – but time spent together, exploring, improving, attempting, and yes, negotiating. Successful relationships are proof-of-work. It’s hard to carve out an intimate life with another person, harder the more stressors of politics, societal divides, and financial hardships surround them. One does not simply swipe right a few times and effortlessly find their perfect life partner: however well-matched you are, it takes work – time, attention, commitment, vulnerability, and plenty of sacrifices. It’s the proof-of-work that matters, not the proof-of-accident or fleeting attraction. There is but one proof-of-steak I endorse in my life – the pictures of my carnivore(-ish) meals that I send, not to Instagram as my fellow millennials might have, but to my shitcoiner friends (always with a comment about staking). And even this proof-of-steak is technically proof-of-work, because you need to source it, earn it, make it, and most importantly: commit to it before it starts building you into the stronger human being for which steak is intended. My generation was raised, intentionally or not, with the opposite mentality – a proof-of-stake mentality, where our mere existence conveyed rights, benefits, and well-being. Every one of us spoiled snowflakes were unique and perfect the way we were, and now are, and tomorrow will be. Whatever we feel is real, whatever delusion we have incorporated lately must be unquestioningly accepted by everyone else. We cannot be exposed to any sort of risk, in case they traumatize us or hurt our precious feelings; horrific ideas of other people cannot be allowed in our midst. It’s no surprise that a generation of proof-of-stake later, we're all coddled and compliant, naive and credulous, unhealthy and stupid. It's no wonder we trust our monetary overlords more so than our own interactions with the world: the top stakers in our fiat proof-of-stake system say that something is, then surely who am I to object? EVERYONE GETS THE BITCOIN PRICE THEY DESERVE Everything important in life requires you to focus, to work diligently toward the thing you desire. You will face set-backs; others will do better than you; and you will wonder why on Earth you even try. Before you actually get around to pressing that buy button, do that bitcoin-paying gig, or mine those first sats, you get nothing. Everything in the world requires work – physical, mental, or financial. What we are isn’t fixed, and at the bottom of bitcoin’s promise to the world lies the promise that work rewards and discipline matters. Everyone gets bitcoin when they’re ready, or intellectually open to it; everyone thus gets the bitcoin price and allocation they deserve. You don’t get things for nothing; You must put in the work before you reap the rewards. Bitcoin teaches us that. Until very recently in our societies, reality taught us that too. In time, perhaps it can once more. Tyler Durden Thu, 11/18/2021 - 20:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 18th, 2021

Space technology can help countries disproportionately impacted by climate change get the help they need

Space technology provides data that Small Island Developing States (SIDS) can use to demonstrate the impact of climate change on their populations. The CommonSensing project will help Fiji, Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands build resilience to the effects of climate change, and provide evidence for financing. Astronaut Tim Peake attends attends 'In conversation: The science behind Cop' during COP26 Jane Barlow/PA Images via Getty Images At COP26, a collaboration in the form of the CommonSensing project urges us to look to space for climate change solutions. The project will help Fiji, Vanuatu, and the Solomon Islands build resilience to the effects of climate change, and provide evidence for financing. Using satellite technology may be essential in Small Island Developing States' efforts to mitigate the risks of climate change, ensure food security, and adapt to climate crises. Climate change innovation must transcend the boundaries of planet earth itself. Or so advocate astronauts, space agencies, and satellite technologists at Glasgow's COP26 climate summit, where the CommonSensing solution - an international project for building climate resilience through satellite remote sensing technology - is being showcased.Space has been co-opted as the playground of billionaires such as Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk. But those working within the sector argue it is time for a perspective shift - technology and, specifically satellite data, is brimming with potential in aiding humanitarian crises, as well as climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts."When you look down on the planet, you see signs of both the cause and effect of climate change," explained British astronaut Tim Peake, speaking at COP26. From aerial views of North American wildfires and Amazon deforestation to smog build-up above the Himalayas, Peake has seen it all. But space, he says, will also provide solutions in the form of data that is needed for informed decision-making. "We haven't got the time or money to get it wrong," he says.Afghanistan, Nigeria, Thailand, and Malawi, are all among those already leveraging satellites to tackle issues of food insecurity. But using space to combat climate change is relatively new terrain, though one gaining in traction; in May, NASA reinvigorated its role as informing US Climate policy; climate-related mission, TRUTHS, has just been launched in the UK. Half of all "essential climate variables" - empirical data supporting climate science and predicting future change - are collected from space. But until now, this data has had an accessibility problem. The CommonSensing solution, bringing together the United Nations Satellite Centre (UNOSAT), Satellite Applications Catapult, the Commonwealth Secretariat, Devex, the United Kingdom's Met Office, The University of Portsmouth, Sensonomic, and Spatial Days, wants to change this.Specifically, the coalition will be working with Small Island Developing States (SIDS). Though on the frontlines of the climate crisis, SIDS contribute least to greenhouse gas emissions and have limited access to crucial, climate-related data.By focusing on Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands and Fiji, all with populations living just five meters above sea level, the CommonSensing solution aims to improve food security, disaster response, and track the effects of climate change."We use geospatial technologies, typically satellite imagery, to create resilience to climate change," says Einar Bjørgo, UNOSAT Director. "Combining it with information like population distribution and vulnerabilities to climate hazards, which helps governments develop short-term tools to help with disaster preparedness, but also long-term initiatives that open access to climate funds."Each country is also receiving technical training in interpreting satellite data, and climate finance advisors will be embedded within governments. To receive financing, developing countries must often prove the effects of climate change through data reporting. But, as UNOSAT technical expert for Fiji, Lebaiatelait Guanavinaka, puts it, "There's a lack of accessible, relevant data robustly supporting evidence-based proposals." This data is crucial for demystifying investment criteria, she says.In Fiji, projects are already underway. Seawall interventions protect against water rising and coastal erosion, seedlings are distributed to enhance food security efforts, and coral biodiversity is safeguarded through mangrove planting."As a last resort, at-risk communities are flagged for relocation," says Guanavinaka. Satellite data can directly assist with these on-the-ground projects, she adds. "We mapped mangroves covering five islands and shared the data and methodology with the Ministry of Forest and Ministry of Lands so they can replicate the same for the smaller islands." Covid-19 has slowed progress, but the teams remain optimistic. "It's important to have people from the governments of SIDS sitting with us over time," says Bjørgo. "We are sharing data among each organization, and involving those on the ground." This kind of collaboration, he adds, is infinitely useful in advancing the science and funding that will combat climate change.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 10th, 2021

Gowanus locals reach deal that paves way for rezoning

Council Members Brad Lander and Stephen Levin, leaders of Brooklyn Community Board 6, and members of the Gowanus Neighborhood Coalition for Justice, announced this morning that they have reached consensus with the de Blasio Administration on “Points of Agreement” (POA) that ensure the Gowanus Neighborhood Rezoning will meet community goals.... The post Gowanus locals reach deal that paves way for rezoning appeared first on Real Estate Weekly. Council Members Brad Lander and Stephen Levin, leaders of Brooklyn Community Board 6, and members of the Gowanus Neighborhood Coalition for Justice, announced this morning that they have reached consensus with the de Blasio Administration on “Points of Agreement” (POA) that ensure the Gowanus Neighborhood Rezoning will meet community goals. The Gowanus Neighborhood Rezoning, the largest under the de Blasio Administration, will enable the construction of approximately 8,000 new housing units, nearly 3,000 of them affordable to low- and moderate-income families in a mixed-use, mixed-income neighborhood around a remediated and revitalized Gowanus Canal. The rezoning includes the most stringent affordability and sustainability requirements of any previous neighborhood rezoning. The “Points of Agreement” between City Hall and the Council Members, the result of extensive community organizing and public engagement, provides that every one of the 1,662 units in NYCHA’s Gowanus Houses and Wyckoff Gardens developments will receive a comprehensive interior modernization estimated at $200 million. The City will invest hundreds of millions more in flooding and stormwater infrastructure, parks, schools, and workforce development, and substantial funding commitments for renovations at the Pacific Branch Library ($14.7 million) and the Old Stone House ($10.95 million).  Community conversations about the future of the neighborhood have been active for nearly a decade, including the “Bridging Gowanus” community planning process convened by Council Member Lander’s office in 2013, that worked to identify shared principles for any development in the area. The Department of City Planning commenced its community engagement in 2016 with five working groups open to all community members and scores of public meetings, attended by thousands of residents and stakeholders. The Gowanus Neighborhood Coalition for Justice, a coalition of tenants, homeowners, public housing residents, small business owners, artists, environmentalists, and affordable housing advocates, organized hundreds of residents to elevate the voices of community members usually left out of the City’s planning processes. GNCJ developed a broad community platform, including three key demands that today’s Points of Agreement address: Upfront funding to meet the capital needs of the public housing in the Gowanus neighborhood, with oversight by NYCHA residents.POA commitment: The City will fund comprehensive in-unit renovations of all apartments at Gowanus Houses (1,134 units) and Wyckoff Houses (528 units) at an estimated cost of $200m. This work includes replacement of kitchens, bathrooms, plumbing, electrical, flooring, interior doors, and lighting fixtures. The City has additionally committed to regular reporting and consultation with residents through the construction process to oversee commitments and protect tenant rights. The City will also fulfill previous commitment to renovate and reopen the Wyckoff Gardens and Gowanus Houses community centers.Mandate “net-zero” combined sewage overflow (CSO) from new construction created as a result of the rezoning.POA commitment: In order to ensure that new development does not pollute the Gowanus Canal, the City has adopted the stringent new 2021 Unified Stormwater Rule that will go into effect before any construction begins. The rule increases on-site requirements for stormwater detention and introduces new retention requirements, which will reduce CSO volumes and events, and help address localized flooding. The City is also committing to a $174 million upgrade to sewer infrastructure to address long-standing flooding along 4th Avenue, which is especially severe at the intersection of Carroll Street.   Gowanus Rezoning Oversight Task Force to monitor compliance with public and private commitments.POA commitment: To ensure compliance with public and private commitments, the agreement includes commitments by all relevant City agencies to regular reporting as well as senior agency staff participation in a Community Oversight Task Force dedicated to monitoring rezoning-related commitments. The Task Force will be supported by an independent facilitator, and include representation from elected officials, CB6, NYCHA residents and leaders, and core community organizations and stakeholders.  On June 3, 2021, Community Board 6 held a highly-attended, indoor/outdoor, hybrid in-person and online public hearing as part of the Uniform Land Use Review Process (with additional opportunities for public input ordered by Judge Katherine Levine pursuant to a lawsuit). Out of that hearing, CB6 voted “Yes with Modifications,” including an extensive set of recommendations that are reflected in today’s agreement. Borough President Eric Adams also recommended to approve the rezoning with modifications, and stood with public housing residents, GNCJ members, and the Council Member to insist on adequate funding for public housing. The Gowanus Neighborhood Rezoning is the first MIH neighborhood rezoning in a whiter, wealthier neighborhood. For the first time ever, a Racial Impact Study was completed providing strong evidence that the plan will result in a more racially and economically inclusive neighborhood.  In addition to historic investments in public housing, stormwater retention, and flood readiness, the Gowanus Neighborhood Rezoning includes:  Nearly 3,000 units of affordable housing, including a commitment to 100% affordability on the City-owned Public Place site. The plan for Gowanus Green includes approximately 950 units priced for extremely low to low income tenants and homeownership opportunities for moderate income families, as well as a new 1.5 acre park and space for a potential new school. The Gowanus Green site will be extensively remediated, under the supervision of the EPA, NYS DEC, and NYC DEP. The EPA has stated that it is feasible for the site to be cleaned up to safely allow for these uses.On sites, the rezoning will require either Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH) Option 1, which requires 25% of units affordable to households at or below 60% of AMI, with 10% of units affordable to households at or below 40% of AMI; or the “deep affordability” MIH option of 20% of units affordable to households at our below 40% of AMI ($43,000 for a family of 3). This is anticipated to generate approximately 2000 affordable units.Investments in new open space, including a resilient waterfront esplanade along the Gowanus Canal. The City has committed to renovations, following meaningful community engagement, at the new Gowanus Green public park and Boerum Park, and Thomas Greene Park. It has committed to build new public spaces on the Salt Lot and the Head End CSO site, following construction of each Superfund-mandated CSO tank, the Bond Street Street-End and at “Transit Plaza” along the Canal by the Smith/9th subway station. Canal developers will be required to build and maintain a new 40-foot public esplanade, following detailed guidelines to ensure continuity and public access between sites, and designed for flood resiliency through the year 2100.Environmental requirements on new development. In addition to the waterfront esplanade and new stormwater management requirements, all new buildings must: Dedicate 100% of their rooftop area to solar, wind, or green infrastructure pursuant to City legislation from 2019. Meet city flood elevation standards, determined on a site-by-site basis, which exceed FEMA standards. Complete remediation of any contamination indicated by the new e-designation, with oversight by the City and State. Innovative new zoning tools to address infrastructure needs. To ensure local school capacity can accommodate neighborhood growth, on certain large sites around the canal, developers can exempt floor area leased to NYC School Construction Authority for the development of new public schools as new seat-need comes online.The plan includes an easement requirement and new citywide transit bonus available for developers along 4th Avenue in exchange for transit improvements. Historic preservation and tools to keep Gowanus creative and mixed-use.  Five historic buildings were designated as landmarks during the rezoning process, including the Old American Can Factory and Powerhouse Arts.Mid-block areas will remain zoned for industrial and commercial use, with modest additional development rights that do not allow for hotels or self-storage. The new “Gowanus Mix” use group codified in zoning will generate over 300,000 square feet dedicated space for light manufacturing, arts, and non-profits.Community, social service, and workforce development resources.City Hall will expand the MAP (Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety) initiative to Gowanus Houses and Wyckoff Gardens, an investment of approximately $2 million annually. MAP brings together neighborhood residents and government agencies to reduce crime. Strategies including youth development and employment, conflict mediation, sports and arts programs aim to address concentrated disadvantage and physical disorder and promote neighborhood cohesion and strong citywide networks.Investments of approximately $1 million annually in workforce development for local residents, with a focus on NYCHA residents, including dedicated funding for industrial job training.Commitments to street safety improvements at high-crash intersections and a comprehensive traffic study of 3rd avenue and the IBZ to address road safety and truck circulation issues. The City will provide over $10 million for new curb extensions and widened sidewalks, bioswales and other green infrastructure, and street furniture such as benches, wayfinding signs, bike racks, and street trees.Tenant protections including an expanded Certificate of No Harassment program (recently adopted citywide through legislation sponsored by Council Member Lander), resources for tenant outreach, and a tailored rezoning that protects rent-stabilized units.  The full Points of Agreement document will be available at the City Council’s Zoning Subcommittee meeting prior to the vote today. In addition to the public commitments in the rezoning plan, developers in Gowanus have committed to additional affordability and use restrictions to preserve the industrial and arts character of the neighborhood. Affordable artists studios: 10 property owners of large sites along the Canal and bordering Thomas Greene Park have committed to enter an agreement with Arts Gowanus to provide over 150 permanently-affordable artist studios in new developments. Arts Gowanus will match eligible artists with available spaces. A portion of the studios will be available for low-income artists, including NYCHA residents, to rent at a more deeply reduced rate. As a part of the agreement, Arts Gowanus will occupy and manage a Gowanus Community Arts Center, including a gallery. Parks Improvement District: Ten developers have committed to cooperate in the formation of a Gowanus Waterfront Business Improvement District focused on stewardship, access, and public programming of open spaces, especially the new waterfront esplanade along the canal. This entity will provide maintenance, public programming, technical assistance, and environmental and ecological advocacy. The steering committee is expected to hold its first meeting in December 2021, and will flesh out details and develop support with input from community members and stakeholders.  All told, the Gowanus Rezoning’s 3,000 new units of permanently affordable housing, a continuous public esplanade along the waterfront, climate-resilient buildings and landscaping, and use restrictions to preserve arts and industry are among the most aggressive, forward-looking set of requirements ever imposed on developers in the United States.  “Today’s agreement shows that community-led, inclusive, sustainable growth is possible. After nearly a decade of conversations among neighbors, and in partnership with the Department of City Planning and City Hall, this community has created one of the best models for inclusive growth anywhere, with strong attention to equity and affordability, and mindful of the environmental history and future of this area. Debates about development are not easy, but I am truly proud of the way we’ve engaged them here. Together, we are setting the stage for a more diverse, more sustainable, thriving, creative neighborhood that will welcome new residents while improving and preserving the ability of public housing residents, artists, small businesses, and neighbors to continue to thrive here for generations to come,” said Council Member Brad Lander. “The Gowanus Rezoning will be a milestone in land use actions in New York City,” said Council Member Stephen Levin.  “Discussions about the Gowanus neighborhood, one of the most vibrant and historic in Brooklyn, have been ongoing for decades. And today we reach a turning point where those discussions have resulted in action. This rezoning will result in not only new housing including a substantial increase in affordable units, but unprecedented investments in our public housing, improvements in the sewer systems and monitoring of our combined sewer overflows, preservation of manufacturing and light industry, and a commitment to protect our artists and public spaces.  There are so many people that helped bring us here but first and foremost I want to thank the residents of Wyckoff Gardens and GowanusHouse and the members of the Gowanus Neighborhood Coalition for Justice. They provide a guide to making sure we are always focused on what is most important. And of course thanks to all the staff and Councilmember Lander who attended more meetings then we can count in the name of true engagement. This process only begins here and it is up to the future elected officials to ensure that all the promises are met but we couldn’t have given them a better place to start.” The post Gowanus locals reach deal that paves way for rezoning appeared first on Real Estate Weekly......»»

