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Hackers Promote Fraudulent Crypto Project On Robinhood"s Twitter Account: How Much Did They Get?

The official Twitter account of Robinhood Markets Inc. read more.....»»

Category: blogSource: benzingaJan 25th, 2023

What is wash trading, the fraudulent practice that some experts say accounts for 70% of transactions on crypto exchanges?

Wash trading can artificially boost prices, give the illusion of liquidity, and generate interest from other investors, experts tell Insider. (Photo by Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images) Wash trading accounts for 70% of trades on some crypto exchanges, a study found.  The practice of firms trading with themselves to boost prices artificially may lure inexperienced investors.  Three experts dive into the practice and what it means for the crypto market.  Illicit crypto transactions skyrocketed in 2022 as scammers and hackers made off with billions, but there's another type of fraud lurking in the industry—wash trading, the fraudulent practice some traders and crypto firms can use to pump prices, dupe investors, and make trading appear more liquid. A recent working paper from the National Bureau of Economic Research found that wash trades accounted for up to 70% of all transaction on non-compliant crypto exchanges, suggesting most trades on these platforms are fraudulent. Mark Cuban, an avid cryptocurrency investor, warned his followers that the discovery and regulatory crackdown on wash trades could potentially set up another implosion in the industry.What is wash trading and why is it bad?Wash trading is essentially when a firm or party trades with itself to artificially boost prices, give the illusion of liquidity, and generate interest from other investors, according to Timothy Cradle, the director of regulatory affairs at Blockchain Intelligence. That can lead other investors to buy the token at an artificially high price. It's fraud and a form of market manipulation, he said.But the practice isn't only limited to individual bad actors. Crypto exchanges can also do wash trading to artificially jack up trading volumes, making the exchange appear more productive or more liquid than it actually is. That could potentially lure investors who are looking for a place to park their money, especially if they're comparing exchanges. "There's competition in every industry. That's not an excuse to go out and do wash trading and try to make your exchange look more liquid than it actually is, especially when you're dealing with cryptocurrency," Cradle said.How common is it?Wash trading could be as simple as sending crypto from one wallet to another, but there are more elaborate schemes out there, says Kim Grauer, the director of research as Chainalysis. In her research, wash trades were identified when a trade met certain relationship criteria with other wallets and addresses – suggesting something fraudulent could be taking place.The NBER paper studied 29 crypto exchanges that were classified as regulated or unregulated, with unregulated exchanges being sorted into two tiers based on size. The authors found wash trading was virtually absent on regulated crypto exchanges, but made up an average 77.5% of trading volume on unregulated exchanges. Tier-1 unregulated exchanges had a slightly lower proportion of wash trades at 61.8% of transactions, compared to 86.2% of transactions Tier-2 unregulated exchanges. For Binance, the largest crypto exchange in the world by trading volume and an unregulated Tier-1 exchange in the study, wash trading was estimated to comprise 46.4% of all transactions. "Binance does not engage in or tolerate wash trading, which is a violation of our terms of use, nor has it ever done so," a spokesperson from the exchange told Insider. "Binance has a dedicated Market Surveillance team that is responsible for reviewing surveillance related to potential abusive and/or manipulative behavior including wash trades and trade price manipulation."KuCoin, another top-five crypto exchange according CoinMarketCap, was estimated 52.9% of its transactions consist of wash trades. A spokesperson from the exchange told Insider KuCoin did not engage in wash trading.The paper also found a higher incident of wash trading in the few weeks after the crypto market saw positive returns, or experienced a drop in volatility. "Price increases could draw retail investors' attention and encourage speculation. Therefore, crypto exchanges are incentivized to pump up volumes to vie for better ranking and more clients."There's no way to truly identify a wash trade unless you have access to account data, which is typically only available to the exchanges themselves, according to Martin Leinweber, digital assets product specialist at MarketVector Indexes. The paper's findings, do, however, give an idea of how important regulation is in the industry, he said.How bad is this for the crypto industry?Experts are hesitant to say it could lead to the crash Mark Cuban envisioned, although the risk of another major crypto exchange going down because of fraudulent behavior is certainly possible, Cradle said."I struggle to agree or disagree with it," Cradle said. "I would find it hard to see a complex industry completely go under because of one type of fraud or manipulation.""I don't see a risk of a sudden crash as investors are already migrating to better exchanges," Leinweber added, pointing the exodus of crypto traders towards Tier 1 exchanges, which typically have better external ratings and are more compliant with regulation. Why aren't regulators paying more attention?One problem could be that the legal framework for crypto regulation is currently ambiguous. For instance, many in the industry have claimed that cryptocurrencies are commodities, not securities. But that definition places crypto in a regulatory loophole, since there is no federal oversight over the commodities spot market the way there is for the futures market."We're in this weird situation where both the CFTC and the SEC haven't really settled on what is cryptocurrency, and the question becomes who's actually going to investigate it and why," Cradle said. Others have criticized the CFTC and the SEC's hands-off approach to regulation. SEC chief Gary Gensler has previously said the US has regulatory framework for crypto firms, but many are not compliant, he said, urging exchanges to "come in and talk." Leinweber speculated that regulators may need to have a more comprehensive strategy if they are truly to crack down on wash trading. "To govern these exchanges, you must have a global strategy. Otherwise, regulatory arbitrage would always exist," he said. "I predict there will be increased regulation. But what we really require is intelligent regulation." Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJan 16th, 2023

Looking for a job in tech? Here are 10 you might want to avoid.

Despite mass layoffs, the tech industry continues to hire. But the jobs aren't all great: Here are the 10 worst entry-level jobs in tech, experts say. A job in tech can lead to a big paycheck — or to an equity stake in a young company. But it's not always that exciting.Maskot/Getty Images Working in tech sounds good, but it isn't always what it's cracked up to be. The industry laid off more than 150,000 workers last year, but it's still hiring in some places. Not all of those jobs are great. Here's a list of 10 experts say you might want to avoid. A tech job can lead to high status and an even higher bank account balance — but they're not all created equal, and some industry watchers say there's a crop you might want to avoid altogether.The industry logged a tough 2022: Elon Musk took over Twitter and slashed half its staff. Mark Zuckerberg's Meta cut tens of thousands of jobs. Amazon launched the largest round of corporate layoffs in its history. And even Google launched a cost-cutting initiative.All told, more than 150,000 tech workers lost their jobs across health tech, education tech, and crypto, according to data from tracker Layoffs.fyi.Still, companies across the tech industry are hiring in 2023. But before you submit your resume, look through our list of the worst entry-level jobs in tech: Insider canvassed forums on Blind, Fishbowl, and Reddit— and spoke to tech career coaches, workers, and even a Silicon Valley therapist to compile our subjective list of the worst entry-level jobs in the industry. Here are the 10 worst entry-level tech jobs, based on our research: IT support specialistIT support specialists help clients troubleshoot and fix issues on their computers, soft wares, and other devices.Thomas Barwick/ Getty ImagesWhat they do: IT support specialists help clients troubleshoot and fix issues on their computers, software, and other devices.The overall number of US job openings in IT support is expected to increase by 6% between 2021 to 2031, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.  The BLS projects that around 75,000 jobs in IT support will open each year. Salary: IT support specialists can make an average base salary of $49,154 a year, according to estimates from Indeed.But salaries vary depending on company and location. An entry-level IT associate at a New York-based consulting firm can make between $65,000 to $80,000 a year, whereas an IT support technician at a Wisconsin-based firm can make up to $20 an hour under a full-time contract, according to job listings on Indeed. Why it's bad: IT support "can be a challenging role" since workers often have to deal with difficult clients that are frustrated when their devices stop working, Dr. Kyle Elliott, a tech career coach, told Insider.Moreover, IT support roles often don't pay well until they've enter a manager-level position, Elliott said. Even so, there can be little room for promotion depending on the size of the company."Although you may be able to progress into a tier-2 or tier-3 level role, there tends to be little upward mobility available in these roles, particularly at smaller companies," Elliott said. From an IT support specialist: One worker who claimed to have been in the IT support industry for seven and a half years posted on Fishbowl that "the first couple of jobs were kinda awful." Another IT support worker who identifies as "tier 1" posted that the job isn't challenging enough since it doesn't draw from the poster's technical expertise, according to Fishbowl.  Customer service specialistCustomer service specialists help clients answer questions related to the company.Tom Werner/Getty ImagesWhat they do: Customer service specialists — also known as customer service representatives — help clients answer questions related to the company. They can also open and close sales accounts and deal with payment issues. The overall number of US job openings in customer service is expected to decline by 4% between 2021 to 2031, according to data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.  Still, the BLS projects that around 389,400 jobs in customer service will open each year. Salary: Customer service specialists can make an average salary of $41,555 per year, according to an estimate from Glassdoor. But the annual salary for these roles depends on the company and industry. An associate client support consultant at the Virginia office of a global human resources tech firm can make $19 an hour, according to a job posting. However, a New York-based sales customer service representative at an industrial manufacturing company has a salary range listed as $45,000 to $50,000 a year. Why it's bad: Customer service representatives are a common first job in the tech industry. But like IT support, they often have to deal with angry customers who are only reaching out when they have an issue, Dr. Kyle Elliott, a tech career coach, told Insider. The role is also "often incredibly fast-paced and repetitive," Elliott said. Customer service representatives may also be required to meet the needs of multiple customers simultaneously, especially if they're helping them in a chat room, Elliott said. "This can negatively impact your mental health and lead to high stress and burnout despite minimal pay," he said. From a customer service specialist: One customer service representative who claims to work at a major phone carrier went to Fishbowl to say that the job "requires lots of patience." "Probably one of my worst experiences in customer service," the worker said.  Social media coordinatorSocial media coordinators work with sales, marketing, and graphic design teams to create social media campaigns.Matt Cardy/Getty ImagesWhat they do: Social media coordinators work with sales, marketing, and graphic design teams to create high-traffic social media campaigns that promote a company's brand or new product.The overall number of digital media coordinator jobs in the US is expected to increase by 6% between 2018 to 2028, according to data from Zippia.Salary: Social media coordinators can make an average salary of $44,685 a year, according to estimates from Indeed. But salaries vary depending on the industry, company and location. A social media coordinator with two years of experience at a New York-based software company can make between $60,000 to $80,000 a year, whereas a social media and communication specialist at a North Carolina-based pet hotel can make $13 an hour, according to job listings on Indeed. Why it's bad: Social media coordinators tend to be popular jobs among entry-level employees who want to break into tech since its serves as a "gateway" to marketing and other higher-paying roles, Dr. Kyle Elliott, a tech career coach, told Insider. But depending on the company, the job may be monotonous and could require long hours and low pay, Elliott said. It can also be high stress. Clients have also told Elliott that social media coordinators tend to take on tasks outside of social media such as digital and e-mail marketing and strategy which can be out of line with what they intended to do. "Social media coordination can be limiting when it comes to career growth," he said. From a social media coordinator: One social media coordinator who claimed to work at an agency went to Fishbowl to complain about how exhausting it is to constantly have to generate new ideas. "It feels unsustainable to be in this creative field sometimes," the poster said. Technical recruiterA technical recruiter helps a company hire qualified workers for roles in data science, engineering, and IT that require specialized skills.Andrey Popov/Getty ImagesWhat they do: A technical recruiter helps a company hire qualified workers for roles in data science, engineering, and IT that require specialized skills. It includes finding, screening, and interviewing potential job candidates.  The overall number of tech recruiting jobs in the US is expected to increase by 5% between 2018 and 2028, according to data from Zippia.Salary: Tech recruiters can expect to make an average base salary of $66,302 a year, according to Indeed.Entry-level salaries can vary depending on the company, industry, and location. An entry-level tech recruiter at a staffing agency based in Massachusetts can make around $40,000 a year, whereas a New York-based recruitment consultant at a talent firm can earn a base salary of $58,500 that can grow up to $80,000 if targets are met, according to the companies' job listings. Why it's bad: Tech recruiter jobs tend to be stressful, especially if you work in-house, Laurie Swanson, the founder of InspiHER Tech, a tech coaching and recruitment company, told Insider. It can be hard to reach goals set by managers given how unpredictable the job market and candidate behavior can be, Swanson said."Being an in-house tech recruiter means you have agreed to be on the front line for all hiring of the open tech jobs (and that is usually a lot), reaching out to people who do not respond, having to explain to your hiring managers why you haven't been able to find someone in their salary range and then finding out that the job you just got 4 people excited to interview for has been put on hold," Swanson said. From a tech recruiter: With droves of tech workers laid off, companies are now hiring recruiters on temporary contracts that don't guarantee full-time employment, creating job uncertainty, according to a post on Fishbowl.One senior tech recruiter on contract for seven years advised against taking contract work because it is "EXTREMELY unstable" after the worker allegedly got laid off from Microsoft, according to a Fishbowl post.  Network engineerNetwork engineers manage a company's computer network to ensure that it runs smoothly.VM/Getty ImagesWhat they do: Network engineers manage a company's computer network to ensure that it runs smoothly. Some duties include monitoring performance, installing or fixing equipment like routers, and performing day-to-day maintenance of the hardware. The overall number of US job openings in networking is expected to increase by 3% between 2021 to 2031, according to data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics.  Still, the BLS projects that around 23,900 jobs in networking and computer systems maintenance will open each year. Salary: Network engineers can expect to make an average base salary of $92,389 per year, according to Indeed.Entry-level salary ranges vary depending on the company, industry, and location. For instance, a junior network technician at a IT company in Colorado can make between $22 to $25 an hour on a full-time contract, where as a tier 1 network engineer for a telecommunications firm in Texas can earn between $60,000 to $75,000 a year, according to the companies' job listings. Why it's bad: While network engineers tend to see their salaries grow with more experience, entry-level roles often pay a low starting salary, Laurie Swanson, the founder and CEO of InspiHER Tech, a tech career coaching service for women, told Insider. The job is also physically demanding, Swanson said. "Though your pay grows, your body starts to fall apart at the same rate," she said. "You are climbing under desks, lifting heavy equipment and pulling the all-nighters without the pizza and beer responding to outages."Plus, if you decide to become a network engineer, make sure you also have great medical insurance because knee surgery is in your future!" From a network engineer: One former networking engineer pivoted to cyber security because networking requires dealing with outages, major production issues, and late night work that lowered quality of life, according to the worker's Reddit post. Work is sometimes required on the weekends as well, said the Reddit post.Customers can also be frustrating. Network engineer Josh Levine made a post on LinkedIn outlining a customer interaction inspired by his job — dialogue that reflects how difficult it can be to deal with customers who are stubborn and don't listen.   Content moderatorsContent moderators at Meta in Austin, Texas.The Washington Post / Contributor/Getty ImagesWhat they do: While the job description of a content moderator varies from company to company, by and large, the role consists of reviewing user-generated content. Industry experts estimate that there were about 100,000 workers performing content moderation across the world, according to an article in the Fordham Law Review from 2021.Average pay: Varies.In Nashville, for example, a quality analyst at TikTok can make anywhere from $65,000 to $82,000 per year, according to a job listing on Indeed, while a content moderator at Intellipro Group, a company that provides services to third-party media companies, earns $17 an hour, according to the company's job posting on Indeed.Why it's bad: Dr. Kyle Elliot, a tech career coach, told Insider that content moderation takes a toll on mental health because it exposes people to negative and offensive content. Ellison said, "depending on the company, there may be little room for growth as content moderators are often contractors rather than employees of the organization." From a content moderator: "My mental health was in the toilet," one moderator told Insider about their time working for TikTok. ""It was filled with the worst of the worst stuff," others said, describing videos of child abuse, self-harm, gruesome accidents, and mass shootings that they were forced to watch.  Project managersProject managers exist across numerous industry and are broadly responsible for the planning, execution, and completion of a project.Astrakan Images/ GettyWhat they do: Project managers exist across numerous industry and are broadly responsible for the planning, execution, and completion of a project. According to estimates from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were around 500,000 project manager roles in 2021. While the average growth rate for all occupations is around 5%, according to the BLS, the growth rate for project managers is expected to be 16% between 2021 and 2030.Average pay: Over $100,000, according to estimates from Indeed.Why it's bad: A source who works closely with tech workers told Insider that project managers have "feast and famine work cycles and loads of responsibilities" but rarely wield decision making power. Added to that, they often need to broker between challenging personality types.From a project manager: One project manager on Blind said, "sometimes it seems like I don't do much, but sometimes it seems like I do a lot," adding that they're used to getting "hated on and being loved."Amazon video reviewersAmazon video reviewers watch thousands of videos per day watching other employees at the company. They serve to "fine-tune" the system Amazon uses to keep track of its own workers, according to The Verge.picture alliance / Contributor/ Getty ImagesWhat they do: Amazon video reviewers watch thousands of videos per day watching other employees at the company. They serve to "fine-tune" the system Amazon uses to keep track of its own workers, according to The Verge. In 2022, California passed Assembly Bill 701 which restricts job performance targets from being set at levels that could pose safety risks or adequate bathroom breaks.  Average pay: $250 to $850 a month depending on location, according to an exclusive report from The Verge.Why it's bad: Several reviewers reported physical issues like headaches, eye pain, and weakening eyesight to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, cited by The Verge. The reviewers are also "made to hit punishing targets, with tracking software logging any periods of inactivity outside of designated break times," The Verge reported. In response, Amazon spokesperson Steve Kelly told The Verge that the reviewers "anecdotes do not reflect our policies or the experiences of the vast majority of our team." From a video reviewer: One video reviewer cited by The Verge said, "We shouldn't blink our eyes while reviewing a video because our accuracy will go less. We have to be on screen at least eight hours — which is kind of painful."Cybersecurity analystWorking in cybersecurity usually involves protecting a company's data, software, hardware, and networks from cyber attacks and threats.Morsa Images/Getty ImagesWhat they do: Working in cybersecurity usually involves protecting a company's data, software, hardware, and networks from cyber attacks and threats. The cybersecurity industry reached an "all-time high" with a reported 4.7 million workers, according to an October report from (ISC)², a nonprofit that specializes in training cybersecurity professionals, cited by Fortune.Average pay: $72,000 on average, according to data from Indeed. Why it's bad: Laurie Swanson, CEO of a tech career coaching service for women, said, "You spend a lot of time reviewing a lot of logs and then, just when you think you've solved a critical data breach, a new hacker erases all the good you've done, the world is not a better place and you are back at square one."From a cyber security specialist: "It could be so much better but unfortunately just seen as someone not adding value," a person who works in cybersecurity wrote on Blind. Data entry specialistThe Bureau of Labor Statistics defines data entry workers as anyone "operating a data entry device" performing duties ranging from verifying data to preparing materials for printing.gorodenkoff/Getty ImagesWhat they do: The Bureau of Labor Statistics defines data entry workers as anyone "operating a data entry device" performing duties ranging from verifying data to preparing materials for printing. There were almost 150,000 people employed in data entry in 2021, according to data from the BLS.Average pay: $15-20 an hour, according to estimates from Indeed. Why it's bad: Cathy Lanzalaco, a career coach who works with new college graduates and entry-level professionals, said the pay for data entry specialists varies greatly across industries and companies, so candidates don't always know what to expect. In addition, the job often requires long hours.  From a data entry specialist: One former data entry specialist on Reddit said, "If you know you're going to be bored, or annoyed, or feel like you're wasting your actual skills, then don't do it. If you know what you're doing and OK with that? Then, again, go for it." Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 3rd, 2023

Liberal PACs and charities that got $260 million from FTX and its executives could be forced to give it all back

FTX, founder Sam Bankman-Fried and other employees gave perhaps $260 million to charities and political groups. It could be clawed back in bankruptcy. Sam Bankman-Fried dines with Anthony Scaramucci, and Kevin O'Leary at the SALT NY ConferenceSALT NY FTX, Sam Bankman-Fried and Ryan Salame pumped millions into super PACs and campaigns. The company could deem the gifts "fraudulent transfers" and sue for refunds. It's happened before. It's also possible the money is gone. "You can't get blood from a turnip," an election lawyer said. The Washington newcomer had a way of turning heads. Or at least his money did — the billions of dollars generated by his web of offshore businesses, and his willingness to write six-figure checks to political parties and lobbyists, sparked the interest of a lot of powerful people.But in 2009, banker Allen Stanford's empire came crashing down when he was charged with running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme. For years afterwards, lawyers tried to recover the money that Stanford had dished out — suing Democratic and Republican fundraising committees, children's hospitals, and anyone else who'd taken his money.In 2022, another fallen billionaire is in a heap of legal trouble. Sam Bankman-Fried, known as SBF, hasn't faced criminal charges. But like Stanford, his multinational conglomerate, centered on the crypto exchange FTX, is under court supervision, and experts consulted by Insider say anyone who benefitted from the cash it generated — including the liberal political groups and charities SBF lavished money on — could be on the hook to its creditors.It's not clear how much FTX's creditors are owed, though SBF told Vox he was trying to raise $8 billion. The roughly $260 million that the company and its employees paid charities and political groups like the Democrats' House Majority PAC are only a small fraction of that amount. But in bankruptcy, nothing is sacred. The same politicians and groups that happily received FTX's donations and welcomed SBF as an influencer in Washington, including Democratic PACs like the House Majority PAC and Women Vote and lawmakers like Debbie Stabenow, could soon find themselves forced to return those funds — and some are already lawyering up.The law allows the company's new management or a bankruptcy trustee to claw money back even after it has changed hands, said Ilan Nieuchowicz, a lawyer at Carlton Fields."It's the trustee's duty to retrieve funds for the estate," he said. SBF and Ryan Salame spent millions on politicsFTX, SBF and other deep-pocketed executives tried to shape Washington with over $70 million in contributions to federal candidates or committees, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. That's to say nothing of state-level expenditures, including about $12 million reportedly spent on a California ballot initiative to increase public health spending.Most of that was in Bankman-Fried's name; he spent almost $39 million on 2022 elections, giving predominantly to Democratic groups. Ryan Salame, another FTX executive, contributed more than $20 million, mostly to Republican ones.FTX and Guarding Against Pandemics, a public-health group that Bankman-Fried funded, spent more than $1 million to lobby federal officials. Guarding Against Pandemics even bought a $3 million house in Washington, DC, showing its intention to be a long-term presence in the capital, according to Puck.Doug Kelley, a Minneapolis lawyer, was appointed by a court to recover funds spent by Minneapolis businessman Tom Petters after Petters's $2 billion Ponzi scheme was exposed. Kelley told Insider he approached politicians that Petters had donated to, including Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, whose campaign returned $80,000. Politicians generally returned the money, he said, although there were some candidates who lost their races and didn't have campaign funds available to pay.Some political groups that Bankman-Fried and Salame supported are in a similar situation, with barely any money left. The Protect Our Future PAC, the top beneficiary of Bankman-Fried's giving, has just $570,000 on hand after receiving $28 million from FTX and its execs, and American Dream Federal Action, which Salame supported, has just $1.5 million left.Michael Toner, a former member of the Federal Elections Commission, said trying to recover money from a pop-up super PAC could be harder than going after a party committee that is active each election cycle, which is what happened in the Stanford case."You can't get blood from a turnip," he said. "These political committees, absent any information to the contrary, they're victims in this just as much as anybody else."Some lawmakers have donated the money they got from FTX and its affiliates to charity, Politico reported. That's a mistake, said Kelley, who said he had to break the news to politicians who did the same thing with money they got from Petters that they would have to repay creditors anyway.Already, there are signs that beneficiaries of FTX's political generosity are seeking legal advice. One elections lawyer contacted for this story told Insider he couldn't comment because he was in talks to represent a client in connection with the fallout of FTX's collapse.Clawbacks can go back years — and take years to hash outWhen a company files for bankruptcy, the goal is to either hammer out a plan that allows some creditors to get paid and allows the company to keep doing business, or sell it for parts and use the money to pay back its creditors.John J. Ray III, the $1,300-an-hour restructuring guru who was named FTX's new CEO earlier this month, has said parts of the business are in good shape and could be sold. But others are a trainwreck: "Never in my career have I seen such a complete failure of corporate controls and such a complete absence of trustworthy financial information," he said in a filing earlier this month.One of the tools at Ray's disposal is the power to reverse many payments made months or years before the company entered bankruptcy. Any creditor that got paid by FTX in the 90 days before it filed for bankruptcy — which could include the users who withdrew a reported $5 billion from FTX before its crash — can be hit with what's known as a preference claim. FTX's new management has up to two years to make these demands.The other type of claim is a so-called fraudulent transfer claim. FTX could argue that almost every political and charitable donation that SBF gave through his companies would count as a fraudulent transfer and must therefore be returned, lawyers said.The window to file a fraudulent transfer claim goes back two years under bankruptcy law and four years under Delaware law, where the bankruptcy cases were filed. But there is a chance it could extend even longer: "Good lawyers and the good trustees are always trying to find a way, if necessary, to make it go back further," according to Jonathan Perlman, a Florida lawyer who has worked as a receiver in several complex financial cases.The FTX bankruptcy could be one of the most complicated in history. About 102 entities have filed cases in Delaware, saying they have perhaps one million creditors, a number that likely includes account holders whose funds were frozen earlier this month.Bankman-Fried and other insiders will probably end up being individually targeted for recoveries. Ray, who took the reins of FTX and Bankman-Fried's hedge fund Alameda Research earlier this month, said the companies' books showed over $3 billion in loans from Alameda to Bankman-Fried and a company he controls called Paper Bird Inc., which is the majority owner of FTX's web of offshore businesses.But charities and political groups could be ripe avenues for recovery, especially if what can be clawed back elsewhere isn't enough to make creditors whole. James Koutoulas, a lawyer who worked on the collapse of MF Global, told Insider he thinks FTX account holders stand to recover just 10 cents on the dollar.Many of the charities and political campaigns received their funds through organizations one or two steps removed from FTX, such as the Future Fund, a project of the nonprofit FTX Foundation, which was founded by Bankman-Fried. But as long as a fraudulent-transfer claim is brought in time, there's theoretically no limit to the number of times money can be transferred that makes it impossible to claw back, said Kathy Bazoian Phelps, a lawyer who has written about Ponzi schemes. There can be clawback risks even if a recipient thought everything was above-board. When lawyer Scott Rothstein was revealed to have stolen over $1 billion from his law firm, the trustee in that case both auctioned his Bugatti and sued the dealer that sold it to him. Several jewelers who sold Rothstein and his wife expensive gems paid five- and six-figure settlements, according to the South Florida Business Journal. Just because a company or receiver can make a clawback claim doesn't mean that it definitely will. And even if they do, a business that accepted money in good faith and provided something of value in exchange would have a defense, Phelps said. And each transfer requires a new legal analysis; even if a super PAC didn't provide anything of value to FTX, the media buyers that it paid for political advertising could argue that they earned their keep.  FTX also supported charitiesFTX and its affiliated hedge fund Alameda Research made Bankman-Fried and his executives, like Salame, Gary Wang, and Caroline Ellison, very rich. But instead of shopping for yachts and professional sports teams, Bankman-Fried and some colleagues talked about "effective altruism" — the utilitarian-adjacent movement that prioritizes giving money away to causes its followers believe will maximize the global good.The FTX Foundation, one of the company's primary charitable vehicles, claims to have donated over $190 million, according to Forbes. Some of its giving was aimed at present-day needs, like combating parasitic worms in Niger and extreme poverty in Uganda. Other projects it supported were more think-tanky and leaned into causes associated with longtermism — focusing on averting unlikely but catastrophic events, like an artificial intelligence that goes rogue.When Allen Stanford's Ponzi scheme went bust, investors got the green light to sue his favorite charities, including St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Le Bonheur Children's Hospital, to try to recoup more than $6 million in investor money. The charities protested, but the cases ended up settling out of court.Kelley told Insider that in the Petters case, he approached many charities to return six- and seven-figure donations they'd received. Minnesota legislators actually changed the law while Kelley was in the middle of his recovery efforts in an effort to protect charities from clawback demands. But at the end of the day, he said, many of them voluntarily returned the money."Think of it as: somebody robbed a bank, and took it across the street, and put it in a church collection plate," said Kelley. "Does that mean the church gets to keep it?"Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 23rd, 2022

