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How RDU airlines are faring as airport preps for busy Memorial Day travel

Officials at Raleigh-Durham International Airpot are preparing for what could be the busiest week at the airport since the pandemic began. On Monday, RDU CEO Mike Landguth said the airport estimates more than 221,000 travelers are expected to f.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 25th, 2021

U.S. airlines expect record travel this Thanksgiving. Here are the biggest trouble spots

Thanksgiving is a busy travel season, and that means large crowds in airports and potential service interruptions in the air if bad weather strikes at the wrong moment. OAG, the airline and airport data behemoth, did some data crunching and came up .....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 26th, 2019

U.S. airlines expect record travel this Thanksgiving. Here are the biggest troublespots

Thanksgiving is a busy travel season, and that means large crowds in airports and potential service interruptions in the air if bad weather strikes at the wrong moment. OAG, the airline and airport data behemoth, did some data crunching and came up .....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 25th, 2019

I flew American Airlines to Europe for the first time during the pandemic and found it"s back to normal with bad food, uncomfortable seats, and free alcohol

American did a great job of getting me to Madrid on time but the flight was far from memorable. One thing I didn't miss was the bad airplane food. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider American Airlines is one of four US carriers flying overseas to Europe and has recently started increasing services as more countries open to American tourists. Transatlantic flights are pretty much back to normal, besides having to wear a mask. Hot meals and alcohol are once again served in all cabins including economy class. See more stories on Insider's business page. American Airlines is one of the leading US carriers flying between the US and Europe, especially from its international gateway in New York. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider The summer before the pandemic saw American fly to 23 European destinations from the US. Fast forward to the summer of 2021, however, and that number stood at 11 as American wasn't as quick to rebuild in Europe following its reopening. Flying American Airlines to Europe during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Source: Cirium But even still, American has maintained service to core cities like London; Madrid; and Rome, while opening new routes including New York-Athens. Athens, Greece. Shutterstock Read More: American and JetBlue just unveiled a new partnership with 33 new routes combined— here's what it means for travelers And American has proved to be an inexpensive option when crossing the pond, as I found when planning a recent work trip to Doha, Qatar with flights on American, British Airways, and Qatar Airways. Flying American Airlines to Europe during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: Gulfstream just debuted its new $75 million ultra-long-range plane that's also the world's largest purpose-built private jet: Meet the G700 I flew American Airlines from New York to Madrid during the summer of vaccinated travel. Here's what it was like. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I booked a flight on American Airlines despite the airline canceling thousands of flights this summer – here's how I'm preparing for the worst After recent bad experiences on American, I was a bit nervous to fly the carrier overseas. I made sure to do extra research on backup options in case something went wrong, and even arrived at the airport four hours early. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I was stranded in Bogotá airport for 10 hours and it taught me the true value of credit card perks and not taking no for an answer But having flown American internationally earlier in the summer, I knew how to prepare. The first step was to download Verifly, American's preferred health passport service that speeds along airport check-in and document verification. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider I submitted all my required documentation and got the green light. As a result, check-in at the airport was less painful than expected as I was able to use a self-serve kiosk to get my boarding pass. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider For those checking a bag, though, there was a bit of a line, as is usually the case in international terminals. I was glad to have only brought a carry-on. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider I was instantly relieved once I had my boarding pass and headed straight to the gate with only a minimal line at security. I felt silly having arrived four hours before departure but as the old saying goes, better safe than sorry. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider One benefit of flying out of American's Terminal 8 at John F. Kennedy International Airport is that Bobby Van's Steakhouse is open, and Priority Pass members through Chase can get a free meal. I had the burger and it was delicious. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I used a credit perk to dine for nearly free at an airport restaurant and it's my new favorite travel hack The rest of the concourse was quiet as I arrived before the bulk of the evening overseas departures. Even still, there were shops and restaurants open for business in a good sign for the industry. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider I headed straight to the gate after lunch and got my first glimpse at the aircraft taking us to Spain, the mighty Boeing 777-200. American now only flies Boeing 777 aircraft between New York and Europe in a win for business class and first class customers that get to enjoy the airline's best premium cabin products. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Pandemic-era safety measures including social distancing floor placards and plexiglass portions at the gate counter were still on display. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Boarding began around 45 minutes prior to departure in American's standard group boarding procedure. Most US airlines have abandoned back-to-front boarding. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider American's Boeing 777-200 aircraft seat 273 passengers across three cabins, with classes of service including business, premium economy, and economy. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Source: SeatGuru In economy, seats are arranged in a 10-abreast, 3-4-3 configuration that's standard for most airlines flying the 777. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Seat pitch in economy is between 31 and 32 inches, according to SeatGuru, while seat width is a standard 17 inches. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Source: SeatGuru I booked this flight quite late and there weren't too many seats from which to choose that didn't require paying an extra fee. American isn't alone in the practice of charging for advance seat assignments on long-haul flights but I despise the practice as these tickets are expensive enough as it is. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider But to American's credit, there were a good showing of complimentary aisle and window seats towards the back of the plane from which to select. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider And to my surprise, the most unique seats in economy were available for selection. The last three rows on this aircraft are arranged in a 2-4-2 configuration meaning there are six two-seat pairs. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider I thought I had lucked out by selecting one of them but my excitement was short-lived. Simply put, these seats were not the most comfortable for a larger traveler. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider The small width didn't help and I felt like I was taking up part of the seat next to me. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider One thing that could've helped was if the armrest for the window seat was moveable, but it was fixed in place. I was so close to the seat in front of me that my tray table couldn't even lay flat (a problem I didn't have on the other carriers on which I flew during this trip). Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider My top concern was having enough room once my seat neighbor arrived. But I lucked out and had both seats to myself as nobody showed up to claim the other. Flying American Airlines to Europe during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider There was a gap between the seat and the cabin wall which offered some additional legroom and a place to store the pillow and blanket kit left on the seat. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider American is quite generous with seat features on its wide-body aircraft. Each seat has an 8.9-inch in-flight entertainment screen with a variety of movies, television shows, games, and music. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider The moving map proved handy during the flight to keep track of our location. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider A tethered remote is also available to control the system and act as a game controller or keyboard for the seat-to-seat chat function. It also comes in handy when scrolling through content since the touch functionality is quite poor in that regard. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider In-flight WiFi is also available on the aircraft for a price. And for those using devices during the flight, in-seat power is offered through USB charging ports and 110v C power outlets at seats. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider The rest of the aircraft was quite full, which surprised me as it was quite late in the season for transatlantic travel. Some passengers were visiting family and friends while others were starting their study abroad term. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Bad weather in New York wreaked a bit of havoc on the airport but we weren't overly affected. I was quite relieved that our departure was pretty close to on time as I had a connection to make in Madrid. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider The storm did, however, make for some great views as we blasted out of New York. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Madrid is quite a short flight from New York and while I wanted to go straight to sleep, I did want to see what the meal service was like. This was the first time I'd had a hot meal on American during the pandemic. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider As I waited for the service to begin, I had a look at what was on offer in the movie department. American had quite a good selection in all categories, and I ultimately picked "The Vault." Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider First attendants started the drink service first with a selection of soft drinks, juices, wine, and beer. Alcohol isn't currently served in economy on American's domestic flights but it flows freely on transatlantic hops. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider I ordered a club soda along with some red wine to help ease my sleep after the meal. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Next came the meal service as flight attendants quickly passed out the trays. I felt like I was being served in a cafeteria as one flight attendant curtly asked, "chicken or pasta?" Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider I unwrapped the entree to find that not much has changed at all when it comes to American's economy catering. The chicken dish was accompanied by a side salad, cheese and crackers, and a cinnamon dessert bar. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider I couldn't describe the chicken beyond that it was served in a tomato-based sauce. I enjoyed the sides more than the main and was glad I had the burger at Bobby Van's before the flight. Next time, I think I'll head straight to sleep. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Flight attendants were very quick to complete the meal service, though, and got it done in under an hour and a half. The flight to Madrid is only six hours and 30 minutes so every second counts. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Ready for bed with a full stomach, I used the pillow and blanket that American had left on the seat and did my best to get comfortable. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Another downside of the two-seat row is that there's a gap between the seat and window, making propping a pillow up against the cabin wall near-impossible. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider But even then, it wasn't too difficult to get to sleep and I woke just before breakfast was served. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Flight attendants once more came around to serve drinks first, followed by a pre-packaged cold breakfast. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider On offer for the optimistic morning meal included Chobani strawberry yogurt, a raspberry fig bar, and coconut cashew granola. All in all, it was quite standard but still enjoyable. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider The flight to Madrid was nearing its end and I can't say I was upset to see it go. American did a great job of getting me to Spain on time but the in-flight experience was exactly what I expected it to be. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider I did appreciate the modernity of the aircraft and the efficiency of the crew but there wasn't anything memorable about this flight. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Besides having to wear a mask, though, I'd say that American is back to normal on these flights, for better or worse. Flying American Airlines from New York to Madrid, Spain during the pandemic. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsider14 hr. 10 min. ago