Category: realestateSource: realestateweeklyNov 10th, 2021

The 7 best places to buy workout clothes for men

Wearing the right apparel makes working out a more enjoyable and comfortable experience. Here are the best places to shop for men's workout clothes. VRST; Rhone; Alyssa Powell/Insider Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky A pair of well-fitting running shorts or a moisture-wicking top helps you feel more comfortable working out. How you work out dictates what you should wear, too - i.e. running shorts for runners, stretch fabrics for lifting, etc. Below, we've rounded up the best places to shop for workout clothes, including gear from Rhone, Janji, and Ten Thousand. Performing your best while working out starts with wearing the right kind of apparel. This means ditching those gym shorts you've had since high school and throwing on a sweat-wicking shirt instead of something made of cotton.It's also important to think about how you prefer to work out, which greatly influences what you should wear. For instance, runners may opt for a lightweight and quick-drying pair of shorts while someone who strength-trains benefits best from a shirt comprised of stretch fabric. In other words, you get far more from a workout when you're comfortable.As the fitness editor for the Insider Reviews team, I'm constantly sweat-testing whatever I can to find the best workout clothes worth wearing - and there's a lot of it. Be it the functional running apparel from a brand like Janji or Ten Thousand's versatile training gear, the options are many.Below, I've listed my seven favorite places to shop for men's workout clothes, with each brand geared toward a specific type of workout type or preference. You'll also find answers to a few FAQs, as well as insight into how I go about testing the workout clothing featured, at the bottom of this guide. The best places to shop for men's workout clothesBest overall: Ten ThousandBest for runners: JanjiBest for odor-resistant: Rhone Best versatile clothing: HyleteBest on a budget: VRST from Dick's Sporting GoodsBest athleisure: VuoriBest for multi-sport training: NoBull Best workout clothes for men overall Ten Thousand So many fitness brands say their apparel is "tested by athletes" but Ten Thousand backs it up with a large roster of athletes located all over the country that put its gear through everything from yoga and HIIT to Crossfit and powerlifting.Pros: Lightweight, comfortable workout gear that's built for a wide range of workouts and use casesCons: Pockets can be too small to hold much else besides keys or credit cards, sizing in the shirt can run smallTo say Ten Thousand puts its workout clothes through its paces is an understatement — the brand quite literally pushes its gear to the limit by throwing it on wear-testers that do just about any form of exercise imaginable. There's HIIT and powerlifting, strength training and functional fitness, and, of course, running. They even throw a little yoga in the mix to show off its comfort and versatility. But just because there's a large variety in the types of workouts the gear can handle doesn't mean there's page after page of a specific short or top fit for an exact routine. Quite the opposite, actually, and simplicity in what it offers is what makes Ten Thousand even more appealing.The brand's lineup is simple yet effective. There's a varied lineup of shorts that range from pairs designed for running or weight lifting to others intended for martial arts fighters. Its shirts feature a similar variety, too; there are tank tops, shirts made with merino, standard moisture-wicking, quick-dry options, and even a rash guard. After spending many a workout decked out in Ten Thousand's gear, the performance of each piece is as impressive as its field testing. No matter what I chose to do, the apparel felt comfortable and functional and was always fit to hold up to whatever I threw at it. Maybe I'd wear the Tactical Short for a 20-mile bike ride after doing a resistance band workout in my apartment. Perhaps it was a 45-minute yoga session followed by a quick jog around my neighborhood in the Lightweight Shirt. Regardless of what it was, the gear held up and never felt out of place.Even the prices aren't shocking to stomach. The shorts range from $58 up to $72 while the tees are in the $50 range (which is what you should expect to pay for premium workout apparel). Interval Short (small)Versatile Shirt (small)Lightweight Shirt (small) Best men's workout clothes for runners Janji Janji's running gear is functional, comfortable, and built to hold up no matter if you're doing a casual 5K or training for a marathon.Pros: High-quality apparel for runners, most pieces feature quick-drying, moisture-wicking fabric, and are extremely comfortableCons: Can be spendy depending on the pieceAttaching superlative terms to workout gear often comes down to personal preference (and moderate exaggeration) but in the case of Janji, and the brand's extremely high-quality running clothes, calling it the best isn't an overstatement — it legitimately makes some of the finest gear on the market.From running shorts and caps to tees, tanks, and weather-resistant tops, Janji covers the running basics in its own signature style. A few of my favorite pieces right now are its Runterra Bio Long Sleeve running shirt and the Thermal Zephyr Runner Jacket. Both have become staples in my running wardrobe of late (as the weather gets a bit colder) and are yet another impressive release from Janji. The jacket, specifically, is among the best apparel I've tested from the brand, too. It comes in a bright orange color which is great for low light runs, and its so warm without being too heavy. I've been running in Janji gear for some time now and keep coming back to it no matter the season. Its shorts are extremely comfortable, no matter how many miles I intend to run, and its tops and caps keep me protected and cool. The brand's selection of fun prints is a nice added touch, too.AFO Middle Shorts (Men's) (small)Runterra Bio Long Sleeve (small)Thermal Zephyr Runner Jacket (small) Best odor-resistant workout clothes for men Rhone/Facebook It's all about the GoldFusion technology with Rhone, which makes good on its promise to keep you stink-free.Pros: Stink-free technology, comfortable fabric, and great fit  Cons: Some reviewers note that the shirts can be a bit longer than anticipatedRhone has long been one of our favorite makers of men's workout gear. Much of it is indeed due to the company's GoldFusion technology, a proprietary, eco-friendly fabric treatment that leverages real gold particles to help fabrics dry up to three times faster. In addition, it's UV protective and promises to permanently control odor.Two new additions to the Rhone GoldFusion line include the 7-inch Swift Lined short and the Swift Tank. The shorts, meant for running, feature a perforated venting system for cooling, as well as two side zipper pockets to hold essentials during a jog. Plus, a soft performance liner promises exceptional fit.As for the Swift Tank, this workout shirt features a quick-drying, odor-repelling perforated fabric that keeps you cool as you break a sweat. Of course, Rhone also has pieces that don't necessarily have precious metals embedded into them but are no less effective at getting the job done. Take, for instance, the new Mako Unlined short. Available in both 7- and 9-inch lengths, this short is made of lightweight, four-way stretch fabric with plenty of pockets so you can wear them at the gym or anywhere else, too.Lined Versatility Short (7-inch) (small)Swift Short Sleeve (small)Reign Classic Short Sleeve (small) Best versatile workout clothes for men Hylete Hylete's line of apparel can be used for almost any kind of workout; boxing, running, lifting weights, you name it. Its gear is smartly designed, comfortable, and stylish enough to wear while not breaking a sweat, too. Pros: Wide selection of versatile workout clothing including casual apparel to technical gear, variety of sizing and lengths to fit different personal style, its tri-blend shirts are especially comfortableCons: Some t-shirt sizing seems to vary across different stylesIf it's versatility you're after, look no further than Hylete's line of active apparel (available in both men's and women's sizing). It offers a varied selection of tees, tanks, polos, pullovers, and hoodies, all designed with athletes in mind.And not just for your typical weight-lifter-slash-runner, either. I've been wearing Hylete's gear for several months now and use it for everything from boxing and resistance band workouts to longer cycling outings on the weekends (I do also lift weights and run in them). Don't get the wrong idea, though. The brand's clothing is functional for a variety of workouts but I have found myself just wearing its tees when I'm not working out — sometimes as something casual to wear while working from home or while running errands. A few favorites of mine is its Icon II Quad-Blend Tee and the Fuse Short. The shirt features a flattering athletic cut and its blend of fabric keeps it comfortable no matter how active I am (and stays comfortable even if I'm doing a workout that makes me particularly sweaty). The Fuse Short is the epitome of the brand's versatility, too. Available not just in sizes ranging from XS to XXL, Hylete also offers them in regular, above-knee, or quad-cut lengths, allowing people to customize the specific fit based on their workout style and fitness preference. I wear the quad cut, myself, and find them to work well for running, lifting weights, cycling, or HIIT and boxing workouts. Hylete's pricing is fairly modest, too, with the Icon II Quad-Blend Tee costing $44 and the Fuse Short $74 — both are prices that fall squarely in the middle of most athletic apparel worth spending money on. The gear is durable, well-built, and ready for a variety of workouts, so it's well worth the investment. Fuse Short (small)Icon II Quad-Blend Tee (small) Best budget workout clothes for men VRST VRST, a venture from Dick's Sporting Goods, is one of the newest athletic apparel brands on the market, offering a versatile lineup of comfortable activewear that's premium yet cost-effective.Pros: Wide selection of quality gear that doesn't have a high-end sticker price, the line features both athletic apparel and active commuter gear, features hallmarks like stretch fabric, moisture-wicking technology, and anti-odor treatmentCons: Basic designs and stylesDick's Sporting Goods, a retailer of all things sports apparel and equipment, launched VRST in 2021, and I was immediately drawn to both its reasonable price point and seemingly premium quality. Once I started actually testing the gear out, that idea that it was premium moved from seeming to confirmed — VRST's line of active apparel is an impressive bunch.Though the selection doesn't exactly wow you in terms of flashy stylings, the gear is impressively functional. It features everything from running shorts and tops to commuter pants, zip up active tops, joggers, tanks, and sweatshirts —  the line is essentially a collection of workout basics.Some highlights I've enjoyed testing were the Run T-Shirt and the Printed Lined Woven Shorts, each of which held up well across runs through my neighborhood and at-home workouts. Specifically, the shirt stayed comfortable (even during a few incredibly humid NYC runs) and didn't seem to feel heavy or bog me down if I started to sweat. This is due to its baked-in moisture-wicking technology, which also should cool as you wear the shirt (though this is a little harder to actually judge if it works correctly). I also found the shorts to be quite versatile and I was able to use them for HIIT workouts, runs, bike rides, and weight lifting sessions, and they stayed comfortable through it all. The four-way stretch design complemented whatever movement I was doing and its internal compression liner provided plenty of support where I needed it. VRST's best feature is its price point, though. For prices consistently lower than what you'd find elsewhere, it's an excellent budget pick that doesn't sacrifice performance or quality. It may not stand toe-to-toe with more premium brands in terms of advanced technical features or style variety, but if it's quality workout gear you need at a reasonable price, VRST is it. Run T-Shirt (small)7-inch Printed Lined Woven Shorts (small) Best athleisure workout clothes for men Vuori Vuori's clothing is both lightweight and comfortable, which makes it a breeze to work out inside or outside during summer.Pros: Supreme comfort, quick-drying material, great for a wide variety of workoutsCons: Some customers found that the shorts could be a bit restrictive due to narrow leg holesIt's obvious the Encinitas, California-based Vuori takes its inspiration from the beach. The workout gear from this company may just make you think you're on the West Coast, with its comfortable, lightweight fit. In particular, we loved the Trail Short, the lightest weight all-purpose pair of shorts from Vuori. The shorts have an elastic waist, supportive Coolmax anti-odor liner, and an athletic fit. The shorts also come with front pockets and a back zip pocket, as well as an iPhone holder in the liner.Also beloved in the Vuori line is the Tradewind Performance shirt and the company's perennially popular joggers. The Tradewind Tee is the company's most technical in the lineup, featuring micro-perforation for ventilation, flatlock seams, and a front chest pocket. The shirt promises to wick moisture and dry quickly, making it perfect for a run, a hot yoga session, or anything in between.Kore Short (small)Trail Short (small)Tradewind Performance Shirt (small) Best for multi-sport training NoBull NoBull's approach to its workout apparel is simple: Make comfortable clothing that works for literally any form of exercise; running, lifting, CrossFit, strength training, you name it. Pros: Versatile clothing for a variety of workout types, a huge range of sizes and styles for all body types, also offers accessories like gym bags, cross-training shoes, headbands, and towels, moderate prices, durableCons: Sizing can run small in some piecesIf you're the kind of person who likes to keep active in a variety of ways, be it running, cycling, lifting weights, or even doing CrossFit, then the workout apparel from NoBull is one to pay attention to. From its shorts and workout tops to its shoes, gym bags, and casual wear, NoBull has something for literally everyone — and that's not hyperbole.As someone who keeps active every day, and who tries to do something different as often as possible, I was excited to try the gear from NoBull. I'd seen ads on Instagram for the brand for some time but had chalked it up to just that: a social media-promoted athletic brand that was just like any of the others. But oh was I wrong. The gear I received from NoBull to test quickly changed my perspective. Not only did I find the apparel to be among the most comfortable in terms of fit, but the styles were all versatile enough that it didn't matter if I was running, doing a resistance band workout, or boxing. That is to say that aside from just being comfortable, they also wick sweat incredibly well and are stretchy enough for a variety of movements. I also tried out a pair of NoBull's running shoes which aside from using them to actually work out, became one of my go-to travel shoes (they're incredibly comfortable if that wasn't already clear). One tiny nitpick to point out is the sizing can be a little small, so if you're in between sizes, go for the next one up just to be safe. The site does have a size guide for each piece, so I recommend referencing that before buying, too. Classic Tee (small)Lightweight Knit Short 7-Inch (small)White Ripstop Runner (small) How I test workout clothes Each of the pieces of workout clothing highlighted in this guide went through a series of tests to see how well it performed across these four categories: Fit, function, durability, and value. Here's how each category specifically factored into which athletic wear ultimately made this guide:Fit: Fit. Comfort. This category could've been called either but we went with "fit" specifically because a well-fitting piece of workout clothing will almost always, in turn, be comfortable. Fit is also more than just making sure you select the right size, but also how it feels while working out. The rise of stretch fabrics has helped this category significantly, especially for those who do HIIT or strength workouts. Function: The basic function of proper workout clothing should be to keep you comfortable, move along with however you workout, and maybe even wick some sweat while it's at it. Thankfully, today's selection of workout gear does all of this in spades (some much better than others). When testing, we looked at how well a brand's sweat-wicking tech actually worked, whether it did, in fact, repel odors, and if the four-way stretch fabric was able to really stretch in all directions. Other functions we assessed were the comfort of built-in short liners and the effectiveness of other materials (like merino).Durability: Premium workout clothing (i.e. the gear that's actually worth your money) should last longer than a few months of heavy use and heavy cleaning. This means it should keep its fit and still offer whatever suite of extra features long after you purchase it and wear it for the first time. This category is best served as a long-term assessment, and we've included updated insight on some pieces where we're able.Value: As mentioned above, the best workout gear won't always be entirely cheap. Though we've included a budget brand in this guide (and one we stand behind), it's oftentimes worth it to spend a little more on workout clothing that's designed to last (as opposed to spending less on something you'll have to replace over and over again).  FAQs What should I consider when shopping for workout clothes?When determining the kind of workout gear you need to accommodate your lifestyle, consider the type of exercise you do most often. Clothing is just another tool to help or hinder you, so be sure you're buying the right gear for the right activity.A piece of clothing's ability to withstand cycles in the washing machine is also a key quality. You'll likely be sweating through these clothes a lot and (hopefully) putting them in the laundry quite often. If you're buying flimsily made clothing, you'll have to replace them much more often.Consider how multi-purpose you need your gear to be, too. Are you only going to wear those joggers to the gym, or are they also for lounging around? Is that long sleeve tee just as good for your run as it is for running errands on the weekend? The workout clothing you wear doesn't have to cover a range of use cases but some are designed for more than just running or lifting weights (and can make your investment stretch a little further).   What are the differences between men's and women's workout clothes?Brands differentiate men's and women's workout clothing both in terms of specific design choices, as well as colorways and style. Men's workout shirts tend to be cut to fit broader shoulders while men's shorts offer more leg coverage (though this isn't always the case) and added space in the crotch. Women's workout shirts are often narrower and form-fitting, have shorter sleeves, and are sometimes designed to fit tighter around the arms. Shorts designed for women tend to feature a cut that accommodates rounder hips, are void of any added space in the crotch, and may also have a wider waistband.Despite these differences, finding the "right" workout clothing comes down to what fits you best and what feels comfortable while you work out. Although this piece focuses specifically on workout clothing designed for cisgender men, we also have another gear guide that features apparel more closely associated with the design and fit tendencies found in women's workout clothing. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 9th, 2021

