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How to follow the landmark SCOTUS rulings coming out on abortion, climate, immigration, and religion

The Supreme Court still has nine cases to decide on before the term ends in late June or early July, including one that could overturn Roe v. Wade. The U.S. Supreme Court building is seen at sunset in Washington on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images The Supreme Court is releasing major decisions before it wraps up its term. The biggest decision to come involves abortion rights. Here's a guide on how to follow the Supreme Court rulings.  In typical Supreme Court fashion, the nine justices are releasing a slew of monumental rulings before the term wraps up and they recess for the summer.Each year, the nation's highest court reviews around 70 to 80 cases out of a pool of more than 7,000 petitions. The court usually saves the most high-profile, weighty, and politically contentious decisions for the end of the term, eyeing a late June or early July deadline.Just this week, the court handed down major decisions that deal with religion and guns. The court's 6-3 conservative majority, in each of the respective cases, expanded religious freedoms and gun rights.There are still nine cases for the court to issue an opinion on. The most consequential of the bunch — and the biggest challenge of this entire blockbuster term — involves abortion rights. The state of Mississippi has asked the Supreme Court to uphold a ban on abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy and overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide almost 50 years ago. Other significant remaining disputes concern climate, immigration and religion. Here's how to follow the Supreme Court as it issues its final rulings of the term:When are these rulings expected?The homepage of the Supreme Court website has a calendar that marks the days opinions come down. The calendar is frequently updated as the term goes on. The next decision day, according to the calendar, is Friday. However, the court does not preview the cases it's going to issues opinions on. That means it's unknown exactly when these final decisions will be released, but the expectation is before early July. Where can I find the Supreme Court rulings?On decision day, the Supreme Court posts its rulings to its web page titled "Opinions of the Court." Beginning at 10 a.m. ET, court watchers refresh the site to see the latest Supreme Court ruling published. SCOTUSblog, an independent law blog helmed by legal experts, usually hosts a live feed on its website on decision days and posts the rulings in near real-time along with some expert analysis. The court issues rulings in 10-minute intervals. But the court does not announce how many rulings it will release ahead of time. Court watchers have relied on a technique to determine whether the court will hand down more than one ruling in a day — looking for the "R" number.To the left of the opinion is a column titled "R" that lists the chronological number of rulings published that day. When the court posts an opinion without an "R" number, that usually means another opinion is coming. When the "R" number is filled out, that's an indication that it's the final ruling of the day.The "Opinions of the Court" page on the Supreme Court website.Screenshot via Supreme Court websiteHow do I learn more about the case and its ruling? The Supreme Court's website has several pages to find further information about a particular case, its oral arguments, and the legal briefs associated with it. On the opinion page, Supreme Court rulings are available to download and read in full. An opinion typically consists of three main parts: the syllabus, the majority opinion, and concurring and dissenting opinions.The opinion starts with the syllabus, which lays out the facts of the case and summarizes it.Next comes the majority opinion, which is the court's decision in the case. It's authored by one justice, whose name appears at the top of the opinion, and that justice provides an explanation for the court's decision. After that is any concurring opinions, which happens when the justices don't agree on everything. Justices who support the main ruling, but have a different reasoning for their support, usually explain that in a concurring opinion.At the end of the document are any dissenting opinions. This is an opinion written by a justice who does not support the decision and voted against it. In the opinion, the justice explains their disagreement, to which other justices can sign on to. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJun 23rd, 2022

The Supreme Court could shake up the nation with upcoming landmark decisions on abortion, guns and religion