Sam Bankman-Fried’s Island Haven Is Drawing Scrutiny After FTX Demise

For the Bahamas, the collapse of one of its most visible companies is a blow to a years-long effort to build a digital-currency hub. Sam Bankman-Fried loved living in the Bahamas. Shacked up in his luxury penthouse with nine FTX colleagues, he could wander Nassau without being hassled. And the Bahamas loved Bankman-Fried, the prestige of his crypto empire and the potential fortunes that it would bring. Their relationship, which had seemed innocuous, is now under the spotlight after FTX’s rapid demise, with lawyers for the crypto exchange accusing Bankman-Fried of undermining reorganization efforts with “incessant and disruptive tweeting.” They also raised the suggestion that some FTX assets were ordered to be transferred to the Bahamian government after the bankruptcy filing. For the island nation, the collapse of one of its most visible companies is a blow to a years-long effort to build a digital-currency hub. Interviews with local residents show FTX’s presence was quickly felt in the little over a year since it moved to Nassau. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] “FTX had been the emblem of what many saw as an emerging crypto boom in the Bahamas,” said Amauri Frantz, a trader who resides on New Providence, the island home to Nassau. “None of the investment community here on the ground would have had a reason to doubt FTX’s ability to realize the dream of the Bahamas becoming a crypto hub.” That much was clear seven months ago, when Bankman-Fried and Bahamas Prime Minister Philip Davis broke ground on a site that was meant to be a sprawling compound for 1,000 FTX workers, complete with a hotel and school. It symbolized the island’s growing stature in the crypto world, coming the same week digital-coin enthusiasts, celebrities and politicians descended on Nassau for a glitzy summit. The scene on the ground looks much different these days. The site sits largely empty. The early outlines of a building foundation have been poured. A few cabins are sprinkled about for the construction crew, though no one was there on an afternoon this week. Read More: Crypto Is Crashing. This Time, Blame FTX and Sam Bankman-Fried The Bahamian government has said the turmoil wasn’t preventable under its regulations. Its securities commission on Thursday said it took control of digital assets of FTX Digital Markets—which it said isn’t part of the US bankruptcy—for safekeeping. The regulator on Nov. 12 denied directing the entity to prioritize withdrawals for Bahamian clients. In a statement to Bloomberg News on Friday, Davis said that his government had taken “swift and immediate action” on FTX, and that the nation would continue to court the digital-asset industry. “It was because the Bahamas had in place a robust regulatory framework for digital assets and digital asset businesses, that the regulator was able to take immediate steps in order to protect the interests of clients, creditors, and other stakeholders globally, and particularly those of FTX Digital Markets Ltd.,” the prime minister said. ‘Big Splash’ The Bahamas, home to about 400,000 people, has played a pioneering role in experimenting with e-money—in 2020, it launched the sand dollar, one of the world’s first central bank digital currencies, beating China’s digital renminbi to the market by six months. But FTX’s decision to move its headquarters there in September 2021 was a coup. Bankman-Fried told the crypto publication Blockworks that he was attracted to the country’s friendlier regulation and less-stringent Covid restrictions than Hong Kong, where it had been located. FTX made it clear it planned to be there for the long haul as it started buying up real estate throughout western Nassau. As the company made aggressive claims to office space at Veridian Corporate Centre, locals started getting a sense they were seeing something unusual. “You can bet your bottom dollar everybody sat up and paid attention,” said Nikki Boeuf, president of the Bahamas Real Estate Association and a broker at Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Bahamas. The company started buying luxury residential properties, too, making “a big splash in a small pond” of the island market, said Boeuf, who wasn’t involved in any of the transactions but has spoken to agents who were. Only some of the property purchases have surfaced publicly, including at least $74.2 million on condos, houses, office space and land in 2022, according to a document reported by The Block. Real estate purchases were called out in a bankruptcy-court filing Thursday by FTX Group’s new chief executive officer, John J. Ray III, who blasted the company’s faulty oversight and misuse of corporate funds. Some of the real estate was recorded in the personal names of employees and FTX advisers, he wrote. Many of the homes were within the confines of the Albany Bahamas club, owned by billionaire British businessman Joe Lewis, singer Justin Timberlake and golfers Tiger Woods and Ernie Els. One of the world’s four casts of Arturo di Modica’s Charging Bull sculpture—made famous from its perch in Lower Manhattan—sits near the resort’s marina and its golf course was designed by Els. Bankman-Fried’s five-bedroom penthouse, which has its own swimming pool, was listed for nearly $40 million prior to FTX’s arrival. In an August interview on Bloomberg’s “The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations,” Bankman-Fried described the Bahamas as “pretty easy to live in,” noting that he’s recognizable in Nassau but also is able to walk down the street and has privacy there. Asked about the “dorm situation” in his penthouse, he said it’s a useful way to socialize and unwind in the evening. “I don’t have enough sort of free time to, like, really put a lot of thought into engineering a social life,” he said. “So it’s—it’s useful if it’s just sort of there passively.” FTX also made efforts to build local roots. The company, in partnership with a local nonprofit, had committed to expanding and revitalizing a community center in Nassau’s Bain & Grants Town, a landlocked district that’s poorer than some of the waterfront areas. The project called for new space for educational programs and food-distribution services, with work expected to be completed by the fall. But little was done besides paying for landscaping on the grounds, a person with knowledge of the matter said. Residents say the government heralded FTX’s arrival. It promoted “the fast-paced expansion and presence of FTX HQ in Nassau as an opportunity for Bahamians,” said Charles Johnson, 44, who owns one of the island’s CrossFit gyms, Da Box. “But many Bahamians couldn’t honestly say that they engaged with the platform in a substantive way,” he said. “It was still mostly a platform for foreign investors.” Groundbreaking, Celebrities Perhaps the peak of excitement came in late April, with the celebrity-packed Crypto Bahamas summit and the ceremony for the new FTX headquarters. At the groundbreaking, Bankman-Fried tweeted a picture of the view of turquoise water and Davis touted the “positive footprints” the company has made throughout the country. Since moving to our shores, @FTX_Official has left positive footprints throughout The Bahamas. Today, they continue to make positive impressions with the groundbreaking of their new headquarters. I look forward to attending the grand opening of the FTX Bahamas headquarters. pic.twitter.com/vWxzMoN9jm — Philip Brave Davis (@HonPhilipEDavis) April 25, 2022 Davis kicked off the Crypto Bahamas conference days later, saying the country is “not only open and ready for business, but moving to the forefront of this most exciting era of digital asset innovation,” according to a news story in the Nassau Guardian. The event, sponsored by FTX and SALT, attracted the likes of Bill Clinton, Tony Blair, Tom Brady and Katy Perry. Tickets reportedly started at $3,000 a head. Franklyn Lightbourne, 52, who operates a tour company and taxi-cab service in Nassau, said within 24 hours after the news of FTX troubles circulated in the local press, he began to book passengers who made their first question to him: “Do you or anyone you’re picking up have an FTX account?” The driver went on to explain that some of the visitors were trying to find ways to get money off the platform through locals who might be able to help or held assets of their own. “It was as if pirates had landed on our shores in hopes to find gold,” he said. —With assistance from Steven Church......»»

Category: topSource: timeNov 21st, 2022

Live election updates: A "red wave" in the House never appeared while three uncalled Senate races will decide the fate of the chamber

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); Results are coming in from the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider is reporting real-time election results on thousands of races across the country.  Trump is 'livid' and 'screaming' his head off after disappointing midterm elections for the GOP, advisor saysFormer US President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally on the eve of Election Day at the Dayton International Airport on November 7, 2022, in Vandalia, Ohio.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesAn advisor to Trump told CNN that the former president is "screaming at everyone" after many Republican candidates backed by him underperformed in the midterm elections."Candidates matter," the Trump advisor, who was not named, told CNN on Wednesday. "They were all bad candidates."Read Full StoryDemocrat Hillary Scholten defeated Trump-backed John Gibbs in Michigan's 3rd Congressional District electionSarah Burnett/AP Photo; Will Weissert/AP Photo; InsiderGibbs had ousted incumbent Rep. Peter Meijer, who supported impeaching President Donald Trump, in a primary before Tuesday's election.Gibb's win and redistricting in the state had Democrats optimistic that the seat could be flipped.Read Full StoryDemocratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham defeats Republican Mark Ronchetti in New Mexico's gubernatorial raceMichelle Lujan Grisham, Eddie Moore/AP; InsiderGrisham is the 32nd governor of New Mexico, and she previously represented the 1st Congressional District in the US House for three terms.Ronchetti, a certified meteorologist who worked as the chief meteorologist for Albuquerque's CBS and FOX affiliates, conceded to Grisham on Tuesday night.Read Full StoryTudor Dixon concedes to Gretchen Whitmer in Michigan's gubernatorial raceMichigan Republican gubernatorial nominee Tudor Dixon.AP Photo/Paul Sancya"I called Governor Whitmer this morning to concede and wish her well," Dixon said in a statement."Michigan's future success rests not in elected officials or government, but all of us," she added. "It is incumbent upon all of us to help our children read, support law enforcement, and grow our economy."Dixon had previously pushed conspiracies around the 2020 presidential election, MLive reported earlier this year.—Mark Cavitt (@MarkCavitt) November 9, 2022 Republican analysts blamed Trump for the GOP's disappointing midterm resultsDonald Trump speaks during an election night event at Mar-a-Lago on November 08, 2022 in Palm Beach, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesThe former president had endorsed hundreds of candidates in the midterm elections as he sought to cement his control over the party. But as of early Wednesday many were performing poorly.In a CNN interview, former Trump aide Alyssa Farah Griffin blamed the failures on the poor quality of the candidates Trump championed. "If you want the Republican Party to thrive, we've got to just finally speak out and say, 'This man is a loser, he lost 2020, he's losing a seat that is winnable this time," she said.Scott Jennings, a conservative analyst and former advisor to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, said the results showed that Trump's hopes of winning back the presidency were a non-starter. "How could you look at these results tonight and conclude Trump has any chance of winning a national election in 2024?" he said. Read Full StoryFormer Trump White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney says the former president 'is not doing very well' in the midtermsFormer President Donald Trump (R) and his then-acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney (L) at the White House on December 5, 2019.Mark Wilson/Getty Images"Between being Donald Trump and Ron DeSantis tonight, you want to be Ron DeSantis," Mulvaney told CBS News, NBC reported. "DeSantis wins tonight and Trump is not doing very well."His comments came after DeSantis, largely seen as Trump's biggest rival, pulled off a huge victory over Charlie Crist in Florida on Tuesday night, which could potentially set him up for a Republican presidential primary in 2024. Meanwhile, numerous Trump-backed candidates, including Mehmet Oz in Pennsylvania and Tudor Dixon in Michigan, have underperformed or lost the mid-term races, Insider and its election partner DDHRead Full StoryTrump midterm results-night party at Mar-a-Lago fell flat as candidates he endorsed fell short of victoryDonald Trump mingles with supporters during an election night event at Mar-a-Lago on November 08, 2022 in Palm Beach, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump's plans to claim credit for Republican Party wins in the midterms at triumphant party held at Mar-a-Lago party fell flat as an anticipated "red wave' of GOP success never appeared. Trump had hoped to cement his place as the Republican Party's king maker at a glitzy party in his resort in Palm Beach, Florida.He invited influential supporters and members of the media to join him and watch on giant TVs as results flowed in, reports said.But major GOP successes never came, and results as of Wednesday morning were mixed. A slew of candidates Trump had endorsed fell short.Trump's remarks at the event were muted, as results early Wednesday suggested a bleak outlook for his party.Read Full StoryThe House Rep. who received Elon Musk's first ever vote for a Republican lost her seat after only 5 monthsElon Musk (L) and Mayra Flores (R)Muhammed Selim Korkutata/Getty Images / Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe GOP House Rep. who got Elon Musk's first Republican vote earlier this year was booted out of Congress in the midterms just five months later.Texas GOP Rep. Mayra Flores lost her seat in the state's 34th Congressional District to Democratic Rep. Vicente Gonzalez by a wide margin. As of early Wednesday, 96% of the votes were counted, leaving Flores trailing by almost nine percentage points.When Flores won in June, Musk predicted big gains for the Republicans that failed to materialize as results came in late on Tuesday."I voted for Mayra Flores – first time I ever voted Republican," he said in June, adding: "Massive red wave in 2022."It's unclear who Musk voted for in this election, though on Monday he tweeted to advocate voting Republican in Congressional races.Read Full StoryDemocrat John Fetterman wiped back tears in an emotional speech after winning key Senate race in PennsylvaniaDemocratic Senate candidate John Fetterman speaks to supporters during an election night party in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on November 9, 2022.Jeff Swensen/Getty ImagesDemocrat John Fetterman beat Republican Mehmet Oz in a tense face-off for a Senate seat in Pennsylvania on, Insider and its election partner DDHQ projected early on Wednesday.After the race was called, a stunned-looking Fetterman addressed cheering supporters at a concert venue in Pittsburgh, telling them: "I'm not really sure what to say right now, my goodness."He wiped away tears as he spoke."We jammed them up. We held the line ... I never expected that we were going to turn these red counties blue, but we did what we needed to do," Fetterman continued.Read Full StoryGOP Sen. Ron Johnson clings to seat in nailbiterScott Olson/Getty; InsiderIncumbent Republican Senator Ron Johnson barely held off Democrat Mandela Barnes to hold his seat, winning a surprisingly close election by mere thousands of votes.The election was an unexpected nailbiter for Johnson, a two-term senator.GOP Rep. blames voters for staying home after she lost a competitive House seatS Republican Representative Mayra Flores of Texas, who is running for reelection, speaks at a campaign event on October 10, 2022 at the University Drafthouse in Mcallen, Texas.Photo by ALLISON DINNER/AFP via Getty ImagesTexas GOP Rep. Mayra Flores wasted no time in ripping her voters after she lost a competitive House seat during Tuesday's midterm elections."The RED WAVE did not happen. Republicans and Independents stayed home," Flores said on Twitter. "DO NOT COMPLAIN ABOUT THE RESULTS IF YOU DID NOT DO YOUR PART!"Read Full StoryJohn Fetterman defeats Mehmet Oz, dealing huge blow to the GOP's Senate hopesInsiderDemocrat John Fetterman has won Pennsylvania's Senate seat over Trump-backed TV show host Mehmet Oz, dealing a serious blow to Republicans' hopes of taking control of the US Senate."We bet on the people of Pennsylvania - and you didn't let us down," Fetterman wrote on Twitter as he declared victory. "And I won't let you down. Thank you."The win is the first Democratic pickup in the Senate.Fetterman, who had a stroke shortly before winning the Democratic primary, eeked out a victory after an uneven debate performance gave new life to Oz's campaign. Fetterman has insisted that the stroke affected only his hearing, not his cognition and that he is fit for office.Oz — who has never held office — faced accusations that he didn't really live in Pennsylvania as well as criticism of his embrace of Trump and anti-abortion rhetoric. Oz has not spoken at his election night event. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer wins re-election in MichiganAP Images; InsiderMichigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has won re-election, fending off a challenge from Trump-backed Republican Tudor Dixon.Republicans began this cycle eager to knock out Whitmer over her management of the COVID-19 pandemic.But the targeting of Whitmer wasn't just at the ballot box.In 2020, federal law enforcement arrested 13 men suspected of engineering a terrorist plot to kidnap Whitmer and attempt to overthrow Michigan's government. The subsequent cases against them have resulted in a mixture of convictions, acquittals, and plea deals. Republican Tudor Dixon says Michigan governor's race is too close to call, despite outlets projecting her loss: 'We don't accept that Fox is calling this'Michigan Republican gubernatorial nominee Tudor Dixon.AP Photo/Paul SancyaAt a party for campaign supporters, Michigan's Republican gubernatorial candidate Tudor Dixon said she refused to accept that her race had been called for her opponent."This race is going to be too close to call, despite what Fox thinks," Dixon told attendees after Democrat Gretchen Whitmer had been declared the projected winner by some outlets, including Fox News. "We don't accept that Fox is calling this."Fox News projected that Whitmer had defeated Tudor, a Trump-backed candidate, with approximately 48% of votes tallied.Read Full Story Chuck Grassley — the oldest US senator — just won re-electionSen. Chuck Grassley, a Republican from IowaTom Williams-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Sen. Chuck Grassley, the oldest current US senator, won re-election at age 89.He is the serving president pro tempore emeritus of the Senate and represents a generation of political leaders who have held on to power despite their advanced ages.An Insider investigation into gerontocracy — the term for a government run by old people — found that young officials feel blocked by those clinging to power and that their issues are being downplayed.(Aside: Grassley was born five years before the chocolate chip cookie was invented. The beloved cookie first appeared in Ruth Wakefield's 1938 cookbook "Tried and True."Grassley was born in September 1933.)  Democrats are winning the House seats they need to winOn a night when Republicans hoped to secure toss-up districts and make headway into blue districts, Democrats have racked up wins in key toss-up races.Democratic Ohio State Rep. Emilia Sykes defeated former Donald Trump campaign staffer Madison Gesiotto Gilbert in Ohio's 13th Congressional District.The 13th district had drawn national attention and millions of dollars in spending.Chris Pappas defeated Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st District US House election, another toss-up district.Democrats also won in Ohio's 1st Congressional District, New Hampshire's 2nd District, and Kansas' 3rd District. Lindsey Graham: It's 'definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure'Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham weighed in on his party's midterms performance as election results began trickling in on Tuesday evening, declaring, it's "definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure.""I think we're gonna be at 51, 52 when it's all said in done in the Senate," the South Carolina senator said during an interview with NBC News, holding out hope for the GOP's chances.Read Full StoryThe House is too close to call. That's a great sign for Democrats and concerning for the GOPAmericans are lining up to vote in the midterm elections. All 435 House seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats are on the ballot this year.ReutersControl of the House remains too close to call, a shocking scenario that raises the possibility Democrats' could escape the midterms with little damage.As of 11:45 p.m. EST, Decision Desk HQ and Insider are unable to project which party will control either house in Congress. While the Senate was always expected to be close, few, if any, pundits foretold of a House contest that would be this narrow.—Walter Hickey (@WaltHickey) November 9, 2022 Republicans began the cycle giddy with excitement. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy even poised that his party could flip 60 seats. Instead, fury over the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade appears to have not only dampened a possible wave election but may even lead to Democratic gains.There have only been two times since World War II that a president's party has gained seats in a midterm election, one of which occurred in the months after the September 11th attacks.—Decision Desk HQ (@DecisionDeskHQ) November 9, 2022  Republicans hoped to turn New York's governor's seat red. They didn't.Joshua Bessex/AP Photo; Mary Altaffer/AP Photo; InsiderTrump-backed GOP candidate Rep. Lee Zeldin made a huge push in the final weeks of the race for New York governor, pushing concerns about crime as his opponent flagged in the polls and insisting the wedge issue would flip the Democratic stronghold red.It didn't.Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul defeated Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin after an unexpectedly strong challenge in New York's gubernatorial election. Appointed governor following the resignation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Hochul is the first woman to be governor of New York.If elected, Zeldin would have dismantled New York's Democratic trifecta, where Democrats hold the governorship and majorities in both legislative chambers.Mehmet Oz is underperforming Trump in some of Pennsylvania in early returnsDr. Mehmet Oz.AP Photo/Laurence KestersonIf Oz wants to win Pennsylvania, he'll need to outperform former President Donald Trump's results in 2020, when he lost the state by just over 80,000 votes.So far, Oz is falling short."This is Western Pennsylvania, small county ... but again Trump ran up huge numbers in Western Pennsylvania. Mehmet Oz is going to win Clarion County overwhelmingly but it's five points less than Trump got," MSNBC's Steve Kornacki said as he ticked off results across the Keystone State.Kornacki pointed out that Oz is underperforming compared to Trump elsewhere too. In Bedford County, a rural county near the Maryland border, Oz received 80.7% of the vote compared to Lt. Gov. John Fetterman's 17%. But Oz's commanding performance is still not enough to match Trump's mark of 83.5%.Read Full StoryRight-wing firebrand Lauren Boebert is in a fight for her seatRep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 8, 2022.J. Scott Applewhite/APGOP Rep. Lauren Boebert is in a tight race in her bid for reelection on the same night when Republicans appear to be poised to take control of the US House.Boebert is facing off against Democrat Adam Frisch, a businessman and former city councilman.DeSantis cruised to victory despite Trump attacking him days before the electionAp Images; InsiderRepublican Gov. Ron DeSantis won reelection in Florida by historic margins on Tuesday, flipping the state from purple to red and doing it all without former President Donald Trump's help.Trump has continually teased the prospect of another presidential run, and could announce soon after the midterms. DeSantis has consistently polled behind the former president as a 2024 GOP favorite, and hasn't said whether he plans to serve out all four years as governor.Trump, who is now a Florida resident, cast his vote for DeSantis on Tuesday but told reporters he didn't think the governor should run against him. "If he did run, I will tell you things about him that won't be very flattering," he told the Wall Street Journal. "I know more about him than anybody other than perhaps his wife, who is really running his campaign."Read Full StoryGOP's Karoline Leavitt loses NH race that would have made her youngest woman ever elected to CongressCharles Krupa/AP Photo; Cheryl Senter/AP PhotoDemocratic Rep. Chris Pappas defeated Republican Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District.Leavitt — a 25-year-old former White House staffer for President Donald Trump — would have been the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.J.D. Vance wins competitive Ohio Senate seatAP Images; InsiderRepublican author J.D. Vance defeated Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan in Ohio, holding a Senate seat for the GOP as they seek to flip one Democratic seat and regain control of Congress' upper chamber.The race was among the most expensive in the country, with Ryan's holding a large financial lead and forcing Republicans to spend big to win.Trump endorsed Vance ahead of the primaries despite the candidate previously comparing the former president to "America's Hitler" in private messages.Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossIcon Sportswire/Getty, InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorGetty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandGetty Images; InsiderDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againParas Griffin/Getty, InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionAP Images; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. DeSantis cruised to a historic victory — despite catching heat from Trump in the days before the election.. Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceAndrew Burton/Getty, InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytNov 9th, 2022

2022 election live updates: John Fetterman defeats Mehmet Oz, dealing huge blow to the GOP"s Senate hopes