American Defense Policy After Twenty Years Of War

American Defense Policy After Twenty Years Of War Authored by Jim Webb via NationalInterest.org, America has always been a place where the abrasion of continuous debate eventually produces creative solutions. Let’s agree on those solutions, and make the next twenty years a time of clear purpose and affirmative global leadership. The American scorecard for foreign policy achievements over the past twenty years is, frankly, pretty dismal. And without talking our way all around the globe, it’s clear that the most dismal score goes to the stupidest mistakes. We fought one war that we never should have fought and another war whose objectives grew so out of control that no amount of battlefield proficiency could overcome the naïve mission creep of the political and military leadership at the top that was defining what our troops were supposed to do. So, let me start with a couple of quotes from two pieces I wrote, one at the beginning of this twenty-year period and the other at the end.   On September 4, 2002, five months before the Bush administration ordered the invasion of Iraq, I wrote the following as part of a larger editorial for the Washington Post, warning that an invasion would be a strategic blunder: Nations such as China can only view the prospect of an American military consumed for the next generation by the turmoil of the Middle East as a glorious windfall. Indeed, if one gives the Chinese credit for having a long-term strategy — and those who love to quote Sun Tzu might consider his nationality — it lends credence to their insistent cultivation of the Muslim world. An “American war” with the Muslims, occupying the very seat of their civilization, would allow the Chinese to isolate the United States diplomatically as they furthered their own ambitions in South and Southeast Asia. Almost exactly nineteen years later as the military planners serving the Biden Administration executed a shamefully incompetent final withdrawal from Afghanistan, I wrote the following for The National Interest, excerpted in the Wall Street Journal, in a piece entitled “Requiem for an Avoidable Disaster:”  …the war that we began was not the same war that we are finally bringing to an end. When we went into Afghanistan in 2001 our national concern was to eliminate terrorist entities who desired to attack us. The common understanding at the time was that we would operate with maneuver elements capable of attacking and neutralizing terrorist entities. It was never to occupy territory with permanent bases or to attempt to change the societal and governmental structure of the Afghan people. This “mission creep” began after a few years of successful operations and was obvious in 2004 when I was in the country as an embed journalist. The change in mission eventually increased our troop presence tenfold and sent our forces on an impossible political journey that no amount of military success could overcome. Why did all this happen? And how can we rectify the damage that has been done to the institutions that were involved, and to our international credibility? There’s an old saying that “success has a thousand fathers but failure is an orphan.” In this case, there were two entirely different categories of orphans, some of whom were not touched personally or even professionally, and some who gave up lives, limbs, and emotional health. For the policymakers in Washington, these were wars to be remotely managed inside the guide rails of theoretical national strategy and uncontrolled financial planning. As with so many other drawn-out military commitments with vaguely defined and often changing objectives, America’s diplomatic credibility steadily decreased while the price tag rose through the roof, into trillions of dollars and thousands of combat deaths. There is no way around the reality that these hand-selected policymakers, military and civilian alike, failed the country, even as many of them were being lionized in the media and offered lucrative post-retirement positions in the private sector. Their immediate strategic goals, vague as they were from the outset, were not accomplished. The larger necessity of meeting global challenges, and particularly China’s determined expansion, was put on the back burner as our operational and diplomatic capabilities were diverted into a constantly quarreling region with the deserved reputation of being the “Graveyard of Empires.” In the context of history, the human cost on the battlefield as viewed by those at the top was manageably small, and carried out by an all-volunteer military. Indeed, despite the length of twenty years of war and many ferocious engagements, the overall casualty numbers were historically low. DOD reports the total number of American military deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan combined over twenty years as 7,074, of which 5,474 were killed in action. This twenty-year number was about the same as six months of American casualties during any one of the peak years of fighting in Vietnam. Emotionally, although there was much sympathy and respect for our soldiers we were not really a nation in a fully engaged war. As the wars continued, life in America went on without disruption. A very small percentage of the country was at human or even family risk. The wars did not interfere on a national scale with the lives of those who chose not to serve. The economy was largely good. In places like my home state of Virginia it absolutely boomed with tens of billions of dollars going to Virginia-based programs in the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This societal disconnect gave the policymakers great latitude in the manner in which they ran the wars. It also resulted in very little congressional oversight, either in operational concepts or in much-need scrutiny of DOD and State Department management and budgets. Powerpoint presentations replaced vigorous discussion. Serious introspection by Pentagon staff members gave way to bland reports from Beltway Bandit consultants hired to provide answers to questions asked during committee hearings. An “Overseas Contingency Fund” with billions of unlabeled dollars allowed military leaders to fund programs that were never directly authorized or specifically appropriated by Congress. To be blunt, the Pentagon and the Joint commands were basically making their own rules, and to hell with everybody else. This was not the Congress in which I had worked as a full committee counsel during the Carter Administration. Nor was it the Pentagon in which I had served as an assistant secretary of defense and Secretary of the Navy under Ronald Reagan. At the other end of the pipeline, it was different. For those who did serve, and especially for those who served in ground combat units and in special operations, being thrown into the middle of a region where violence and bitter retribution is the norm was often a life-altering experience. Repetitive combat tours pulled them away from home, from family, and from the normal routines of their peers again and again, creating burnout from unresolved personal issues of stress and readjustment to civilian life. So-called “stop loss” programs kept many soldiers on active duty after their initial terms of service were supposed to end, a policy that brought the not-unreal slogan that stop-loss was, in reality, nothing more than a back-door version of the draft: We have you. And we are going to keep you until we no longer need you. The traditional policy of allowing troops a two-to-one ratio of “dwell time” at home between deployments was repeatedly shortened until, for the Army, the ratio was less than one-to-one, requiring soldiers to return to combat for fifteen months with only twelve months at home to recuperate, refurbish, and retrain. Those who left the military after one enlistment rather than choosing a career were largely ignored by commands that provided little post-military guidance and sent battle-weary young soldiers home without much more than a goodbye. But along the way, as with those who have served our country in uniform in every other war, our young military did the job that they were sent to do, no matter the overall wisdom of the mission itself. With respect to these capable and dedicated young Americans who stepped forward to serve, I feel fortunate to have been able to play a part in making sure that the public was aware of the contributions they made, and to put into place policies that recognized and properly rewarded their service. And as a writer, journalist and later a Senator I was able to use whatever pulpit was available in order to emphasize that our greatest strategic challenges were not in the places where our elites had decided to invest our people and our national treasure, and to call for the country’s leadership to cease its unfortunate obsession with a region that has never needed a permanent American ground presence as a means of mediating, much less resolving, its centuries-old conflicts. You don’t take out a hornet’s nest by sitting on top of it. We’re smarter than that, and also more capable.   In addition to working on strongly felt issues such as economic fairness and criminal justice reform, once I was elected to the Senate I took a two-pronged approach to resolving the mess that had been made in our misadventures in Iraq and Afghanistan. The first involved our larger strategic interests. I immediately gained a seat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and two years later was named Chairman of the Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs. From our immediate office, I designed a staff—and a legislative approach—that would energetically re-emphasize our commitment to relations in East Asia, and recruited good people to carry out that approach. My mission to my staff was that we were going to work to invigorate American relations in East Asia, particularly in South Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Thailand, Singapore, and the Philippines, and we were going to open up Burma to the outside world. We did more than talk about this, averaging three intense trips every year where I was able to meet with top leaders in those countries as well as almost every other country in ASEAN. Barack Obama later announced a similar policy after he was elected two years later, calling it the “Pivot to Asia.” Unfortunately, his administration’s approach skirted the largest issue in the region by avoiding any major confrontations with China. The pivot was largely abandoned at a crucial period in 2012 after China claimed sovereignty over a two million square kilometer area of the South China Sea, and began militarizing numerous contested islands claimed by several other countries. The Obama administration declined to criticize China’s actions, saying that the United States would not take a position on sovereignty issues. Quite obviously, not taking a position in this matter was defaulting to China’s aggressive acts. I responded by introducing a Senate resolution condemning any use of military force in the resolution of sovereignty issues in the South China Sea, which passed with a unanimous vote. The second involved the day-to-day manner in which our wars were being fought, and the way that our younger military people were being treated by those at the top. I participated in numerous hearings on all aspects from my seats on the Armed Services and Foreign Relations committees, becoming even more concerned about the lack of serious congressional oversight. During one Foreign Relations Committee hearing on post-invasion reconstruction efforts, an assistant secretary of state testified that the United States had spent 32 billion dollars on different smaller-scale projects.  I asked him to provide me and the committee a complete list of every project, as well as the cost. That was in 2007. I’m still waiting for his answer. This was clearly not the way things worked when I was a counsel in the House, where such requests were often answered within a day or two, from information that had already been compiled. In fact, the lack of an answer, despite follow-up calls from my staff, followed a broader pattern that had evolved after 9/11 when vague answers and delayed responses had become the norm, a deliberate and increasingly routine snub of the Congress by higher-level members of the executive branch. Take your choice. This was either incompetent leadership or deliberate obstruction. If the congressional liaisons from DOD were able to provide specific, complicated data within a day or two in 1977, certainly the computers of 2007 were capable of doing so after thirty years of technological progress. I responded by co-authoring legislation along with Senator Claire McCaskill that created the Wartime Contracts Commission, modeled after the Truman Commission of World War Two. After three years of investigations, the commission’s final report estimated that due to major failures in our contracting system the United States had squandered up to 60 billion dollars through contract waste and fraud in Iraq and Afghanistan. Unfortunately, the commission lacked subpoena power or criminal jurisdiction over actions taken in the past, but it certainly got the attention of would-be fraudsters, led to better record-keeping, improved the oversight process, and put a marker down for contracts from that point forward.   