Saturday links: craving silence

On Saturdays we catch up with the non-finance related items that we didn’t get to earlier in the week. You can check... AutosDriving is the most dangerous thing most Americans do every day. What can be done to reduce traffic fatalities? (vox.com)A sustainable car needs to be designed from the ground up. (nytimes.com)Is the Arcimoto FUV the future of mobility? (axios.com)What is a 'diminished value claim'? (humbledollar.com)EnergyWhy New Orleans lost power for so long post-Hurricane Ida. (nytimes.com)China’s president Xi Jinping has pledged to end the financing of new coal power plants overseas. (ft.com)Fire'Fire weather,' i.e. hot, dry and windy, is on the rise in the West. (arstechnica.com)Americans keep moving into fire-prone areas. (bloomberg.com)Goats are particularly effective at eliminating wildfire risks. (nytimes.com)ClimateClimate risk is coming for banks. (ritholtz.com)In the Northern hemisphere Summer is getting longer. (washingtonpost.com)It's going to get more expensive to insure coastal real estate. (nytimes.com)EnvironmentWe can pull carbon from the atmosphere, the question is one of scaling. (reasonstobecheerful.world)The biggest toilet paper brands are made from pulp from virgin forests. (axios.com)Why the Mississippi River Delta is sinking. (theconversation.com)How a new microdrip irrigation system could change farming. (bloomberg.com)Covid has not been great for trash generation. (nytimes.com)AnimalsWhy does Colossal want to re-introduce woolly mammoths into the Arctic? (businessofbusiness.com)Commercial fishing is a global Ponzi scheme. (scientificamerican.com)SpaceSolar flares are an ongoing risk for humanity. (knowablemagazine.org)The soon-to-be launched James Webb Space Telescope will be 100 times as powerful as the Hubble. (vox.com)ArchaeologyWhy scientists believe that a large airburst destroyed Tall el-Hammam, a Middle Bronze Age city. (nature.com)The date that humans populated the Americas keeps getting pushed back. (wsj.com)Researchers may have found the oldest case of archaic human art. (scientificamerican.com)Air travelThe FAA is struggling to keep up with all the new stuff in the sky. (axios.com)The U.S. is set to lift the travel ban for vaccinated flyers from the EU and UK. (yahoo.com)Where the major U.S. airlines stand on vaccine mandates for employees. (washingtonpost.com)What's next for airport screening? (axios.com)TravelNational parks are looking for ways to keep crowds in check. (wsj.com)Barcelona is kicking Airbnb ($ABNB), and other short term rentals, out. (nytimes.com)TechnologyThe case for having a laptop separate from work. (theverge.com)New security features in Apple ($AAPL) iOS 15. (wired.com)BehaviorWhat constitutes a psychologically rich life? (psychologytoday.com)Why we all feel so tired all the time. (time.com)Health careHow the pandemic is causing nurses to reassess their career choice. (indystar.com)Nursing home staff shortages are at crisis levels. (axios.com)HealthOn the prospects for a vaccine for poison ivy. (scientificamerican.com)Baby poop is loaded with microplastics. (wired.com)Why have the Dutch people stopped growing taller? (washingtonpost.com)FitnessPeloton ($PTON) is pushing to get its machines in public spaces like hotels and gyms. (frontofficesports.com)Why your workout burns fewer calories than you think. (nytimes.com)DogsTherapy dogs are available at some airports for travelers and workers. (washingtonpost.com)Therapy dogs are also a thing on college campuses. (theconversation.com)A startup, Loyal, wants to improve the healthspan and lifespan in dogs. (techcrunch.com)What's the purpose of a dog's dewclaw? (mentalfloss.com)WeedAmazon ($AMZN) is a force for marijuana legalization. (protocol.com)The legal marijuana business is on a hiring spree. (washingtonpost.com)College students are using marijuana more and drinking less. (washingtonpost.com)FoodSome restaurateurs are using the pandemic as an opportunity to restructure how they do business, including wages. (nytimes.com)Scaling up cultured meat production is going to difficult and expensive. (thecounter.org)MBAApplications to elite MBA programs have leveled off. (wsj.com)The MBA gender pay gap is slowly closing. (ft.com)Earlier on Abnormal ReturnsCoronavirus links: flu season. (abnormalreturns.com)What you missed in our Friday linkfest. (abnormalreturns.com)Podcast links: the future of finance. (abnormalreturns.com)Are you a financial adviser looking for some out-of-the-box thinking? Then check out our weekly e-mail newsletter. (newsletter.abnormalreturns.com)Mixed mediaLuxury brands are offering customers expert, in-house repair services. (robbreport.com)Why songwriters get such a small cut of music revenues. (variety.com)Home dining rooms have been repurposed in pandemic. (washingtonpost.com).....»»

Category: blogSource: abnormalreturnsSep 25th, 2021

United Airlines hit with record $1.9 million fine for delays that left passengers stuck on planes for lengthy periods

The US Transportation Department cited 25 incidents of tarmac delays on United planes between December 2015 and February of this year. The fine imposed on United was the largest of its kind, according to the Transportation Department. Thomas Pallini/Insider United Airlines has been hit with a $1.9 million penalty for long tarmac delays, per Reuters. A consent order cited 25 incidents that occurred between December 2015 and February of this year. The airline breached federal rules by keeping passengers stuck on planes for too long. See more stories on Insider's business page. United Airlines has been fined $1.9 million by the Transportation Department for keeping thousands of passengers stuck on planes for hours, in violation of federal rules, Reuters reported.It is the largest penalty of its kind to be imposed, according to the outlet. The department said in a consent order that United failed to adhere to the assurances in its contingency plan for long tarmac delays for 20 domestic flights and five international flights at airports across the US. A total of 3,218 passengers were affected.A tarmac delay occurs when a plane on the ground is either awaiting takeoff or has just landed and passengers do not have the opportunity to get off the plane.In one 2019 incident, a United flight en route to Chicago was diverted to an airport in Wisconsin, due to a winter storm. It was held on the tarmac for more than four hours.In a statement to Reuters on Friday, United said its "committed to fully meeting all DOT rules and will continue identifying and implementing improvements in how we manage difficult operating conditions." United Airlines did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment. In July 2021, airlines reported a total of 40 tarmac delays of more than three hours on domestic flights, compared with 11 the month before, per the department. United is not the only airline to have faced sky-high penalties in recent years. In 2019, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines were fined a total of $1.75 million for long tarmac delays at US airports.Delta said at the time that it provided customers with substantial compensation for the delays, including cash reimbursements, SkyMiles, and future travel vouchers. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 25th, 2021

JetBlue just began flying between New York and London with the smallest plane of any airline on the route - here"s why I"m eager to book it again