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  John Fetterman defeats Mehmet Oz, dealing huge blow to the GOP's Senate hopesDemocratic Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman; Republican celebrity TV doctor Mehmet Oz.Nate Smallwood/Getty Images; Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesDemocrat John Fetterman has won Pennsylvania's Senate seat over Trump-backed TV show host Mehmet Oz, dealing a serious blow to Republicans' hopes of taking control of the US Senate."We bet on the people of Pennsylvania - and you didn't let us down," Fetterman wrote on Twitter as he declared victory. "And I won't let you down. Thank you."The win is the first Democratic pickup in the Senate.Fetterman, who had a stroke shortly before winning the Democratic primary, eeked out a victory after an uneven debate performance gave new life to Oz's campaign. Fetterman has insisted that the stroke affected only his hearing, not his cognition and that he is fit for office.Oz — who has never held office — faced accusations that he didn't really live in Pennsylvania as well as criticism of his embrace of Trump and anti-abortion rhetoric. Oz has not spoken at his election night event. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer wins re-election in MichiganMichigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.TOM BRENNERMichigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has won re-election, fending off a challenge from Trump-backed Republican Tudor Dixon.Republicans began this cycle eager to knock out Whitmer over her management of the COVID-19 pandemic.But the targeting of Whitmer wasn't just at the ballot box.In 2020, federal law enforcement arrested 13 men suspected of engineering a terrorist plot to kidnap Whitmer and attempt to overthrow Michigan's government. The subsequent cases against them have resulted in a mixture of convictions, acquittals, and plea deals. Republican Tudor Dixon says Michigan governor's race is too close to call, despite outlets projecting her loss: 'We don't accept that Fox is calling this'Michigan Republican gubernatorial nominee Tudor Dixon.AP Photo/Paul SancyaAt a party for campaign supporters, Michigan's Republican gubernatorial candidate Tudor Dixon said she refused to accept that her race had been called for her opponent."This race is going to be too close to call, despite what Fox thinks," Dixon told attendees after Democrat Gretchen Whitmer had been declared the projected winner by some outlets, including Fox News. "We don't accept that Fox is calling this."Fox News projected that Whitmer had defeated Tudor, a Trump-backed candidate, with approximately 48% of votes tallied.Read Full Story Chuck Grassley — the oldest US senator — just won re-electionSen. Chuck Grassley, a Republican from IowaTom Williams-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Sen. Chuck Grassley, the oldest current US senator, won re-election at age 89.He is the serving president pro tempore emeritus of the Senate and represents a generation of political leaders who have held on to power despite their advanced ages.An Insider investigation into gerontocracy — the term for a government run by old people — found that young officials feel blocked by those clinging to power and that their issues are being downplayed.(Aside: Grassley was born five years before the chocolate chip cookie was invented. The beloved cookie first appeared in Ruth Wakefield's 1938 cookbook "Tried and True."Grassley was born in September 1933.)  Democrats are winning the House seats they need to winOn a night when Republicans hoped to secure toss-up districts and make headway into blue districts, Democrats have racked up wins in key toss-up races.Democratic Ohio State Rep. Emilia Sykes defeated former Donald Trump campaign staffer Madison Gesiotto Gilbert in Ohio's 13th Congressional District.The 13th district had drawn national attention and millions of dollars in spending.Chris Pappas defeated Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st District US House election, another toss-up district.Democrats also won in Ohio's 1st Congressional District, New Hampshire's 2nd District, and Kansas' 3rd District. Lindsey Graham: It's 'definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure'Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham weighed in on his party's midterms performance as election results began trickling in on Tuesday evening, declaring, it's "definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure.""I think we're gonna be at 51, 52 when it's all said in done in the Senate," the South Carolina senator said during an interview with NBC News, holding out hope for the GOP's chances.Read Full StoryThe House is too close to call. That's a great sign for Democrats and concerning for the GOPAmericans are lining up to vote in the midterm elections. All 435 House seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats are on the ballot this year.ReutersControl of the House remains too close to call, a shocking scenario that raises the possibility Democrats' could escape the midterms with little damage.As of 11:45 p.m. EST, Decision Desk HQ and Insider are unable to project which party will control either house in Congress. While the Senate was always expected to be close, few, if any, pundits foretold of a House contest that would be this narrow.—Walter Hickey (@WaltHickey) November 9, 2022 Republicans began the cycle giddy with excitement. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy even poised that his party could flip 60 seats. Instead, fury over the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade appears to have not only dampened a possible wave election but may even lead to Democratic gains.There have only been two times since World War II that a president's party has gained seats in a midterm election, one of which occurred in the months after the September 11th attacks.—Decision Desk HQ (@DecisionDeskHQ) November 9, 2022  Republicans hoped to turn New York's governor's seat red. They didn't.Joshua Bessex/AP Photo; Mary Altaffer/AP Photo; InsiderTrump-backed GOP candidate Rep. Lee Zeldin made a huge push in the final weeks of the race for New York governor, pushing concerns about crime as his opponent flagged in the polls and insisting the wedge issue would flip the Democratic stronghold red.It didn't.Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul defeated Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin after an unexpectedly strong challenge in New York's gubernatorial election. Appointed governor following the resignation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Hochul is the first woman to be governor of New York.If elected, Zeldin would have dismantled New York's Democratic trifecta, where Democrats hold the governorship and majorities in both legislative chambers.Mehmet Oz is underperforming Trump in some of Pennsylvania in early returnsDr. Mehmet Oz.AP Photo/Laurence KestersonIf Oz wants to win Pennsylvania, he'll need to outperform former President Donald Trump's results in 2020, when he lost the state by just over 80,000 votes.So far, Oz is falling short."This is Western Pennsylvania, small county ... but again Trump ran up huge numbers in Western Pennsylvania. Mehmet Oz is going to win Clarion County overwhelmingly but it's five points less than Trump got," MSNBC's Steve Kornacki said as he ticked off results across the Keystone State.Kornacki pointed out that Oz is underperforming compared to Trump elsewhere too. In Bedford County, a rural county near the Maryland border, Oz received 80.7% of the vote compared to Lt. Gov. John Fetterman's 17%. But Oz's commanding performance is still not enough to match Trump's mark of 83.5%.Read Full StoryRight-wing firebrand Lauren Boebert is in a fight for her seatRep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 8, 2022.J. Scott Applewhite/APGOP Rep. Lauren Boebert is in a tight race in her bid for reelection on the same night when Republicans appear to be poised to take control of the US House.Boebert is facing off against Democrat Adam Frisch, a businessman and former city councilman.DeSantis cruised to victory despite Trump attacking him days before the electionFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis and his wife, Florida first lady Casey DeSantis, celebrate his victory over Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rep. Charlie Crist during an election night watch party at the Tampa Convention Center on November 8, 2022 in Tampa, Florida.Octavio Jones/Getty ImagesRepublican Gov. Ron DeSantis won reelection in Florida by historic margins on Tuesday, flipping the state from purple to red and doing it all without former President Donald Trump's help.Trump has continually teased the prospect of another presidential run, and could announce soon after the midterms. DeSantis has consistently polled behind the former president as a 2024 GOP favorite, and hasn't said whether he plans to serve out all four years as governor.Trump, who is now a Florida resident, cast his vote for DeSantis on Tuesday but told reporters he didn't think the governor should run against him. "If he did run, I will tell you things about him that won't be very flattering," he told the Wall Street Journal. "I know more about him than anybody other than perhaps his wife, who is really running his campaign."Read Full StoryGOP's Karoline Leavitt loses NH race that would have made her youngest woman ever elected to CongressCharles Krupa/AP Photo; Cheryl Senter/AP PhotoDemocratic Rep. Chris Pappas defeated Republican Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District.Leavitt — a 25-year-old former White House staffer for President Donald Trump — would have been the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.J.D. Vance wins competitive Ohio Senate seatOhio Republican Senate nominee JD Vance.AP Photo/Tom E. PuskarRepublican author J.D. Vance defeated Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan in Ohio, holding a Senate seat for the GOP as they seek to flip one Democratic seat and regain control of Congress' upper chamber.The race was among the most expensive in the country, with Ryan's holding a large financial lead and forcing Republicans to spend big to win.Trump endorsed Vance ahead of the primaries despite the candidate previously comparing the former president to "America's Hitler" in private messages.Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossLM Otero/AP Photo; InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorMediaNews Group/Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandMaryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wes Moore.AP Photo/Alex BrandonDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againJessica McGowan/Paras Griffin/Getty Images; InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. DeSantis cruised to a historic victory — despite catching heat from Trump in the days before the election.. Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 9th, 2022

2022 election live updates: The House remains too close to call, a sign that the "red wave" the GOP hoped for hasn"t arrived yet

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  Republican Tudor Dixon says Michigan governor's race is too close to call, despite outlets projecting her loss: 'We don't accept that Fox is calling this'Michigan Republican gubernatorial nominee Tudor Dixon.AP Photo/Paul SancyaAt a party for campaign supporters, Michigan's Republican gubernatorial candidate Tudor Dixon said she refused to accept that her race had been called for her opponent."This race is going to be too close to call, despite what Fox thinks," Dixon told attendees after Democrat Gretchen Whitmer had been declared the projected winner by some outlets, including Fox News. "We don't accept that Fox is calling this."Fox News projected that Whitmer had defeated Tudor, a Trump-backed candidate, with approximately 48% of votes tallied.Read Full Story Chuck Grassley — the oldest US senator — just won re-electionSen. Chuck Grassley, a Republican from IowaTom Williams-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Sen. Chuck Grassley, the oldest current US senator, won re-election at age 89.He is the serving president pro tempore emeritus of the Senate and represents a generation of political leaders who have held on to power despite their advanced ages.An Insider investigation into gerontocracy — the term for a government run by old people — found that young officials feel blocked by those clinging to power and that their issues are being downplayed.(Aside: Grassley was born five years before the chocolate chip cookie was invented. The beloved cookie first appeared in Ruth Wakefield's 1938 cookbook "Tried and True."Grassley was born in September 1933.)  Democrats are winning the House seats they need to winOn a night when Republicans hoped to secure toss-up districts and make headway into blue districts, Democrats have racked up wins in key toss-up races.Democratic Ohio State Rep. Emilia Sykes defeated former Donald Trump campaign staffer Madison Gesiotto Gilbert in Ohio's 13th Congressional District.The 13th district had drawn national attention and millions of dollars in spending.Chris Pappas defeated Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st District US House election, another toss-up district.Democrats also won in Ohio's 1st Congressional District, New Hampshire's 2nd District, and Kansas' 3rd District. Lindsey Graham: It's 'definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure'Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham weighed in on his party's midterms performance as election results began trickling in on Tuesday evening, declaring, it's "definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure.""I think we're gonna be at 51, 52 when it's all said in done in the Senate," the South Carolina senator said during an interview with NBC News, holding out hope for the GOP's chances.Read Full StoryThe House is too close to call. That's a great sign for Democrats and concerning for the GOPAmericans are lining up to vote in the midterm elections. All 435 House seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats are on the ballot this year.ReutersControl of the House remains too close to call, a shocking scenario that raises the possibility Democrats' could escape the midterms with little damage.As of 11:45 p.m. EST, Decision Desk HQ and Insider are unable to project which party will control either house in Congress. While the Senate was always expected to be close, few, if any, pundits foretold of a House contest that would be this narrow.—Walter Hickey (@WaltHickey) November 9, 2022 Republicans began the cycle giddy with excitement. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy even poised that his party could flip 60 seats. Instead, fury over the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade appears to have not only dampened a possible wave election but may even lead to Democratic gains.There have only been two times since World War II that a president's party has gained seats in a midterm election, one of which occurred in the months after the September 11th attacks.—Nate Cohn (@Nate_Cohn) November 9, 2022 Republicans hoped to turn New York's governor's seat red. They didn't.Joshua Bessex/AP Photo; Mary Altaffer/AP Photo; InsiderTrump-backed GOP candidate Rep. Lee Zeldin made a huge push in the final weeks of the race for New York governor, pushing concerns about crime as his opponent flagged in the polls and insisting the wedge issue would flip the Democratic stronghold red.It didn't.Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul defeated Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin after an unexpectedly strong challenge in New York's gubernatorial election. Appointed governor following the resignation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Hochul is the first woman to be governor of New York.If elected, Zeldin would have dismantled New York's Democratic trifecta, where Democrats hold the governorship and majorities in both legislative chambers.Mehmet Oz is underperforming Trump in some of Pennsylvania in early returnsDr. Mehmet Oz.AP Photo/Laurence KestersonIf Oz wants to win Pennsylvania, he'll need to outperform former President Donald Trump's results in 2020, when he lost the state by just over 80,000 votes.So far, Oz is falling short."This is Western Pennsylvania, small county ... but again Trump ran up huge numbers in Western Pennsylvania. Mehmet Oz is going to win Clarion County overwhelmingly but it's five points less than Trump got," MSNBC's Steve Kornacki said as he ticked off results across the Keystone State.Kornacki pointed out that Oz is underperforming compared to Trump elsewhere too. In Bedford County, a rural county near the Maryland border, Oz received 80.7% of the vote compared to Lt. Gov. John Fetterman's 17%. But Oz's commanding performance is still not enough to match Trump's mark of 83.5%.Read Full StoryRight-wing firebrand Lauren Boebert is in a fight for her seatRep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 8, 2022.J. Scott Applewhite/APGOP Rep. Lauren Boebert is in a tight race in her bid for reelection on the same night when Republicans appear to be poised to take control of the US House.Boebert is facing off against Democrat Adam Frisch, a businessman and former city councilman.DeSantis cruised to victory despite Trump attacking him days before the electionFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis and his wife, Florida first lady Casey DeSantis, celebrate his victory over Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rep. Charlie Crist during an election night watch party at the Tampa Convention Center on November 8, 2022 in Tampa, Florida.Octavio Jones/Getty ImagesRepublican Gov. Ron DeSantis won reelection in Florida by historic margins on Tuesday, flipping the state from purple to red and doing it all without former President Donald Trump's help.Trump has continually teased the prospect of another presidential run, and could announce soon after the midterms. DeSantis has consistently polled behind the former president as a 2024 GOP favorite, and hasn't said whether he plans to serve out all four years as governor.Trump, who is now a Florida resident, cast his vote for DeSantis on Tuesday but told reporters he didn't think the governor should run against him. "If he did run, I will tell you things about him that won't be very flattering," he told the Wall Street Journal. "I know more about him than anybody other than perhaps his wife, who is really running his campaign."Read Full StoryGOP's Karoline Leavitt loses NH race that would have made her youngest woman ever elected to CongressCharles Krupa/AP Photo; Cheryl Senter/AP PhotoDemocratic Rep. Chris Pappas defeated Republican Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District.Leavitt — a 25-year-old former White House staffer for President Donald Trump — would have been the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.J.D. Vance wins competitive Ohio Senate seatOhio Republican Senate nominee JD Vance.AP Photo/Tom E. PuskarRepublican author J.D. Vance defeated Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan in Ohio, holding a Senate seat for the GOP as they seek to flip one Democratic seat and regain control of Congress' upper chamber.The race was among the most expensive in the country, with Ryan's holding a large financial lead and forcing Republicans to spend big to win.Trump endorsed Vance ahead of the primaries despite the candidate previously comparing the former president to "America's Hitler" in private messages.Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossLM Otero/AP Photo; InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorMediaNews Group/Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandMaryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wes Moore.AP Photo/Alex BrandonDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againJessica McGowan/Paras Griffin/Getty Images; InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. DeSantis cruised to a historic victory — despite catching heat from Trump in the days before the election.. Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 9th, 2022

2022 election live updates: The House remains too close to call, a sign that the "red wave" the GOP hoped for hasn"t arrived

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  The House is too close to call. That's a great sign for Democrats and concerning for the GOPAmericans are lining up to vote in the midterm elections. All 435 House seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats are on the ballot this year.ReutersControl of the House remains too close to call, a shocking scenario that raises the possibility Democrats' could escape the midterms with little damage.As of 11:45 p.m. EST, Decision Desk HQ and Insider are unable to project which party will control either house in Congress. While the Senate was always expected to be close, few, if any, pundits foretold of a House contest that would be this narrow.Republicans began the cycle giddy with excitement. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy even poised that his party could flip 60 seats. Instead, fury over the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade appears to have not only dampened a possible wave election but may even lead to Democratic gains.There have only been two times since World War II that a president's party has gained seats in a midterm election, one of which occurred in the months after the September 11th attacks.—Walter Hickey (@WaltHickey) November 9, 2022 Republicans hoped to turn New York's governor's seat red. They didn't.Joshua Bessex/AP Photo; Mary Altaffer/AP Photo; InsiderTrump-backed GOP candidate Rep. Lee Zeldin made a huge push in the final weeks of the race for New York governor, pushing concerns about crime as his opponent flagged in the polls and insisting the wedge issue would flip the Democratic stronghold red.It didn't.Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul defeated Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin after an unexpectedly strong challenge in New York's gubernatorial election. Appointed governor following the resignation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Hochul is the first woman to be governor of New York.If elected, Zeldin would have dismantled New York's Democratic trifecta, where Democrats hold the governorship and majorities in both legislative chambers.Mehmet Oz is underperforming Trump in some of Pennsylvania in early returnsDr. Mehmet Oz.AP Photo/Laurence KestersonIf Oz wants to win Pennsylvania, he'll need to outperform former President Donald Trump's results in 2020, when he lost the state by just over 80,000 votes.So far, Oz is falling short."This is Western Pennsylvania, small county ... but again Trump ran up huge numbers in Western Pennsylvania. Mehmet Oz is going to win Clarion County overwhelmingly but it's five points less than Trump got," MSNBC's Steve Kornacki said as he ticked off results across the Keystone State.Kornacki pointed out that Oz is underperforming compared to Trump elsewhere too. In Bedford County, a rural county near the Maryland border, Oz received 80.7% of the vote compared to Lt. Gov. John Fetterman's 17%. But Oz's commanding performance is still not enough to match Trump's mark of 83.5%.Read Full StoryDemocrat wins a major toss-up seat in OhioOn a night when Republicans hoped to secure toss-up districts and make headway into Democratic districts, Democratic Ohio State Rep. Emilia Sykes defeated former Donald Trump campaign staffer Madison Gesiotto Gilbert in Ohio's 13th Congressional District.The 13th district had drawn national attention and millions of dollars in spending.Right-wing firebrand Lauren Boebert is in a fight for her seatRep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 8, 2022.J. Scott Applewhite/APGOP Rep. Lauren Boebert is in a tight race in her bid for reelection on the same night when Republicans appear to be poised to take control of the US House.Boebert is facing off against Democrat Adam Frisch, a businessman and former city councilman.DeSantis cruised to victory despite Trump attacking him days before the electionFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis and his wife, Florida first lady Casey DeSantis, celebrate his victory over Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rep. Charlie Crist during an election night watch party at the Tampa Convention Center on November 8, 2022 in Tampa, Florida.Octavio Jones/Getty ImagesRepublican Gov. Ron DeSantis won reelection in Florida by historic margins on Tuesday, flipping the state from purple to red and doing it all without former President Donald Trump's help.Trump has continually teased the prospect of another presidential run, and could announce soon after the midterms. DeSantis has consistently polled behind the former president as a 2024 GOP favorite, and hasn't said whether he plans to serve out all four years as governor.Trump, who is now a Florida resident, cast his vote for DeSantis on Tuesday but told reporters he didn't think the governor should run against him. "If he did run, I will tell you things about him that won't be very flattering," he told the Wall Street Journal. "I know more about him than anybody other than perhaps his wife, who is really running his campaign."Read Full StoryGOP's Karoline Leavitt loses NH race that would have made her youngest woman ever elected to CongressCharles Krupa/AP Photo; Cheryl Senter/AP PhotoDemocratic Rep. Chris Pappas defeated Republican Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District.Leavitt — a 25-year-old former White House staffer for President Donald Trump — would have been the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.J.D. Vance wins competitive Ohio Senate seatOhio Republican Senate nominee JD Vance.AP Photo/Tom E. PuskarRepublican author J.D. Vance defeated Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan in Ohio, holding a Senate seat for the GOP as they seek to flip one Democratic seat and regain control of Congress' upper chamber.The race was among the most expensive in the country, with Ryan's holding a large financial lead and forcing Republicans to spend big to win.Trump endorsed Vance ahead of the primaries despite the candidate previously comparing the former president to "America's Hitler" in private messages.Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossLM Otero/AP Photo; InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorMediaNews Group/Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandMaryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wes Moore.AP Photo/Alex BrandonDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againJessica McGowan/Paras Griffin/Getty Images; InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. DeSantis cruised to a historic victory — despite catching heat from Trump in the days before the election.. Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 9th, 2022

2022 election live updates: Abbott wins governor"s race in Texas; Beto O"Rourke takes another loss

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossLM Otero/AP Photo; InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorMediaNews Group/Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandMaryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wes Moore.AP Photo/Alex BrandonDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againJessica McGowan/Paras Griffin/Getty Images; InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. . Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 8th, 2022

The wild life of billionaire Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, who has apologized for Elon Musk"s layoffs and is known for eccentricities like eating one meal a day, and taking ice baths