Having grown up in the military, and serving as an infantry Marine in Vietnam, and with a son who had left college to enlist in the Marine Corps infantry and fought in Ramadi, Iraq during one of the worst periods in that war, I seized the opportunity – and undertook the obligation – to properly reward the contributions of those who had stepped forward to serve. Immediately after I won the election to the Senate, and two months before actually being sworn in, I sat down with the Senate legislative counsel and drafted the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Having spent four years as a full committee counsel on the House Veterans Affairs Committee, my legislative model was the GI Bill that had been given to our World War Two veterans, the most generous GI Bill in history up to that time: pay for the veteran’s tuition and fees, buy the books, and provide a monthly living stipend. For every tax dollar that was spent on the World War Two GI bill, our treasury received eight dollars in tax remunerations from veterans who had gone on to successful lives. By contrast, the Vietnam Era GI Bill had provided only a monthly payment that in almost every case was far less than the costs of higher education, beginning in 1966 at a paltry rate of 50 dollars a month and ending in the early 1970s at $340 a month. I introduced the Post-9/11 GI Bill on my first day as a Senator. I put together a bipartisan leadership team—two Republicans, John Warner and Chuck Hagel; two Democrats, Frank Lautenberg and myself; two of them World War Two veterans, and two of them Vietnam veterans. Sixteen months later in a modern-day Congressional miracle, the bill became law, ironically over the strong opposition of the Bush Administration to the very end. The White House and the Pentagon claimed that such a generous bill would affect retention, causing too many people to leave the military. The obvious but implicit message was, Don’t treat them too good; they’ll leave. This position was taken by general officers who were going to receive a couple of hundred thousand dollars every year in military retirement when they themselves decided to leave. Having spent five years in the Pentagon and being intimately familiar with manpower issues, I held a completely different belief, that the generosity of the new GI Bill would enhance enlistments and help broaden the base of our overall military. In a back-handed compliment, at least in my view, I was not invited to the White House for the ceremony when the President signed the bill. But to date, millions of post-9/11 veterans have used this Bill, which is beyond cavil the most generous GI Bill in history. It has created opportunities and empowered the careers of people who are now making their way into positions of leadership and influence throughout the country. Shortly after I introduced the GI Bill, I introduced legislation to mandate a proper ratio for dwell time between overseas deployments. The legislation would have required that military members not be returned to combat unless they had been home for at least the amount of time that they had previously been gone. This was not unreasonable. A two-to-one ratio was a simple formula that reflected traditional rotation cycles. With the continuous deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan it had fallen to less than one-to-one, which meant that for years our soldiers would be gone longer than they were at home, and when they were at home they would be spending much of their time getting ready to go back. This reality was clearly affecting not only morale but also the potential for long-term emotional difficulties such as post-traumatic stress. Predictably, the White House and the Pentagon opposed the legislation. Some claimed that I had designed it with a hidden agenda to slow down the war in Iraq. Others, led by Senator Lindsey Graham, claimed that the legislation was unconstitutional, that Congress could not intervene in the operational tempo of the military since the President was the Commander in Chief. But a precedent was already set. During the Korean War, Congress had ceased the deployment of soldiers who were being sent to the war zone without proper training by mandating that no military members could be deployed overseas unless they had spent 120 days on active duty. If the military leaders weren’t going to take care of their people, it was only right that Congress should set proper boundaries. The Republicans filibustered the legislation, which then required sixty votes for passage. Although the bill twice received a fifty-six vote majority, with several Republican votes for passage, we did not break the filibuster.  But we did put the issue of dwell time firmly before Congress and the public, and the two-to-one deployment cycle eventually became the express goal inside the Department of Defense. All of that is history. I put it before you as something of a template to show the patterns that evolved and have continued over the past twenty years, as well as evidence that strong and informed leadership in Congress can turn things around. In many ways, this dislocation is between those who make policy—including military leaders—and those who carry it out. It continues due to the group mentality of a foreign policy aristocracy seeking common agreement rather than original thought. And it has exacerbated this ever-growing dislocation by freezing out those who are not, basically, in the club because their thinking does not fit the usual mantra and their ideas threaten the prevailing orthodoxy. We need these other voices. There are lessons to be learned and unavoidable questions that need to be answered at every level. Some involve the articulation of our national security objectives and how we define national strategy. Some involve when and how we should use the military for operational missions in harm’s way. And some involve the actual makeup of these military missions, from their remote or covert or overt nature, and if deployed in large numbers how large that footprint should be, and what portion should consist of military contractors along the lines of the past twenty years. And for those who want to repair the damage, it challenges us to find clear ways where we can move forward. Who do we hold accountable for the random and often changing strategic mistakes that have damaged our strength and our reputation? How do we move forward in the way we articulate and implement our national strategy here at home? How do we regain our respect in the international community, both among our friends who need us, and from potential adversaries who pray every day that America will lose its willpower, that we would be so overcome by military failures abroad and turbulence at home that the nation itself will atrophy and descend into the ranks of an also-ran, second-rate power?   We should begin with a vigorous and open discussion about the makeup, power, and influence of America’s massive defense establishment. And here I’m talking about the highest levels of our uniformed military, the civilian government officials, the powerful defense corporations, the numerous think tanks funded heavily by the defense industry, the hugely influential lobbying organizations, and—if not at the bottom, certainly in the bullseye of the efforts of all of these entities—the authorizing and appropriating committees in the Senate and House of Representatives. Couple that with the media of all sorts, particularly the huge growth of the internet and social media, and one can see how complicated the debate over any controversial issue can become. We were warned about this, sixty years ago, by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in his well-remembered speech about the “military / industrial complex.” The speech was the president’s carefully placed farewell message to the American people, made just three days before he left office. His words resonate, symbolic in their timing as his final shot across the bow, and coming as they did from this former five-star general who knew the military with a completeness that no other American president could ever match. After commenting that in the aftermath of World War Two the “conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience,” Eisenhower expressed his concern about the “total influence – economic, political, even spiritual” of this new reality “in every city, every State house, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications.”   The outgoing, immensely popular President then bluntly called out the members of his own professional culture—the military itself—and the bond its top leaders were increasingly forming with America’s defense corporations. “In the councils of government we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military / industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.” Looking at the decades following his speech and particularly the past twenty years, I believe President Eisenhower would be amazed at how massively this military-industrial complex has grown, how entangled the relationships between the military and the industrial complex have become, and how much it has affected the career paths of civilian “experts,” as well as the positions taken by many senior flag officers facing retirement. Lucrative civilian careers have been made through the “revolving doors” of serving for a few years in appointed posts in the Departments of Defense and State, or by working on committee staffs in the Congress, then rotating over the space of many years in and out of government into the defense-oriented industry and in the ever more influential think tanks, some of them heavily funded by corporations with major financial interests in defense contracts. The number of people involved in such revolving doors and the amount of money flowing back and forth would have stunned the understanding of people in Eisenhower’s era. Likewise, many military officers have made similar career moves, taking advantage of skills and relationships that were developed while on active duty. Those in uniform and others who work in the area of national defense regularly comment about the potential for conflicts of interest among the most senior flag officers as they carry out their final active duty positions before retiring and prepare for their next career in the civilian world. Critical issues ranging from the procurement of weapons systems to carrying out politically sensitive military operations often comprise the way in which potential civilian employers decide on the next chapter in their lives. A hand played well can bring large financial benefits. A hand played poorly can result in media stigma or even being relieved of their duties, and a beach house in Tarpon Springs. As with other areas of public service, it would be useful for Congress to examine the firewalls in place in order to maintain the vitally important separation of the military, on the one side, and the industrial complex on the other, just as President Dwight Eisenhower so prophetically pointed out sixty years ago. Dwight Eisenhower would have liked General Robert Barrow, the twenty-seventh commandant of the Marine Corps. His leadership example personally inspired me, both during and after my service in the Corps. We had many personal discussions over the years, until he passed away in 2008. He was a great combat leader. He mastered guerrilla warfare while fighting Japanese units alongside Chinese soldiers in World War Two. In the Korean War, he received the Navy Cross, our country’s second-highest award, for extraordinary heroism as a company commander during the historic breakout from the Chosin Reservoir. And in Vietnam, he was known as one of the war’s finest regimental commanders. He knew war, he knew loyalty, and he knew his Marines. General Barrow was fond of emphasizing that moral courage was often harder, and more exemplary, than physical courage. On matters of principle, he would not bend. During one difficult period when he was dealing with serious issues in the political process, the four-star Commandant calmly pointed out to me that his obligation was to run the Marine Corps “the same way a good company commander runs his rifle company: I’ll do the best job I know how to do, and if you don’t like what I’m doing, then fire me.” It is rare these days to see such leaders wearing the stars of a general or an admiral. And thinking of President Eisenhower’s prescient warnings about what he termed the “the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals,” I have no doubt that he and General Barrow shared the same concerns. General Barrow held another firm belief. Having served as Commandant of the Marine Corps, he believed it would soil the dignity of that office by trading on its credibility for financial gain through banging on doors in Washington as a lobbyist or serving as a board member giving a defense-related corporation his prized insider’s advice on how to sell their product. The Japanese have a saying that “life is a generation, but reputation is forever.” And General Barrow’s pristine motivation will forever preserve his honor. I grew up in the military. I know the price that families must pay when their fathers or now even their mothers are continuously deployed, because I lived it as a very young boy. My father, a pilot who flew B-17s and B-29s in World War Two and cargo planes in the Berlin Airlift, was continually deployed either overseas or on bases with no family housing, at one point for more than three years. I know the demands and yet the honor of leading infantry Marines in combat and then spending years in and out of the hospital after being wounded. I know what it is like to be a father with a son deployed in a very bad place as an enlisted infantry Marine. And most of all I know the pride that comes from being able to say for the rest of my life that when my country called, I was there, and I took care of my people. My other major point today is that our top leaders in all sectors of national defense need to get going and develop a clearly articulated foreign policy. We have lost twenty years, unfortunately fulfilling the prediction that I made in the Washington Post five months before the invasion of Iraq that “Nations such as China can only view the prospect of an American military consumed for the next generation by the turmoil of the Middle East as a glorious windfall.” And for China, indeed it was. It’s ironic that we are now hearing frantic warnings from our uniformed leaders about China’s determined expansionism, both military and economic, and particularly about how recent reports of Chinese technological leaps might be something of a new “Sputnik” moment where America has been caught off-guard and now must rush to catch up. Too bad they weren’t following this as these policies and technological improvements were developed by the Chinese over at least the past two decades, while our focus remained intently on the never-ending and never-resolved brawls in the Middle East. The very people who now are wringing their hands and calling for a full-fledged effort to counter such threats are the same people who should have been warning the nation of their possibility ten or even twenty years ago. So, ask yourself: If things go wrong, who then shall we blame? Much of the world is now uneasy with China’s unremitting aggression on its home turf in Asia. Over the past decade, China has been calling its own shots, rejecting international law and public opinion while flexing its muscle to signal its view that it will soon replace the United States as the region’s dominant military, diplomatic and economic power. Beijing has taken down Hong Kong’s democracy movement; started military spats with India; disrupted life for tens of millions by damming the headwaters of the Mekong River; conducted what our government now deems a campaign of genocide against Muslim Uighurs; escalated tensions with Japan over the Senkaku Islands; consolidated its illegal occupation and militarization of islands in the South China Sea; and made repeated bellicose gestures designed to test the international community’s resistance to “unifying” the “renegade province” of Taiwan. China’s military is expanding and modernizing and its Navy is becoming not only technological but global. While we expended a huge portion of our human capital, emotional energy, and national treasure on two wars, China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) has had a major economic impact in Asia, Africa, and Latin America and with individual governments on other continents. In Africa, whose population has quadrupled since 1970 and which counts only one of the world’s top thirty countries in Gross National Product, more than forty countries have signed on to China’s BRI. Let’s get going. We have alliances to enhance, and extensive national security interests to protect. We need to address these issues immediately and with clarity. America has always been a place where the abrasion of continuous debate eventually produces creative solutions. Eventually is now. Let’s agree on those solutions, and make the next twenty years a time of clear purpose and affirmative global leadership. Tyler Durden Tue, 11/09/2021 - 00:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 9th, 2021