There's a certain weight to international travel that I didn't feel on JetBlue, largely because it's familiar and the plane only seated 138 people. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider JetBlue Airways just began flying between New York and London with one of Airbus' newest jets. The Airbus A321neoLR is the next-generation variant of the popular A321 and is capable of flying transatlantic flights. JetBlue has packed the aircraft full of customer-friendly features that take away from the fact that the aircraft is smaller than what competitors use. See more stories on Insider's business page. JetBlue Airways began flying between New York and London in August, bringing its low fares to Europe for the first time. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I flew on JetBlue's historic first trip to London and saw how low fares and great service will give competitors a run for their money Introductory fares on the route started at $599 round-trip for economy class and $1,979 for Mint business class. Inside JetBlue Airways' new Airbus A321neoLR. Thomas Pallini/Insider One way the airline is keeping prices low is by flying smaller aircraft across the pond. Inside JetBlue Airways' new Airbus A321neoLR. Thomas Pallini/Insider JetBlue chose the Airbus A321neoLR for its European flights and is currently the only airline to fly a single-aisle aircraft between New York and London. JetBlue Airways' first Airbus A321neoLR. JetBlue Airways and Airbus The trend is becoming more common as airlines try to lower costs on lucrative transatlantic flights, and manufacturers like Airbus are accommodating by making the planes fly further than ever before. Dominique Boutin/TASS/Getty Read More: Double-decker planes are going extinct as Airbus and Boeing discontinue their largest models. Here's why airlines are abandoning 4-engine jets. Some frequent flyers, including myself, dread the idea of having to fly on a single-aisle plane across an ocean. But after two flights on the aircraft, I was more than happy with the experience and enjoyed flying on it more than some larger aircraft. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Here's why I'd book another flight on a JetBlue Airbus A321neoLR when flying transatlantic. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Insider paid a media rate to fly from New York to London and back As a New Yorker, I've taken countless JetBlue flights in my flying career and have seen how quickly the airline has improved its onboard product in recent years. Those improvements culminated in the Airbus A321neoLR, flying exclusively between New York and London. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider JetBlue's latest seat products and satellite WiFi can be found on the aircraft, as well as other features like the JetBlue "pantry." Inside JetBlue Airways' new Airbus A321neoLR. Thomas Pallini/Insider I specifically book a standard economy seat for the overnight flight to London in seat 24A. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider I sat down in the seat and felt surprisingly at ease. It felt like just another flight on JetBlue, an airline on which I'd become incredibly comfortable flying. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I flew on a newly upgraded JetBlue plane and despite less legroom and slimmer seats, the refresh is exactly what the airline needed JetBlue offers 32 inches of legroom in these seats as well as 18.4 inches of width. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider For a larger traveler like myself, the extra room made a world of difference. I didn't feel hemmed in or struggling to find a comfortable position. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Those dimensions make JetBlue's seats more spacious than all of its competitors on the route, despite the smaller plane. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider American Airlines offers between 31 and 32 inches of seat pitch for its economy seats on the Boeing 777-300ER, according to SeatGuru, while seat widths range between 16.2 and 17.1 inches. An American Airlines Boeing 777-300ER. Nicolas Economou/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Source: SeatGuru British Airways' Boeing 777-200 aircraft offers 31 inches of pitch and 17.5 inches of seat width in economy, according to SeatGuru. A British Airways Boeing 777. Reuters Source: SeatGuru Delta Air Lines' Boeing 767-400ER aircraft offer 31 inches of pitch and a nearly comparable 18.1 inches of width, according to SeatGuru. A Delta Air Lines Boeing 767-400. Philip Pilosian/Shutterstock.com Source: SeatGuru Virgin Atlantic Airways offers between 31 and 34 inches of pitch on its Airbus A350-1000 XWB aircraft in economy, according to SeatGuru, with a seat width of 17.4 inches. A Virgin Atlantic Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. Robert Smith/MI News/NurPhoto/Getty Images Source: SeatGuru United Airlines offers the closest rival on its premium-configured Boeing 767-300ER with seat pitches varying between 31 and 34 inches for economy seats and 18.5 inches of pitch, according to SeatGuru. The 34-inch pitch seats are paid, extra-legroom "Economy Plus" seats. A United Airlines Boeing 767-300ER. Thomas Pallini/Business Insider JetBlue's spacious seats are accompanied by a low-density configuration of only 138 seats across 31 rows. In economy, you can see from the first row all the way to the last with no dividers in between. Inside JetBlue Airways' new Airbus A321neoLR. Thomas Pallini/Insider American, by comparison, has 216 economy seats alone on its Boeing 777-300ER flying between New York and London. American Airlines Boeing 777 at New York JFK airport before boarding passengers. William Perugini/shutterstock The only other airline flying planes with fewer passengers between New York and Europe is French boutique airline La Compagnie. A La Compagnie Airbus A321neo. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I toured La Compagnie, the all-business class airline flying between the US and France. It's the closest thing to flying private across the Atlantic. Having fewer seats means it takes less time to board and deplane the aircraft. It might even take less time to board and deplane than JetBlue's other aircraft that have more seats. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Personally, having fewer people onboard made it feel like there was a lot less hassle during boarding and deplaning. Flying to London felt no different than if I was flying down to Florida, and it made the overall experience a lot less stressful. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Beyond its impressive spaciousness, the economy seat itself had all the usual trimmings for a transatlantic product a 10.1-inch in-flight entertainment screen with a USB charging port, 110v AC power outlet, and adjustable headrest. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Also on display during boarding was the Airbus Airspace cabin found on its newest jets. Mood lighting welcomes passengers onboard with LED lights above giving the impression of a starry night. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Economy seats are configured in a standard 3-3 configuration with an equal number of aisle, window, and middle seats. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider It didn't take long to get everybody onboard and ready for the seven-hour crossing. We would've departed right on time had it not been for bad weather in the area that prevented us from pushing back from the gate. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider But once we got underway, it was smooth sailing to London. The A321neoLR handled what little turbulence we experienced quite well. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider Flight attendants walked up and down the aisle to perform the in-flight service, just like a normal flight. It took a bit longer than it should have but that was chalked up to it being the very first flight. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider One cool feature of JetBlue's transatlantic product is that customers can order their meals from the in-flight entertainment system. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider I quickly fell asleep and woke up over Ireland in time for breakfast with only around an hour left in the flight. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider The fuel-efficient Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan engines also make the cabin incredibly quiet and conducive to uninterrupted sleep. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider The flight ended, as all do, and I was thinking more about how happy I was in London than the fact that I flew across the Atlantic in a single-aisle plane. Flying JetBlue Airways from New York to London. Thomas Pallini/Insider I flew back to New York just a few days later on the very same aircraft. The only difference was that this time, I was in business class. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider JetBlue rolled out a brand-new Mint business class seat for this aircraft to give flyers maximum privacy and exclusivity. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read More: I flew JetBlue's new London to New York route in Mint business class. It's a premium leisure traveler's dream but some kinks need to be ironed out. Business class seats are arranged in a 1-1 configuration across 12 rows, taking up nearly half of the aircraft. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Each seat offers direct aisle access and has closing doors for additional privacy. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider There were even fewer passengers on this flight so boarding took less than 30 minutes and we were quickly on our way to New York. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider The flight time was also around seven hours for this leg thanks to favorable winds. What the A321neoLR lacks in speed, however, JetBlue makes up for in the in-flight service. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider A three-course meal was served for lunch, accompanied by multiple pre-landing snacks. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider And for those still hungry, the JetBlue "pantry" is available on the aircraft where passengers can take whatever snacks and beverages they like. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Besides the extra flight duration, I could hardly tell the difference or care that I was on a smaller plane. Flying JetBlue Airways from London to New York in Mint business class. Thomas Pallini/Insider Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 25th, 2021

Extreme weather disrupted almost half of JetBlue"s flights on Thursday with cancellations continuing as the airline recovers