Jack Dorsey, famous for his unusual life of luxury, stepped down as Twitter CEO in 2021 but continues to lead Block as its "Block Head." Jack Dorsey onstage at a bitcoin convention on June 4, 2021 in Miami, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty Images Jack Dorsey cofounded Twitter in 2006 and the company made him a billionaire. He's famous for his unusual life of luxury, including a daily fasting routine and regular ice baths. He stepped down as Twitter CEO in November 2021 but continues to lead Block as its "Block Head." Visit Business Insider's home page for more stories. From fighting armies of bots to quashing rumors about sending his beard hair to rapper Azealia Banks, Twitter founder Jack Dorsey leads an unusual life of luxury.Dorsey has had a turbulent career in Silicon Valley. After cofounding Twitter on March 21 2006, he was booted as the company's CEO two years later, but returned in 2015 having set up his second company, Square — which he rebranded as Block in 2021.He led Twitter through the techlash that has engulfed social media companies, testifying before Congress multiple times.And Dorsey announced on November 29, 2021, he had stepped down as the CEO of Twitter. He continues to lead Block, where in April 2022 he changed his title from "CEO" to "Block Head." In May 2022, Dorsey officially stepped down from Twitter's board of directors amid Elon Musk's bid for the company, which became final in October 2022. Shortly after the takeover, Musk called for mass layoffs at Twitter, impacting thousands of employees and an estimated 50% of the company's workforce. Dorsey subsequently apologized to "folks at Twitter past and present" in a tweet, claiming responsibility for the terminations because he "grew the company size too quickly." Dorsey has provoked his fair share of controversy and criticism, extolling fasting and ice baths as part of his daily routine. His existence is not entirely spartan, however. Like some other billionaires, he owns a stunning house, dates models, and drives fast cars.Scroll on to read more about the fabulous life of Jack Dorsey.Rebecca Borison and Madeline Stone contributed reporting to an earlier version of this story.Dorsey began programming while attending Bishop DuBourg High School in St. Louis.VineAt age 15, Dorsey wrote dispatch software that is still used by some taxi companies.Source: Bio. When he wasn't checking out specialty electronics stores or running a fantasy football league for his friends, Dorsey frequently attended punk-rock concerts. @jackThese days Dorsey doesn't favour the spiky hairdo.Source: The Wall Street JournalLike many of his fellow tech billionaires, Dorsey never graduated college.edyson / FlickrHe briefly attended the Missouri University of Science and Technology and transferred to New York University before calling it quits.Source: Bio.In 2000, Dorsey built a simple prototype that let him update his friends on his life via BlackBerry and email messaging.joi / FlickrNobody else really seemed interested, so he put away the idea for a bit.Source: The Unofficial Stanford BlogFun fact: Jack Dorsey is also a licensed masseur.Getty Images/Bill PuglianoHe got his license in about 2002, before exploding onto the tech scene.Sources: The Wall Street JournalHe got a job at a podcasting company called Odeo, where he met his future Twitter cofounders.Jack Dorsey, Biz Stone and Evan Williams took home the prize in the blogging category at SXSW in 2007.Flickr via Scott Beale/LaughingSquidOdeo went out of business in 2006, so Dorsey returned to his messaging idea, and Twitter was born.On March 21, 2006, Dorsey posted the first tweet.Jack Dorsey's first tweet.Twitter/@jackDorsey kept his Twitter handle simple, "@jack."Dorsey and his cofounders, Evan Williams and Biz Stone, bought the Twitter domain name for roughly $7,000.Khalid Mohammed / AP ImagesDorsey took out his nose ring to look the part of a CEO. He was 30 years old.A year later, Dorsey was already less hands-on at Twitter. Evan Williams and Jack Dorsey.Wikimedia CommonsBy 2008, Williams had taken over as CEO, and Dorsey transitioned to chairman of Twitter's board. Dorsey immediately got started on new projects. He invested in Foursquare and launched a payments startup called Square that lets small-business owners accept credit card payments through a smartphone attachment.Sources: Twitter and Bio.In 2011, Dorsey got the chance to interview US President Barack Obama in the first Twitter Town Hall.President Obama talks to the audience next to Jack Dorsey during his first ever Twitter Town Hall.ReutersDorsey had to remind Obama to keep his replies under 140 characters, Twitter's limit at the time.Source: TwitterTwitter went public in November 2013, and within hours Dorsey was a billionaire.APIn 2014 Forbes pegged Dorsey's net worth at $2.2 billion. On the day it was reported he was expected to resign, Bloomberg's Billionaires Index calculated his net worth at $12.3 billion.Source: Bio. and ForbesIt was revealed in a 2019 filing that Dorsey earned just $1.40 for his job as Twitter CEO the previous year.Twitter and Square founder Jack Dorsey, who doesn't earn anything from his primary day job.David Becker / GettyThe $1.40 salary actually represented a pay rise for Dorsey, who in previous years had refused any payment at all.He's far from the only Silicon Valley mogul to have taken a measly salary - Mark Zuckerberg makes $1 a year as CEO of Facebook.Source: Insider He might have been worth more had he not given back 10% of his stock to Square.Jack Dorsey with Hollywood producer Brian Grazer, Veronica Smiley, and Kate Greer at the annual Allen and Co. conference at the Sun Valley, Idaho Resort in 2013.ReutersThis helped Square employees, giving them more equity and stock options. It was also helpful in acquiring online food-delivery startup Caviar.Sources: Insider and CaviarWith his newfound wealth, he bought a BMW 3 Series, but reportedly didn't drive it often.Alex Davies / Business Insider"Now he's able to say, like, 'The BMW is the only car I drive, because it's the best automotive engineering on the planet,' or whatever," Twitter cofounder Biz Stone told The New Yorker in 2013.Source: The New YorkerHe also reportedly paid $9.9 million for this seaside house on El Camino Del Mar in the exclusive Seacliff neighborhood of San Francisco.The Real Estalker via Sotheby'sThe house has a view of the Golden Gate Bridge, which Dorsey views as a marvel of design.Source: InsiderBefore the pandemic, Dorsey said he worked from home one day a week.Jack Dorsey's home setup.Twitter/@jackIn an interview with journalist Kara Swisher conducted over Twitter, Dorsey said he worked every Tuesday out of his kitchen.He also told Kara Swisher that Elon Musk is his favorite Twitter user.Elon Musk is a prolific tweeter.PewDiePie/YouTubeDorsey said Musk's tweets are, "focused on solving existential problems and sharing his thinking openly."He added that he enjoys all the "ups and downs" that come with Musk's sometimes unpredictable use of the site. Musk himself replied, tweeting his thanks and "Twitter rocks!" followed by a string of random emojis.Both Musk and Dorsey are crypto enthusiasts, and appear to have developed a good public relationship.Source: InsiderFacebook CEO and rival Mark Zuckerberg once served Jack Dorsey a goat he killed himself.Gene KimDorsey told Rolling Stone about the meal, which took place in 2011. Dorsey said the goat was served cold, and that he personally stuck to salad.Source: Rolling StoneHis eating habits have raised eyebrows.Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for WIRED25Appearing on a podcast run by a health guru who previously said that vaccines caused autism, Dorsey said he eats one meal a day and fasts all weekend. He said the first time he tried fasting it made him feel like he was hallucinating."It was a weird state to be in. But as I did it the next two times, it just became so apparent to me how much of our days are centered around meals and how — the experience I had was when I was fasting for much longer, how time really slowed down," he said.The comments drew fierce criticism from many who said Dorsey was normalizing eating disorders.In a later interview with Wired, Dorsey said he eats seven meals a week, "just dinner."Sources: Insider, The New StatesmanIn the early days of Twitter, Dorsey aspired to be a fashion designer.Cindy Ord / Getty Images, Franck MichelDorsey would regularly don leather jackets and slim suits by Prada and Hermès, as well as Dior Homme reverse-collar dress shirts, a sort of stylish take on the popped collar.More recently he favors edgier outfits, including the classic black turtleneck favored by Silicon Valley luminaries like Steve Jobs.Sources: CBS News and The Wall Street JournalHe also re-introduced the nose-ring and grew a beard.GettyDorsey seems to care less about looking the part of a traditional executive these days.Singer Azealia Banks claimed to have been sent clippings of Dorsey's beard hair to fashion into a protective amulet, although Dorsey denied this happened.Azealia Banks.GettyIn 2016, Banks posted on her now-deleted Twitter account that Dorsey sent her his hair, "in an envelope." Dorsey later told the HuffPo that the beard-posting incident never happened.Sources: Insider and HuffPoDorsey frequently travels the world and shares his photos with his 6 million Twitter followers.Jack Dorsey meeting Japanese Prime Minister Sinzo Abe.Twitter/@JPN_PMOOn his travels, Dorsey meets heads of state, including Japan's former Prime Minister Shinzō Abe.Source: TwitterTweets about his vacation in Myanmar also provoked an outcry.Bagan, Myanmar.Shutterstock/Martin M303Dorsey tweeted glowingly about a vacation he took to Myanmar for his birthday in December 2018. "If you're willing to travel a bit, go to Myanmar," he said.This came at the height of the Rohingya crisis, and Dorsey was attacked for his blithe promotion of the country — especially since social media platforms were accused of having been complicit in fuelling hatred towards the Rohingya.Source: InsiderHowever, Dorsey says he doesn't care about "looking bad."FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Trump welcomes South Korea’s President Moon to the White House in WashingtonReutersIn a bizarre Huffington Post interview in 2019, Dorsey was asked whether Donald Trump — an avid tweeter — could be removed from the platform if he called on his followers to murder a journalist. Dorsey gave a vague answer which drew sharp criticism.Following the interview's publication, Dorsey said he doesn't care about "looking bad.""I care about being open about how we're thinking and about what we see," he added.In September 2018, Jack Dorsey was grilled by lawmakers alongside Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Jack Dorsey are sworn-in for a Senate Intelligence Committee.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesDorsey and Sandberg were asked about election interference on Twitter and Facebook as well as alleged anti-conservative bias in social media companies.Source: InsiderDuring the hearing, Dorsey shared a snapshot of his spiking heart rate on Twitter.AP Photo/Jose Luis MaganaDorsey was in the hot seat for several hours. His heart rate peaked at 109 beats per minute.Source: InsiderDorsey testified before Congress once again on October 28, 2020.Jack Dorsey tuning into the hearing with the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation/Handout via REUTERSDorsey appeared via videoconference at the Senate hearing on Section 230, a part of US law that protects internet companies from legal liability for user-generated content, as well as giving them broad authority to decide how to moderate their own platforms.In prepared testimony ahead of the hearing, Dorsey said stripping back Section 230 would "collapse how we communicate on the Internet," and suggested ways for tech companies to make their moderation processes more transparent. During the hearing, Dorsey once again faced accusations of anti-conservative biasJack Dorsey appearing virtually at the hearing.Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty ImagesThe accusations from Republican lawmakers focused on the way Twitter enforces its policies, particularly the way it has labelled tweets from President Trump compared to other world leaders.Dorsey took the brunt of questions from lawmakers, even though he appeared alongside Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Google CEO Sundar Pichai.Source: ProtocolDuring the hearing, the length of Dorsey's beard drew fascination from pundits.Dorsey had to address accusations of censorship.Greg Nash/Pool via REUTERSSome users referred to Dorsey's facial hair as his "quarantine beard," while others said it made him look like a wizard.—rat king (@MikeIsaac) October 28, 2020—Taylor Hatmaker (@tayhatmaker) October 28, 2020"Jack Dorsey's beard is literally breaking Twitter's own face detection," posted cybersecurity blogging account @Swiftonsecurity.—SwiftOnSecurity (@SwiftOnSecurity) October 28, 2020 Dorsey also addressed the way Twitter dealt with a dubiously sourced New York Post story about Hunter Biden.Jack Dorsey appearing on-screen at the hearing.Greg Nash/Pool via REUTERS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYWhen the New York Post published a report about Hunter Biden on October 14 that threw up red flags about sourcing, Twitter blocked users from sharing URLs citing its "hacked materials" policy.Dorsey subsequently apologized publicly, saying it was wrong of Twitter to block URLs.—jack (@jack) October 16, 2020During the Senate hearing, Sen. Ted Cruz accused Twitter of taking the "unilateral decision to censor" the Post.Dorsey said the Post's Twitter account would remain locked until it deleted its original tweet, but that updated policies meant it could tweet the same story again without getting blocked.Source: InsiderDorsey had to appear before another hearing on November 17 2020 — this time about how Twitter handled content moderation around the 2020 presidential election.U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee via REUTERS/File PhotoDorsey was summoned alongside Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg by Republicans who were displeased with how the platforms had dealt with then-President Donald Trump's social media accounts. Both CEOs defended their companies, saying they are politically neutral.When he's not in Washington, Dorsey regularly hops in and out of ice baths and saunas.This is not Dorsey's sauna.ShutterstockDorsey said in the "Tales of the Crypt" podcast that he started using ice baths and saunas in the evenings around 2016.He will alternately sit in his barrel sauna for 15 minutes and then switch to an ice bath for three. He repeats this routine three times, before finishing it off with a one-minute ice bath.He also likes to take an icy dip in the mornings to wake him up.Source: CNBCDorsey's dating life has sparked intrigue. In 2018, he was reported to be dating Sports Illustrated model Raven Lyn Corneil.Sports Illustrated Swimsuit / YouTube / GettyPage Six reported in September 2018 that the pair were spotted together at the Harper's Bazaar Icons party during New York Fashion Week. Page Six also reported that Dorsey's exes included actress Lily Cole and ballet dancer Sofiane Sylve.Source: Page SixHe's a big believer in cryptocurrency, frequently tweeting about its virtues.Teresa Kroeger/Getty ImagesIn particular, Dorsey is a fan of Bitcoin, which he described in early 2019 as "resilient" and "principled." He told the "Tales of the Crypt" podcast in March that year that he was maxing out the $10,000 weekly spending limit on Square's Cash App buying up Bitcoin.In October 2020 he slammed Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong for forbidding employee activism at the company, saying cryptocurrency is itself a form of activism.—jack (@jack) September 30, 2020 Source: Insider, Insider and CNBC Dorsey said Square was launching a new bitcoin business in summer 2021.Square CEO Jack Dorsey speaks at the Bitcoin 2021 Convention, a crypto-currency conference held on June 4, 2021 in Miami, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesDorsey announced the new venture in a tweet on July 15, 2021 and said its name was "TBD." It wasn't clear whether that was its actual name, or Dorsey hadn't decided on a name yet.—jack (@jack) July 15, 2021 Dorsey said he hopes bitcoin can help bring about "world peace."Jack Dorsey on stage at the Bitcoin 2021 Convention, a crypto-currency conference in Miami.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesDorsey appeared alongside Elon Musk and Ark Invest CEO Cathie Wood during a panel called "The B Word" on July 2021. He said he loves the bitcoin community because it's "weird as hell.""It's the only reason that I have a career — because I learned so much from people like who are building bitcoin today," Dorsey said.At the end of 2019 Dorsey said he would move to Africa for at least three months in 2020.AP Photo/Francois MoriDorsey's announcement followed a tour of Ethiopia, Ghana, Nigeria, and South Africa. "Africa will define the future (especially the bitcoin one!). Not sure where yet, but I'll be living here for 3-6 months mid 2020," he tweeted. Dorsey then came under threat of being ousted as Twitter CEO by activist investor Elliott Management.Paul Singer, founder and president of Elliott Management.REUTERS/Mike Blake/File PhotoBoth Bloomberg and CNBC reported in late February 2020 that major Twitter investor Elliott Management — led by Paul Singer — was seeking to replace Dorsey. Reasons given included the fact that Dorsey split his time between two firms by acting as CEO to both Twitter and financial tech firm Square, as well as his planned move to Africa.Source: InsiderTesla CEO and frequent Twitter user Elon Musk weighed in on the news, throwing his support behind Dorsey.Tesla CEO Elon Musk.REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke"Just want to say that I support @jack as Twitter CEO," Musk tweeted, adding that Dorsey has a good heart, using the heart emoji.Source: InsiderDorsey managed to strike a truce with Elliott Management.AP Photo/Jose Luis MaganaTwitter announced on March 9, 2020 that it had reached a deal with Elliott Management which would leave Jack Dorsey in place as CEO.The deal included a $1 billion investment from private equity firm Silver Lake, and partners from both Elliott Management and Silver Lake joined Twitter's board.Patrick Pichette, lead independent director of Twitter's board, said he was "confident we are on the right path with Jack's leadership," but added that a new temporary committee would be formed to instruct the board's evaluation of Twitter's leadership.In April 2020, Dorsey announced that he was forming a new charity fund that would help in global relief efforts amid the coronavirus pandemic.Dorsey.Matt Crossick/PA Images via Getty ImagesDorsey said he would pour $1 billion of his own Square equity into the fund, or roughly 28% of his total wealth at the time. The fund, dubbed Start Small LLC, would first focus on helping in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, he said.Dorsey said he would be making all transactions on behalf of the fund public in a spreadsheet.In July 2020, hackers compromised 130 Twitter accounts in a bitcoin scam.TwitterThe accounts of high-profile verified accounts belonging to Bill Gates, Kim Kardashian West, and others were hacked, with attackers tweeting out posts asking users to send payment in bitcoin to fraudulent cryptocurrency addresses.As a solution, Twitter temporarily blocked all verified accounts — those with blue check marks on their profiles — but the damage was done.  Elon Musk said he personally contacted Dorsey following the hack.Elon Musk (left) and Dorsey.Susan Walsh/AP; Getty ImagesDuring a July 2020 interview with The New York Times, Musk said he had immediately called Dorsey after he learned about the hack."Within a few minutes of the post coming up, I immediately got texts from a bunch of people I know, then I immediately called Jack so probably within less than five minutes my account was locked," said Musk.Source: The New York TimesIn March 2021 Dorsey put his first-ever tweet up for auction.Jack Dorsey and Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO, off camera, testify during a Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing in Dirksen Building where they testified on the influence of foreign operations on social media on September 5, 2018Tom Williams/CQ Roll CallAs the craze for Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) gathered momentum, Dorsey announced he was auctioning his first tweet for charity. It was bought for $2.9 million by Hakan Estavi, chief executive at at Bridge Oracle. Dorsey said proceeds from the auction would go to Give Directly's Africa response.Twitter announced on November 29 Dorsey had stepped down as CEO.Jack Dorsey co-founder and chairman of Twitter and co-founder and CEO of Square.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesCNBC was the first to report on Dorsey's expected resignation, citing unnamed sources.Twitter confirmed the story the same day, announcing Chief Technology Officer Parag Agrawal would take over as CEO with immediate effect.Dorsey posted on his Twitter account saying: "Not sure anyone has heard but, I resigned from Twitter."In his tweet he included a screenshot of the email he sent to Twitter staff announcing his resignation.—jack⚡️ (@jack) November 29, 2021And in May 2022, his time on the board of directors officially came to an end, an anticipated move that coincides with the company's stockholder's meeting. Two days after Dorsey stepped down as Twitter CEO, Square changed its name to Block.Block's revamped logo.Block"The name change creates room for further growth," the company said in a statement."Block references the neighborhood blocks where we find our sellers, a blockchain, block parties full of music, obstacles to overcome, a section of code, building blocks, and of course, tungsten cubes," it added.The line about tungsten cubes was an apparent reference to a craze among crypto enthusiasts of paying as much as $3,500 for novelty tungsten cubes.In April 2022, Dorsey changed his official title at Block from CEO to "Block Head."Jack Dorsey's official job description on the Block website was changed to say Block Head.BlockThe title change was made official in a regulatory filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 20, 2022."There will be no changes in Mr. Dorsey's roles and responsibilities," the filing said.Block's website was also updated to list his new title as Block Head.Musk tweeted in response to the news using fire emojis to signal his approval for Dorsey's title.—Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 23, 2022 Musk officially added the title of "Technoking" to his role at Tesla in March 2021.Dorsey said in an April 2022 tweet his "biggest regret" was Twitter shutting down Vine.Marco Bello/AFP/Getty ImagesDorsey replied to a Twitter user lamenting Vine's demise saying: "I know. Biggest regret," accompanied by a sad face emoji.Twitter acquired short-form video app Vine in 2012 but shut it down in 2016.In August 2022, Twitter's former head of security, Peiter Zatko, filed a whistleblower complaint with the SEC alleging the company participated in negligent security practices under Dorsey.Ex Twitter security chief Peiter Zatko.Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesIn his 84-page report and subsequent testimony, Zatko made a number of allegations against the company, including claims it had "egregious deficiencies" around security protocol and that Dorsey experienced a "drastic loss of focus" in his last year as CEO of Twitter. In September 2022, Dorsey was deposed and questioned under oath as part of Elon Musk's legal battle with Twitter and his proposed $44 billion takeover.Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in Washington, DC, in 2018.APMusk's team accused Twitter of misleading investors and intentionally "miscounting" spam accounts, Insider reported. Later that month, private texts revealed Dorsey had tried to get Musk involved with Twitter a year prior to the Tesla CEO's $44 billion proposal.Jack Dorsey and Elon Musk.Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue/Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesIn the texts, Dorsey explained why he left the company and said he previously pushed to get Musk involved with Twitter. "A new platform is needed. It can't be a company. That's why I left," Dorsey wrote to Musk, adding he thinks Twitter should be an "open-sourced protocol" and "cant have an advertising model." Dorsey also told Musk he had advocated for the Tesla CEO's addition to the Twitter board a year earlier, but the request was denied, which he said he thought "was completely stupid and backwards."In October 2022, as Musk was finalizing his Twitter deal, Dorsey quietly launched a beta for his new social-media company, Bluesky Social.Bluesky SocialThe blockchain-based company's beta launch raked in 30,000 signups in two days. According to Bluesky's website, the company is intended to support "a new foundation for social networking which gives creators independence from platforms, developers the freedom to build, and users a choice in their experience."After Musk ordered mass layoffs at Twitter after taking over in November 2022, Dorsey tweeted an apology: "I own the responsibility for why everyone is in this situation: I grew the company size too quickly. I apologize for that."Jack Dorsey/Twitter"Folks at Twitter past and present are strong and resilient," he wrote on Twitter. "They will always find a way no matter how difficult the moment. I realize many are angry with me."He continued: "I am grateful for, and love, everyone who has ever worked on Twitter. I don't expect that to be mutual in this moment...or ever…and I understand."Source: InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 5th, 2022

Kim Kardashian agreed to pay the SEC $1.3 million - a warning shot from the watchdog to crypto-promoting celebrities

Other celebrities including Floyd Mayweather and Jake Paul have been sued by investors for promoting cryptocurrencies that later tanked in value. FILE PHOTO: U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission logoThomson Reuters Kim Kardashian agreed to pay the SEC $1.3 million for promoting Ethereum Max this week. Other celebrities including Floyd Mayweather and Jake Paul have been hit with lawsuits from crypto investors.  The SEC's ruling is a "stark celebrity warning," one analyst said. Several crypto-promoting celebrities may have been watching nervously this week after Kim Kardashian settled with the Securities and Exchange Commission over undisclosed payments for promoting a token on Instragram account. Kardashian agreed Monday to pay the SEC $1.26 million to settle an ongoing investigation into her promotion of the Ethereum Max token.The reality TV star failed to disclose that she was paid $250,000 to publish a June 2021 Instagram story shilling EMAX – a token with a market cap of just $11.7 million that bears no relation to ethereum. The reality star and influencer ran afoul of a 1930s securities law that says people touting investments must disclose if they're paid to do so, and say specifically how much they were paid. SEC chair Gary Gensler seemed to send out a warning to other celebrities in a statement issued after the Kardashian ruling."This case is a reminder that, when celebrities or influencers endorse investment opportunities, including crypto asset securities, it doesn't mean that those investment products are right for all investors," he said."Ms. Kardashian's case also serves as a reminder to celebrities and others that the law requires them to disclose to the public when and how much they are paid to promote investing in securities," Gensler added.Kardashian isn't the only celebrity who has been rebuked for promoting EMAX.Crypto investors sued boxing legend Floyd Mayweather and basketball Hall-of-Famer Paul Pierce as well as Kardashian in January, filing a lawsuit that alleged the three celebrities duped fans into buying the token before it plummeted 98% in value.In February, another class-action lawsuit accused celebrities including YouTuber Jake Paul, rappers Lil Yachty and Soulja Boy, and former Backstreet Boys member Nick Carter of shilling SafeMoon as part of a pump-and-dump scheme.The SEC's settlement with Kardashian is the first sign that the regulator will crack down on celebrities accused of taking part in those sorts of schemes, analysts said."The $1.26 million fine levied on Kim Kardashian for promoting Ethereum Max is a stark warning to other celebrities not to dabble in the dark world of crypto to make a quick buck," Hargreaves Lansdown's Susannah Streeter said."Regulators are clearly horrified at the damage superstar celebrities can do to the bank balances of vulnerable consumers, who are influenced by almost every move they make," she added. "The delusions of quick riches can spread far too rapidly on social media with speculation amplified by reposts by millions of followers."The SEC declined to comment further.Read more: After the 'Squid Game' cryptocurrency emerges as a scam, 4 experts break down the 3 smart ways to spot a fraudulent token and invest safelyRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytOct 8th, 2022

The wild life of billionaire Twitter founder and "Block Head" Jack Dorsey, who"s officially left the social network"s board, eats one meal a day, and takes ice baths