Register: How to Save on Tech Expenses by Choosing the Right Product

What: Technology can help support brokerage offerings, but real estate professionals should choose wisely before investing in tech solutions. The wrong move can not only have negative repercussions on your business’ productivity and efficiency, but it can also result in months-long losses—both in time and profitability. Tune in to RISMedia’s next webinar, sponsored by BoomTown […] The post Register: How to Save on Tech Expenses by Choosing the Right Product appeared first on RISMedia. What: Technology can help support brokerage offerings, but real estate professionals should choose wisely before investing in tech solutions. The wrong move can not only have negative repercussions on your business’ productivity and efficiency, but it can also result in months-long losses—both in time and profitability. Tune in to RISMedia’s next webinar, sponsored by BoomTown and moderated by Verl Workman of Workman Success Systems, to learn how the correct tech solutions for your business will help you save in the long run by streamlining your processes and introducing necessary automations. When: Wed., Nov. 3 at 3 p.m. ET Register now! Sponsored By:     Moderated By:     Moderated by: Verl Workman, CEO and founder of Workman Success Systems, has delivered keynotes, seminars and more to thousands of real estate professionals worldwide. Drawing on his experience in sales, marketing, management and technology, Workman has empowered the masses to expand their knowledge and achieve their goals. Mac Hill, considered an “OG Boomer,” has been with BoomTown for nearly eight years, serving in a variety of roles. He joined the company all the way back in 2012 as a support specialist, where he helped clients with technical questions and issue resolution. After a period of time, he identified a huge opportunity for better training, and worked with another colleague to create BoomTown’s first Training Team. They developed training webinars, videos, and began executing live trainings with clients both at the BoomTown HQ and at clients’ offices. Brandon Brittingham, REALTOR®, CEO and team leader at The Maryland and Delaware Group of Long & Foster Real Estate, based in Salisbury, Maryland. His real estate team, one of the best and busiest in the country, was ranked as No. 1 in the entirety of Long & Foster for homes sold. Brittingham started as a solo agent in 2007. Right away, he made a commitment to himself to be the best in every aspect of his profession. He wanted to offer the best customer service possible to every one of his clients. It worked! In an incredibly short time span, Brittingham rose to become a top seller on the Eastern Shore peninsula, a popular real estate region spanning three states: Maryland, Delaware and Virginia. Rivers Pearce is the co-founder and CEO of W8LESS. With nearly two decades of experience in the digital marketing and technology world, Pearce helps business leaders navigate the increasingly complex landscape of technology that powers modern marketing and sales organizations. He has worked with Fortune 500 level brands in e-commerce and online marketing, and has deep expertise in the real estate and property technology industries. He has worked with the majority of the top real estate teams in the country and is intimately familiar with not only the tech side of the business, but also the operations and business models that successful real estate professionals are leveraging today. He also works with tech companies who are interested in entering the real estate vertical or enhancing their position within the space through marketing, partnerships, events, experiences and more. Each month, RISMedia’s webinars draw more than 1,000 agents and brokers from across the country, eager for exclusive insight from the industry’s most profitable professionals. For a recap of our recent webinar, “How Agents Find Their Niche and Succeed” please visit RISMedia’s Housecall. To access all RISMedia webinars, please subscribe on YouTube. The post Register: How to Save on Tech Expenses by Choosing the Right Product appeared first on RISMedia......»»

Category: realestateSource: rismediaOct 30th, 2021

15 best yoga gifts for the yogi in your life, no matter their skill level or practice

Gift the yogi in your life something to help improve their practice, whether it's a new mat, some practice inspiration, or a pair of grippy socks. If you are a beginner, try taking an in-person yoga class as the instructor can help modify or correct poses. 10'000 Hours/Getty images When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. The best way to shop for a yogi is to consider where they are in their practice and what they enjoy using. For the new yogi, consider basics like comfortable athletic wear or yoga props like blocks or mats. Below are 15 thoughtful yoga gifts for yogis of all skill levels, including Glo memberships and lululemon gift cards. Practicing yoga, and any of its many forms and disciplines, is one of the best ways to manage stress, improve flexibility, and calm your mind. A practice that dates back centuries, yoga originated in ancient India with roots that tie it to Hindusim, Buddhism, Jainism, and a host of other religions.Yoga today encompasses a variety of formats. This includes Bikram Yoga, which is colloquially referred to as "hot yoga," as well as others like Ashtanga or Vinyasa (which is considered the most popular form in the western world). If someone on your holiday list is an avid yogi, coming up with gift ideas beyond a yoga mat or a pair of leggings might be challenging; let's face it, they already have these in abundance. Sticking to the basics is a solid option when you're buying gifts for someone just beginning a yoga-friendly lifestyle but shopping for seasoned practitioners requires creativity.But don't fret, we've got you covered. To some, yoga is a spiritual, mindful practice and to others, it's their dedicated form of exercise. Whatever their connection, there's a gift for every yogi on your list.Here are 15 of the best yoga gifts for yogis of any skill level or discipline: Glo Glo Membership, available via Glo, from $18The Glo app offers yogis of all levels unlimited access to more than 4,000 classes taught by world-class instructors, on-demand whenever, wherever they're itching to get on the mat. Classes are recommended based on how long you have to practice (from 10 minutes on up to a full 60-minute session), your interests (yoga, Pilates, or mediation), and user favorites. You can even browse the app's library and choose classes however you see fit. Amazon SpunkySoul New Beginnings Bracelet Stack, available via Amazon, $19SpunkySoul wants to help yogis channel their positive energy on and off the mat with its Lotus New Beginnings bracelet collection, and after all 2020 has put us through, who couldn't use the good vibes? A lotus charm hangs from each stack of bracelets, representing "good fortune, positive energy, purity, eternity, creation, enlightenment, and new beginnings."All stacks also include a bracelet made from lava beads, which can be used as a diffuser: Just add a few drops of your favorite essential oils to one of the lava beads and let the blend create an aromatic accessory that's good for the soul. Saje Saje Yoga Grounding Diffuser Blend, available via Saje, $22If your yogi is just as obsessed with essential oils as they are with yoga, they'll love Saje's grounding diffuser blend. The aromatic combination of earthy patchouli, bright orange, peaceful neroli, spicy ho wood, and crisp champaca is said to promote feelings of gratitude and Zen. It's the perfect formula to have circulating whether you're on or off the mat. Amazon Ewedoos Yoga Mat Bag, available via Amazon, from $20Whether their studio classes are back in session, or their home yoga space could use some organization, this roomy bag from Ewedoos is a storage staple. Unlike other yoga bags that are only roomy enough to fit your mat and maybe a towel, the main compartment of the Ewedoos bag is spacious enough to hold a mat and accessories like straps or a yoga block.Plus, a water bottle and towel can go in the large side pocket, while a small interior zip compartment holds the essentials you'd usually keep in a purse, like your car keys, phone, or wallet. Amazon Yogi Bare Teddy mat, available via Amazon, $70The Teddy from Yogi Bare is a machine-washable yoga mat that helps take some of the tediousness out of keeping a mat clean — just throw it in the washer and that's it, it's clean. The mat is also great for anyone who likes to do hot yoga as it features a sweat-adaptive surface that won't get slippery when wet. Gifting a mat may not always seem like the best choice for a yogi but this one is the exception.  Lululemon/Facebook Lululemon Gift Card, available via lululemonNothing motivates me to exercise quite like a new pair of leggings, so if you're struggling to find the perfect gift for a yogi, I highly recommend treating them to a shopping spree at lululemon. The store is swarming with technical athletic wear geared toward yogis because the brand acknowledges the ways clothes can make or break your flow. The brand also designs clothes for different genders, so there's something for everyone. Amazon Ajna Yoga Bolster, available via Amazon, $70Though yoga bolsters are underrated accessories compared to blocks and straps, they're essential to restorative practices. Bolsters support and alleviate pressure on joints, provide lumbar relief, deepen stretches, and help the body achieve total relaxation in times of discomfort. They're also quite versatile and can be used in a range of practices or meditations, and even work off the mat when the body needs extra support.Ajna's yoga prop is an especially great pick because it's eco-friendly, made with 100% vegan materials, free of harmful chemicals or toxic solvents, and super comfortable. The bolster also comes in a range of colors, so you can give your yogi their favorite. Amazon The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali by Sri Swami Satchidananda, available via Amazon, $16There's so much more to yoga than poses named after animals and an Instagram-worthy aesthetic. Yoga is rooted in Ayurvedic beliefs, spiritual connections, and Indian philosophy. The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali offer readers a deep dive into some of these teachings, specifically those of Raja Yoga, which is the practice of concentration and meditation.The text is a compilation of valuable lessons from the yogic teachings on ethics, meditation, and physical postures, and also provides insight on how to cope through everyday situations both on and off the mat. Amazon AmazonBasics Foam Roller, available via Amazon, $11Foam rollers aren't typically grouped with yoga props but they can be extremely beneficial to a yogi's practice. Because yoga requires a lot of movement and fluidity from one pose to the next, your muscles need to be pliable; when they're restricted, so is your movement.Foam rollers help work out the kinks in your muscles, so they stay healthy and limber. They can be used pre-flow to warm the muscles, and post-flow as a recovery tool. Wayfair Delsanto Wall-Mounted Sports Rack, available via Wayfair, $25How and where one decides to practice looks different for almost every yogi. For anyone hopping on the mat at home, this storage display is a gift that helps make their space look and feel a little more special (and organized). Amazon Sunflower Home Foam Yoga Cushion, available via Amazon, $15As amazing as yoga is for the mind and body, it can also be extremely hard on the knees, wrists, and hands. Sunflower Home's miniature cushions help ease the strain by putting pressure off of these sensitive areas.They're made with eco-friendly PU foam, so they won't absorb much moisture (re: sweat) and are made extra thick for optimal support. The cushions are also multi-purpose and can be used off the mat anytime your joints require some relief. Urban Outfitters Calm Club Yoga Card Deck, available via Urban Outfitters, $18Pick a card, any card, then flow it out. This fun card deck from Calm Club is a compilation of 52 yoga poses — one for every week in the year. The idea is that yogis choose a card at random on a Monday and dedicate the week to incorporating the illustrated pose into their practice. By Sunday, they'll hopefully have mastered it (or, at the very least, are on their way to mastering it). Anthropologie Herban Essentials Yoga Towelettes,  available via Anthropologie, $16I don't wash my yoga mat near as much as I should, though I know I'm not the only one guilty of doing this. Do your yogi friend a favor and gift them these hygienic towelettes from Herban Essentials — they need them, I promise. Each single-use towelette is made from therapeutic-grade essential oils from organic fruits, herbs, and vegetables supplied by American farmers.They're also naturally antibacterial, antiseptic, aromatherapeutic, and leave a calming scent of lavender lingering on your mat so you're inhaling soothing fumes, not days-old sweat, Tavi Noir Tavi Noir Yoga Socks, availabe via Tavi Noir, $16Rather than a festive pair of socks, gift your yogi some cushy footwear with a little more grip this holiday season. Tavi Noir's grip socks are made of cozy cotton, are non-slip, and feature a compression arch band. Designed for yoga and Pilates, these socks do well to keep feet planted and firm on the mat. The best part is the brand is technically unisex in sizing and offers a variety of larger styles for anyone with larger feet. Amazon Yoga Poses Poster, available via Amazon, $25Spontaneity is the best way to spice up a routine, so if their practice is feeling a little stale, this yoga poses poster can help them shake things up on the mat. This poster serves as a fun way to progress in their training while also allowing them to track their progress.  Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytOct 28th, 2021