JetBlue Airways canceled or delayed over half of its flights yesterday, leaving passengers stranded for hours. AP/Elaine Thompson JetBlue left hundreds of passengers stranded after delaying or canceling half of its flights on Thursday. The airline said severe weather in Florida and New England caused the flight disruptions. Weather was a primary factor in delays that occurred over the summer, causing issues for American and Spirit. See more stories on Insider's business page. JetBlue Airways canceled or delayed over half of its flights yesterday, leaving passengers at some airports stranded for hours.On Thursday, JetBlue passengers complained on Twitter about hours-long flight delays and subsequent cancellations, with some saying they were stranded for up to 25 hours."The bulk of cancellations ... were the result of dangerous thunderstorms in South Florida and the Northeast last night and into this morning. This weather leads to airport closures and air traffic control programs. Whenever these weather events take place they can also create residual impacts as we work to reposition aircraft and crews," a JetBlue spokesperson told Insider.According to data from FlightAware, 50% of JetBlue flights were disrupted yesterday, with 44% being delayed and 6% being canceled. The airline had the highest ratio of flight disruptions compared to other carriers, including Southwest and American which only had 20% of flights delayed and 1% and 2% canceled, respectively.Meanwhile, Delta Air Lines, which, according to the airline, has the largest operation at New York's JFK International Airport, only had 17% of its flights delayed and 0% canceled on Thursday. Today, JetBlue has already delayed 27% and canceled 6% of its flights, compared to Delta, American, United, and Southwest that have all delayed less than 10% and canceled between 0 and 1%.Weather was the principal factor in the hundreds of flight cancellations incurred by airlines over the summer. In June, American was forced to slash 80 flights a day after extreme weather disrupted the operation. The airline also cut 1% of its schedule for July to help manage the travel boom as it battled weather and labor shortages.Meanwhile, Spirit Airlines' operation broke down after a poorly timed combination of severe weather and staffing issues, forcing it to cancel 2,000 flights as it fought to get its schedule back on track. Its slow recovery got the attention of the US Department of Transportation, which contacted the airline to "remind" them of passenger rights when their flights are canceled, reported The Points Guy. Spirit was still canceling half of its flights into its fifth day of disruptions, while JetBlue has only canceled 8% on its second day, according to FlightAware.Editor's note: An earlier headline implied JetBlue canceled half of its flights on Thursday. It has been updated.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 24th, 2021

Extreme weather caused JetBlue to cancel half of its flights on Thursday with cancellations continuing as the airline recovers

JetBlue Airways canceled or delayed over half of its flights yesterday, leaving passengers stranded for hours. meric AP/Elaine Thompson JetBlue left hundreds of passengers stranded after delaying or canceling half of its flights on Thursday. The airline said severe weather in Florida and New England caused the flight disruptions. Weather was a primary factor in delays that occurred over the summer, causing issues for American and Spirit. See more stories on Insider's business page. JetBlue Airways canceled or delayed over half of its flights yesterday, leaving passengers at some airports stranded for hours.On Thursday, JetBlue passengers complained on Twitter about hours-long flight delays and subsequent cancellations, with some saying they were stranded for up to 25 hours."The bulk of cancellations ... were the result of dangerous thunderstorms in South Florida and the Northeast last night and into this morning. This weather leads to airport closures and air traffic control programs. Whenever these weather events take place they can also create residual impacts as we work to reposition aircraft and crews," a JetBlue spokesperson told Insider.According to data from FlightAware, 50% of JetBlue flights were disrupted yesterday, with 44% being delayed and 6% being canceled. The airline had the highest ratio of flight disruptions compared to other carriers, including Southwest and American which only had 20% of flights delayed and 1% and 2% canceled, respectively.Meanwhile, Delta Air Lines, which, according to the airline, has the largest operation at New York's JFK International Airport, only had 17% of its flights delayed and 0% canceled on Thursday. Today, JetBlue has already delayed 27% and canceled 6% of its flights, compared to Delta, American, United, and Southwest that have all delayed less than 10% and canceled between 0 and 1%.Weather was the principal factor in the hundreds of flight cancellations incurred by airlines over the summer. In June, American was forced to slash 80 flights a day after extreme weather disrupted the operation. The airline also cut 1% of its schedule for July to help manage the travel boom as it battled weather and labor shortages.Meanwhile, Spirit Airlines' operation broke down after a poorly timed combination of severe weather and staffing issues, forcing it to cancel 2,000 flights as it fought to get its schedule back on track. Its slow recovery got the attention of the US Department of Transportation, which contacted the airline to "remind" them of passenger rights when their flights are canceled, reported The Points Guy. Spirit was still canceling half of its flights into its fifth day of disruptions, while JetBlue has only canceled 8% on its second day, according to FlightAware.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytSep 24th, 2021