Jack Dorsey, famous for his unusual life of luxury, stepped down as Twitter CEO in 2021 but continues to lead Block as its "Block Head." Jack Dorsey onstage at a bitcoin convention on June 4, 2021 in Miami, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty Images Jack Dorsey cofounded Twitter in 2006 and the company made him a billionaire. He's famous for his unusual life of luxury, including a daily fasting routine and regular ice baths. He stepped down as Twitter CEO in November 2021 but continues to lead Block as its "Block Head." Visit Business Insider's home page for more stories. From fighting armies of bots to quashing rumors about sending his beard hair to rapper Azealia Banks, Twitter founder Jack Dorsey leads an unusual life of luxury.Dorsey has had a turbulent career in Silicon Valley. After cofounding Twitter on March 21 2006, he was booted as the company's CEO two years later, but returned in 2015 having set up his second company, Square — which he rebranded as Block in 2021.He led Twitter through the techlash that has engulfed social media companies, testifying before Congress multiple times.And Dorsey announced on November 29, 2021, he had stepped down as the CEO of Twitter. He continues to lead Block, where in April 2022 he changed his title from "CEO" to "Block Head." And on Wednesday, Dorsey officially stepped down from Twitter's board of directors amid Elon Musk's bid for the company, a move that has been expected since fall 2021.Dorsey has provoked his fair share of controversy and criticism, extolling fasting and ice baths as part of his daily routine. His existence is not entirely spartan, however. Like some other billionaires, he owns a stunning house, dates models, and drives fast cars.Scroll on to read more about the fabulous life of Jack Dorsey.Rebecca Borison and Madeline Stone contributed reporting to an earlier version of this story.Dorsey began programming while attending Bishop DuBourg High School in St. Louis.VineAt age 15, Dorsey wrote dispatch software that is still used by some taxi companies.Source: Bio. When he wasn't checking out specialty electronics stores or running a fantasy football league for his friends, Dorsey frequently attended punk-rock concerts. @jackThese days Dorsey doesn't favour the spiky hairdo.Source: The Wall Street JournalLike many of his fellow tech billionaires, Dorsey never graduated college.edyson / FlickrHe briefly attended the Missouri University of Science and Technology and transferred to New York University before calling it quits.Source: Bio.In 2000, Dorsey built a simple prototype that let him update his friends on his life via BlackBerry and email messaging.joi / FlickrNobody else really seemed interested, so he put away the idea for a bit.Source: The Unofficial Stanford BlogFun fact: Jack Dorsey is also a licensed masseur.Getty Images/Bill PuglianoHe got his license in about 2002, before exploding onto the tech scene.Sources: The Wall Street JournalHe got a job at a podcasting company called Odeo, where he met his future Twitter cofounders.Jack Dorsey, Biz Stone and Evan Williams took home the prize in the blogging category at SXSW in 2007.Flickr via Scott Beale/LaughingSquidOdeo went out of business in 2006, so Dorsey returned to his messaging idea, and Twitter was born.On March 21, 2006, Dorsey posted the first tweet.Jack Dorsey's first tweet.Twitter/@jackDorsey kept his Twitter handle simple, "@jack."Dorsey and his cofounders, Evan Williams and Biz Stone, bought the Twitter domain name for roughly $7,000.Khalid Mohammed / AP ImagesDorsey took out his nose ring to look the part of a CEO. He was 30 years old.A year later, Dorsey was already less hands-on at Twitter. Evan Williams and Jack Dorsey.Wikimedia CommonsBy 2008, Williams had taken over as CEO, and Dorsey transitioned to chairman of Twitter's board. Dorsey immediately got started on new projects. He invested in Foursquare and launched a payments startup called Square that lets small-business owners accept credit card payments through a smartphone attachment.Sources: Twitter and Bio.In 2011, Dorsey got the chance to interview US President Barack Obama in the first Twitter Town Hall.President Obama talks to the audience next to Jack Dorsey during his first ever Twitter Town Hall.ReutersDorsey had to remind Obama to keep his replies under 140 characters, Twitter's limit at the time.Source: TwitterTwitter went public in November 2013, and within hours Dorsey was a billionaire.APIn 2014 Forbes pegged Dorsey's net worth at $2.2 billion. On the day it was reported he was expected to resign, Bloomberg's Billionaires Index calculated his net worth at $12.3 billion.Source: Bio. and ForbesIt was revealed in a 2019 filing that Dorsey earned just $1.40 for his job as Twitter CEO the previous year.Twitter and Square founder Jack Dorsey, who doesn't earn anything from his primary day job.David Becker / GettyThe $1.40 salary actually represented a pay rise for Dorsey, who in previous years had refused any payment at all.He's far from the only Silicon Valley mogul to have taken a measly salary - Mark Zuckerberg makes $1 a year as CEO of Facebook.Source: Insider He might have been worth more had he not given back 10% of his stock to Square.Jack Dorsey with Hollywood producer Brian Grazer, Veronica Smiley, and Kate Greer at the annual Allen and Co. conference at the Sun Valley, Idaho Resort in 2013.ReutersThis helped Square employees, giving them more equity and stock options. It was also helpful in acquiring online food-delivery startup Caviar.Sources: Insider and CaviarWith his newfound wealth, he bought a BMW 3 Series, but reportedly didn't drive it often.Alex Davies / Business Insider"Now he's able to say, like, 'The BMW is the only car I drive, because it's the best automotive engineering on the planet,' or whatever," Twitter cofounder Biz Stone told The New Yorker in 2013.Source: The New YorkerHe also reportedly paid $9.9 million for this seaside house on El Camino Del Mar in the exclusive Seacliff neighborhood of San Francisco.The Real Estalker via Sotheby'sThe house has a view of the Golden Gate Bridge, which Dorsey views as a marvel of design.Source: InsiderBefore the pandemic, Dorsey said he worked from home one day a week.Jack Dorsey's home setup.Twitter/@jackIn an interview with journalist Kara Swisher conducted over Twitter, Dorsey said he worked every Tuesday out of his kitchen.He also told Kara Swisher that Elon Musk is his favorite Twitter user.Elon Musk is a prolific tweeter.PewDiePie/YouTubeDorsey said Musk's tweets are, "focused on solving existential problems and sharing his thinking openly."He added that he enjoys all the "ups and downs" that come with Musk's sometimes unpredictable use of the site. Musk himself replied, tweeting his thanks and "Twitter rocks!" followed by a string of random emojis.Both Musk and Dorsey are crypto enthusiasts, and appear to have developed a good public relationship.Source: InsiderFacebook CEO and rival Mark Zuckerberg once served Jack Dorsey a goat he killed himself.Gene KimDorsey told Rolling Stone about the meal, which took place in 2011. Dorsey said the goat was served cold, and that he personally stuck to salad.Source: Rolling StoneHis eating habits have raised eyebrows.Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for WIRED25Appearing on a podcast run by a health guru who previously said that vaccines caused autism, Dorsey said he eats one meal a day and fasts all weekend. He said the first time he tried fasting it made him feel like he was hallucinating."It was a weird state to be in. But as I did it the next two times, it just became so apparent to me how much of our days are centered around meals and how — the experience I had was when I was fasting for much longer, how time really slowed down," he said.The comments drew fierce criticism from many who said Dorsey was normalizing eating disorders.In a later interview with Wired, Dorsey said he eats seven meals a week, "just dinner."Sources: Insider, The New StatesmanIn the early days of Twitter, Dorsey aspired to be a fashion designer.Cindy Ord / Getty Images, Franck MichelDorsey would regularly don leather jackets and slim suits by Prada and Hermès, as well as Dior Homme reverse-collar dress shirts, a sort of stylish take on the popped collar.More recently he favors edgier outfits, including the classic black turtleneck favored by Silicon Valley luminaries like Steve Jobs.Sources: CBS News and The Wall Street JournalHe also re-introduced the nose-ring and grew a beard.GettyDorsey seems to care less about looking the part of a traditional executive these days.Singer Azealia Banks claimed to have been sent clippings of Dorsey's beard hair to fashion into a protective amulet, although Dorsey denied this happened.Azealia Banks.GettyIn 2016, Banks posted on her now-deleted Twitter account that Dorsey sent her his hair, "in an envelope." Dorsey later told the HuffPo that the beard-posting incident never happened.Sources: Insider and HuffPoDorsey frequently travels the world and shares his photos with his 6 million Twitter followers.Jack Dorsey meeting Japanese Prime Minister Sinzo Abe.Twitter/@JPN_PMOOn his travels, Dorsey meets heads of state, including Japan's former Prime Minister Shinzō Abe.Source: TwitterTweets about his vacation in Myanmar also provoked an outcry.Bagan, Myanmar.Shutterstock/Martin M303Dorsey tweeted glowingly about a vacation he took to Myanmar for his birthday in December 2018. "If you're willing to travel a bit, go to Myanmar," he said.This came at the height of the Rohingya crisis, and Dorsey was attacked for his blithe promotion of the country — especially since social media platforms were accused of having been complicit in fuelling hatred towards the Rohingya.Source: InsiderHowever, Dorsey says he doesn't care about "looking bad."FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Trump welcomes South Korea’s President Moon to the White House in WashingtonReutersIn a bizarre Huffington Post interview in 2019, Dorsey was asked whether Donald Trump — an avid tweeter — could be removed from the platform if he called on his followers to murder a journalist. Dorsey gave a vague answer which drew sharp criticism.Following the interview's publication, Dorsey said he doesn't care about "looking bad.""I care about being open about how we're thinking and about what we see," he added.In September 2018, Jack Dorsey was grilled by lawmakers alongside Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Jack Dorsey are sworn-in for a Senate Intelligence Committee.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesDorsey and Sandberg were asked about election interference on Twitter and Facebook as well as alleged anti-conservative bias in social media companies.Source: InsiderDuring the hearing, Dorsey shared a snapshot of his spiking heart rate on Twitter.AP Photo/Jose Luis MaganaDorsey was in the hot seat for several hours. His heart rate peaked at 109 beats per minute.Source: InsiderDorsey testified before Congress once again on October 28, 2020.Jack Dorsey tuning into the hearing with the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation/Handout via REUTERSDorsey appeared via videoconference at the Senate hearing on Section 230, a part of US law that protects internet companies from legal liability for user-generated content, as well as giving them broad authority to decide how to moderate their own platforms.In prepared testimony ahead of the hearing, Dorsey said stripping back Section 230 would "collapse how we communicate on the Internet," and suggested ways for tech companies to make their moderation processes more transparent. During the hearing, Dorsey once again faced accusations of anti-conservative biasJack Dorsey appearing virtually at the hearing.Michael Reynolds-Pool/Getty ImagesThe accusations from Republican lawmakers focused on the way Twitter enforces its policies, particularly the way it has labelled tweets from President Trump compared to other world leaders.Dorsey took the brunt of questions from lawmakers, even though he appeared alongside Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Google CEO Sundar Pichai.Source: ProtocolDuring the hearing, the length of Dorsey's beard drew fascination from pundits.Dorsey had to address accusations of censorship.Greg Nash/Pool via REUTERSSome users referred to Dorsey's facial hair as his "quarantine beard," while others said it made him look like a wizard.—rat king (@MikeIsaac) October 28, 2020—Taylor Hatmaker (@tayhatmaker) October 28, 2020"Jack Dorsey's beard is literally breaking Twitter's own face detection," posted cybersecurity blogging account @Swiftonsecurity.—SwiftOnSecurity (@SwiftOnSecurity) October 28, 2020 Dorsey also addressed the way Twitter dealt with a dubiously sourced New York Post story about Hunter Biden.Jack Dorsey appearing on-screen at the hearing.Greg Nash/Pool via REUTERS TPX IMAGES OF THE DAYWhen the New York Post published a report about Hunter Biden on October 14 that threw up red flags about sourcing, Twitter blocked users from sharing URLs citing its "hacked materials" policy.Dorsey subsequently apologized publicly, saying it was wrong of Twitter to block URLs.—jack (@jack) October 16, 2020During the Senate hearing, Sen. Ted Cruz accused Twitter of taking the "unilateral decision to censor" the Post.Dorsey said the Post's Twitter account would remain locked until it deleted its original tweet, but that updated policies meant it could tweet the same story again without getting blocked.Source: InsiderDorsey had to appear before another hearing on November 17 2020 — this time about how Twitter handled content moderation around the 2020 presidential election.U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee via REUTERS/File PhotoDorsey was summoned alongside Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg by Republicans who were displeased with how the platforms had dealt with then-President Donald Trump's social media accounts. Both CEOs defended their companies, saying they are politically neutral.When he's not in Washington, Dorsey regularly hops in and out of ice baths and saunas.This is not Dorsey's sauna.ShutterstockDorsey said in the "Tales of the Crypt" podcast that he started using ice baths and saunas in the evenings around 2016.He will alternately sit in his barrel sauna for 15 minutes and then switch to an ice bath for three. He repeats this routine three times, before finishing it off with a one-minute ice bath.He also likes to take an icy dip in the mornings to wake him up.Source: CNBCDorsey's dating life has sparked intrigue. In 2018, he was reported to be dating Sports Illustrated model Raven Lyn Corneil.Sports Illustrated Swimsuit / YouTube / GettyPage Six reported in September 2018 that the pair were spotted together at the Harper's Bazaar Icons party during New York Fashion Week. Page Six also reported that Dorsey's exes included actress Lily Cole and ballet dancer Sofiane Sylve.Source: Page SixHe's a big believer in cryptocurrency, frequently tweeting about its virtues.Teresa Kroeger/Getty ImagesIn particular, Dorsey is a fan of Bitcoin, which he described in early 2019 as "resilient" and "principled." He told the "Tales of the Crypt" podcast in March that year that he was maxing out the $10,000 weekly spending limit on Square's Cash App buying up Bitcoin.In October 2020 he slammed Coinbase CEO Brian Armstrong for forbidding employee activism at the company, saying cryptocurrency is itself a form of activism.—jack (@jack) September 30, 2020 Source: Insider, Insider and CNBC Dorsey said Square was launching a new bitcoin business in summer 2021.Square CEO Jack Dorsey speaks at the Bitcoin 2021 Convention, a crypto-currency conference held on June 4, 2021 in Miami, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesDorsey announced the new venture in a tweet on July 15, 2021 and said its name was "TBD." It wasn't clear whether that was its actual name, or Dorsey hadn't decided on a name yet.—jack (@jack) July 15, 2021 Dorsey said he hopes bitcoin can help bring about "world peace."Jack Dorsey on stage at the Bitcoin 2021 Convention, a crypto-currency conference in Miami.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesDorsey appeared alongside Elon Musk and Ark Invest CEO Cathie Wood during a panel called "The B Word" on July 2021. He said he loves the bitcoin community because it's "weird as hell.""It's the only reason that I have a career — because I learned so much from people like who are building bitcoin today," Dorsey said.At the end of 2019 Dorsey said he would move to Africa for at least three months in 2020.AP Photo/Francois MoriDorsey's announcement followed a tour of Ethiopia, Ghana, Nigeria, and South Africa. "Africa will define the future (especially the bitcoin one!). Not sure where yet, but I'll be living here for 3-6 months mid 2020," he tweeted. Dorsey then came under threat of being ousted as Twitter CEO by activist investor Elliott Management.Paul Singer, founder and president of Elliott Management.REUTERS/Mike Blake/File PhotoBoth Bloomberg and CNBC reported in late February 2020 that major Twitter investor Elliott Management — led by Paul Singer — was seeking to replace Dorsey. Reasons given included the fact that Dorsey split his time between two firms by acting as CEO to both Twitter and financial tech firm Square, as well as his planned move to Africa.Source: InsiderTesla CEO and frequent Twitter user Elon Musk weighed in on the news, throwing his support behind Dorsey.Tesla CEO Elon Musk.REUTERS/Hannibal Hanschke"Just want to say that I support @jack as Twitter CEO," Musk tweeted, adding that Dorsey has a good heart, using the heart emoji.Source: InsiderDorsey managed to strike a truce with Elliott Management.AP Photo/Jose Luis MaganaTwitter announced on March 9, 2020 that it had reached a deal with Elliott Management which would leave Jack Dorsey in place as CEO.The deal included a $1 billion investment from private equity firm Silver Lake, and partners from both Elliott Management and Silver Lake joined Twitter's board.Patrick Pichette, lead independent director of Twitter's board, said he was "confident we are on the right path with Jack's leadership," but added that a new temporary committee would be formed to instruct the board's evaluation of Twitter's leadership.In April 2020, Dorsey announced that he was forming a new charity fund that would help in global relief efforts amid the coronavirus pandemic.Dorsey.Matt Crossick/PA Images via Getty ImagesDorsey said he would pour $1 billion of his own Square equity into the fund, or roughly 28% of his total wealth at the time. The fund, dubbed Start Small LLC, would first focus on helping in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic, he said.Dorsey said he would be making all transactions on behalf of the fund public in a spreadsheet.In July 2020, hackers compromised 130 Twitter accounts in a bitcoin scam.TwitterThe accounts of high-profile verified accounts belonging to Bill Gates, Kim Kardashian West, and others were hacked, with attackers tweeting out posts asking users to send payment in bitcoin to fraudulent cryptocurrency addresses.As a solution, Twitter temporarily blocked all verified accounts — those with blue check marks on their profiles — but the damage was done.  Elon Musk said he personally contacted Dorsey following the hack.Elon Musk (left) and Dorsey.Susan Walsh/AP; Getty ImagesDuring a July 2020 interview with The New York Times, Musk said he had immediately called Dorsey after he learned about the hack."Within a few minutes of the post coming up, I immediately got texts from a bunch of people I know, then I immediately called Jack so probably within less than five minutes my account was locked," said Musk.Source: The New York TimesIn March 2021 Dorsey put his first-ever tweet up for auction.Jack Dorsey and Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook COO, off camera, testify during a Senate (Select) Intelligence Committee hearing in Dirksen Building where they testified on the influence of foreign operations on social media on September 5, 2018Tom Williams/CQ Roll CallAs the craze for Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) gathered momentum, Dorsey announced he was auctioning his first tweet for charity. It was bought for $2.9 million by Hakan Estavi, chief executive at at Bridge Oracle. Dorsey said proceeds from the auction would go to Give Directly's Africa response.Twitter announced on November 29 Dorsey had stepped down as CEO.Jack Dorsey co-founder and chairman of Twitter and co-founder and CEO of Square.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesCNBC was the first to report on Dorsey's expected resignation, citing unnamed sources.Twitter confirmed the story the same day, announcing Chief Technology Officer Parag Agrawal would take over as CEO with immediate effect.Dorsey posted on his Twitter account saying: "Not sure anyone has heard but, I resigned from Twitter."In his tweet he included a screenshot of the email he sent to Twitter staff announcing his resignation.—jack⚡️ (@jack) November 29, 2021And in May 2022, his time on the board of directors officially came to an end, an anticipated move that coincides with the company's stockholder's meeting. Two days after Dorsey stepped down as Twitter CEO, Square changed its name to Block.Block's revamped logo.Block"The name change creates room for further growth," the company said in a statement."Block references the neighborhood blocks where we find our sellers, a blockchain, block parties full of music, obstacles to overcome, a section of code, building blocks, and of course, tungsten cubes," it added.The line about tungsten cubes was an apparent reference to a craze among crypto enthusiasts of paying as much as $3,500 for novelty tungsten cubes.In April 2022, Dorsey changed his official title at Block from CEO to "Block Head."Jack Dorsey's official job description on the Block website was changed to say Block Head.BlockThe title change was made official in a regulatory filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 20, 2022."There will be no changes in Mr. Dorsey's roles and responsibilities," the filing said.Block's website was also updated to list his new title as Block Head.Musk tweeted in response to the news using fire emojis to signal his approval for Dorsey's title.—Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 23, 2022 Musk officially added the title of "Technoking" to his role at Tesla in March 2021.Dorsey said in an April 2022 tweet his "biggest regret" was Twitter shutting down Vine.Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter and co-founder & CEO of Square, attends the crypto-currency conference Bitcoin 2021 Convention at the Mana Convention Center in Miami, Florida, on June 4, 2021.Marco Bello/AFP/Getty ImagesDorsey replied to a Twitter user lamenting Vine's demise saying: "I know. Biggest regret," accompanied by a sad face emoji.Twitter acquired short-form video app Vine in 2012 but shut it down in 2016.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 25th, 2022

Live updates: Pennsylvania"s GOP Senate primary is going down to the wire

Senate seats in contention, Rep. Madison Cawthorn loses in North Carolina and a GOP face-off in Pennsylvania to run for US Senate. North Carolina GOP Rep. Madison Cawthorn lost his seat in a primary on Tuesday.Saul Loeb - Pool/Getty ImagesWelcome to the Insider live blog for the May 17 primaries.Key Senate and House races remain too close to callFormer President Donald Trump poses for photos with David McCormick at the Trump National Golf Club Bedminster clubhouse in Bedminster, N.J. Mehmet Oz speaks at a town hall-style event at the Newtown Athletic Club in Newtown, Pa.AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster and AP Photo/Marc LevySeveral races are still neck-and-neck as of Wednesday morning, including the high-profile Republican Pennsylvania Senate contest, where just 0.19 percentage points separate Dr. Mehmet Oz from David McCormick with thousands of absentee ballots left to be counted. Meanwhile in the House, progressive candidates are potentially on the verge of scoring two big wins, with Jamie McLeod-Skinner on track to knock out centrist Rep. Kurt Schrader in Oregon's 5th District and progressive Summer Lee leading her main rival Steve Irwin by 446 votes in the open race for the Pittsburgh-based 12th Congressional District.  -Grace Panetta Pennsylvania remains unsettled as election night draws to a closeGREENSBURG, PA - Pennsylvania Republican U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz joins former President Donald Trump onstage during a rally.Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty ImagesDr. Mehmet Oz and Dave McCormick remain in neck-and-neck contention for the GOP nomination for Senate in Pennsylvania with less than half a percentage point separating the two frontrunners by late Tuesday night, meaning the race may not be called until Wednesday. More votes are still left to be counted in counties were Oz has been performing well, and a ballot printing error in Lancaster County that will require workers to manually recreate and re-scan 16,000 absentee ballots over the next few days will also potentially slow down the counting if the race remains this close. -Grace Panetta Lamb reportedly concedes Pennsylvania Senate primaryConor Lamb.Brendan McDermid/ReutersRep. Conor Lamb has conceded Pennsylvania's Democratic Senate primary, Politico's Holly Otterbein reports.Lt. Gov. John Fetterman is projected to win the contest, per Decision Desk HQ. As of 11 p.m. Eastern Time, Fetterman was running ahead of Lamb by more than 32 percentage points.We still don't know who the Republican nominee is and may not find that out tonight. Either way, the general election could decide which party will control the Senate. — By Brent D. GriffithsPolls close, wrapping up an evening of primariesIdaho Gov. Brad Little.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesPolls are closed everywhere in the country, wrapping up an evening of primaries in states all over the US. The final results will come in Idaho, which just closed its last polls, and Oregon, which votes entirely by mail. The final race that will determine former President Donald Trump's status as kingmaker in the Republican party is in Idaho. There, Incumbent Gov. Brad Little is facing a primary challenge from his own Lieutenant Governor Janice McGeachin, whom Trump endorsed. Oregon has an open primary for governor after the current governor, Democrat Kate Brown, is term limited out. US House seats are also up for grabs, with tensions growing between centrist and progressive Democrats in the House. Follow along to see the results of the races for gubernatorial nominations and congressional seats in Oregon, and for the governor's race in Idaho. - Kimberly Leonard Meet the man who just took down Rep. Madison CawthornChuck Edwards, a North Carolina state senator, defeated freshman GOP Rep. Madison Cawthorn on Tuesday.Camila DeChalus/InsiderTake a look at this Insider profile of state Sen. Chuck Edwards, the Republican who just unseated Rep. Madison Cawthorn in North Carolina's 11th Congressional District.Senior Reporter Camila DeChalus traveled to Hendersonville and spoke with the state senator in May to learn more about the rising star in North Carolina. She found the antithesis of Cawthorn in Edwards: a candidate lacking his rival's hyperbolic bravado and a scant social media presence.When DeChalus asked about Cawthorn's plethora of recent controversies, Edwards told her that "it's obvious that he [Cawthorn] got caught up in political stardom and turned his back on the people in these mountains."He said that his "qualms with Madison Cawthorn are based on his performance and his poor attendance record in Congress."— By Madison HallBiden lauds Fetterman's Pennsylvania Senate nominationPresident Joe Biden hadn't said anything about the Pennsylvania Senate race — until John Fetterman won the Democratic nomination.AP Photo/Carolyn KasterPresident Joe Biden finally has something to say about Pennsylvania's Democratic Senate race.Lt. Gov. John Fetterman is projected to be the Democratic Party's nominee in what will be one of the nation's closest watched Senate races, Decision Desk HQ projects.Unlike his predecessor, Biden loathes to weigh in on contested party primaries. It didn't help matters that the Delawarian president who never forgets his Scranton roots encountered a race with three big names in Pennsylvania politics: Fetterman, Rep. Conor Lamb, and state-Sen. Malcolm Kenyatta.Lamb and Kenyatta were close Biden allies. Biden bestowed one of his highest compliments on Lamb, saying that the young former Marine reminded him of his son Beau Biden when Lamb's 2018 special election attracted national attention. While Kenyatta was a key Biden surrogate and was among a group of rising stars that spoke during the 2020 Democratic National Convention's keynote address."Democrats are united around John, who is a strong nominee, will run a tough race, and can win in November," Biden said in a statement.— By Brent D. GriffithsA legislative leader and TikTok star is headed to Congress from KentuckyMorgan McGarvey, Kentucky's state Senate minority leader, is a TikTok star.Timothy D. Easley/AP PhotoKentucky's state Senate minority leader Morgan McGarvey, who won the Democratic primary to succeed retiring Rep. John Yarmuth in the safely Democratic, Louisville-based 3rd Congressional District, will also bring some TikTok starpower to Congress. McGarvey and his colleague, Sen. Reginald Thomas, currently boast nearly 130,000 followers on the @kysenatedems account. That's where the two use TikTok trends to document their daily lives in the state legislature and the woes of being in the superminority, including a video of Thomas doing the "Rick & Morty" trend in front of the state Senate chamber that eaned 5.7 million views.McGarvey is likely to also be in the minority in Congress, but at least he can give his colleagues some TikTok pointers. -Grace Panetta Rep. Madison Cawthorn losesRep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C.House Television via APControversial GOP Rep. Madison Cawthorn is projected to lose his re-election campaign in the face of fierce opposition from his fellow North Carolina Republicans.State-Sen. Chuck Edwards is projected to win the race, per Decision Desk HQ. Sen. Thom Tillis endorsed Edwards, a sign of just how much fellow elected Republicans rebelled against Cawthorn.Cawthorn courted controversy even before his election. But the 26-year-old finally hit a nerve on Capitol Hill when he suggested on a podcast that there were illicit sex and drug-filled parties in Washington. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said publicly that Cawthorn had lost his trust. Tillis came off the sidelines and pushed hard for Edwards' campaign. And the rest is now history.— Brent D. GriffithsNorth Carolina GOP Senate candidate Ted Budd and Donald Trump.Chris Seward/AP PhotoFormer President Donald Trump's endorsement of Republican Rep. Ted Budd was likely crucial in helping the two-term lawmaker clinch the GOP nomination for US Senate on Tuesday, despite a crowded field of contenders. But Budd too has been decidedly Trumpian in the types of legislation he has introduced while in Congress. In April, for example, he introduced the Build the Wall Now Act to have the federal government continue constructing the border wall between the US and Mexico that was started under Trump and that President Joe Biden paused by executive order. Budd also introduced the Justice for Victims of Sanctuary Cities Act of 2021, which would allow people to sue cities if someone unauthorized to be living in the US committed a crime against them. While in office, Trump targeted sanctuary cities that are often led by Democrats and that sheltered migrants against federal crackdowns on illegal immigration. On education, Budd introduced a bill to recreate Trump's 1776 Commission, which was disbanded under Biden. Members of the conservative commission had created a 45-page document that aimed to promote a "patriotic education," and was intended as a rebuttal to the New York Times' 1619 Project. Budd's Freedom from Regulations Act, introduced in 2021, echoed a Trump-era executive order that called for trashing two regulations every time the administration created a new one. — Kimberly LeonardClay Aiken on track to lose, Decision Desk HQ projectsAmerican Idol star Clay Aiken is headed for defeat in his race for a US House seat in North Carolina.Vince Bucci/Getty ImagesClay Aiken is currently running third in the race for the Democratic nomination for North Carolina's 4th Congressional District. State-Sen. Valerie Foushee is already projected to have won the nomination. Long-time incumbent Rep. David Price, a Democrat, previously announced his retirement after over 30 years in Congress.Aiken won his party's 2014 nomination but later lost the general election to then-Rep. Renee Ellmers. The 2003 American Idol runner-up decided to give it another go this cycle.Since American Idol, Aiken launched a private foundation and starred on Broadway in the Monty Python-inspired "Spamalot."Daily Kos Elections joked on Twitter that now it can no longer be said that Aiken finishes second in everything. Outside of elections, Aiken finished as the runner-up on 2012's edition of the Celebrity Apprentice when it was still hosted by then-future President Donald Trump.— Brent D. GriffithsDoug Mastriano, a Pennsylvania state senator, is the Republican nominee for governor.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano is the winner of the Republican primary in the Pennsylvania gubernatorial race, according to DDHQ and Insider.— Madison HallFetterman's turn in the Insider spotlightJohn Fetterman on the Senate campaign trial in May 2022.Keith Srakocic/AP PhotoCheck out this Insider profile of John Fetterman, the Democratic nominee for the US Senate from Pennsylvania. In November 2020, Insider's Charles Davis interviewed Fetterman about his journey from being largely apolitical, to being elected mayor of Braddock, Pennsylvania, in 2005, to being branded a rising Democratic star.Fetterman told Insider that he doesn't think that Democrats can't reach Trump voters. "If we're going to reverse the fortunes of not only our party but, most importantly, communities and regions, [we need to be] reinvesting and acknowledging that these places deserve to be championed," Fetterman said."There's certainly unreachable people," he said. "I think it's people reacting to a level of authenticity or rawness. You're not going to convince me that Pennsylvania changed radically from Barack Obama to Donald Trump."— Sarah GrayMehmet Oz: Not in it for the moneyMehmet Oz would earn $174,000 if he becomes a US senator.Matt Rourke/APIf Donald Trump endorsee Mehmet Oz win's tonight's US Senate primary in Pennsylvania, then defeats the Democratic nominee in November, he'll earn a standard congressional salary, which today stands at $174,000.Not bad, no, but it's peanuts compared to what he's been making in the private sector — or perhaps pistachios, given that Oz scored a cool $125,000 for a one-day speech to the American Pistachio Growers Association in March 2020, according a federal financial disclosure Oz submitted to the Senate in April.For hosting quiz show Jeopardy! during a two-week stint in late March and early April 2021, Oz earned $268,701, records show.And that's all before you consider his former day job: Oz reported earning more than $7 million from "income derived from ownership interest in Oz Media LLL through Oz Property Holdings." He also received a $2 million salary for hosting the "Dr. Oz Show."Oz is also an active stock trader, reporting sizeable investments in companies such as Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, defense contractor Northrop Grumman, and drugmaker Johnson & Johnson, among several dozen others. — Dave LevinthalFetterman wins Pennsylvania Democratic senator nominationJohn Fetterman, left, is the Democratic nominee for the Pennsylvania US Senate seat.Keith Srakocic/AP PhotoJohn Fetterman is the winner of the Democratic primary race for Pennsylvania's US Senate seat. That's the call from Insider and DDHQ. Fetterman, currently the state's lieutenant governor, defeated Rep. Conor Lamb, Malcolm Kenyatta, and Alexandria Khalil. Fetterman is currently recovering from a recent stroke and announced on Tuesday that he had received a pacemaker implant.A pricey house race to watch near Pittsburgh: PA-12Sen. Bernie Sanders endorsed Pennsylvania state Rep. Summer Lee in her bid to win the nomination for the state's 12th congressional district.Rebecca Droke/AP PhotoWith the retirement of GOP Rep. Fred Keller, this district outside of Pittsburgh in the Susquehanna Valley is a potential pickup opportunity for Democrats.It's also a race that was looking pretty stale until the past few weeks. The frontrunner, state Rep. Summer Lee, has endorsements from Emily's List and Justice Democrats. Sen. Bernie Sanders recently stumped for her and she seemed to have everything going in her favor until a ton of money started pouring into the race. The American Israel Public Affairs Committee, most commonly referred to as AIPAC, has been funding ads through a new Super PAC called the United Democracy Project for Lee's opponent, Steve Irwin. Lee would be the latest in a new generation of Democrats in Washington with positions further to the left than most of the caucus, as well as more critical views of Israel. Should Irwin pull out a victory, his surge couldn't have been hurt by the AIPAC ad spree, but Lee remains the favorite. The Republican primary has been more quiet, with Michael Doyle — unrelated to retiring Rep. Mike Doyle — running unopposed.— Jake LahutPennsylvania's US Senate race is stupid expensivePennsylvania Republican Senate Candidate Mehmet OzAlexi Rosenfeld/Getty ImagesThe government of Erie, Pennsylvania, population 94,831, forecasts that it'll bring in about $95.7 million worth of revenue during 2022.Pennsylvania's US Senate race, meanwhile, is on pace to bring in twice that — maybe even more — en route to competing for the crown of the year's most expensive political race.As of April 27, the race had already attracted more than $68.3 million in contributions, according to federal records compiled by nonpartisan research organization OpenSecrets.There are two overriding reasons for this. First, both the Republican and Democratic primaries are highly competitive. They feature multiple candidates — David McCormick, Mehmet Oz and Kathy Barnette on the right, John Fetterman and Conor Lamb on the left. More candidates + more competition = more, more, more money.Second, McCormick and Oz are extremely wealthy. Both have pumped millions of dollars of their personal money into the race, with Oz alone accounting for more than $12 million, according to Federal Election Commission records. McCormick, at $11 million, isn't far behind.Tonight's winners will then have nearly six months to slug each other ahead of November's general election. National party committees and super PACs, which may raise and spend unlimited amounts of money, will almost assuredly supplement the candidates' own fundraising efforts with tens of millions of more dollars.— Dave LevinthalPolls in Pennsylvania closed at 8 p.m. ET.InsiderFollow along to see the results for the Republican and Democratic  candidates for governor, the US Senate, House from the Keystone State.Madison Cawthorn's cryptic crypto play may have violated the STOCK ActMadison Cawthorn, Republican nominee for North Carolina's 11th Congressional District, speaks during the largely virtual 2020 Republican National Convention broadcast from Washington, on August 26, 2020.2020 Republican National Convention/Handout via ReutersRep. Madison Cawthorn has plenty of problems — ones involving guns, money, cocaine orgies, and a nude video, to name four.One that's flying a bit below the radar, but still serious: he may have violated a federal conflicts-of-interest law by not publicly reporting his stated purchase in a cryptocurrency named for an anti-Joe Biden slogan.Per federal law, Cawthorn had 45-days to formally disclose details about his crypto play. But as of this evening, Cawthorn had done no such thing, and his campaign and congressional office have not responded to Insider's questions as to why.Failure to properly report such financial transactions can result in a fine administered by Congress, or in extreme cases, a referral to the Department of Justice.— Dave LevinthalTed Budd wins GOP Primary for open Senate seatFormer President Donald Trump endorsed Rep. Ted Budd of North Carolina in the 2022 North Carolina Senate race.AP Photo/Chris SewardRepublican Ted Budd will face off against Democrat Cheri Beasley for a crucial open US Senate seat in North Carolina, Insider and Decision Desk HQ project. Budd is a Republican congressman who was endorsed by President Donald Trump, and easily cleared a field of GOP opponents. Beasley, the former chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, is hoping to flip control of the seat currently held by retiring GOP Sen. Richard Burr.Mayoral MayhemCharlotte, NCShutterstockA Republican hasn't been the mayor of Louisville, Kentucky, for more than 50 years. Four Republican candidates are hoping to change that, including Bill Dieruf, the current mayor of Jeffersontown, a nearby suburb. The current mayor of Lexington, Kentucky's second-largest city, Linda Gorton, is running for reelection. Gorton's opponents recently chided her at a public forum over housing costs and crime rates. She countered by noting that she rose to the occasion when challenges surfaced in Lexington during her time in office, particularly during the pandemic.In Charlotte, North Carolina, Democratic Mayor Vi Alexander Lyles is vying for another term in office. Lyles became the first Black mayor in Charlotte history in 2017 after unseating the incumbent mayor. She's facing off against three other Democratic candidates tonight.You can check out and follow the three mayoral primaries here.—Madison HallJohn Fetterman gets pacemakerIn this Sept. 21, 2018 photo, former Braddock, Pa., Mayor John Fetterman speaks at a campaign rally for Pennsylvania candidates in PhiladelphiaAP Photo/Matt RourkePennsylvania Lt. Governor John Fetterman "just completed a successful procedure to implant a pacemaker with a defibrillator," his communications director, Joe Calvello, said in a statement Tuesday evening. "The procedure began at 3:15 pm, John was released at 5:56 pm, and he has been given the all-clear that it was successful. He is resting at the hospital and recovering well. John continues to improve every day, and he is still on track for a full recovery."Fetterman, who is running for the US Senate in Pennsylvania in tonight's Democratic primary, suffered a stroke last week.— Dave LevinthalResults just beginning to trickle in in KentuckyHouse Budget Committee Chairman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., talks with reporters after meeting with the House Democratic Caucus and Biden administration officials to discuss progress on an infrastructure bill, at the Capitol in Washington.J. Scott Applewhite/APPolls closed in Kentucky at 6 p.m. Eastern Time, and the results are beginning to come in. See results for the Senate, House and state legislative primaries here, and results for the mayoral elections in Louisville and Lexington here.The most notable primary race of the night is the Democratic primary in Kentucky's Third District to replace retiring Democratic Rep. John YarmuthA slew of Democratic candidates are seeking the nomination for the mayor's office in Louisville to replace term-limited outgoing Mayor Greg Fischer. Incumbent Mayor Linda Gorton is also seeking reelection to the mayor's office in Lexington, Kentucky in a nonpartisan primary. Democrats love Republican primaries — for fundraisingDemocratic Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, DCCC Chair, at a press conference on Capitol HillBill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is rarely immune to hyperbole or breathlessness. So it should perhaps come as little surprise how much the party's campaign arm for US House races is leveraging today's Republican Senate primary in Pennsylvania to raise cash for itself."Trump has already helped make J.D. Vance the Republican nominee in the critical Ohio Senate race. Now, he's scheming to do the same with Dr. Oz in the ultimate swing state of Pennsylvania … please understand: If Trump is able to pack Congress with his top loyalists, it could pave the way for his return to the White House," the DCCC wrote supporters.It continues: "And at this dire moment, you have two options: OPTION 1: Ignore our urgent pleas, delete this email, and watch while Trump destroys our House Majority and Democratic Trifecta with his dangerous followers. OPTION 2: Step up with a powerful grassroots gift before midnight to stop Trump's power-hungry schemes and protect our Democratic House."  — Dave LevinthalTight gubernatorial primary races in the Beaver State- Former Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek, who is running for governor, poses for photos in Columbia Park in Portland, Ore., on Feb. 18, 2022. Oregon's primary elections are Tuesday, May 17, 2022.AP Photo/Sara Cline, fileDemocratic Gov. Kate Brown is finishing up her second term in office and cannot run again. After 35 straight years of having a Democrat as governor, Republicans in Oregon are hoping this is their year to regain executive power, but must figure out their nominee from a slate of 19 candidates led by former state Rep. Christine Drazan and businessman Bob Tiernan. With Brown term-limited, she leaves behind a wide-open Democratic field with 15 candidates. Two notable leaders on the Democratic ticket include Oregon Treasurer Tobias Read and former House Speaker Tina Kotek.The list of Democratic primary contenders used to be longer — former New York Times columnist Nick Kristof left his job to explore running for office in October 2021. Oregon's Supreme Court ultimately ruled in February that he couldn't be on the ballot, citing his failure to meet the three-year residency requirement to qualify.— Madison HallEmbattled Rep. Madison Cawthorn fights for a second term after a slew of scandalsU.S. Rep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C., waves to the crowd after he spoke before former President Donald Trump takes the stage at a rally on April 9, 2022, in Selma, NC.Chris Seward/APCawthorn catapulted into rising star status in the GOP when he was elected to Congress from North Carolina's 11th District in 2020 at age 25. But a series of ethics troubles, and explosive comments have infuriated his GOP colleagues and spurred some to openly root for his ouster, as Michael Kruse recently dug into for Politico Magazine. Our Camila DeChalus reported from Hendersonville earlier this month on Cawthorn's leading primary challenger, state Sen. Chuck Edwards, voters' mixed feelings about Cawthorn's scandals, and the former volunteers who have buyer's remorse. A split field of seven primary challengers could help Cawthorn squeak by to reelection, but he could head to a July 26 runoff if no one gets about 30% of the vote. — Grace PanettaWould you pay $1 million out-of-pocket for a US Senate seat?McCormick received more than $70 million in discretionary awards connected to a Bridgewater Associates plan.Divorce agreement between David McCormick and Amy RichardsonAs C. Ryan Barber and Adam Wren reported earlier this year, divorce documents obtained by Insider indicate that Republican US Senate candidate David McCormick could face such a situation — if he's first able to survive his Pennsylvania primary battle against Mehmet Oz and Kathy Barnette.As Barber and Wren wrote: "McCormick's divorce agreement includes a clause stipulating that he would pay his ex-wife $1 million if he voluntarily left his lucrative position at Bridgewater Associates for the 'public domain.' The agreement between McCormick and his ex-wife, Amy Richardson, defined 'public domain' as employment in 'any government entity' and required him to pay the seven-figure sum in a pair of $500,000 installments in the first two years of any full-time public sector job.Once the frontrunner, McCormick has slipped in the polls of late and could conceivably finish third. Former President Donald Trump has endorsed Oz, the longtime television show host, while Barnette has surged as a MAGA-friendly alternative to both Oz and McCormick. — Dave LevinthalOz, Barnette, and McCormick jockey in a close race in PennsylvaniaPennsylvania Republican Senate candidate Kathy Barnette speaks during a campaign rally at The Fuge in Warminster, Pennsylvania.Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty ImagesWe went to Pennsylvania earlier this month and found a lot of Trump voters who were pretty unhappy with Dr. Mehmet Oz as the former president's endorsement. Kathy Barnette has had an impressive surge late in the race, but the conservative author's background is now the subject of considerable scrutiny and has some Republicans worried she'd get beat by the Democrats should she make it to the November general election. No doubt, a victory for Barnette would be a big shock. But she's been within striking distance in all the latest polls. The candidate hoping to get a bump from undecideds is former hedge fund CEO David McCormick, who has picked up endorsements from the likes of Sen. Ted Cruz and former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.– Jake LahutRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 18th, 2022