Inside the World of Black Bitcoin, Where Crypto Is About Making More Than Just Money

“We can operate on an even playing field in the digital world” At the Black Blockchain Summit, there is almost no conversation about making money that does not carry with it the possibility of liberation. This is not simply a gathering for those who would like to ride whatever bumps and shocks, gains and losses come with cryptocurrency. It is a space for discussing the relationship between money and man, the powers that be and what they have done with power. Online and in person, on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C., an estimated 1,500 mostly Black people have gathered to talk about crypto—decentralized digital money backed not by governments but by blockchain technology, a secure means of recording transactions—as a way to make money while disrupting centuries-long patterns of oppression. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] “What we really need to be doing is to now utilize the technology behind blockchain to enhance the quality of life for our people,” says Christopher Mapondera, a Zimbabwean American and the first official speaker. As a white-haired engineer with the air of a lecturing statesman, Mapondera’s conviction feels very on-brand at a conference themed “Reparations and Revolutions.” Along with summit organizer Sinclair Skinner, Mapondera co-founded BillMari, a service that aims to make it easier to transmit cryptocurrency to wherever the sons and daughters of Africa have been scattered. So, not exactly your stereotypical “Bitcoin bro.” Contrary to the image associated with cryptocurrency since it entered mainstream awareness, almost no one at the summit is a fleece-vest-wearing finance guy or an Elon Musk type with a grudge against regulators. What they are is a cross section of the world of Black crypto traders, educators, marketers and market makers—a world that seemingly mushroomed during the pandemic, rallying around the idea that this is the boon that Black America needs. In fact, surveys indicate that people of color are investing in cryptocurrency in ways that outpace or equal other groups—something that can’t be said about most financial products. About 44% of those who own crypto are people of color, according to a June survey by the University of Chicago’s National Opinion Research Center. In April, a Harris Poll reported that while just 16% of U.S. adults overall own cryptocurrency, 18% of Black Americans have gotten in on it. (For Latino Americans, the figure is 20%.) The actor Hill Harper of The Good Doctor, a Harvard Law School friend of former President Barack Obama, is a pitchman for Black Wall Street, a digital wallet and crypto trading service developed with Najah Roberts, a Black crypto expert. And this summer, when the popular money-transfer service Cash App added the option to purchase Bitcoin, its choice to explain the move was the MC Megan Thee Stallion. “With my knowledge and your hustle, you’ll have your own empire in no time,” she says in an ad titled “Bitcoin for Hotties.” Read more: Americans Have Learned to Talk About Racial Inequality. But They’ve Done Little to Solve It But, as even Megan Thee Stallion acknowledges in that ad, pinning one’s economic hopes on crypto is inherently risky. Many economic experts have described crypto as little better than a bubble, mere fool’s gold. The rapid pace of innovation—it’s been little more than a decade since Bitcoin was created by the enigmatic, pseudonymous Satoshi Nakamoto—has left consumers with few protections. Whether the potential is worth those risks is the stuff of constant, and some would say, infernal debate. Jared Soares for TIMECleve Mesidor, who founded the National Policy Network of Women of Color in Blockchain What looms in the backdrop is clear. In the U.S., the median white family’s wealth—reflecting not just assets minus debt, but also the ability to weather a financial setback—sat around $188,200, per the Federal Reserve’s most recent measure in 2019. That’s about eight times the median wealth of Black families. (For Latino families, it’s five times greater; the wealth of Asian, Pacific Island and other families sits between that of white and Latino families, according to the report.) Other estimates paint an even grimmer picture. If trends continue, the median Black household will have zero wealth by 2053. The summit attendees seem certain that crypto represents keys to a car bound for somewhere better. “Our digital selves are more important in some ways than our real-world selves,” Tony Perkins, a Black MIT-trained computer scientist, says during a summit session on “Enabling Black Land and Asset Ownership Using Blockchain.” The possibilities he rattles off—including fractional ownership of space stations—will, to many, sound fantastical. To others, they sound like hope. “We can operate on an even playing field in the digital world,” he says. The next night, when in-person attendees gather at Barcode, a Black-owned downtown D.C. establishment, for drinks and conversation, there’s a small rush on black T-shirts with white lettering: SATOSHI, they proclaim, IS BLACK. That’s an intriguing idea when your ancestors’ bodies form much of the foundation of U.S. prosperity. At the nation’s beginnings, land theft from Native Americans seeded the agricultural operations where enslaved Africans would labor and die, making others rich. By 1860, the cotton-friendly ground of Mississippi was so productive that it was home to more millionaires than anywhere else in the country. Government-supported pathways to wealth, from homesteading to homeownership, have been reliably accessible to white Americans only. So Black Bitcoiners’ embrace of decentralized currencies—and a degree of doubt about government regulators, as well as those who have done well in the traditional system—makes sense. Skinner, the conference organizer, believes there’s racial subtext in the caution from the financial mainstream regarding Bitcoin—a pervasive idea that Black people just don’t understand finance. “I’m skeptical of all of those [warnings], based on the history,” Skinner, who is Black American, says. Even a drop in the value of Bitcoin this year, which later went back up, has not made him reticent. “They have petrol shortages in England right now. They’ll blame the weather or Brexit, but they’ll never have to say they’re dumb. Something don’t work in Detroit or some city with a Black mayor, we get a collective shame on us.” Read more: America’s Interstate Slave Trade Once Trafficked Nearly 30,000 People a Year—And Reshaped the Country’s Economy The first time I speak to Skinner, the summit is still two weeks away. I’d asked him to talk through some of the logistics, but our conversation ranges from what gives money value to the impact of ride-share services on cabbies refusing Black passengers. Tech often promises to solve social problems, he says. The Internet was supposed to democratize all sorts of things. In many cases, it defaulted to old patterns. (As Black crypto policy expert Cleve Mesidor put it to me, “The Internet was supposed to be decentralized, and today it’s owned by four white men.”) But with the right people involved from the start of the next wave of change—crypto—the possibilities are endless, Skinner says. Skinner, a Howard grad and engineer by training, first turned to crypto when he and Mapondera were trying to find ways to do ethanol business in Zimbabwe. Traditional international transactions were slow or came with exorbitant fees. In Africa, consumers pay some of the world’s highest remittance, cell phone and Internet data fees in the world, a damaging continuation of centuries-long wealth transfers off the continent to others, Skinner says. Hearing about cryptocurrency, he was intrigued—particularly having seen, during the recession, the same banking industry that had profited from slavery getting bailed out as hundreds of thousands of people of color lost their homes. So in 2013, he invested “probably less than $3,000,” mostly in Bitcoin. Encouraged by his friend Brian Armstrong, CEO of Coinbase, one of the largest platforms for trading crypto, he grew his stake. In 2014, when Skinner went to a crypto conference in Amsterdam, only about eight Black people were there, five of them caterers, but he felt he had come home ideologically. He saw he didn’t need a Rockefeller inheritance to change the world. “I don’t have to build a bank where they literally used my ancestors to build the capital,” says Skinner, who today runs a site called I Love Black People, which operates like a global anti-racist Yelp. “I can unseat that thing by not trying to be like them.” Eventually, he and Mapondera founded BillMari and became the first crypto company to partner with the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe to lower fees on remittances, the flow of money from immigrants overseas back home to less-developed nations—an economy valued by the World Bank and its offshoot KNOMAD at $702 billion in 2020. (Some of the duo’s business plans later evaporated, after Zimbabwe’s central bank revoked approval for some cryptocurrency activities.) Skinner’s feelings about the economic overlords make it a bit surprising that he can attract people like Charlene Fadirepo, a banker by trade and former government regulator, to speak at the summit. On the first day, she offers attendees a report on why 2021 was a “breakout year for Bitcoin,” pointing out that major banks have begun helping high-net-worth clients invest in it, and that some corporations have bought crypto with their cash on hand, holding it as an asset. Fadirepo, who worked in the Fed’s inspector general’s office monitoring Federal Reserve banks and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, is not a person who hates central banks or regulation. A Black American, she believes strongly in both, and in their importance for protecting investors and improving the economic position of Black people. Today she operates Guidefi, a financial education and advising company geared toward helping Black women connect with traditional financial advisers. It just launched, for a fee, direct education in cryptocurrency. Crypto is a relatively new part of Fadirepo’s life. She and her Nigerian-American doctor husband earn good salaries and follow all the responsible middle-class financial advice. But the pandemic showed her they still didn’t have what some of his white colleagues did: the freedom to walk away from high-risk work. As the stock market shuddered and storefronts shuttered, she decided a sea change was coming. A family member had mentioned Bitcoin at a funeral in 2017, but it sounded risky. Now, her research kept bringing her back to it. Last year, she and her husband bought $6,000 worth. No investment has ever generated the kinds of returns for them that Bitcoin has. “It has transformed people’s relationship with money,” she says. “Folks are just more intentional … and honestly feeling like they had access to a world that was previously walled off.” Read more: El Salvador Is Betting on Bitcoin to Rebrand the Country — and Strengthen the President’s Grip She knows frauds exists. In May, a federal watchdog revealed that since October 2020, nearly 7,000 people have reported losses of more than $80 million on crypto scams—12 times more scam reports than the same period the previous year. The median individual loss: $1,900. For Fadirepo, it’s worrying. That’s part of why she helps moderate recurring free learning and discussion options like the Black Bitcoin Billionaires chat room on Clubhouse, which has grown from about 2,000 to 130,000 club members this year. Jared Soares for TIMECharlene Fadirepo, a banker and former government regulator, near the National Museum of African American History and Culture There’s a reason Black investors might prefer their own spaces for that kind of education. Fadirepo says it’s not unheard-of in general crypto spaces—theoretically open to all, but not so much in practice—to hear that relying on the U.S. dollar is slavery. “To me, a descendant of enslaved people in America, that was painful,” she says. “There’s a lot of talk about sovereignty, freedom from the U.S. dollar, freedom from inflation, inflation is slavery, blah blah blah. The historical context has been sucked out of these conversations about traditional financial systems. I don’t know how I can talk about banking without also talking about history.” Back in January, I found myself in a convenience store in a low-income and predominantly Black neighborhood in Dallas, an area still living the impact of segregation decades after its official end. I was there to report on efforts to register Black residents for COVID-19 shots after an Internet-only sign-up system—and wealthier people gaming the system—created an early racial disparity in vaccinations. I stepped away to buy a bottle of water. Inside the store, a Black man wondered aloud where the lottery machine had gone. He’d come to spend his usual $2 on tickets and had found a Bitcoin machine sitting in its place. A second Black man standing nearby, surveying chip options, explained that Bitcoin was a form of money, an investment right there for the same $2. After just a few questions, the first man put his money in the machine and walked away with a receipt describing the fraction of one bitcoin he now owned. Read more: When a Texas County Tried to Ensure Racial Equity in COVID-19 Vaccinations, It Didn’t Go as Planned I was both worried and intrigued. What kind of arrangement had prompted the store’s owner to replace the lottery machine? That month, a single bitcoin reached the $40,000 mark. “That’s very revealing, if someone chooses to put a cryptocurrency machine in the same place where a lottery [machine] was,” says Jeffrey Frankel, a Harvard economist, when I tell him that story. Frankel has described cryptocurrencies as similar to gambling, more often than not attracting those who can least afford to lose, whether they are in El Salvador or Texas. Frankel ranks among the economists who have been critical of El Salvador’s decision to begin recognizing Bitcoin last month as an official currency, in part because of the reality that few in the county have access to the internet, as well as the cryptocurrency’s price instability and its lack of backing by hard assets, he says. At the same time that critics have pointed to the shambolic Bitcoin rollout in El Salvador, Bitcoin has become a major economic force in Nigeria, one of the world’s larger players in cryptocurrency trading. In fact, some have argued that it has helped people in that country weather food inflation. But, to Frankel, crypto does not contain promise for lasting economic transformation. To him, disdain for experts drives interest in cryptocurrency in much the same way it can fuel vaccine hesitancy. Frankel can see the potential to reduce remittance costs, and he does not doubt that some people have made money. Still, he’s concerned that the low cost and click-here ease of buying crypto may draw people to far riskier crypto assets, he says. Then he tells me he’d put the word assets here in a hard set of air quotes. And Frankel, who is white, is not alone. Darrick Hamilton, an economist at the New School who is Black, says Bitcoin should be seen in the same framework as other low-cost, high-risk, big-payoff options. “In the end, it’s a casino,” he says. To people with less wealth, it can feel like one of the few moneymaking methods open to them, but it’s not a source of group uplift. “Like any speculation, those that can arbitrage the market will be fine,” he says. “There’s a whole lot of people that benefited right before the Great Recession, but if they didn’t get out soon enough, they lost their shirts too.” To buyers like Jiri Sampson, a Black cryptocurrency investor who works in real estate and lives outside Washington, D.C., that perspective doesn’t register as quite right. The U.S.-born son of Guyanese immigrants wasn’t thinking about exploitation when he invested his first $20 in cryptocurrency in 2017. But the groundwork was there. Sampson homeschools his kids, due in part to his lack of faith that public schools equip Black children with the skills to determine their own fates. He is drawn to the capacity of this technology to create greater agency for Black people worldwide. The blockchain, for example, could be a way to establish ownership for people who don’t hold standard documents—an important issue in Guyana and many other parts of the world, where individuals who have lived on the land for generations are vulnerable to having their property co-opted if they lack formal deeds. Sampson even pitched a project using the blockchain and GPS technology to establish digital ownership records to the Guyanese government, which did not bite. “I don’t want to downplay the volatility of Bitcoin,” Sampson says. But that’s only a significant concern, he believes, if one intends to sell quickly. To him, Bitcoin represents a “harder” asset than the dollar, which he compares to a ship with a hole in it. Bitcoin has a limited supply, while the Fed can decide to print more dollars anytime. That, to Sampson, makes some cryptocurrencies, namely Bitcoin, good to buy and hold, to pass along wealth from one generation to another. Economists and crypto buyers aren’t the only ones paying attention. Congress, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Federal Reserve have indicated that they will move toward official assessments or regulation soon. At least 10 federal agencies are interested in or already regulating crypto in some way, and there’s now a Congressional Blockchain Caucus. Representatives from the Federal Reserve and the SEC declined to comment, but SEC Chairman Gary Gensler assured a Senate subcommittee in September that his agency is working to develop regulation that will apply to cryptocurrency markets and trading activity. Enter Cleve Mesidor, of the quip about the Internet being owned by four white men. When we meet during the summit, she introduces herself: “Cleve Mesidor, I’m in crypto.” She’s the first person I’ve ever heard describe herself that way, but not that long ago, “influencer” wasn’t a career either. A former Obama appointee who worked inside the Commerce Department on issues related to entrepreneurship and economic development, Mesidor learned about cryptocurrency during that time. But she didn’t get involved in it personally until 2013, when she purchased $200 in Bitcoin. After leaving government, she founded the National Policy Network of Women of Color in Blockchain, and is now the public policy adviser for the industry group the Blockchain Association. There are more men than women in Black crypto spaces, she tells me, but the gender imbalance tends to be less pronounced than in white-dominated crypto communities. Mesidor, who immigrated to the U.S. from Haiti and uses her crypto investments to fund her professional “wanderlust,” has also lived crypto’s downsides. She’s been hacked and the victim of an attempted ransomware attack. But she still believes cryptocurrency and related technology can solve real-world problems, and she’s trying, she says, to make sure that necessary consumer protections are not structured in a way that chokes the life out of small businesses or investors. “D.C. is like Vegas; the house always wins,” says Mesidor, whose independently published book is called The Clevolution: My Quest for Justice in Politics & Crypto. “The crypto community doesn’t get that.” Passion, she says, is not enough. The community needs to be involved in the regulatory discussions that first intensified after the price of a bitcoin went to $20,000 in 2017. A few days after the summit, when Mesidor and I spoke by phone, Bitcoin had climbed to nearly $60,000. At Barcode, the Washington lounge, Isaiah Jackson is holding court. A man with a toothpaste-commercial smile, he’s the author of the independently published Bitcoin & Black America, has appeared on CNBC and is half of the streaming show The Gentleman of Crypto, which bills itself as the one of the longest-running cryptocurrency shows on the Internet. When he was building websites as a sideline, he convinced a large black church in Charlotte, N.C., to, for a time, accept Bitcoin donations. He helped establish Black Bitcoin Billionaires on Clubhouse and, like Fadirepo, helps moderate some of its rooms and events. He’s also a former teacher, descended from a line of teachers, and is using those skills to develop (for a fee) online education for those who want to become crypto investors. Now, there’s a small group standing near him, talking, but mostly listening. Jackson was living in North Carolina when one of his roommates, a white man who worked for a money-management firm, told him he had just heard a presentation about crypto and thought he might want to suggest it to his wealthy parents. The concept blew Jackson’s mind. He soon started his own research. “Being in the Black community and seeing the actions of banks, with redlining and other things, it just appealed to me,” Jackson tells me. “You free the money, you free everything else.” Read more: Beyond Tulsa: The Historic Legacies and Overlooked Stories of America’s ‘Black Wall Streets’ He took his $400 savings and bought two bitcoins in October 2013. That December, the price of a single bitcoin topped $1,100. He started thinking about what kind of new car he’d buy. And he stuck with it, even seeing prices fluctuate and scams proliferate. When the Gentlemen of Bitcoin started putting together seminars, one of the early venues was at a college fair connected to an annual HBCU basketball tournament attended by thousands of mostly Black people. Bitcoin eventually became more than an investment. He believed there was great value in spreading the word. But that was then. “I’m done convincing people. There’s no point battling going back and forth,” he says. “Even if they don’t realize it, what [investors] are doing if they are keeping their bitcoin long term, they are moving money out of the current system into another one. And that is basically the best form of peaceful protest.”   —With reporting by Leslie Dickstein and Simmone Shah.....»»