Futures Slide Alongside Cryptocurrencies Amid China Crackdown

Futures Slide Alongside Cryptocurrencies Amid China Crackdown US futures and European stocks fell amid ongoing nerves over the Evergrande default, while cryptocurrency-linked stocks tumbled after the Chinese central bank said such transactions are illegal. Sovereign bond yields fluctuated after an earlier selloff fueled by the prospect of tighter monetary policy. At 745am ET, S&P 500 e-minis were down 19.5 points, or 0.43%, Nasdaq 100 e-minis were down 88.75 points, or 0.58% and Dow e-minis were down 112 points, or 0.33%. In the biggest overnight news, Evergrande offshore creditors remain in limbo and still haven't received their coupon payment effectively starting the 30-day grace period, while also in China, the State Planner issued a notice on the crackdown of cryptocurrency mining, will strictly prohibit financing for new crypto mining projects and strengthen energy consumption controls of new crypto mining projects. Subsequently, the PBoC issued a notice to further prevent and dispose of the risks from speculating on cryptocurrencies, to strengthen monitoring of risks from crypto trading and such activities are illegal. The news sent the crypto space tumbling as much as 8% while cryptocurrency-exposed stocks slumped in U.S. premarket trading. Marathon Digital (MARA) drops 6.5%, Bit Digital (BTBT) declines 4.7%, Riot Blockchain (RIOT) -5.9%, Coinbase -2.8%. Big banks including JPMorgan, Citigroup, Morgan Stanley and Bank of America Corp slipped about 0.5%, while oil majors Exxon Mobil and Chevron Corp were down 0.4% and 0.3%, respectively, in premarket trading.Mega-cap FAAMG tech giants fell between 0.5% and 0.6%. Nike shed 4.6% after the sportswear maker cut its fiscal 2022 sales expectations and warned of delays during the holiday shopping season. Several analysts lowered their price targets on the maker of sports apparel and sneakers after the company cut its FY revenue growth guidance to mid-single- digits. Here are some of the biggest U.S. movers today: Helbiz (HLBZ) falls 10% after the micromobility company filed with the SEC for the sale of as many as 11m shares by stockholders. Focus Universal (FCUV), an online marketing company that’s been a favorite of retail traders, surged 26% in premarket trading after the stock was cited on Stocktwits in recent days. Vail Resorts (MTN) falls 2.7% in postmarket trading after its full-year forecasts for Ebitda and net income missed at the midpoint. GlycoMimetics (GLYC) jumps 15% postmarket after announcing that efficacy and safety data from a Phase 1/2 study of uproleselan in patients with acute myeloid leukemia were published in the journal Blood on Sept. 16. VTV Therapeutics (VTVT) surges 30% after company says its HPP737 psoriasis treatment showed favorable safety and tolerability profile in a multiple ascending dose study. Fears about a sooner-than-expected tapering amid signs of stalling U.S. economic growth and concerns over a spillover from China Evergrande’s default had rattled investors in September, putting the benchmark S&P 500 index on course to snap a seven-month winning streak. Elaine Stokes, a portfolio manager at Loomis Sayles & Co., told Bloomberg Television, adding that “what they did is tell us that they feel really good about the economy.” While the bond selloff vindicated Treasury bears who argue yields are too low to reflect fundamentals, others see limits to how high they can go. “We’d expected bond yields to go higher, given the macro situation where growth is still very strong,” Sylvia Sheng, global multi-asset strategist with JPMorgan Asset Management, said on Bloomberg Television. “But we do stress that is a modest view, because we think that upside to yields is still limited from here given that central banks including the Fed are still buying bonds.” Still, Wall Street’s main indexes rallied in the past two session and are set for small weekly gains. European equities dipped at the open but trade off worst levels, with the Euro Stoxx 50 sliding as much as 1.1% before climbing off the lows. France's CAC underperformed at the margin. Retail, financial services are the weakest performers. EQT AB, Europe’s biggest listed private equity firm, fell as much as 8.1% after Sweden’s financial watchdog opened an investigation into suspected market abuse. Here are some of the other biggest European movers today: SMCP shares surge as much as 9.9%, advancing for a 9th session in 10, amid continued hopes the financial troubles of its top shareholder will ultimately lead to a sale TeamViewer climbs much as 4.2% after Bankhaus Metzler initiated coverage with a buy rating, citing the company’s above-market growth AstraZeneca gains as much as 3.6% after its Lynparza drug met the primary endpoint in a prostate cancer trial Darktrace drops as much as 9.2%, paring the stock’s rally over the past few weeks, as a technical pattern triggered a sell signal Adidas and Puma fall as much as 4% and 2.9%, respectively, after U.S. rival Nike’s “large cut” to FY sales guidance, which Jefferies said would “likely hurt” shares of European peers Earlier in the session, Asian stocks rose for a second day, led by rallies in Japan and Taiwan, following U.S. peers higher amid optimism over the Federal Reserve’s bullish economic outlook and fading concerns over widespread contagion from Evergrande. Stocks were muted in China and Hong Kong. India’s S&P BSE Sensex topped the 60,000 level for the first time on Friday on optimism that speedier vaccinations will improve demand for businesses in Asia’s third-largest economy. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index gained as much as 0.7%, with TSMC and Sony the biggest boosts. That trimmed the regional benchmark’s loss for the week to about 1%. Japan’s Nikkei 225 climbed 2.1%, reopening after a holiday, pushing its advance for September to 7.7%, the best among major global gauges. The Asian regional benchmark pared its gain as Hong Kong stocks fell sharply in late afternoon trading amid continued uncertainty, with Evergrande giving no sign of making an interest payment that was due Thursday. Among key upcoming events is the leadership election for Japan’s ruling party next week, which will likely determine the country’s next prime minister. “Investor concerns over the Evergrande issue have retreated a bit for now,” said Hajime Sakai, chief fund manager at Mito Securities Co. in Tokyo. “But investors will have to keep downside risk in the corner of their minds.” Indian stocks rose, pushing the Sensex above 60,000 for the first time ever. Key gauges fell in Singapore, Malaysia and Australia, while the Thai market was closed for a holiday. Treasuries are higher as U.S. trading day begins after rebounding from weekly lows reached during Asia session, adding to Thursday’s losses. The 10-year yield was down 1bp at ~1.42%, just above the 100-DMA breached on Thursday for the first time in three months; it climbed to 1.449% during Asia session, highest since July 6, and remains 5.2bp higher on the week, its fifth straight weekly increase. Several Fed speakers are slated, first since Wednesday’s FOMC commentary set forth a possible taper timeline.  Bunds and gilts recover off cheapest levels, curves bear steepening. USTs bull steepen, richening 1.5bps from the 10y point out. Peripheral spreads are wider. BTP spreads widen 2-3bps to Bunds. In FX, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index climbed back from a one-week low as concern about possible contagion from Evergrande added to buying of the greenback based on the Federal Reserve tapering timeline signaled on Wednesday. NZD, AUD and CAD sit at the bottom of the G-10 scoreboard. ZAR and TRY are the weakest in EM FX. The pound fell after its rally on Thursday as investors looked ahead to BOE Governor Andrew Bailey’s sPeech next week about a possible interest-rate hike. Traders are betting that in a contest to raise borrowing costs first, the Bank of England will be the runaway winner over the Federal Reserve. The New Zealand and Aussie dollars led declines among Group-of-10 peers. The euro was trading flat, with a week full of events failing “to generate any clear directional move,” said ING analysts Francesco Pesole and Chris Turner. German IFO sentiment indeces will “provide extra indications about the area’s sentiment as  businesses faced a combination of delta variant concerns and lingering supply disruptions”. The Norwegian krone is the best performing currency among G10 peers this week, with Thursday’s announcement from the Norges Bank offering support In commodities, crude futures hold a narrow range up around best levels for the week. WTI stalls near $73.40, Brent near $77.50. Spot gold extends Asia’s gains, adding $12 on the session to trade near $1,755/oz. Base metals are mixed, LME nickel and aluminum drop ~1%, LME tin outperforms with a 2.8% rally. Bitcoin dips after the PBOC says all crypto-related transactions are illegal. Looking to the day ahead now, we’ll hear from Fed Chair Powell, Vice Chair Clarida and the Fed’s Mester, Bowman, George and Bostic, as well as the ECB’s Lane and Elderson, and the BoE’s Tenreyro. Finally, a summit of the Quad Leaders will be held at the White House, including President Biden, and the Prime Ministers of Australia, India and Japan. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures down 0.3% to 4,423.50 STOXX Europe 600 down 0.7% to 464.18 German 10Y yield fell 8.5 bps to -0.236% Euro little changed at $1.1737 MXAP up 0.4% to 201.25 MXAPJ down 0.5% to 643.20 Nikkei up 2.1% to 30,248.81 Topix up 2.3% to 2,090.75 Hang Seng Index down 1.3% to 24,192.16 Shanghai Composite down 0.8% to 3,613.07 Sensex up 0.2% to 60,031.83 Australia S&P/ASX 200 down 0.4% to 7,342.60 Kospi little changed at 3,125.24 Brent Futures up 0.4% to $77.57/bbl Gold spot up 0.7% to $1,755.38 U.S. Dollar Index little changed at 93.14 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg China Evergrande Group’s unusual silence about a dollar-bond interest payment that was due Thursday has put a focus on what might happen during a 30-day grace period. The Reserve Bank of Australia’s inflation target is increasingly out of step with international counterparts and fails to account for structural changes in the country’s economy over the past 30 years, Westpac Banking Corp.’s Bill Evans said. With central banks from Washington to London this week signaling more alarm over faster inflation, the ultra-stimulative path of the euro zone and some of its neighbors appears lonelier than ever. China’s central bank continued to pump liquidity into the financial system on Friday as policy makers sought to avoid contagion stemming from China Evergrande Group spreading to domestic markets. A more detailed look at global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asian equity markets traded mixed with the region failing to fully sustain the impetus from the positive performance across global counterparts after the silence from Evergrande and lack of coupon payments for its offshore bonds, stirred uncertainty for the company. ASX 200 (-0.4%) was negative as underperformance in mining names and real estate overshadowed the advances in tech and resilience in financials from the higher yield environment. Nikkei 225 (+2.1%) was the biggest gainer overnight as it played catch up to the prior day’s recovery on return from the Autumnal Equinox holiday in Japan and with exporters cheering the recent risk-conducive currency flows, while KOSPI (-0.1%) was lacklustre amid the record daily COVID-19 infections and after North Korea deemed that it was premature to declare that the Korean War was over. Hang Seng (-1.2%) and Shanghai Comp. (-0.8%) were indecisive after further liquidity efforts by the PBoC were offset by concerns surrounding Evergrande after the Co. failed to make coupon payments due yesterday for offshore bonds but has a 30-day grace period with the Co. remaining quiet on the issue. Finally, 10yr JGBs were lower on spillover selling from global counterparts including the declines in T-notes as the US 10yr yield breached 1.40% for the first time since early-July with the pressure in bonds also stemming from across the Atlantic following a more hawkish BoE, while the presence of the BoJ in the market today for over JPY 1.3tln of government bonds with 1yr-10yr maturities did very little to spur prices. Top Asian News Rivals for Prime Minister Battle on Social Media: Japan Election Asian Stocks Rise for Second Day, Led by Gains in Japan, Taiwan Hong Kong Stocks Still Wagged by Evergrande Tail Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Tech Index Extends Decline to More Than 2% European equities (Stoxx 600 -0.9%) are trading on the back foot in the final trading session of the week amid further advances in global bond yields and a mixed APAC handover. Overnight, saw gains for the Nikkei 225 of 2.1% with the index aided by favourable currency flows, whilst Chinese markets lagged (Shanghai Comp. -0.8%, Hang Seng -1.6%) with further liquidity efforts by the PBoC offset by concerns surrounding Evergrande after the Co. failed to make coupon payments due yesterday for offshore bonds. As context, despite the losses in Europe today, the Stoxx 600 is still higher by some 1.2% on the week. Stateside, futures are also on a softer footing with the ES down by 0.4% ahead of a busy Fed speaker schedule. Back to Europe, sectors are lower across the board with Retail and Personal & Household Goods lagging peers. The former has been hampered by losses in Adidas (-3.0%) following after hours earnings from Nike (-4.2% pre-market) which saw the Co. cut its revenue guidance amid supply chain woes. AstraZeneca (+2.1%) sits at the top of the FTSE 100 after announcing that the Lynparza PROpel trial met its primary endpoint. Daimler’s (+0.1%) Mercedes-Benz has announced that it will take a 33% stake in a battery cell manufacturing JV with Total and Stellantis. EQT (-6.5%) sits at the foot of the Stoxx 600 after the Swedish FSA announced it will open an investigation into the Co. Top European News EQT Investigated by Sweden’s FSA Over Suspected Market Abuse Gazprom Says Claims of Gas Under-supply to Europe Are ‘Absurd’ German Sept. Ifo Business Confidence 98.8; Est. 99 German Business Index at Five-Month Low in Pre-Election Verdict In FX, the rot seems to have stopped for the Buck in terms of its sharp and marked fall from grace amidst post-FOMC reflection and re-positioning in the financial markets on Thursday. Indeed, the Dollar index has regained some poise to hover above the 93.000 level having recoiled from 93.526 to 92.977 over the course of yesterday’s hectic session that saw the DXY register a marginal new w-t-d high and low at either end of the spectrum. Pre-weekend short covering and consolidation may be giving the Greenback a lift, while the risk backdrop is also less upbeat ahead of a raft of Fed speakers flanking US new home sales data. Elsewhere, the Euro remains relatively sidelined and contained against the Buck with little independent inspiration from the latest German Ifo survey as the business climate deteriorated broadly in line with consensus and current conditions were worse than forecast, but business expectations were better than anticipated. Hence, Eur/Usd is still stuck in a rut and only briefly/fractionally outside 1.1750-00 parameters for the entire week, thus far, as hefty option expiry interest continues to keep the headline pair in check. However, there is significantly less support or gravitational pull at the round number today compared to Thursday as ‘only’ 1.3 bn rolls off vs 4.1 bn, and any upside breach could be capped by 1.1 bn between 1.1765-85. CAD/NZD/AUD - Some payback for the non-US Dollars following their revival, with the Loonie waning from 1.2650+ peaks ahead of Canadian budget balances, though still underpinned by crude as WTI hovers around Usd 73.50/brl and not far from decent option expiries (from 1.2655-50 and 1.2625-30 in 1.4 bn each). Similarly, the Kiwi has faded after climbing to within single digits of 0.7100 in wake of NZ trade data overnight revealing a much wider deficit as exports slowed and imports rose, while the Aussie loses grip of the 0.7300 handle and skirts 1.1 bn option expiries at 0.7275. CHF/GBP/JPY - The Franc is fairly flat and restrained following a dovish SNB policy review that left in lagging somewhat yesterday, with Usd/Chf and Eur/Chf straddling 0.9250 and 1.0850 respectively, in contrast to Sterling that is paring some hawkish BoE momentum, as Cable retreats to retest bids circa 1.3700 and Eur/Gbp bounces from sub-0.8550. Elsewhere, the Yen has not been able to fend off further downside through 110.00 even though Japanese participants have returned to the fray after the Autumn Equinox holiday and reports suggest some COVID-19 restrictions may be lifted in 13 prefectures on a trial basis. SCANDI/EM/PM/CRYPTO - A slight change in the pecking order in Scandi-land as the Nok loses some post-Norges Bank hike impetus and the Sek unwinds a bit of its underperformance, but EM currencies are bearing the brunt of the aforementioned downturn in risk sentiment and firmer Usd, with the Zar hit harder than other as Gold is clings to Usd 1750/oz and Try down to deeper post-CBRT rate cut lows after mixed manufacturing sentiment and cap u readings. Meanwhile, Bitcoin is being shackled by the latest Chinese crackdown on mining and efforts to limit risks from what it describes as unlawful speculative crypto currency trading. In commodities, WTI and Brent are set the conclude the week in the green with gains in excess of 2% for WTI at the time of writing; in-spite of the pressure seen in the complex on Monday and the first-half of Tuesday, where a sub USD 69.50/bbl low was printed. Fresh newsflow has, once again, been limited for the complex and continues to focus on the gas situation. More broadly, no update as of yet on the Evergrande interest payment and by all accounts we appear to have entered the 30-day grace period for this and, assuming catalysts remain slim, updates on this will may well dictate the state-of-play. Schedule wise, the session ahead eyes significant amounts of central bank commentary but from a crude perspective the weekly Baker Hughes rig count will draw attention. On the weather front, Storm Sam has been upgraded to a Hurricane and is expected to rapidly intensify but currently remains someway into the mid-Atlantic. Moving to metals, LME copper is pivoting the unchanged mark after a mixed APAC lead while attention is on Glencore’s CSA copper mine, which it has received an offer for; the site in 2020 produced circa. 46k/T of copper which is typically exported to Asia smelters. Elsewhere, spot gold and silver are firmer but have been very contained and remain well-within overnight ranges thus far. Which sees the yellow metal holding just above the USD 1750/oz mark after a brief foray below the level after the US-close. US Event Calendar 10am: Aug. New Home Sales MoM, est. 1.0%, prior 1.0% 10am: Aug. New Home Sales, est. 715,000, prior 708,000 Central Bank Speakers 8:45am: Fed’s Mester Discusses the Economic Outlook 10am: Powell, Clarida and Bowman Host Fed Listens Event 10:05am: Fed’s George Discusses Economic Outlook 12pm: Fed’s Bostic Discusses Equitable Community Development DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap WFH today is a bonus as it’s time for the annual ritual at home where the latest, sleekest, shiniest iPhone model arrives in the post and i sheepishly try to justify to my wife when I get home why I need an incremental upgrade. This year to save me from the Spanish Inquisition I’m going to intercept the courier and keep quiet. Problem is that such speed at intercepting the delivery will be logistically challenging as I remain on crutches (5 weeks to go) and can’t grip properly with my left hand due to an ongoing trapped nerve. I’m very glad I’m not a racehorse. Although hopefully I can be put out to pasture in front of the Ryder Cup this weekend. The big news of the last 24 hours has been a galloping global yield rise worthy of the finest thoroughbred. A hawkish Fed meeting, with the dots increasing and the end of QE potentially accelerated, didn’t quite have the ability to move markets but the global dam finally broke yesterday with Norway being the highest profile developed country to raise rates this cycle (expected), but more importantly a Bank of England meeting that saw the market reappraise rate hikes. Looking at the specific moves, yields on 10yr Treasuries were up +13.0bps to 1.430% in their biggest daily increase since 25 February, as both higher real rates (+7.9bps) and inflation breakevens (+4.9bps) drove the advance. US 10yr yields had been trading in a c.10bp range for the last month before breaking out higher, though they have been trending higher since dropping as far as 1.17% back in early-August. US 30yr yields rose +13.2bps, which was the biggest one day move in long dated yields since March 17 2020, which was at the onset of the pandemic and just days after the Fed announced it would be starting the current round of QE. The large selloff in US bonds saw the yield curve steepen and the long-end give back roughly half of the FOMC flattening from the day before. The 5y30y curve steepened 3.4bps for a two day move of -3.3bps. However the 2y10y curve steepened +10.5bps, completely reversing the prior day’s flattening (-4.2bps) and leaving the spread at 116bp, the steepest level since first week of July. 10yr