Live updates: Rep. Madison Cawthorn dramatically loses seat as Pennsylvania and North Carolina ballots are counted

Senate seats in contention, Rep. Madison Cawthorn loses in North Carolina and a GOP face-off in Pennsylvania to run for US Senate. North Carolina GOP Rep. Madison Cawthorn lost his seat in a primary on Tuesday.Saul Loeb - Pool/Getty ImagesWelcome to the Insider live blog for the May 17 primaries.Polls close, wrapping up an evening of primariesIdaho Gov. Brad Little.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesPolls are closed everywhere in the country, wrapping up an evening of primaries in states all over the US. The final results will come in Idaho, which just closed its last polls, and Oregon, which votes entirely by mail. The final race that will determine former President Donald Trump's status as kingmaker in the Republican party is in Idaho. There, Incumbent Gov. Brad Little is facing a primary challenge from his own Lieutenant Governor Janice McGeachin, whom Trump endorsed. Oregon has an open primary for governor after the current governor, Democrat Kate Brown, is term limited out. US House seats are also up for grabs, with tensions growing between centrist and progressive Democrats in the House. Follow along to see the results of the races for gubernatorial nominations and congressional seats in Oregon, and for the governor's race in Idaho. - Kimberly Leonard Meet the man who just took down Rep. Madison CawthornChuck Edwards, a North Carolina state senator, defeated freshman GOP Rep. Madison Cawthorn on Tuesday.Camila DeChalus/InsiderTake a look at this Insider profile of state Sen. Chuck Edwards, the Republican who just unseated Rep. Madison Cawthorn in North Carolina's 11th Congressional District.Senior Reporter Camila DeChalus traveled to Hendersonville and spoke with the state senator in May to learn more about the rising star in North Carolina. She found the antithesis of Cawthorn in Edwards: a candidate lacking his rival's hyperbolic bravado and a scant social media presence.When DeChalus asked about Cawthorn's plethora of recent controversies, Edwards told her that "it's obvious that he [Cawthorn] got caught up in political stardom and turned his back on the people in these mountains."He said that his "qualms with Madison Cawthorn are based on his performance and his poor attendance record in Congress."— By Madison HallBiden lauds Fetterman's Pennsylvania Senate nominationPresident Joe Biden hadn't said anything about the Pennsylvania Senate race — until John Fetterman won the Democratic nomination.AP Photo/Carolyn KasterPresident Joe Biden finally has something to say about Pennsylvania's Democratic Senate race.Lt. Gov. John Fetterman is projected to be the Democratic Party's nominee in what will be one of the nation's closest watched Senate races, Decision Desk HQ projects.Unlike his predecessor, Biden loathes to weigh in on contested party primaries. It didn't help matters that the Delawarian president who never forgets his Scranton roots encountered a race with three big names in Pennsylvania politics: Fetterman, Rep. Conor Lamb, and state-Sen. Malcolm Kenyatta.Lamb and Kenyatta were close Biden allies. Biden bestowed one of his highest compliments on Lamb, saying that the young former Marine reminded him of his son Beau Biden when Lamb's 2018 special election attracted national attention. While Kenyatta was a key Biden surrogate and was among a group of rising stars that spoke during the 2020 Democratic National Convention's keynote address."Democrats are united around John, who is a strong nominee, will run a tough race, and can win in November," Biden said in a statement.— By Brent D. GriffithsA legislative leader and TikTok star is headed to Congress from KentuckyMorgan McGarvey, Kentucky's state Senate minority leader, is a TikTok star.Timothy D. Easley/AP PhotoKentucky's state Senate minority leader Morgan McGarvey, who won the Democratic primary to succeed retiring Rep. John Yarmuth in the safely Democratic, Louisville-based 3rd Congressional District, will also bring some TikTok starpower to Congress. McGarvey and his colleague, Sen. Reginald Thomas, currently boast nearly 130,000 followers on the @kysenatedems account. That's where the two use TikTok trends to document their daily lives in the state legislature and the woes of being in the superminority, including a video of Thomas doing the "Rick & Morty" trend in front of the state Senate chamber that eaned 5.7 million views.McGarvey is likely to also be in the minority in Congress, but at least he can give his colleagues some TikTok pointers. -Grace Panetta Rep. Madison Cawthorn losesRep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C.House Television via APControversial GOP Rep. Madison Cawthorn is projected to lose his re-election campaign in the face of fierce opposition from his fellow North Carolina Republicans.State-Sen. Chuck Edwards is projected to win the race, per Decision Desk HQ. Sen. Thom Tillis endorsed Edwards, a sign of just how much fellow elected Republicans rebelled against Cawthorn.Cawthorn courted controversy even before his election. But the 26-year-old finally hit a nerve on Capitol Hill when he suggested on a podcast that there were illicit sex and drug-filled parties in Washington. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said publicly that Cawthorn had lost his trust. Tillis came off the sidelines and pushed hard for Edwards' campaign. And the rest is now history.— Brent D. GriffithsNorth Carolina GOP Senate candidate Ted Budd and Donald Trump.Chris Seward/AP PhotoFormer President Donald Trump's endorsement of Republican Rep. Ted Budd was likely crucial in helping the two-term lawmaker clinch the GOP nomination for US Senate on Tuesday, despite a crowded field of contenders. But Budd too has been decidedly Trumpian in the types of legislation he has introduced while in Congress. In April, for example, he introduced the Build the Wall Now Act to have the federal government continue constructing the border wall between the US and Mexico that was started under Trump and that President Joe Biden paused by executive order. Budd also introduced the Justice for Victims of Sanctuary Cities Act of 2021, which would allow people to sue cities if someone unauthorized to be living in the US committed a crime against them. While in office, Trump targeted sanctuary cities that are often led by Democrats and that sheltered migrants against federal crackdowns on illegal immigration. On education, Budd introduced a bill to recreate Trump's 1776 Commission, which was disbanded under Biden. Members of the conservative commission had created a 45-page document that aimed to promote a "patriotic education," and was intended as a rebuttal to the New York Times' 1619 Project. Budd's Freedom from Regulations Act, introduced in 2021, echoed a Trump-era executive order that called for trashing two regulations every time the administration created a new one. — Kimberly LeonardClay Aiken on track to lose, Decision Desk HQ projectsAmerican Idol star Clay Aiken is headed for defeat in his race for a US House seat in North Carolina.Vince Bucci/Getty ImagesClay Aiken is currently running third in the race for the Democratic nomination for North Carolina's 4th Congressional District. State-Sen. Valerie Foushee is already projected to have won the nomination. Long-time incumbent Rep. David Price, a Democrat, previously announced his retirement after over 30 years in Congress.Aiken won his party's 2014 nomination but later lost the general election to then-Rep. Renee Ellmers. The 2003 American Idol runner-up decided to give it another go this cycle.Since American Idol, Aiken launched a private foundation and starred on Broadway in the Monty Python-inspired "Spamalot."Daily Kos Elections joked on Twitter that now it can no longer be said that Aiken finishes second in everything. Outside of elections, Aiken finished as the runner-up on 2012's edition of the Celebrity Apprentice when it was still hosted by then-future President Donald Trump.— Brent D. GriffithsDoug Mastriano, a Pennsylvania state senator, is the Republican nominee for governor.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano is the winner of the Republican primary in the Pennsylvania gubernatorial race, according to DDHQ and Insider.— Madison HallFetterman's turn in the Insider spotlightJohn Fetterman on the Senate campaign trial in May 2022.Keith Srakocic/AP PhotoCheck out this Insider profile of John Fetterman, the Democratic nominee for the US Senate from Pennsylvania. In November 2020, Insider's Charles Davis interviewed Fetterman about his journey from being largely apolitical, to being elected mayor of Braddock, Pennsylvania, in 2005, to being branded a rising Democratic star.Fetterman told Insider that he doesn't think that Democrats can't reach Trump voters. "If we're going to reverse the fortunes of not only our party but, most importantly, communities and regions, [we need to be] reinvesting and acknowledging that these places deserve to be championed," Fetterman said."There's certainly unreachable people," he said. "I think it's people reacting to a level of authenticity or rawness. You're not going to convince me that Pennsylvania changed radically from Barack Obama to Donald Trump."— Sarah GrayMehmet Oz: Not in it for the moneyMehmet Oz would earn $174,000 if he becomes a US senator.Matt Rourke/APIf Donald Trump endorsee Mehmet Oz win's tonight's US Senate primary in Pennsylvania, then defeats the Democratic nominee in November, he'll earn a standard congressional salary, which today stands at $174,000.Not bad, no, but it's peanuts compared to what he's been making in the private sector — or perhaps pistachios, given that Oz scored a cool $125,000 for a one-day speech to the American Pistachio Growers Association in March 2020, according a federal financial disclosure Oz submitted to the Senate in April.For hosting quiz show Jeopardy! during a two-week stint in late March and early April 2021, Oz earned $268,701, records show.And that's all before you consider his former day job: Oz reported earning more than $7 million from "income derived from ownership interest in Oz Media LLL through Oz Property Holdings." He also received a $2 million salary for hosting the "Dr. Oz Show."Oz is also an active stock trader, reporting sizeable investments in companies such as Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, defense contractor Northrop Grumman, and drugmaker Johnson & Johnson, among several dozen others. — Dave LevinthalFetterman wins Pennsylvania Democratic senator nominationJohn Fetterman, left, is the Democratic nominee for the Pennsylvania US Senate seat.Keith Srakocic/AP PhotoJohn Fetterman is the winner of the Democratic primary race for Pennsylvania's US Senate seat. That's the call from Insider and DDHQ. Fetterman, currently the state's lieutenant governor, defeated Rep. Conor Lamb, Malcolm Kenyatta, and Alexandria Khalil. Fetterman is currently recovering from a recent stroke and announced on Tuesday that he had received a pacemaker implant.A pricey house race to watch near Pittsburgh: PA-12Sen. Bernie Sanders endorsed Pennsylvania state Rep. Summer Lee in her bid to win the nomination for the state's 12th congressional district.Rebecca Droke/AP PhotoWith the retirement of GOP Rep. Fred Keller, this district outside of Pittsburgh in the Susquehanna Valley is a potential pickup opportunity for Democrats.It's also a race that was looking pretty stale until the past few weeks. The frontrunner, state Rep. Summer Lee, has endorsements from Emily's List and Justice Democrats. Sen. Bernie Sanders recently stumped for her and she seemed to have everything going in her favor until a ton of money started pouring into the race. The American Israel Public Affairs Committee, most commonly referred to as AIPAC, has been funding ads through a new Super PAC called the United Democracy Project for Lee's opponent, Steve Irwin. Lee would be the latest in a new generation of Democrats in Washington with positions further to the left than most of the caucus, as well as more critical views of Israel. Should Irwin pull out a victory, his surge couldn't have been hurt by the AIPAC ad spree, but Lee remains the favorite. The Republican primary has been more quiet, with Michael Doyle — unrelated to retiring Rep. Mike Doyle — running unopposed.— Jake LahutPennsylvania's US Senate race is stupid expensivePennsylvania Republican Senate Candidate Mehmet OzAlexi Rosenfeld/Getty ImagesThe government of Erie, Pennsylvania, population 94,831, forecasts that it'll bring in about $95.7 million worth of revenue during 2022.Pennsylvania's US Senate race, meanwhile, is on pace to bring in twice that — maybe even more — en route to competing for the crown of the year's most expensive political race.As of April 27, the race had already attracted more than $68.3 million in contributions, according to federal records compiled by nonpartisan research organization OpenSecrets.There are two overriding reasons for this. First, both the Republican and Democratic primaries are highly competitive. They feature multiple candidates — David McCormick, Mehmet Oz and Kathy Barnette on the right, John Fetterman and Conor Lamb on the left. More candidates + more competition = more, more, more money.Second, McCormick and Oz are extremely wealthy. Both have pumped millions of dollars of their personal money into the race, with Oz alone accounting for more than $12 million, according to Federal Election Commission records. McCormick, at $11 million, isn't far behind.Tonight's winners will then have nearly six months to slug each other ahead of November's general election. National party committees and super PACs, which may raise and spend unlimited amounts of money, will almost assuredly supplement the candidates' own fundraising efforts with tens of millions of more dollars.— Dave LevinthalPolls in Pennsylvania closed at 8 p.m. ET.InsiderFollow along to see the results for the Republican and Democratic  candidates for governor, the US Senate, House from the Keystone State.Madison Cawthorn's cryptic crypto play may have violated the STOCK ActMadison Cawthorn, Republican nominee for North Carolina's 11th Congressional District, speaks during the largely virtual 2020 Republican National Convention broadcast from Washington, on August 26, 2020.2020 Republican National Convention/Handout via ReutersRep. Madison Cawthorn has plenty of problems — ones involving guns, money, cocaine orgies, and a nude video, to name four.One that's flying a bit below the radar, but still serious: he may have violated a federal conflicts-of-interest law by not publicly reporting his stated purchase in a cryptocurrency named for an anti-Joe Biden slogan.Per federal law, Cawthorn had 45-days to formally disclose details about his crypto play. But as of this evening, Cawthorn had done no such thing, and his campaign and congressional office have not responded to Insider's questions as to why.Failure to properly report such financial transactions can result in a fine administered by Congress, or in extreme cases, a referral to the Department of Justice.— Dave LevinthalTed Budd wins GOP Primary for open Senate seatFormer President Donald Trump endorsed Rep. Ted Budd of North Carolina in the 2022 North Carolina Senate race.AP Photo/Chris SewardRepublican Ted Budd will face off against Democrat Cheri Beasley for a crucial open US Senate seat in North Carolina, Insider and Decision Desk HQ project. Budd is a Republican congressman who was endorsed by President Donald Trump, and easily cleared a field of GOP opponents. Beasley, the former chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, is hoping to flip control of the seat currently held by retiring GOP Sen. Richard Burr.Mayoral MayhemCharlotte, NCShutterstockA Republican hasn't been the mayor of Louisville, Kentucky, for more than 50 years. Four Republican candidates are hoping to change that, including Bill Dieruf, the current mayor of Jeffersontown, a nearby suburb. The current mayor of Lexington, Kentucky's second-largest city, Linda Gorton, is running for reelection. Gorton's opponents recently chided her at a public forum over housing costs and crime rates. She countered by noting that she rose to the occasion when challenges surfaced in Lexington during her time in office, particularly during the pandemic.In Charlotte, North Carolina, Democratic Mayor Vi Alexander Lyles is vying for another term in office. Lyles became the first Black mayor in Charlotte history in 2017 after unseating the incumbent mayor. She's facing off against three other Democratic candidates tonight.You can check out and follow the three mayoral primaries here.—Madison HallJohn Fetterman gets pacemakerIn this Sept. 21, 2018 photo, former Braddock, Pa., Mayor John Fetterman speaks at a campaign rally for Pennsylvania candidates in PhiladelphiaAP Photo/Matt RourkePennsylvania Lt. Governor John Fetterman "just completed a successful procedure to implant a pacemaker with a defibrillator," his communications director, Joe Calvello, said in a statement Tuesday evening. "The procedure began at 3:15 pm, John was released at 5:56 pm, and he has been given the all-clear that it was successful. He is resting at the hospital and recovering well. John continues to improve every day, and he is still on track for a full recovery."Fetterman, who is running for the US Senate in Pennsylvania in tonight's Democratic primary, suffered a stroke last week.— Dave LevinthalResults just beginning to trickle in in KentuckyHouse Budget Committee Chairman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., talks with reporters after meeting with the House Democratic Caucus and Biden administration officials to discuss progress on an infrastructure bill, at the Capitol in Washington.J. Scott Applewhite/APPolls closed in Kentucky at 6 p.m. Eastern Time, and the results are beginning to come in. See results for the Senate, House and state legislative primaries here, and results for the mayoral elections in Louisville and Lexington here.The most notable primary race of the night is the Democratic primary in Kentucky's Third District to replace retiring Democratic Rep. John YarmuthA slew of Democratic candidates are seeking the nomination for the mayor's office in Louisville to replace term-limited outgoing Mayor Greg Fischer. Incumbent Mayor Linda Gorton is also seeking reelection to the mayor's office in Lexington, Kentucky in a nonpartisan primary. Democrats love Republican primaries — for fundraisingDemocratic Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, DCCC Chair, at a press conference on Capitol HillBill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is rarely immune to hyperbole or breathlessness. So it should perhaps come as little surprise how much the party's campaign arm for US House races is leveraging today's Republican Senate primary in Pennsylvania to raise cash for itself."Trump has already helped make J.D. Vance the Republican nominee in the critical Ohio Senate race. Now, he's scheming to do the same with Dr. Oz in the ultimate swing state of Pennsylvania … please understand: If Trump is able to pack Congress with his top loyalists, it could pave the way for his return to the White House," the DCCC wrote supporters.It continues: "And at this dire moment, you have two options: OPTION 1: Ignore our urgent pleas, delete this email, and watch while Trump destroys our House Majority and Democratic Trifecta with his dangerous followers. OPTION 2: Step up with a powerful grassroots gift before midnight to stop Trump's power-hungry schemes and protect our Democratic House."  — Dave LevinthalTight gubernatorial primary races in the Beaver State- Former Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek, who is running for governor, poses for photos in Columbia Park in Portland, Ore., on Feb. 18, 2022. Oregon's primary elections are Tuesday, May 17, 2022.AP Photo/Sara Cline, fileDemocratic Gov. Kate Brown is finishing up her second term in office and cannot run again. After 35 straight years of having a Democrat as governor, Republicans in Oregon are hoping this is their year to regain executive power, but must figure out their nominee from a slate of 19 candidates led by former state Rep. Christine Drazan and businessman Bob Tiernan. With Brown term-limited, she leaves behind a wide-open Democratic field with 15 candidates. Two notable leaders on the Democratic ticket include Oregon Treasurer Tobias Read and former House Speaker Tina Kotek.The list of Democratic primary contenders used to be longer — former New York Times columnist Nick Kristof left his job to explore running for office in October 2021. Oregon's Supreme Court ultimately ruled in February that he couldn't be on the ballot, citing his failure to meet the three-year residency requirement to qualify.— Madison HallEmbattled Rep. Madison Cawthorn fights for a second term after a slew of scandalsU.S. Rep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C., waves to the crowd after he spoke before former President Donald Trump takes the stage at a rally on April 9, 2022, in Selma, NC.Chris Seward/APCawthorn catapulted into rising star status in the GOP when he was elected to Congress from North Carolina's 11th District in 2020 at age 25. But a series of ethics troubles, and explosive comments have infuriated his GOP colleagues and spurred some to openly root for his ouster, as Michael Kruse recently dug into for Politico Magazine. Our Camila DeChalus reported from Hendersonville earlier this month on Cawthorn's leading primary challenger, state Sen. Chuck Edwards, voters' mixed feelings about Cawthorn's scandals, and the former volunteers who have buyer's remorse. A split field of seven primary challengers could help Cawthorn squeak by to reelection, but he could head to a July 26 runoff if no one gets about 30% of the vote. — Grace PanettaWould you pay $1 million out-of-pocket for a US Senate seat?McCormick received more than $70 million in discretionary awards connected to a Bridgewater Associates plan.Divorce agreement between David McCormick and Amy RichardsonAs C. Ryan Barber and Adam Wren reported earlier this year, divorce documents obtained by Insider indicate that Republican US Senate candidate David McCormick could face such a situation — if he's first able to survive his Pennsylvania primary battle against Mehmet Oz and Kathy Barnette.As Barber and Wren wrote: "McCormick's divorce agreement includes a clause stipulating that he would pay his ex-wife $1 million if he voluntarily left his lucrative position at Bridgewater Associates for the 'public domain.' The agreement between McCormick and his ex-wife, Amy Richardson, defined 'public domain' as employment in 'any government entity' and required him to pay the seven-figure sum in a pair of $500,000 installments in the first two years of any full-time public sector job.Once the frontrunner, McCormick has slipped in the polls of late and could conceivably finish third. Former President Donald Trump has endorsed Oz, the longtime television show host, while Barnette has surged as a MAGA-friendly alternative to both Oz and McCormick. — Dave LevinthalOz, Barnette, and McCormick jockey in a close race in PennsylvaniaPennsylvania Republican Senate candidate Kathy Barnette speaks during a campaign rally at The Fuge in Warminster, Pennsylvania.Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty ImagesWe went to Pennsylvania earlier this month and found a lot of Trump voters who were pretty unhappy with Dr. Mehmet Oz as the former president's endorsement. Kathy Barnette has had an impressive surge late in the race, but the conservative author's background is now the subject of considerable scrutiny and has some Republicans worried she'd get beat by the Democrats should she make it to the November general election. No doubt, a victory for Barnette would be a big shock. But she's been within striking distance in all the latest polls. The candidate hoping to get a bump from undecideds is former hedge fund CEO David McCormick, who has picked up endorsements from the likes of Sen. Ted Cruz and former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.– Jake LahutRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 17th, 2022