Category: topSource: timeOct 15th, 2021

NATO"s Plans To Hack Your Brain

NATO's Plans To Hack Your Brain Authored by Ben Norton via TheGrayZone.com, Western governments in the NATO military alliance are developing tactics of “cognitive warfare,” using the supposed threats of China and Russia to justify waging a “battle for your brain” in the “human domain,” to “make everyone a weapon.” NATO is developing new forms of warfare to wage a “battle for the brain,” as the military alliance put it. The US-led NATO military cartel has tested novel modes of hybrid warfare against its self-declared adversaries, including economic warfare, cyber warfare, information warfare, and psychological warfare. Now, NATO is spinning out an entirely new kind of combat it has branded cognitive warfare. Described as the “weaponization of brain sciences,” the new method involves “hacking the individual” by exploiting “the vulnerabilities of the human brain” in order to implement more sophisticated “social engineering.” Until recently, NATO had divided war into five different operational domains: air, land, sea, space, and cyber. But with its development of cognitive warfare strategies, the military alliance is discussing a new, sixth level: the “human domain.” A 2020 NATO-sponsored study of this new form of warfare clearly explained, “While actions taken in the five domains are executed in order to have an effect on the human domain, cognitive warfare’s objective is to make everyone a weapon.” “The brain will be the battlefield of the 21st century,” the report stressed. “Humans are the contested domain,” and “future conflicts will likely occur amongst the people digitally first and physically thereafter in proximity to hubs of political and economic power.” The 2020 NATO-sponsored study on cognitive warfare While the NATO-backed study insisted that much of its research on cognitive warfare is designed for defensive purposes, it also conceded that the military alliance is developing offensive tactics, stating, “The human is very often the main vulnerability and it should be acknowledged in order to protect NATO’s human capital but also to be able to benefit from our adversaries’s vulnerabilities.” In a chilling disclosure, the report said explicitly that “the objective of Cognitive Warfare is to harm societies and not only the military.” With entire civilian populations in NATO’s crosshairs, the report emphasized that Western militaries must work more closely with academia to weaponize social sciences and human sciences and help the alliance develop its cognitive warfare capacities. The study described this phenomenon as “the militarization of brain science.” But it appears clear that NATO’s development of cognitive warfare will lead to a militarization of all aspects of human society and psychology, from the most intimate of social relationships to the mind itself. Such all-encompassing militarization of society is reflected in the paranoid tone of the NATO-sponsored report, which warned of “an embedded fifth column, where everyone, unbeknownst to him or her, is behaving according to the plans of one of our competitors.” The study makes it clear that those “competitors” purportedly exploiting the consciousness of Western dissidents are China and Russia. In other words, this document shows that figures in the NATO military cartel increasingly see their own domestic population as a threat, fearing civilians to be potential Chinese or Russian sleeper cells, dastardly “fifth columns” that challenge the stability of “Western liberal democracies.” NATO’s development of novel forms of hybrid warfare come at a time when member states’ military campaigns are targeting domestic populations on an unprecedented level. The Ottawa Citizen reported this September that the Canadian military’s Joint Operations Command took advantage of the Covid-19 pandemic to wage an information war against its own domestic population, testing out propaganda tactics on Canadian civilians. Internal NATO-sponsored reports suggest that this disclosure is just scratching the surface of a wave of new unconventional warfare techniques that Western militaries are employing around the world. Canada hosts ‘NATO Innovation Challenge’ on cognitive warfare Twice each year, NATO holds a “pitch-style event” that it brand as an “Innovation Challenge.” These campaigns – one hosted in the Spring and the other in the Fall, by alternating member states – call on private companies, organizations, and researchers to help develop new tactics and technologies for the military alliance. The shark tank-like challenges reflect the predominant influence of neoliberal ideology within NATO, as participants mobilize the free market, public-private partnerships, and the promise of cash prizes to advance the agenda of the military-industrial complex. NATO’s Fall 2021 Innovation Challenge is hosted by Canada, and is titled “The invisible threat: Tools for countering cognitive warfare.” “Cognitive warfare seeks to change not only what people think, but also how they act,” the Canadian government wrote in its official statement on the challenge. “Attacks against the cognitive domain involve the integration of cyber, disinformation/misinformation, psychological, and social-engineering capabilities.” Ottawa’s press release continued: “Cognitive warfare positions the mind as a battle space and contested domain. Its objective is to sow dissonance, instigate conflicting narratives, polarize opinion, and radicalize groups. Cognitive warfare can motivate people to act in ways that can disrupt or fragment an otherwise cohesive society.” NATO-backed Canadian military officials discuss cognitive warfare in panel event An advocacy group called the NATO Association of Canada has mobilized to support this Innovation Challenge, working closely with military contractors to attract the private sector to invest in further research on behalf of NATO – and its own bottom line. While the NATO Association of Canada (NAOC) is technically an independent NGO, its mission is to promote NATO, and the organization boasts on its website, “The NAOC has strong ties with the Government of Canada including Global Affairs Canada and the Department of National Defence.” As part of its efforts to promote Canada’s NATO Innovation Challenge, the NAOC held a panel discussion on cognitive warfare on October 5. The researcher who wrote the definitive 2020 NATO-sponsored study on cognitive warfare, François du Cluzel, participated in the event, alongside NATO-backed Canadian military officers. The October 5 panel on cognitive warfare, hosted by the NATO Association of Canada The panel was overseen by Robert Baines, president of the NATO Association of Canada. It was moderated by Garrick Ngai, a marketing executive in the weapons industry who serves as an adviser to the Canadian Department of National Defense and vice president and director of the NAOC. Baines opened the event noting that participants would discuss “cognitive warfare and new domain of competition, where state and non-state actors aim to influence what people think and how they act.” The NAOC president also happily noted the lucrative “opportunities for Canadian companies” that this NATO Innovation Challenge promised. NATO researcher describes cognitive warfare as ‘ways of harming the brain’ The October 5 panel kicked off with François du Cluzel, a former French military officer who in 2013 helped to create the NATO Innovation Hub (iHub), which he has since then managed from its base in Norfolk, Virginia. Although the iHub insists on its website, for legal reasons, that the “opinions expressed on this platform don’t constitute NATO or any other organization points of view,” the organization is sponsored by the Allied Command Transformation (ACT), described as “one of two Strategic Commands at the head of NATO’s military command structure.” The Innovation Hub, therefore, acts as a kind of in-house NATO research center or think tank. Its research is not necessarily official NATO policy, but it is directly supported and overseen by NATO. In 2020, NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander Transformation (SACT) tasked du Cluzel, as manager of the iHub, to conduct a six-month study on cognitive warfare. Du Cluzel summarized his research in the panel this October. He initiated his remarks noting that cognitive warfare “right now is one of the hottest topics for NATO,” and “has become a recurring term in military terminology in recent years.” Although French, Du Cluzel emphasized that cognitive warfare strategy “is being currently developed by my command here in Norfolk, USA.” The NATO Innovation Hub manager spoke with a PowerPoint presentation, and opened with a provocative slide that described cognitive warfare as “A Battle for the Brain.” “Cognitive warfare is a new concept that starts in the information sphere, that is a kind of hybrid warfare,” du Cluzel said. “It starts with hyper-connectivity. Everyone has a cell phone,” he continued. “It starts with information because information is, if I may say, the fuel of cognitive warfare. But it goes way beyond solely information, which is a standalone operation – information warfare is a standalone operation.” Cognitive warfare overlaps with Big Tech corporations and mass surveillance, because “it’s all about leveraging the big data,” du Cluzel explained. “We produce data everywhere we go. Every minute, every second we go, we go online. And this is extremely easy to leverage those data in order to better know you and use that knowledge to change the way you think.” Naturally, the NATO researcher claimed foreign “adversaries” are the supposed aggressors employing cognitive warfare. But at the same time, he made it clear that the Western military alliance is developing its own tactics. Du Cluzel defined cognitive warfare as the “art of using technologies to alter the cognition of human targets.” Those technologies, he noted, incorporate the fields of NBIC – nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science. All together, “it makes a kind of very dangerous cocktail that can further manipulate the brain,” he said. Du Cluzel went on to explain that the exotic new method of attack “goes well beyond” information warfare or psychological operations (psyops). “Cognitive warfare is not only a fight against what we think, but it’s rather a fight against the way we think, if we can change the way people think,” he said. “It’s much more powerful and it goes way beyond the information [warfare] and psyops.” De Cluzel continued: “It’s crucial to understand that it’s a game on our cognition, on the way our brain processes information and turns it into knowledge, rather than solely a game on information or on psychological aspects of our brains. It’s not only an action against what we think, but also an action against the way we think, the way we process information and turn it into knowledge.” “In other words, cognitive warfare is not just another word, another name for information warfare. It is a war on our individual processor, our brain.” The NATO researcher stressed that “this is extremely important for us in the military,” because “it has the potential, by developing new weapons and ways of harming the brain, it has the potential to engage neuroscience and technology in many, many different approaches to influence human ecology… because you all know that it’s very easy to turn a civilian technology into a military one.” As for who the targets of cognitive warfare could be, du Cluzel revealed that anyone and everyone is on the table. “Cognitive warfare has universal reach, from starting with the individual to states and multinational organizations,” he said. “Its field of action is global and aim to seize control of the human being, civilian as well as military.” And the private sector has a financial interest in advancing cognitive warfare research, he noted: “The massive worldwide investments made in neurosciences suggests that the cognitive domain will probably one of the battlefields of the future.” The development of cognitive warfare totally transforms military conflict as we know it, du Cluzel said, adding “a third major combat dimension to the modern battlefield: to the physical and informational dimension is now added a cognitive dimension.” This “creates a new space of competition beyond what is called the five domains of operations – or land, sea, air, cyber, and space domains. Warfare in the cognitive arena mobilizes a wider range of battle spaces than solely the physical and information dimensions can do.” In short, humans themselves are the new contested domain in this novel mode of hybrid warfare, alongside land, sea, air, cyber, and outer space. NATO’s cognitive warfare study warns of “embedded fifth column” The study that NATO Innovation Hub manager François du Cluzel conducted, from June to November 2020, was sponsored by the military cartel’s Allied Command Transformation, and published as a 45-page report in January 2021 (PDF). The chilling document shows how contemporary warfare has reached a kind of dystopian stage, once imaginable only in science fiction. “The nature of warfare has changed,” the report emphasized. “The majority of current conflicts remain below the threshold of the traditionally accepted definition of warfare, but new forms of warfare have emerged such as Cognitive Warfare (CW), while the human mind is now being considered as a new domain of war.” For NATO, research on cognitive warfare is not just defensive; it is very much offensive as well. “Developing capabilities to harm the cognitive abilities of opponents will be a necessity,” du Cluzel’s report stated clearly. “In other words, NATO will need to get the ability to safeguard her decision making process and disrupt the adversary’s one.” And anyone could be a target of these cognitive warfare operations: “Any user of modern information technologies is a potential target. It targets the whole of a nation’s human capital,” the report ominously added. “As well as the potential execution of a cognitive war to complement to a military conflict, it can also be conducted alone, without any link to an engagement of the armed forces,” the study went on. “Moreover, cognitive warfare is potentially endless since there can be no peace treaty or surrender for this type of conflict.” Just as this new mode of battle has no geographic borders, it also has no time