gilt yields saw nearly as strong a move (+10.8bps) with those on shorter-dated 2yr gilts (+10.7bps) hitting their highest level (0.386%) since the pandemic began.That came on the back of the BoE’s latest policy decision, which pointed in a hawkish direction, building on the comment in the August statement that “some modest tightening of monetary policy over the forecast period is likely to be necessary” by saying that “some developments during the intervening period appear to have strengthened that case”. The statement pointed out that the rise in gas prices since August represented an upside risks to their inflation projections from next April, and the MPC’s vote also saw 2 members (up from 1 in August) vote to dial back QE. See DB’s Sanjay Raja’s revised rate hike forecasts here. We now expect a 15bps hike in February. The generalised move saw yields in other European countries rise as well, with those on 10yr bunds (+6.6bps), OATs (+6.5bps) and BTPs (+5.7bps) all seeing big moves higher with 10yr bunds seeing their biggest climb since late-February and back to early-July levels as -0.258%. The yield rise didn’t stop equity indices recovering further from Monday’s rout, with the S&P 500 up +1.21% as the index marked its best performance in over 2 months, and its best 2-day performance since May. Despite the mood at the end of the weekend, the S&P now starts Friday in positive territory for the week. The rally yesterday was led by cyclicals for a second straight day with higher commodity prices driving outsized gains for energy (+3.41%) and materials (+1.39%) stocks, and the aforementioned higher yields causing banks (+3.37%) and diversified financials (+2.35%) to outperform. The reopening trade was the other main beneficiary as airlines rose +2.99% and consumer services, which include hotel and cruiseline companies, gained +1.92%. In Europe, the STOXX 600 (+0.93%) witnessed a similarly strong performance, with index led by banks (+2.16%). As a testament to the breadth of yesterday’s rally, the travel and leisure sector (+0.04%) was the worst performing sector on this side of the Atlantic even while registering a small gain and lagging its US counterparts. Before we get onto some of yesterday’s other events, it’s worth noting that this is actually the last EMR before the German election on Sunday, which has long been signposted as one of the more interesting macro events on the 2021 calendar, the results of which will play a key role in not just domestic, but also EU policy. And with Chancellor Merkel stepping down after four terms in office, this means that the country will soon be under new management irrespective of who forms a government afterwards. It’s been a volatile campaign in many respects, with Chancellor Merkel’s CDU/CSU, the Greens and the centre-left SPD all having been in the lead at various points over the last six months. But for the last month Politico’s Poll of Polls has shown the SPD consistently ahead, with their tracker currently putting them on 25%, ahead of the CDU/CSU on 22% and the Greens on 16%. However the latest poll from Forschungsgruppe Wahlen yesterday suggested a tighter race with the SPD at 25, the CDU/CSU at 23% and the Greens at 16.5%. If the actual results are in line with the recent averages, it would certainly mark a sea change in German politics, as it would be the first time that the SPD have won the popular vote since the 2002 election. Furthermore, it would be the CDU/CSU’s worst ever result, and mark the first time in post-war Germany that the two main parties have failed to win a majority of the vote between them, which mirrors the erosion of the traditional big parties in the rest of continental Europe. For the Greens, 15% would be their best ever score, and exceed the 9% they got back in 2017 that left them in 6th place, but it would also be a disappointment relative to their high hopes back in the spring, when they were briefly polling in the mid-20s after Annalena Baerbock was selected as their Chancellor candidate. In terms of when to expect results, the polls close at 17:00 London time, with initial exit polls released immediately afterwards. However, unlike the UK, where a new majority government can immediately come to power the day after the election, the use of proportional representation in Germany means that it could potentially be weeks or months before a new government is formed. Indeed, after the last election in September 2017, it wasn’t until March 2018 that the new grand coalition between the CDU/CSU and the SPD took office, after attempts to reach a “Jamaica” coalition between the CDU/CSU, the FDP and the Greens was unsuccessful. In the meantime, the existing government will act as a caretaker administration. On the policy implications, it will of course depend on what sort of government is actually formed, but our research colleagues in Frankfurt have produced a comprehensive slidepack (link here) running through what the different parties want across a range of policies, and what the likely coalitions would mean for Germany. They also put out another note yesterday (link here) where they point out that there’s still much to play for, with the SPD’s lead inside the margin of error and with an unusually high share of yet undecided voters. Moving on to Asia and markets are mostly higher with the Nikkei (+2.04%), CSI (+0.53%) and India’s Nifty (+0.52%) up while the Hang Seng (-0.03%), Shanghai Comp (-0.07%) and Kospi (-0.10%) have all made small moves lower. Meanwhile, the Evergrande group missed its dollar bond coupon payment yesterday and so far there has been no communication from the group on this. They have a 30-day grace period to make the payment before any event of default can be declared. This follows instructions from China’s Financial regulators yesterday in which they urged the group to take all measures possible to avoid a near-term default on dollar bonds while focusing on completing unfinished properties and repaying individual investors. Yields on Australia and New Zealand’s 10y sovereign bonds are up +14.5bps and +11.3bps respectively this morning after yesterday’s move from their western counterparts. Yields on 10y USTs are also up a further +1.1bps to 1.443%. Elsewhere, futures on the S&P 500 are up +0.04% while those on the Stoxx 50 are down -0.10%. In terms of overnight data, Japan’s August CPI printed at -0.4% yoy (vs. -0.3% yoy expected) while core was unchanged in line with expectations. We also received Japan’s flash PMIs with the services reading at 47.4 (vs. 42.9 last month) while the manufacturing reading came in at 51.2 (vs. 52.7 last month). In pandemic related news, Jiji reported that Japan is planning to conduct trials of easing Covid restrictions, with 13 prefectures indicating they’d like to participate. This is likely contributing to the outperformance of the Nikkei this morning. Back to yesterday now, and one of the main highlights came from the flash PMIs, which showed a continued deceleration in growth momentum across Europe and the US, and also underwhelmed relative to expectations. Running through the headline numbers, the Euro Area composite PMI fell to 56.1 (vs. 58.5 expected), which is the lowest figure since April, as both the manufacturing (58.7 vs 60.3 expected) and services (56.3 vs. 58.5 expected) came in beneath expectations. Over in the US, the composite PMI fell to 54.5 in its 4th consecutive decline, as the index hit its lowest level in a year, while the UK’s composite PMI at 54.1 (vs. 54.6 expected) was the lowest since February when the country was still in a nationwide lockdown. Risk assets seemed unperturbed by the readings, and commodities actually took another leg higher as they rebounded from their losses at the start of the week. The Bloomberg Commodity Spot index rose +1.12% as Brent crude oil (+1.39%) closed at $77.25/bbl, which marked its highest closing level since late 2018, while WTI (+1.07%) rose to $73.30/bbl, so still a bit beneath its recent peak in July. However that is a decent rebound of roughly $11/bbl since its recent low just over a month ago. Elsewhere, gold (-1.44%) took a knock amidst the sharp move higher in yields, while European natural gas prices subsidised for a third day running, with futures now down -8.5% from their intraday peak on Tuesday, although they’re still up by +71.3% since the start of August. US negotiations regarding the upcoming funding bill and raising the debt ceiling are ongoing, with House Speaker Pelosi saying that the former, also called a continuing resolution, will pass “both houses by September 30,” and fund the government through the first part of the fiscal year, starting October 1. Treasury Secretary Yellen has said the US will likely breach the debt ceiling sometime in the next month if Congress does not increase the level, and because Republicans are unwilling to vote to raise the ceiling, Democrats will have to use the once-a-fiscal-year tool of budget reconciliation to do so. However Democrats, are also using that process for the $3.5 trillion dollar economic plan that makes up the bulk of the Biden agenda, and have not been able to get full party support yet. During a joint press conference with Speaker Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Schumer said that Democrats have a “framework” to pay for the Biden Economic agenda, which would imply that the broad outline of a deal was reached between the House, Senate and the White House. However, no specifics were mentioned yesterday. With Democrats looking to vote on the bipartisan infrastructure bill early next week, negotiations today and this weekend on the potential reconciliation package will be vital. Looking at yesterday’s other data, the weekly initial jobless claims from the US for the week through September 18 unexpectedly rose to 351k (vs. 320k expected), which is the second week running they’ve come in above expectations. Separately, the Chicago Fed’s national activity index fell to 0.29 in August (vs. 0.50 expected), and the Kansas City Fed’s manufacturing activity index also fell more than expected to 22 in September (vs. 25 expected). To the day ahead now, and data highlights include the Ifo’s business climate indicator from Germany for September, along with Italian consumer confidence for September and US new home sales for August. From central banks, we’ll hear from Fed Chair Powell, Vice Chair Clarida and the Fed’s Mester, Bowman, George and Bostic, as well as the ECB’s Lane and Elderson, and the BoE’s Tenreyro. Finally, a summit of the Quad Leaders will be held at the White House, including President Biden, and the Prime Ministers of Australia, India and Japan. Tyler Durden Fri, 09/24/2021 - 08:12.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeSep 24th, 2021