What Elon Musk’s Twitter Takeover Means for CEO Parag Agrawal

As owner of the company, Musk will have the power to transform the board and fire key individuals who don’t align with his vision for the platform. Following a tumultuous 12 days of negotiations, billionaire Elon Musk reached an agreement with Twitter’s board, including former CEO Jack Dorsey and current CEO Parag Agrawal, on April 25 to purchase Twitter for approximately $44 billion. The world’s richest man pledged to overhaul the platform’s content moderation tactics in a move that would promote what he considers free speech. As owner of the company, Musk will have the power to transform the board and fire key individuals who don’t align with his vision for the platform. In a securities filing April 13, Musk said he did not “have confidence in [the company’s] management”. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] That puts Twitter’s CEO, Parag Agrawal, at risk. But what is Agrawal’s background and what could happen to him following Musk’s takeover? Who is Parag Agrawal? Agrawal had only been in the role of CEO for 5 months before the announcement of Musk’s takeover. Before being appointed to the lead role in November, Agrawal maintained a low profile. The Indian-born tech expert moved to the U.S. in 2005 to study for a doctorate in computer science at Stanford University. After brief stints in research at Microsoft, AT&T and Yahoo, Agrawal joined Twitter as a software engineer in 2011. With under 1000 employees, the company was in the early stages of leveraging machine learning to create targeted advertising, according to the New York Times. Agrawal built a reputation as one of the platform’s top engineers, and was appointed to a team that transformed Twitter’s developing projects. He was also instrumental in focusing the platform’s efforts on the “timeline” structure of tweets on users’ homepages. When he was promoted to Chief Technology Officer in 2017, Agrawal moved Twitter onto cloud computing services to address engineering problems that had caused sluggish growth. In 2019, Twitter’s founder and then-CEO, Jack Dorsey, announced that Twitter would fund an open-source project to create decentralized social media, with Agrawal at the helm. Known as Project Bluesky, it would create technology and protocols that would allow seamless sharing of content across multiple social networks. According to the Times, it would allow users to make their own moderation decisions and apply their own algorithm to promote content. ​​Agrawal also oversaw Twitter’s effort to incorporate cryptocurrencies into the platform, letting users send tips to each other, according to the Times. Dorsey, who closely collaborated with Agrawal during his time as CTO on the company’s direction, described his trust in Agrawal as “bone deep”. When did Agrawal become CEO of Twitter? It had already been a rocky 6 months for Twitter before Musk’s takeover bid. The platform’s founder Jack Dorsey stepped down as CEO in November 2021 after facing scrutiny from investors over the amount of time he spent on other projects. Slow to catch up with other social media giants during its 16 year existence, Twitter reported a net loss of $221 million last year. In a tweet on Nov. 29, Dorsey announced his resignation and said that Agrawal had been chosen as his successor after a “rigorous process”. “He’s been my choice for some time given how deeply he understands the company and its needs,” he said. “Parag has been behind every critical decision that helped turn this company around…He leads with his heart and soul, and is someone I learn from daily.” not sure anyone has heard but, I resigned from Twitter pic.twitter.com/G5tUkSSxkl — jack⚡️ (@jack) November 29, 2021 According to documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Agrawal receives a $1 million annual salary plus bonuses and stock awards. What has Agrawal said about free speech? Agrawal shares Dorsey’s vision for a future of decentralized social media platforms, according to CNBC. When developing Project Bluesky in 2019, Agrawal commented that Twitter’s moderation softwares would be guided by algorithms, not company executives. “Our role has shifted from ‘we host a bunch of content’ to ‘we guide people toward what they are interested in,’” he said in November. “We are thinking about this in terms of, ‘How does something get attention and in what context?’ What do you host or not host is a problem of 10 years ago. Twitter’s content moderation policies landed the company at the center of free speech debates when it suspended Donald Trump’s account following the Jan. 6 Capitol riots, citing concerns that his tweets risked “further incitement of violence.” The company has a hateful conduct policy that explicitly bans tweets meant to cite fear of, or violence toward, protected groups. Read more: What Elon Musk’s Purchase of Twitter Could Mean for Donald Trump’s Account Musk, who described himself as a “free speech absolutist”, wants to overhaul Twitter’s content moderation procedures. “I invested in Twitter as I believe in its potential to be the platform for free speech around the globe, and I believe free speech is a societal imperative for a functioning democracy,” Musk said in an SEC filing. “However, since making my investment I now realize the company will neither thrive nor serve this societal imperative in its current form. Twitter needs to be transformed as a private company.” Agrawal’s views on free speech on Twitter, which he shared in an interview with MIT Technology Review in 2020, seem antithetical to Musk’s views. “Our role is not to be bound by the First Amendment, but our role is to serve a healthy public conversation and our moves are reflective of things that we believe lead to a healthier public conversation,” he said. “The kinds of things that we do about this is, focus less on thinking about free speech, but thinking about how the times have changed. “One of the changes today that we see is speech is easy on the internet…The scarce commodity today is attention.” The then-CTO said the platform’s main struggle is making sure its algorithms are pointing to content which “lead[s] to a healthy public conservation.” Read more: ‘The Idea Exposes His Naiveté.’ Twitter Employees On Why Elon Musk Is Wrong About Free Speech What has Agrawal said about Musk’s deal? Following news of Musk’s deal April 25, Agrawal tweeted: “Twitter has a purpose and relevance that impacts the entire world. Deeply proud of our teams and inspired by the work that has never been more important.” At a company-wide town hall meeting the same day, which was heard by Reuters, the CEO told employees that the future of Twitter under Musk is uncertain. According to Reuters, Agrawal deferred many questions including those about the board’s rationale for the deal, instead directing to Musk. The company told employees that Musk will participate in a Q&A session at a later date. Agrawal did, however, say that there were no plans for lay-offs. Asked whether Trump will be allowed back on the platform, Agrawal said: “Once the deal closes, we don’t know which direction the platform will go…I believe when we have an opportunity to speak with Elon, it’s a question we should address with him.” In an email to employees earlier in the day, Agrawal said that he realized the deal would be a “significant change and you’re likely processing what this means for you and Twitter’s future.” What could happen to Agrawal once Musk takes over? Agrawal and Musk’s views on content moderation clearly clash, but the question remains over whether the owner-to-be will keep the CEO on board. In his SEC filing, Musk did not specify who he does not have confidence in within Twitter’s management. In the town hall meeting reported by Reuters, Bret Taylor, chair of Twitter’s board of directors, reassured employees that the agreement with Musk prioritized “operating continuity” until the deal was closed. He didn’t say what this means for the company’s chief executives, however. Twitter’s founder Dorsey tweeted that while he supported Musk’s takeover, he believed the Tesla CEO’s vision for Twitter aligned with that of Agrawal. “Elon’s goal of creating a platform that is ‘maximally trusted and broadly inclusive’ is the right one,” he said. “This is also @paraga’s goal, and why I chose him. Thank you both for getting the company out of an impossible situation.” According to research firm Equilar, Agrawal would get an estimated $42 million if he were terminated within 12 months of a change in control of Twitter......»»

Category: topSource: timeApr 26th, 2022

Why Elon Musk’s Plans to ‘Fix’ Twitter Will Be Harder to Implement Than He Thinks

Musk has laid out a series of changes to Twitter after making a deal to buy it for $44 billion Elon Musk is purchasing Twitter. After months of publicly toying with the idea, the world’s richest man successfully negotiated a deal to buy the social media platform for $44 billion. On Monday, Musk gave a statement with a short list of goals for the platform, many of which he has recently floated to his 83 million followers on Twitter. “Free speech is the bedrock of a functioning democracy, and Twitter is the digital town square where matters vital to the future of humanity are debated,” he tweeted. “I also want to make Twitter better than ever by enhancing the product with new features, making the algorithms open source to increase trust, defeating the spam bots, and authenticating all humans.” [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] But are Musk’s goals actually feasible? Can he really transform Twitter into a less-moderated forum where free speech flourishes—and at the same time make it a service that generates more revenue from subscribers than advertisers? Sure, he’s the world’s wealthiest private citizen, but he’ll need Twitter to churn out income, if only to pay back the banks that loaned him $25 billion for the purchase. Here’s a look at Musk’s proposed changes, where Twitter stands on them currently, and what history–and experts–tell us about whether they might be successfully implemented.   🚀💫♥️ Yesss!!! ♥️💫🚀 pic.twitter.com/0T9HzUHuh6 — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 25, 2022 ‘Free speech absolutist’ Musk called himself a “free speech absolutist” in a March tweet. Last January, three days after President Trump received a permanent Twitter suspension for his “risk of further incitement of violence” following the Jan. 6 insurrection, Musk tweeted: “A lot of people are going to be super unhappy with West Coast high tech as the de facto arbiter of free speech.” Musk’s hardline rhetoric about free speech flies in the face of Twitter’s recent evolution in this area. In 2018, the site came under fire after an MIT study showed that misinformation spread faster on Twitter than real news. Since then, the company has stepped up its efforts to combat hate speech and increase user safety, including the ability for its users to flag false information. The controversial Twitter account Libs of Tik Tok was twice suspended for “hateful conduct”—and last week, the company announced it would ban advertisements that challenge widely-accepted research on climate change. Read More: What Elon Musk’s Purchase of Twitter Could Mean for Donald Trump’s Account But misinformation, propaganda and extremist views are still omnipresent on the site, especially surrounding Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. While Musk has said that hate speech would be banned, he has yet to parse out the gray areas, and it seems possible that more lenient policies for content moderation could lead to more of the toxic behavior that Twitter has been trying to stamp out for years. And fewer guardrails around speech could be bad for Twitter’s bottom line: advertisers might be less likely to pay money for posts that might sit next to racism, bigotry or sexism. Removing ads David Paul Morris—Bloomberg/Getty ImagesTwitter headquarters in San Francisco, Calif. on April 21, 2022. In a now-deleted Tweet, Musk argued for the removal of all ads from Twitter, writing, “The power of corporations to dictate policy is greatly enhanced if Twitter depends on advertising money to survive.” Twitter is almost wholly reliant on ads to stay afloat financially. In Q4 2021, the company reported advertising revenue of $1.41 billion out of $1.57 billion in total revenue during that quarter. In November, the company rolled out its first consumer subscription package, Twitter Blue, which costs $3 a month for access to “premium features.” But Chief Executive Parag Agrawal said in February that Blue is “not critical” to meeting its revenue projections, according to the Wall Street Journal. Musk has expressed support for a subscription model, but wants it to be cheaper than it currently is now. At a TED conference this month, he said that his interest in Twitter “is not a way to make money.” But he will need for the platform to continue to earn revenue, because he paid for more than half of it in financing from Morgan Stanley and other institutions. In order to service his debt, he will likely need to not just preserve Twitter’s ad revenue, but grow it. Spam bots and human authentication Musk called spam bots the “single most annoying problem” on Twitter. Bots, which often promote crypto-based scams these days, flood users’ feeds in an attempt to lure unsuspecting victims. Twitter already has a rigorous process for weeding out fake accounts: the company uses software during the registration process to detect patterns of automation. But botmakers are getting more slippery and sophisticated, allowing many to pass through Twitter’s censors undetected. Meanwhile, it’s much harder to sniff out manual fakes, in which real people create fake accounts to spread disinformation or defraud people. One 21-year-old, for instance, repeatedly impersonated Trump family members on Twitter for a year, even tricking the President. Read More: Elon Musk—2021 Person of the Year At the moment, Musk seems to believe that the best solution to the bots problem is to authenticate “all real humans,” or to have accounts overtly linked to other personal identifiers, whether it be a phone number, an email address or a photo. But this idea has raised the ire of many Twitter users who like the app precisely for its pseudonymity. “I would rather have spam bots than have to “authenticate” my human identity. I’ve made it this far without ever associating my government name with my extracurricular activities,” wrote one user in response to Musk. “How can we ensure the people from at-risk regions who have to be under pseudonyms to enjoy the freedom to express the truth while authenticating they’re real humans without blowing their cover?,” the engineer Jane Manchun Wong wrote. Others worried that a detailed list of users, even if kept internally by Twitter, would be vulnerable to seizure or hacks from governments or malicious actors. Michael Saylor, CEO of the business intelligence firm MicroStrategy, responded to Musk with his own suggestion last week: that users should be required to post “a one-time security deposit” that they forfeit if they are reported and found to be acting in malice. This solution, however, could lead to collective bullying, in which a group with a vendetta could mass-report a real individual to get them de-verified and stripped of their deposit. Open-source algorithms What people see on social media is usually the work of complicated algorithms, whose components are often closely guarded secrets of Big Tech. Musk wants Twitter to open-source its algorithms—i.e., to publicly share the decision-making behind what tweets get shown to users. If someone’s tweets are “emphasized or de-emphasized, that action should remain apparent,” he argued at the TED conference. Many agree with him generally, especially in the wake of the 2021 Facebook papers, which showed how skewed algorithms can have disastrous consequences. But several experts have argued that the process of making such information public is far more complicated than Musk is asserting. “The algorithm is just the tip of the iceberg.…The rest of the iceberg is all of this data that Twitter has,” Robin Burke, a professor of information science at University of Colorado at Boulder, told the Washington Post this month. Even if the sprawling computer code was released to the public, Burke argues, much of it would be completely illegible to most viewers—and would be especially useless without the inserted data, which contains plenty of private and personal information. An edit button When Musk polled his followers on April 4 as to whether they wanted Twitter to implement an Edit button, they responded resoundingly: 73% of 4.4 million votes were “yes.” Calls for an Edit button have long been omnipresent on Twitter, while Reddit and Facebook have Edit features that work fairly well for their users. But while an edit button would allow users to fix typos, it would also open the door for bad actors to alter the record of public conversation. Trolls could publish a widely agreed-upon statement in order to rack up likes and retweets, only to change it to something heinous after the fact. Hackers could break into the accounts of governments or corporations and alter information. Ben Sangster, a former Twitter software engineer, wrote that while he was part of an internal effort to create an Edit button in 2015, his team “concluded that the potential for abuse was too high to move forward.” There’s also a smaller technical issue: Twitter allows third-party apps and developers, including widely-used ones like TweetDeck, to download tweets in real time. Once a tweet is downloaded by a platform like TweetDeck, there’s no way for Twitter to recall or edit it, Lewis Mitchell, a data science professor at the University of Adelaide, wrote in a recent article. Twitter itself has announced it is working on an Edit button, but has remained fairly tight-lipped on any details. One user who responded to Musk’s poll suggested that the Edit button should only be available for a few minutes after someone publishes, and that the original Tweet remain available to the public. Musk called the proposal “reasonable.” I hope that even my worst critics remain on Twitter, because that is what free speech means — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 25, 2022 While Musk faces plenty of challenges, he’s overcome daunting obstacles before, whether at SpaceX or Tesla. And he acknowledged on Twitter that he is ready to hear from his critics, no matter how loud they might be: “I hope that even my worst critics remain on Twitter, because that is what free speech means.”.....»»

Category: topSource: timeApr 26th, 2022

Trump Sues Hillary Clinton, Says She "Maliciously Conspired" To Weave Collusion Conspiracy Theory

Trump Sues Hillary Clinton, Says She 'Maliciously Conspired' To Weave Collusion Conspiracy Theory Former US President Donald Trump sued Hillary Clinton and several other Democrats on Thursday, alleging they attempted to rig the 2016 US presidential election by fabricating a conspiracy theory tying his campaign to Russia. "Acting in concert, the Defendants maliciously conspired to weave a false narrative that their Republican opponent, Donald J. Trump, was colluding with a hostile foreign sovereignty," reads the lawsuit, filed in a federal court in Florida. Remember this? Computer scientists have apparently uncovered a covert server linking the Trump Organization to a Russian-based bank. pic.twitter.com/8f8n9xMzUU — Hillary Clinton (@HillaryClinton) November 1, 2016 Meanwhile, a flashback: Authored by Paul Sperry via RealClearInvestigations.com, A Hillary Clinton campaign operation to plant a false rumor about Donald Trump setting up a “secret hotline” to Moscow through a Russian bank was much broader than known and involved multiple U.S. agencies, according to declassified documents and sources briefed on an ongoing criminal investigation of the scheme. In addition to the FBI, the 2016 Clinton campaign tried to convince the Obama administration’s State Department, Justice Department and Central Intelligence Agency to look into the hoax, and continued pressing the issue even after Trump was inaugurated in January 2017.The goal was to trigger federal investigative activity targeting her Republican rival and leak the damaging information to the media. “The Clinton machine flooded the FBI with pressure from a number of angles until investigations of Trump were opened and reopened,” said one of the briefed sources who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive law enforcement matter. "The deception was wide-ranging." Michael Sussmann: The indicted former Clinton campaign attorney wasn't the only one feeding the bogus Alfa Bank story to the feds. perkinscoie.com Special Counsel John Durham outlined the FBI part of the scheme in a felony indictment of Michael Sussmann. The former Clinton campaign lawyer was charged last month with making a false statement to the former general counsel of the FBI when he claimed he was not working “for any client” in bringing to the FBI’s attention allegations of a secret channel of communication between computer servers in Trump Tower and the Alfa Bank in Russia. According to the indictment, Sussmann was in fact acting on behalf of clients including the Clinton campaign, and an unnamed tech executive who RCI has previously reported is Rodney L. Joffe, a regular adviser to the Biden White House on cybersecurity and infrastructure policies. Internal emails reveal the Clinton operatives knew the links they made between Trump and Russia were “weak,” even describing them as a “red herring,” but fed them to investigators anyway. The Sussmann indictment revealed the doubts of those developing the Alfa Bank story. U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia After Sussmann’s meeting with the FBI in September 2016, the Clinton campaign approached the State Department the following month with the same lead, this time using paid Clinton campaign subcontractor Christopher Steele to feed the rumors. A former British intelligence officer, Steele was offered as a reliable source to help corroborate the rumors. On Oct. 11, 2016, Steele gave his contact at Foggy Bottom documents alleging that a supposed hidden server at Trump Tower was pinging Moscow. Christopher Steele: Author of the debunked dossier passed the Alfa Bank story to the State Department, which passed it along to FBI agent Peter Strzok. (Aaron Chown/PA FILE via AP) Two days later, a State official who previously worked under former secretary Clinton funneled the information to the FBI’s then-top Eurasia/Russia counterintelligence official, Stephen Laycock, according to recently declassified notes and testimony. Laycock, in turn, forwarded the information to Peter Strzok, the FBI agent who led the investigation of Trump and his campaign and had just weeks earlier texted a bureau lawyer, “We’ll stop [Trump from being elected].” "I informed Peter Strzok and another supervisor,” Laycock testified last year in a closed-door Senate hearing. Telephone: After Steele fed the Alfa Bank story to State, it was passed to the FBI’s then-top Eurasia/Russia counterintelligence official, Stephen Laycock (left), who in turn passed it on to lead FBI agent on Trump-Russia, Peter Strzok (right). Facebook/Twitter Steele, who later confessed he was “desperate” to defeat Trump, was the author of the debunked dossier claiming Trump colluded with Russia to steal the election. He even misspelled the name of the Russian bank as “Alpha.” Still, the FBI took his rumors seriously enough to interview tech vendors working for the Trump Organization and obtain warrants to search Trump Tower servers. Within days of receiving the State Department tip, Strzok also used Steele’s dossier to secure a wiretap on Trump adviser Carter Page. Clinton foreign policy adviser and current National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan would put out a written statement trumpeting the Trump-Alfa Bank story, which was shared by then-candidate Clinton on Oct. 31, 2016, after Slate reported on it. Fusion GPS, the Washington opposition-research group that worked for the Clinton campaign as a paid agent, and helped gather dirt on Alfa Bank and draft the materials Sussmann would later submit to the FBI, reportedly pressed Slate to publish the story by the account of its author, journalist Franklin Foer. The Clinton campaign played up the Trump-Alfa Bank story on the eve of the 2016 election. Twitter/@HillaryClinton “This was a highly sophisticated operation using enablers in both the media and federal agencies,” George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley told RealClearInvestigations. The Clinton campaign did not let up even after Trump won the election. In mid-November 2016, it enlisted top Justice Department official Bruce Ohr – whose wife, Nellie, worked for Fusion GPS – to add credibility to the Alfa rumors. That month, Ohr advised the FBI that Steele had told him that the Alfa Bank server was a link to the Trump campaign. Then in early December, Ohr met with the FBI case supervisor who worked for Strzok at least twice. Declassified notes and other records show that during those meetings, Ohr provided him with thumb drives he had received from paid Clinton opposition researcher and Fusion GPS co-founder, Glenn Simpson, and Ohr’s wife and Simpson’s colleague, Nellie. Quoting his Clinton sources, Ohr insisted the alleged backdoor computer channel between Trump and Alfa was real. Bruce Ohr: The Justice Department official -- linked to Clinton opposition research firm Fusion GPS through his wife Nellie, a Fusion employee -- brought the firm's arguments and materials to the FBI. The Global Initiative The FBI spent months investigating the claim, eventually dismissing it as baseless. After the FBI closed the case, Sussmann turned to the nation’s top intelligence agency for assistance, as RCI first reported. In December 2016, Sussmann called then-CIA Director John Brennan’s general counsel – Caroline Krass – to set up a meeting to brief her about the same Alfa Bank rumors. Krass expressed interest in the tip. Then in early February 2017, officials from her office formally sat down with Sussmann for more than an hour to discuss the Trump-Russian bank rumors. Sussmann provided them updated versions of the materials he had handed off to the FBI. Caroline Krass: General counsel to then-CIA Director John Brennan welcomed Sussmann's pitch of the Alfa Bank story, which reportedly passed from the CIA to FBI. CIA/Wikipedia The CIA, in turn, referred the rumors to an FBI liaison for further investigation, according to the sources briefed on his case. Strzok was the lead FBI liaison to the CIA at the time. Among the documents Durham has obtained is a CIA memo memorializing the meeting with Sussmann, according to the sources. In his grand jury indictment, Durham accused Sussmann of also misleading the CIA, which he referred to only as “Agency-2.” The special counsel alleges that Sussmann, as he did when meeting with an FBI official, had also failed to inform contacts at Langley that he was representing a client – in the latter case specifically Joffe – tied to the Clinton campaign operation and who had been promised a high-level job in a Clinton administration. Billing the Democrat’s campaign for his work on the “confidential project," Sussmann recruited Joffe and a team of federal computer contractors to mine proprietary databases containing vast quantities of sensitive, nonpublic Internet data for possible dirt on Trump and his advisers. In a new court document filed last week, Durham revealed his team has obtained more than 80,000 pages of documents in response to grand jury subpoenas issued to more than 15 targets and witnesses, including the computer contractors. Among others receiving subpoenas: political organizations, private firms, tech companies and other entities, including a major university — Georgia Tech — which allegedly participated in the Clinton conspiracy as a Pentagon contractor. Some witnesses have been granted immunity and are cooperating with prosecutors, the sources close to the probe said. Jonathan Turley: "One would expect a CIA official to express reluctance in an investigation that would have a largely domestic focus," says the law professor. CNN “While Sussmann may have hidden his work for the Clinton campaign, this was obviously a useful attack on Trump,” Turley said. “One would expect a CIA official to express reluctance in an investigation that would have a largely domestic focus. But as with the FBI, the Clinton campaign found eager officials to move on any such allegation.” The CIA is largely barred from collecting information inside the United States or on American citizens.“The CIA has no business involving itself in a domestic political issue,” Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton told RCI. “The evidence suggests the primary purpose of the meeting was political." Fitton said his watchdog group has filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the CIA demanding all records generated from the contacts Sussmann had with the agency in December 2016 and February 2017. The CIA did not return requests for comment.For good measure, old Clinton hands tried another pressure point. In early February 2017, Clinton's foreign policy adviser Sullivan huddled with Fusion GPS's Simpson and Daniel Jones, an FBI analyst-turned-Democrat-operative, to reboot the same smear campaign against Trump. (As RCI previously reported, Sullivan, who spearheaded the campaign's effort to promote the narrative of a disturbing Trump-Russia relationship via the Alfa Bank story, is under scrutiny for possibly lying to Congress about his role in the operation.) Jones, in turn, reached out to his former colleagues at the FBI, who reopened the investigation into the old allegations of a cyber-link between Trump and Alfa Bank. Jake Sullivan played a pivotal role in the Alfa Bank story as 2016 Clinton foreign policy adviser. AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File The next month, acting on Jones’ recycled tip, FBI agents visited the offices of the Pennsylvania company that housed the Trump server, which was actually administered by a third-party hotel promotions firm – Cendyn, based in Florida. But their second investigation proved to be another dead end. The sinister communications Jones claimed were flowing between an alleged Trump server and Alfa Bank were found to be innocuous marketing emails. In other words, spam. Sources say it is odd that FBI headquarters continued to pursue the allegations, because internal FBI communications reveal that the bureau’s own cyber sleuths had pooh-poohed them within days of Sussmann’s briefing, RCI has learned. Strzok himself had been briefed on that assessment of the materials Sussman dropped off at headquarters on Sept. 19, 2016. In fact, in a Sept. 23, 2016, internal message to Strzok, an FBI official relayed his preliminary findings following an interview with Cendyn, the Florida marketing firm that managed the alleged Trump server.“Followed up this morning with Central Dynamics [Cendyn] who confirmed that the mail1.trump-email.com domain is an old domain that was set up in approximately 2009 when they were doing business with the Trump Organization that was never used,” according to the message. Reacting to the Durham indictment, Strzok recently tried to distance himself from the Alfa scandal, insisting in a Lawfare blog: “I had a minor role in the events in question, insofar as I transferred the material Sussman gave to Jim Baker, the FBI’s general counsel at the time, to the personnel who ultimately supervised and looked into the allegations.” Echoing other critics, Strzok complained that Durham – who originally was tapped to investigate the origins of the Russia “collusion” investigation by Trump’s Attorney General Bill Barr – is conducting a partisan witch hunt on behalf of Trump. Strzok's claims notwithstanding, Barr's successor, the President Biden-nominated Attorney General Merrick Garland, testified last week that he has renewed funding and staffing for Durham’s far-reaching investigation for the next fiscal year. “[Y]ou can readily assume his budget has been approved,” Garland assured Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee.   Tyler Durden Thu, 03/24/2022 - 14:20.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytMar 24th, 2022