limit: “This battlefield is global via the internet. With no beginning and no end, this conquest knows no respite, punctuated by notifications from our smartphones, anywhere, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.” The NATO-sponsored study noted that “some NATO Nations have already acknowledged that neuroscientific techniques and technologies have high potential for operational use in a variety of security, defense and intelligence enterprises.” It spoke of breakthroughs in “neuroscientific methods and technologies” (neuroS/T), and said “uses of research findings and products to directly facilitate the performance of combatants, the integration of human machine interfaces to optimise combat capabilities of semi autonomous vehicles (e.g., drones), and development of biological and chemical weapons (i.e., neuroweapons).” The Pentagon is among the primary institutions advancing this novel research, as the report highlighted: “Although a number of nations have pursued, and are currently pursuing neuroscientific research and development for military purposes, perhaps the most proactive efforts in this regard have been conducted by the United States Department of Defense; with most notable and rapidly maturing research and development conducted by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).” Military uses of neuroS/T research, the study indicated, include intelligence gathering, training, “optimising performance and resilience in combat and military support personnel,” and of course “direct weaponisation of neuroscience and neurotechnology.” This weaponization of neuroS/T can and will be fatal, the NATO-sponsored study was clear to point out. The research can “be utilised to mitigate aggression and foster cognitions and emotions of affiliation or passivity; induce morbidity, disability or suffering; and ‘neutralise’ potential opponents or incur mortality” – in other words, to maim and kill people. The 2020 NATO-sponsored study on cognitive warfare The report quoted US Major General Robert H. Scales, who summarized NATO’s new combat philosophy: “Victory will be defined more in terms of capturing the psycho-cultural rather than the geographical high ground.” And as NATO develops tactics of cognitive warfare to “capture the psycho-cultural,” it is also increasingly weaponizing various scientific fields. The study spoke of “the crucible of data sciences and human sciences,” and stressed that “the combination of Social Sciences and System Engineering will be key in helping military analysts to improve the production of intelligence.” “If kinetic power cannot defeat the enemy,” it said, “psychology and related behavioural and social sciences stand to fill the void.” “Leveraging social sciences will be central to the development of the Human Domain Plan of Operations,” the report went on. “It will support the combat operations by providing potential courses of action for the whole surrounding Human Environment including enemy forces, but also determining key human elements such as the Cognitive center of gravity, the desired behaviour as the end state.” All academic disciplines will be implicated in cognitive warfare, not just the hard sciences. “Within the military, expertise on anthropology, ethnography, history, psychology among other areas will be more than ever required to cooperate with the military,” the NATO-sponsored study stated. The report nears its conclusion with an eerie quote: “Today’s progresses in nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science (NBIC), boosted by the seemingly unstoppable march of a triumphant troika made of Artificial Intelligence, Big Data and civilisational ‘digital addiction’ have created a much more ominous prospect: an embedded fifth column, where everyone, unbeknownst to him or her, is behaving according to the plans of one of our competitors.” “The modern concept of war is not about weapons but about influence,” it posited. “Victory in the long run will remain solely dependent on the ability to influence, affect, change or impact the cognitive domain.” The NATO-sponsored study then closed with a final paragraph that makes it clear beyond doubt that the Western military alliance’s ultimate goal is not only physical control of the planet, but also control over people’s minds: “Cognitive warfare may well be the missing element that allows the transition from military victory on the battlefield to lasting political success. The human domain might well be the decisive domain, wherein multi-domain operations achieve the commander’s effect. The five first domains can give tactical and operational victories; only the human domain can achieve the final and full victory.” Canadian Special Operations officer emphasizes importance of cognitive warfare When François du Cluzel, the NATO researcher who conducted the study on cognitive warfare, concluded his remarks in the October 5 NATO Association of Canada panel, he was followed by Andy Bonvie, a commanding officer at the Canadian Special Operations Training Centre. With more than 30 years of experience with the Canadian Armed Forces, Bonvie spoke of how Western militaries are making use of research by du Cluzel and others, and incorporating novel cognitive warfare techniques into their combat activities. “Cognitive warfare is a new type of hybrid warfare for us,” Bonvie said. “And it means that we need to look at the traditional thresholds of conflict and how the things that are being done are really below those thresholds of conflict, cognitive attacks, and non-kinetic forms and non-combative threats to us. We need to understand these attacks better and adjust their actions and our training accordingly to be able to operate in these different environments.” Although he portrayed NATO’s actions as “defensive,” claiming “adversaries” were using cognitive warfare against them, Bonvie was unambiguous about the fact that Western militaries are developing these tecniques themselves, to maintain a “tactical advantage.” “We cannot lose the tactical advantage for our troops that we’re placing forward as it spans not only tactically, but strategically,” he said. “Some of those different capabilities that we have that we enjoy all of a sudden could be pivoted to be used against us. So we have to better understand how quickly our adversaries adapt to things, and then be able to predict where they’re going in the future, to help us be and maintain the tactical advantage for our troops moving forward.” ‘Cognitive warfare is the most advanced form of manipulation seen to date’ Marie-Pierre Raymond, a retired Canadian lieutenant colonel who currently serves as a “defence scientist and innovation portfolio manager” for the Canadian Armed Forces’ Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security Program, also joined the October 5 panel. “Long gone are the days when war was fought to acquire more land,” Raymond said. “Now the new objective is to change the adversaries’ ideologies, which makes the brain the center of gravity of the human. And it makes the human the contested domain, and the mind becomes the battlefield.” “When we speak about hybrid threats, cognitive warfare is the most advanced form of manipulation seen to date,” she added, noting that it aims to influence individuals’ decision-making and “to influence a group of a group of individuals on their behavior, with the aim of gaining a tactical or strategic advantage.” Raymond noted that cognitive warfare also heavily overlaps with artificial intelligence, big data, and social media, and reflects “the rapid evolution of neurosciences as a tool of war.” Raymond is helping to oversee the NATO Fall 2021 Innovation Challenge on behalf of Canada’s Department of National Defence, which delegated management responsibilities to the military’s Innovation for Defence Excellence and Security (IDEaS) Program, where she works. In highly technical jargon, Raymond indicated that the cognitive warfare program is not solely defensive, but also offensive: “This challenge is calling for a solution that will support NATO’s nascent human domain and jump-start the development of a cognition ecosystem within the alliance, and that will support the development of new applications, new systems, new tools and concepts leading to concrete action in the cognitive domain.” She emphasized that this “will require sustained cooperation between allies, innovators, and researchers to enable our troops to fight and win in the cognitive domain. This is what we are hoping to emerge from this call to innovators and researchers.” To inspire corporate interest in the NATO Innovation Challenge, Raymond enticed, “Applicants will receive national and international exposure and cash prizes for the best solution.” She then added tantalizingly, “This could also benefit the applicants by potentially providing them access to a market of 30 nations.” Canadian military officer calls on corporations to invest in NATO’s cognitive warfare research The other institution that is managing the Fall 2021 NATO Innovation Challenge on behalf of Canada’s Department of National Defense is the Special Operations Forces Command (CANSOFCOM). A Canadian military officer who works with CANSOFCOM, Shekhar Gothi, was the final panelist in the October 5 NATO Association of Canada event. Gothi serves as CANSOFCOM’s “innovation officer” for Southern Ontario. He concluded the event appealing for corporate investment in NATO’s cognitive warfare research. The bi-annual Innovation Challenge is “part of the NATO battle rhythm,” Gothi declared enthusiastically. He noted that, in the spring of 2021, Portugal held a NATO Innovation Challenge focused on warfare in outer space. In spring 2020, the Netherlands hosted a NATO Innovation Challenge focused on Covid-19. Gothi reassured corporate investors that NATO will bend over backward to defend their bottom lines: “I can assure everyone that the NATO innovation challenge indicates that all innovators will maintain complete control of their intellectual property. So NATO won’t take control of that. Neither will Canada. Innovators will maintain their control over their IP.” The comment was a fitting conclusion to the panel, affirming that NATO and its allies in the military-industrial complex not only seek to dominate the world and the humans that inhabit it with unsettling cognitive warfare techniques, but to also ensure that corporations and their shareholders continue to profit from these imperial endeavors. Tyler Durden Fri, 10/15/2021 - 03:30.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytOct 15th, 2021

Wind turbine techs get paid $27 per hour to do one of the most dangerous jobs in the economy - and the profession is growing fast

Wind techs climb to dizzying heights to keep turbines in service, and jobs in the industry are projected to increase by 68% from 2020 to 2030. Mahmut Serdar Alakus/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images Wind-turbine technicians are the workers who service the very top of towering wind farms. The median wage is $27 per hour, and most jobs don't require a four-year degree. Employment is projected to increase 68% from 2020 to 2030 - significantly faster than other sectors. See more stories on Insider's business page. There are more than 65,000 land-based wind turbines across the US, according to the American Wind Energy Association, and more are coming online each year.Each of the wind turbines that dots the landscape of a wind farm is generally made of a tower, blades, and a central unit called a nacelle. All three elements require specialists to install and maintain them throughout the life of a turbine.The nacelles have the most going on, since that is the housing for the generator, gearbox, brakes, and circuitry that convert the mechanical energy into electricity to send down to the power grid. Markus Scholz/picture alliance via Getty Images In order to make repairs, wind techs typically have to climb as high as 300 feet up the narrow tube of the tower to the nacelle while hauling up all the tools, computers, and safety gear needed to get the job done. While some tasks require climbing outside the nacelle, most routine work is done within the enclosure.Other crews are used to inspect, repair, or clean the fiberglass blades, which requires workers to rappel down from the nacelle to complete the job while dangling hundreds of feet above the ground.The median wage for wind techs is $27 per hour, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, which works out to about $56,000 per year - about 33% higher than the national median earnings of $42,000.A community college or technical degree is typically enough to qualify for the job, and many employers provide a year or more of on-the-job training. Most techs will need to understand electrical, hydraulic, braking, mechanical, and computers systems, as well as have first aid and rescue training. Mahmut Serdar Alakus/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images With 6,900 workers in 2020, the field is small but one of the fastest growing in the entire economy, with BLS projections expecting a 68% increase in new jobs by 2030. That's nearly nine times faster than the projection for all other occupations tracked by the agency.Beyond claustrophobia and acrophobia, a few things might dissuade someone from racing to find a wind-tech job.For one thing, the schedule can be grueling. Most wind farms are located in remote areas, so travel times to job sites can take a long time. Plus, bad weather or other unpredictable events can knock out a turbine at any time of the day or night, and repairs need to happen as quickly as possible. Mahmut Serdar Alakus/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images More importantly, the Labor Department says wind techs have one of the highest rates of injury and illness of all occupations. In particular, a 2017 study found that falls in the energy sector are quite common (though just a few are fatal) as are strains, sprains, and overexertion.As the world shifts from carbon to renewable power sources, it will increasingly rely on workers like wind techs to do the high-risk jobs that keep the modern economy moving.If you are a wind tech or a worker who has a job you consider high risk, please get in touch with Dominick Reuter via email. Responses to this story will be kept confidential.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytOct 10th, 2021