Unvaccinated Americans abroad will need a COVID-19 test within 24 hours of flying home from November, rather than the current 3 days, the White House said

Unvaccinated Americans abroad will need to prove they've bought a "viral test" for when they land in the US from November, the White House said. A health care worker tests a traveller at a COVID-19 testing station at LAX airport. Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images Unvaccinated Americans abroad will need a negative COVID-19 test within a day of their return flight from November. They will also need to buy a "viral test" to take when back in the US, the White House said. Currently, returning Americans need a test within 72 hours of flying, regardless of vaccination status. See more stories on Insider's business page. Unvaccinated Americans abroad will have to test negative for COVID-19 within a day of their return flight to the US, rather than within three days, under new rules coming in November, the White House press secretary said Monday.Jen Psaki said in a briefing that unvaccinated Americans flying home would need "proof of a negative test result taken within one day of their departure," as well as proof they have bought a "viral test" to take when they get to the US.The rules would "obviously apply to children as well," she said.Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) rules state that all air passengers coming to the United States, including US citizens and vaccinated people, must have a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours of their flight, or proof that they've recovered from COVID-19 in the past three months.Everyone must be tested three to five days after their return flight, too. Unvaccinated people must also self-quarantine for seven full days even if they test negative - if they don't get tested, they must self-isolate for 10 days. Vaccinated people don't have to self-quarantine if they test negative.Some of the details of the upcoming November rules remain unclear, such as what kind of tests passengers would need to prove they have bought, and whether the new rules apply to partially vaccinated people. Psaki said there were ongoing "discussions" about how the new process would work.About 37% of the US population are unvaccinated, according to Our World in Data. A further 9% are partially vaccinated, according to the data.The CDC has advised against international travel for unvaccinated Americans since January.The announcement came as the White House said it expected to ease the travel ban for vaccinated travelers from Europe and the UK. The ban has been in place since March 14, 2020.Some airlines worldwide have already mandated vaccines for flyers. Alan Joyce, chief executive officer at Qantas, said on September 9 that the airline would only allow vaccinated people to board its flights.It's not yet clear whether the White House will introduce vaccine mandates for domestic flights.Dr. Anthony Fauci, President Biden's chief medical adviser, said Sunday that the Biden administration had "not yet gotten to the point of requiring vaccinations on domestic flights, but everything is on the table.""I would support that if you want to get on a plane and travel with other people then you should be vaccinated," he said. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 24th, 2021

The FAA says airlines must crack down harder on unruly passengers - and is giving them 1 week to respond

The FAA has proposed $1 million in fines for unruly passengers, but flight attendant union leader Sara Nelson asked the US for more protection. PROSPEROUS BAY, SAINT HELENA - OCTOBER 21: An air stewardess waits for the steps to be placed at the aeroplane door on the runway at St Helena airport on October 21, 2017 in Prosperous Bay, Saint Helena. Following the introduction of weekly flights to the island, resident St Helenians, known locally as 'Saints', are preparing for a potential influx of tourists and investment as well as enjoying the possibilities brought by much faster transport links with South Africa. Previously, travel to the island involved travelling for a week by the Royal Mail Ship (RMS) 'Saint Helena' from Cape Town. Saint Helena is a 46 square mile island in the South Atlantic which has been under British control since 1834. Leon Neal/Getty Images The FAA has asked airlines to step up their efforts to curb passenger violence on planes. The FAA has received about 4,000 reports of unruly passenger violence between January and September. Flight attendants union leader Sara Nelson has asked the FAA to take more action to protect workers. See more stories on Insider's business page. The Federal Aviation Administration asked airlines to provide information on their efforts to reduce passenger violence within one week.The FAA met with trade groups representing Delta, American, United, and other airlines on Tuesday regarding the country's passenger violence crisis, Reuters reported. The federal agency reportedly told airlines to "commit to take more action" to stop violence on board."Aviation safety is a collaborative effort," FAA administrator Steve Dickson said in a tweet. "Thank you to [Airlines for America], [Regional Airline Association] and [National Air Carrier Association] for your continued partnership and substantial work to help reduce unruly behavior. Look forward to continuing our work together to protect passengers and crew."-FAA Steve Dickson (@FAA_Steve) September 21, 2021The FAA will hold similar meetings with airport and labor representatives, Reuters reported.The FAA has received about 4,000 reports of unruly passenger violence between January and September 2021. Most of the reports related to passengers refusing to wear a mask.Flight attendants have born the brunt of violence on airlines. One in five flight attendants said they've had a passenger get physically angry with them, according to the industry's largest union.Flight attendants told Insider they've feared for their safety due to the risk of violence on board after many have reported being punched, spat on, and called racial slurs by passengers. Attendants said their mental health has declined due to regular verbal harassment from frustrated passengers.The federal agency has proposed more than $1 million in fines for unruly passengers this year, but flight attendant union leader Sara Nelson asked the FAA and Department of Justice for further protection."It is time to make the FAA 'zero tolerance' policy permanent, the Department of Justice to utilize existing statute to conduct criminal prosecution, and implement a series of actions proposed by our union to keep problems on the ground and respond effectively in the event of incidents," Nelson said in July......»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 21st, 2021

Austin airport traffic remains very curtailed but industry is hopeful for spring rebound

Passenger traffic remain depressed at the start of 2021 at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. But airlines are investing in new flights and sounding hopeful about travel rebounding in 2021......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMar 16th, 2021

How coronavirus "hysteria" is already hitting home for the Charlotte area"s tourism sector

Hotels, airlines and the airport are among many in the $7.4 billion regional tourism sector hurt by travel restrictions and cancellations prompted by fear of spreading the novel coronavirus......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMar 11th, 2020

I paid $70 to access Qantas" lavish lounge at Heathrow airport, and loved it so much that staff had to kick me out

Rachel Hosie/Insider In 2019, Australian airline Qantas made the decision to open up its lounges to passengers of all travel classes and all carriers. This means that provided the lounge isn't too busy, you can buy your way in for as little as $35. Bef.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 2nd, 2020

A faster TSA experience is at hand, Thanksgiving travel data suggests

For several years, airlines have been collaborating with the Transportation Security Administration to improve airport security checkpoints, and the results so far are promising indeed......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsDec 10th, 2019

Airlines expect record travel this Thanksgiving. Here are the biggest trouble spots.

Thanksgiving is a busy travel season, and that means large crowds in airports and potential service interruptions in the air if bad weather strikes at the wrong moment. OAG, the airline and airport data behemoth, did some data crunching and came up w.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 27th, 2019

Airlines expect record travel this Thanksgiving. Dallas, Houston among possible trouble spots

Thanksgiving is a busy travel season, and that means large crowds in airports and potential service interruptions in the air if bad weather strikes at the wrong moment. OAG, the airline and airport data behemoth, did some data crunching and came up with .....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsNov 27th, 2019

Majority of power restored at Oakland airport after everything mysteriously shut off, leaving passengers stuck on planes and stranded sitting on floors

Anda Chu/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images The power went out at Oakland International Airport on Tuesday at about 6:30 p.m. local time, kicking off the busy Thanksgiving travel rush. A full blackout lasted ei.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 27th, 2019

Majority of power restored at Oakland airport after everything mysteriously shut off leaving passengers stuck on planes and stranded sitting on floors

Anda Chu/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images The power went out at Oakland International Airport on Tuesday evening at around 6:30 p.m. local time, kicking off the busy Thanksgiving travel rush. The full blackout lasted.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 27th, 2019

Majority of power restored at Oakland airport after everything mysteriously shut off leaving passengers stuck on planes and stranded sitting on floors in the dark

Anda Chu/Digital First Media/East Bay Times via Getty Images The power went out at Oakland International Airport on Tuesday evening at around 6:30 p.m. local time, kicking off the busy Thanksgiving travel rush. The full blackout lasted.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 27th, 2019