US Treasury Confirms We Can Remove "Illicit Activity" From Bitcoin FUD Dice

US Treasury Confirms We Can Remove "Illicit Activity" From Bitcoin FUD Dice Authored by Gyges Lydias via BitcoinMagazine.com, With the US Treasury recently indicating that bitcoin and altcoins aren’t used for significant illicit activity, it’s time to change the narrative... It’s time to take “illicit activity” off the FUD dice. Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of the Treasury published reports that indicated that the use of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies for illicit activity is far outstripped by the use of traditional assets. Critics can no longer credibly present the specter of illicit activity to beat back bitcoin; now the foremost experts in the world say it is not a major threat. The Treasury Department published three reports that identified key concerns for money laundering, terrorist financing and weapons proliferation financing. Here’s what each said about the use of cryptocurrencies: “(T)he use of virtual assets for money laundering remains far below that of fiat currency and more traditional methods.” –The 2022 National Money Laundering Risk Assessment, page 41 “(T)errorist use of virtual assets appears to remain limited when compared to other financial products and services.” –The 2022 National Terrorist Financing Risk Assessment, page 23 “There is no evidence that a proliferation network has used a virtual asset to procure a specific proliferation-sensitive good or technology…” –The 2022 National Proliferation Financing Risk Assessment, page 29 Case closed! Staff of the U.S. Treasury, the authors of the report, are the most knowledgeable and best-equipped investigators and enforcers against illicit financing in the world. Moreover, the reports were reviewed by other U.S. government partners, including the Department of Justice, the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI. There could not be a more authoritative source to convey these findings. Of course, the treasury’s reports confirm what industry participants have demonstrated for years. The most recent edition of the “Crypto Crime Trends” report published by blockchain analysis firm Chainalysis, for instance, found that just 0.15% of cryptocurrency transaction volume in 2021 involved “illicit” addresses. The recent arrest of the alleged Bitfinex hackers — and the seizure of nearly 100,000 bitcoin — also demonstrates that moving large sums of money on a public network that can be monitored from a Raspberry Pi isn’t as easy as, well, pie. But the reports also confirm what we know from common experience: that we use bitcoin far, far, far more frequently for storing wealth and sending money to family members and reducing emissions and making micropayments and fleeing the freaking Taliban than for illicit finance. After the publication of these reports, if you are a journalist, or a policymaker, or a pundit, or even an anon on Twitter, it is now irresponsible and flat out wrong to say that “crypto” is a major vector for money laundering or terrorist financing. The top experts in the world disagree. Not that some won’t try to continue making this claim anyway. The United State’s sanctions on Russia have seemingly generated copious opportunities for cryptocurrency haters to claim that it will be used to evade sanctions. All of this despite the release of the Treasury reports and live rebuttals from Treasury and White House officials that say everything is fine. Take this recent Politico article, “Russia's Hidden Tool To undermine Sanctions,” for instance. The sixth paragraph should lead the piece: “Treasury officials say they aren’t overly worried about crypto.” And really, the story could end there. But the piece accepts speculation from a pundit that crypto assets like bitcoin could be used for sanctions evasion if they manage to bypass KYC processes. And if my mother had wheels she would have been a bike. Fortunately, when the facts are on your side, you can put up a pretty good defense. Coin Center’s Twitter account has been ground zero for fighting illicit finance FUD recently, with its staff pointing out that officials at FinCEN, the Treasury Department, the National Security Council and the White House have all said that there’s no evidence that bitcoin is a threat to U.S. sanctions. Their defense is a good example of how to counter speculation and fear mongering: return to the facts about bitcoin’s use and point out the real world examples of how bitcoin is empowering and protecting some of the most vulnerable people in the world. THE PATH FORWARD The three Treasury reports released this month also discuss the future risk that crypto assets like bitcoin could pose to the U.S. illicit finance regime. Examining risk is not a bad thing — I want my government to be aware of any risks posed by the proliferation of public blockchains, provided they also maintain a sober assessment of the benefits. For the U.S. Treasury, that certainly seems to be the case. U.S. legislators recognize the same thing; Representative Ritchie Torres said earlier this week that, “You should never define any technology by its worst uses… there's more to crypto than ransomware, just like there's more to money than money laundering.” Bitcoin is a global, neutral and open monetary network. Anyone can use it, and that means sometimes parties we despise may use Bitcoin alongside us. When that happens, the protection and promotion of the network — which is premised on freedom, equality and self-agency — will still be worthwhile. The U.S. Bill of Rights shows that extending freedoms to everyone is far better than constraining freedoms for everyone. Bitcoin’s growth will prove the same; I think it already does. But the truth right now is that the parties we despise do not use bitcoin, at least as compared to traditional networks. The Treasury reports released earlier this month state this unequivocally. As we continue to fight for this internet freedom money, it will be essential to cite these highly credible sources as proof. [ZH: It appears Elizabeth Warren hadn't read the report or done her homework...] ELIZABETH WARREN SO FUCKING REKT.pic.twitter.com/BmLYKY7bdb — INVESTMENT HULK (@INVESTMENTSHULK) March 17, 2022 Tyler Durden Thu, 03/17/2022 - 17:05.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeMar 17th, 2022

The Questionable Ethics Of Anti-Bitcoin ESG Junk-Science

The Questionable Ethics Of Anti-Bitcoin ESG Junk-Science Authored by 'Level39' via Bitcoin Magazine, Bitcoin environmental concerns are often portrayed in misleading and exaggerated ways contrary to proper research... Bitcoin receives disproportionate media coverage over its tiny fraction of a percent of global emissions and relatively inconsequential environmental impact. Why this happens requires following the money into environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) accounting. ESG accountants appear to be using Bitcoin’s open, transparent ledger — that can be audited by anyone in the world in real time — to exaggerate Bitcoin’s impact on the environment, with shoddy science, while profiting from the very fears they provoke. In February 2022, an op-ed, titled “Revisiting Bitcoin’s Carbon Footprint,” was published in the scientific journal “Joule,” authored by four researchers: Alex de Vries, Ulrich Gallersdörfer, Lena Klaaßen and Christian Stoll. Their written commentary, which admits limitations in their estimates, states that as bitcoin miners migrated from China to Kazakhstan and the United States in 2021, the network’s carbon footprint increased to 0.19% of global emissions. What went unnoticed by the media was that the researchers have professional motives to overstate Bitcoin’s relatively tiny environmental impact. The op-ed’s lead author, Alex de Vries, failed to disclose that he is employed by De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB), the Dutch central bank. Central banks are no fans of open, global payment rails, which bypass monopolistic government settlement layers. De Vries first released his “Bitcoin Energy Consumption Index” in November 2016, which coincides with his first round of employment with DNB, giving the appearance that DNB encouraged his critique of Bitcoin’s energy consumption. In November 2020, de Vries was rehired by the Dutch central bank as a data scientist in its financial economic crime unit and has been on a worldwide media tour for his “hobby” research ever since. As DNB is now promoting his research, he is effectively a paid opposition researcher for DNB. Source: LinkedIn As an employee of a central bank, de Vries has an incentive to exaggerate Bitcoin’s environmental impact to protect the interests of his employer. Hating on #bitcoin tells me one of two things about you. Either you haven’t learned enough about it, or its success threatens yours. — Evan Prim (@EvanPrim) March 5, 2022 Embedded tweet. His collaborators, however, have different motives altogether. Gallersdörfer, Klaaßen and Stoll are cofounders of the Crypto Carbon Ratings Institute (CCRI), a company that provides data on the carbon exposure of cryptocurrency investments and business activities. Source: Crypto Carbon Ratings Institute Collectively, the three CCRI researchers have authored almost a dozen academic papers on the environmental impact of cryptocurrencies. Source: Crypto Carbon Ratings Institute CCRI’s modus operandi is to exaggerate Bitcoin’s environmental impact through a technique the Cambridge Centre of Alternative Finance (CCAF) describes as presenter bias. This entails making apples-to-oranges comparisons — such as comparing Bitcoin to small countries — in order to elicit outrage, rather than making apples-to-apples comparisons with other industries. CCRI’s best-guess estimates on carbon emissions are then packaged and sold to financial institutions who are under pressure to disclose ESG accounting due to the investor outrage promoted by the presenter bias that CCRI itself used to provoke that outrage. Source: ETC Group It doesn’t matter that the small countries Bitcoin is compared to have a GDP that is half of the value secured by Bitcoin. It doesn’t matter if the published papers are of a low standard or lack rigorous peer review (“Joule”’s peer review process is kept secret and does not require peer review for commentary articles). Nor does it matter that Bitcoin’s emissions are too small to have a meaningful impact on climate change. All that matters is that the media is willing to publish articles highlighting their junk science narratives, along with cherry-picked examples, and the financial industry becomes pressured to contract with the CCRI to utilize their research and data. ESG researchers are able to profit, by leveraging the media to stoke public outrage, over what amounts to such an inconsequential amount of carbon emissions that actual environmentalists should be disturbed that the public’s attention is being distracted from larger issues that have real and substantial consequences for humanity. EXAGGERATING BITCOIN’S ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Ironically, on Cambridge University’s Comparisons page, where it describes the tricks of ESG presenter bias, it publishes a graphic that exaggerates Bitcoin’s power consumption to look larger than it is. Here is Cambridge’s original artwork: Source: Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance Notice how Bitcoin is almost the same size as industries that have significantly higher values. If the Cambridge researchers had drawn the bubbles to proper scale, it would look like this: Source: Data from Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance These kinds of comparisons don’t even tell the full story, given that Bitcoin uses more renewable energy than any of these other industries. Despite what academia and the media would have us believe, Bitcoin’s environmental impact is too small to have any meaningful impact on a global scale. This is not to say that bitcoin miners don’t have a responsibility to be good stewards of the environment in their communities. However, those are local concerns and not particularly a good use of outsized international attention if protecting the global environment is the true goal. When environmental researchers, the media and government devote greater than a fraction of a percent of their content discussing Bitcoin’s emissions, it becomes a disservice to environmentalism. Undue diversions only serve to virtue signal, distract from more important issues and make people less trustful of legitimate environmental causes. Source: Figure 11 from Hass McCook’s “Bitcoin's Energy Use Compared To Other Major Industries” CCRI isn’t solving impactful environmental issues when it admonishes Bitcoin. The company mines open blockchain data for its media-driven narratives and shames the market into buying its own data, for profit. This data allows institutional investors to claim carbon neutrality, and entice environmentally conscious investors into their products, while nothing of particular substance is achieved. “‘ESG investing’ in its current form is similar to people who take selfies of themselves in fancy locations to show they were there, while barely experiencing it for real. Mostly theater, little substance. For example, we pollute, but buy offsets to make it someone else's problem. We outsource our manufacturing base to another country to reduce headline energy consumption, but then buy products they make while blaming them for polluting. This is deflection, not reform…People sell their Chinese shares, buy Apple shares instead, and pat themselves on the back. Meanwhile their phone, computer, chair, sneakers, cookware, electronic devices, and kids' toys are all partly Chinese made. A lot of it is window dressing. ‘ESG’ as currently used is corporate, sanitized, and nearly meaningless. It's like the word ‘synergy.’ It's a TPS report. If anything, pretending we are doing good to check off certain boxes as perceived by others, while still doing whatever we were doing before, slows real progress. One of the worst things we can do is to feel like we are doing something constructive, without actually doing so.” — Lyn Alden SELLING PROOF-OF-STAKE INVESTMENTS The CCRI publishes an annual report to promote proof-of-stake networks as environmentally friendly while promoting a highly misleading “energy per transaction” metric. What isn’t acknowledged in the CCRI’s report is that proof of stake is not a replacement for proof of work, as the two consensus mechanisms achieve completely different goals. Proof of work is a consensus mechanism that ensures pools of miners can collectively challenge bad actors — ensuring no one party can assert control over other users, all while providing a fair and meritocratic distribution of new coins. Proof of stake doesn’t accomplish this as it resembles a corporate security structure, where the wealthiest holders have all the voting power and founders pre-mine unimpeachable control authority over users, while receiving compounding dividends. With proof of stake, users have to trust the founders not to denial-of-service (DoS) attack them. In proof of work, miners buy energy on an open market to make DoS attacks too expensive, which in turn allows Bitcoin to protect minority user rights. Proof of work’s energy consumption is a feature, not a bug. Environmental researchers who claim proof of stake to be a more efficient consensus mechanism are like a policy think tank promoting plutocratic authoritarianism as a more efficient kind of government. To equate proof of stake with proof of work entirely misses the point of how decentralization works and what it intends to achieve. But, why does the CCRI produce a report? Institutional investors commission the CCRI’s research, in order to promote centralized altcoins, while using the CCRI’s data to sell ESG-friendly “crypto” investments. By overstating Bitcoin’s global impact and promoting proof of stake as an alternative, the CCRI is effectively driving demand for institutional ESG products and its own ESG services. This isn’t about helping the environment — it’s a money-making scheme. BITCOIN IS AN EASY TARGET Bitcoin’s open and transparent accounting makes it an easy target for those who benefit from exaggerating Bitcoin’s environmental impact for profit. An interesting thought experiment is to consider how environmental accountants would characterize other industries if they were as transparent about their energy consumption as Bitcoin is. A 2020 report by the Rapid Transit Alliance estimated that the global sports industry is responsible for 0.6% of global emissions — more than three times the emissions of Bitcoin. The report uses the same presenter bias of comparing the sports industry’s emissions to that of Spain or Poland. The report states that the global sports industry generates around $500 billion a year, which is considerably less than the amount of value secured by Bitcoin. If the sports industry had open and transparent power consumption data, like Bitcoin does, would ESG accountants shame the sports community for causing an environmental disaster? Would it be a good use of everyone’s time when there are much more important environmental issues that need to be solved? BITCOIN AS A GREEN INVESTMENT It might not be evident from media reports, but Bitcoin is already a relatively green investment. A 2021 paper stated that, “adding Bitcoin to a diversified equity portfolio can both enhance the risk–return relationship of the portfolio and reduce the portfolio's aggregate carbon emissions.” If institutions feel pressured to make their bitcoin holdings carbon neutral, it doesn’t take much effort. According to a January 2022 report by CoinShares, “Each bitcoin would require offsetting 2.2 tonnes of CO2 per year, or roughly the same as one return flight on business class between New York to Tokyo … At a bitcoin price of 42,000 USD, this would amount to an annual cost of 0.48%.” Even bitcoin miners that are demonized in the press, like Greenidge Generation Holdings, have made their entire mining operations 100% carbon neutral without considerable effort. Greenidge uses offset project registries that fund projects to sequester and reduce emissions. And yet, Bitcoin is a powerful, location-agnostic, buyer of last resort of renewable energy, that balances grid loads, can fund renewables stymied by lengthy interconnection queues to congested grids, and helps mitigate flared methane gas. When one realizes that Bitcoin is a solution to help monetize inefficiencies in the renewable energy sector — and as a zero-sum game increasing green mining disincentivizes carbon-intensive mining — some interesting ideas begin to take shape. INCENTIVE OFFSETS In a paper authored by Troy Cross and Andrew M. Bailey, “incentive offsets” are proposed as a way for investors to make bitcoin holdings carbon neutral by investing just 0.5% of their holdings in green bitcoin mining operations. Unlike other proposals to green bitcoin, theirs promotes Bitcoin adoption, preserves the fungibility of bitcoin and costs nothing, while providing a return. Cross recently discussed the idea with Peter McCormack on an episode of “What Bitcoin Did” as well as during a follow-up conversation with Nic Carter. ESG MISINFORMATION ESG advocates are perhaps unlikely to endorse any form of green bitcoin mining, as it would effectively neutralize their conflicted narrative. Already de Vries et al. went out of their way to peddle misleading arguments, in their op-ed, to criticize green mining and downplay its role in environmental solutions. For example, they suggest flared gas mitigation through mining offers limited benefits but ignore the fact that wind and diminishing stack flow rates make bitcoin mining significantly more efficient and ecological than allowing methane to flare and potentially vent into the atmosphere. Environmentalists have recently acknowledged that methane is much a larger problem than was previously realized. Or when de Vries showed Bitcoin’s energy consumption rising after China banned bitcoin mining, which resulted in a well-publicized 50% drop in hash rate. De Vries declined to include it in his estimates and dismissed it by saying, “Because of the previous challenges in determining the most likely energy consumption impact, any adjustment would be arbitrary. For this reason, no adjustments were made to reflect immediate impact of the ban.” This is effectively an admission his own estimates are spurious. De Vries has made an ESG career on top of a debunked “energy per transaction” metric, while 100% double counting the same footprint onto investors. In a paper written by de Vries and Stoll, in 2021, the two erroneously estimated that the average service life of a Bitcoin ASIC miner was only 16 months. This is blatantly false and easily disproved by on-chain data which shows Bitmain S7s, that are seven years old, are still actively used by miners. By weaponizing academia, fraudulent assertions are repeated by the media without fact-checking. In reality, Bitcoin accounts for an estimated 0.05% of global e-waste and since ASIC miners don’t have batteries or complex systems, the parts are easily recyclable. When misleading arguments are used to dismiss Bitcoin’s environmental efforts, while simultaneously overstating its footprint, it becomes evident that critics are not acting in good faith. How can they be when they have glaring conflicts of interest? The ESG community has an ethics problem where its own architects profit off of the hysterics they generate and often fail to disclose those conflicts of interests to the public as their junk science narratives are amplified by the media. Exaggerated comparisons, deceptive arguments and profit-driven motives leaves the public with the perception that criticizing Bitcoin’s relatively miniscule footprint does not stem from a selfless and courageous act of environmentalism. Rather, it appears that Bitcoin critics have professional motives in mind, and a desire to maintain the status quo, that make their claims ethically questionable. Bitcoin, of course, does not care. Renewables need Bitcoin more than Bitcoin needs renewables. The ESG industry can extract Bitcoin’s data, exaggerate its externalities and downplay any progress to profit through green institutional investment products. Bitcoin will keep on producing blocks and paving the way for open payment rails with honest, incorruptible proof of work. All the while, miners will buy up every stranded and wasted megawatt of renewable energy and give it a fighting chance to make headway in the market. The future of energy production is bright and Bitcoin will use it to incentivize innovation and human flourishing. Tyler Durden Mon, 03/14/2022 - 03:30.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeMar 14th, 2022

Cryptocurrencies recover from last week"s sell-off as traders mull the impact of a new variant, while little-known "omicron" coin soars

Bitcoin recovered from Friday's steep sell-off, rising around 5% and lifting other cryptocurrencies, including the little-known token 'omicron'. BitcoinFrancesco Carta fotografo Bitcoin and ether bounced back on Monday, recovering somewhat after Friday's steep sell-off.  A small decentralized reserve token known as "omicron" surged as focus on the new COVID-19 intensified.  South Africa detected the "omicron" variant of Covid-19 last week, initially sparking a sell-off in crypto. Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell. Cryptocurrencies staged a sharp recovery on Monday, bouncing back from the steep sell-off late last week, when the "Omicron" variant of COVID-19 emerged, spooking investors and pummelling financial markets. Meanwhile, a mysterious token with the same name as the new variant surged in value.Bitcoin rose 4.8% in 24 hours to stand at $57,136.17 by 07:52 a.m. ET Monday, having fallen by as much as 8% at one point on Friday, according to CoinGecko. Ether rose 5% in 24 hours to stand at $4,313.26, recovering from Friday's 11% drop. The Omicron variant was first detected in South Africa last week. Since then, cases have begun to emerge in a number of countries outside the region and a number of governments including the UK and Israel have scrambled to restrict certain travel. News of the variant on Friday hit risk assets including crypto, as investors rushed for the safety of the likes of gold. News that the Omicron variant was more transmissible sparked concerns last week. The South African doctor who first spotted the new covid variant, told the BBC Sunday patients who had caught it had "extremely mild symptoms" but more time would need to pass until it is clear how the disease will impact vulnerable people. By Monday, with still little in the way of hard evidence as to how easily transmissible the variant was, investors reassessed the threat omicron may pose to the economy and edged back into cryptocurrencies and stocks."Like gold, Bitcoin is being used as a hedge against global uncertainty in the world," Adrian Pollard, ​​Chief Product Officer to HollaEx, a crypto exchange software company, told Insider.In the meantime, a little-known decentralized reserve currency named omicron surged by almost 70% on the day and by 900% on the week, as trader focus on the new COVID-19 intensified. According to the developers' website, the token is backed by a basket of assets that includes stablecoin USDC and is only listed on SushiSwap."Omicron is a clear sign of a bubble, and while it might be a good way to make a quick return, it is not a good buying option for the long term investors," Freddie Evans, Sales Trader at UK based digital asset broker GlobalBlock told insider. "With the founders of the coin being unknown, it is also at risk of a rug pull, the likes of which we saw with Squid Game coin last month," he said. In a rug pull, the developers abandon a project and take the proceeds. The most recent example was the Squid Game token, whose creators ran away with an estimated $3.38 million after having pumped the token up. "We have a list of criteria that we check against for all cryptocurrencies that request for listings. We don't publish the exact criteria otherwise it will be gamed. Omicron passes the criteria and hence it is listed," Bobby Ong co-founder of CoinGecko said. According to its website the omic token already existed before the emergence of the omicron variant last week. CoinGecko has been tracking it since November 11. The coin has a website, twitter account and discord account. But little else is known about it."Another risk is associated with the fact that such coins are traded on decentralized exchanges, where no one checks the source of their origin, which means that they can vanish as quickly as they appear,"  Lei Wang, Co-founder & CEO of Kine Protocol, decentralized derivatives trading platform, told Insider. Other more popular altcoins like solana's sol rose by 7.6%, while cardano's ada climbed by 3.5%. Metaverse tokens such as Decentraland's mana rose 5% and Sandbox's sand jumped 8% Monday. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 29th, 2021