From Roe V. Wade to gun safety, here's a preview of the high-profile cases the Supreme Court will soon decide on as it wraps up a blockbuster term. Activists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty Images The Supreme Court will release a handful of highly anticipated rulings by late June or early July. The decisions concern abortion, guns, religion and other significant issues. The court's conservative majority could drastically shake up American law and life.  As a blockbuster Supreme Court term nears its end, the justices are expected to roll out highly anticipated decisions on abortion, guns, and religion that could drastically shake up American law — and life. The court is set to release two dozen rulings by the end of June or early July before it recesses for summer. A handful of them are high-profile disputes, poised to have dramatic implications and unleash widespread public reaction. Here are those closely followed cases.AbortionThe most consequential case before the nation's highest court is about abortion. Mississippi has asked the justices to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion at the federal level nearly 50 years ago.Last month's leaked draft opinion on the case showed the Supreme Court may side with Mississippi and toss out abortion rights, sending shockwaves through the nation. Chief Justice John Roberts at the time noted that the draft does not represent a final ruling, but court watchers say the conservative majority is likely to take that direction, which would dramatically reshape the law and deepen political divides. At the center of the challenge is a Mississippi law that seeks to ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, contradicting the standard set in Roe, which allows the procedure until around 24 weeks, otherwise known as viability. Mississippi's state law never went into effect as lower courts deemed it unconstitutional. If the Supreme Court reverses abortion rights, Mississippi and a slew of Republican-led states are expected to impose abortion restrictions as they've long sought to do, creating a messy patchwork of laws and enraging reproductive-rights supporters.Parkland survivor and activist David Hogg speaks during a rally outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in a gun rights case that centers on New York's restrictive gun permit law and whether limits the state has placed on carrying a gun in public violate the Second Amendment.AP Photo/Jose Luis MaganaGunsFollowing a recent string of deadly mass shootings across the country, Republican and Democratic lawmakers on Capitol Hill are hammering out legislation to strengthen gun laws after decades of gridlock. At the same time, the Supreme Court is deciding on a momentous case that could loosen gun laws.For over a century, New York has required people who want a license to carry a gun in public to demonstrate a "proper cause," or a special reason, to do so. The Supreme Court is considering whether that rule violates the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms.During oral arguments in November, the conservative justices seemed open to strike down the New York law as unconstitutional — an outcome that would for the first time expand Americans' rights to carry a gun in public. In addition to New York, at least seven other states, representing around 73 million people, have similar concealed-carry licensing rules. Should those laws fall, gun-safety advocates worry that more firearms will be brought into public spaces as gun violence increases nationwide. ReligionThe court's newly expanded 6-3 conservative majority has shown a tendency to protect religious liberties. In two current cases, the conservative justices may once again deliver victories to religious-freedom advocates.One case involves a Maine program that prohibits using taxpayer money to cover tuition fees at private schools that offer religious instruction. The state seeks to maintain a "religiously neutral" public education, in line with the First Amendment that the government should not promote religion.The challengers, two Maine families, say the rule violates their First Amendment rights to exercise religion freely. A Supreme Court decision in their favor could clear the way for state governments to use taxpayer dollars to pay for religious schools, narrowing the separation of church and state, and bolstering the school-choice movement largely propped up by the religious right. The other case concerns a former high school football coach in Washington state who lost his job for praying on the 50-yard line after games. Coach Joseph Kennedy claims the school district violated his First Amendment rights, though the school district argues his conduct pressured children to join in prayer and may be perceived as a government endorsement of religion. Other casesThe court will also issue decisions concerning climate and immigration policy in significant cases that have not attracted as much national attention but have the potential to influence President Joe Biden's domestic agenda.In one dispute, the administration wants to end the controversial Trump-era "Remain in Mexico" policy, which requires asylum seekers at the southern border to wait in Mexico until their applications are processed.Another case deals with the Environmental Protection Agency's ability to regulate greenhouse gases, raising legal questions about the agency's powers. The court's ruling could pose difficulties for the Biden administration to pursue its climate objectives if it decides against the EPA.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 15th, 2022

Live updates: Texas abortion clinic staff describe how patients "begged for help" after Roe v. Wade fell — report

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Olivia Rodrigo calls out SCOTUS justices who voted to overturn Roe v. Wade with a rendition of 'F--- You'Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Glastonbury Festival on Saturday.Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage via Getty ImagesPop star Olivia Rodrigo on Saturday sent a message to the Supreme Court justices responsible for overturning Roe v. Wade, calling them out during her set at the Glastonbury music festival. Rodrigo invited her guest, British singer Lily Allen, on stage and the pair performed Allen's 2009 song, "Fuck You" — but not before Rodrigo named all five SCOTUS justices who helped gut the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America."Today is a very, very special day. This is actually my first Glastonbury," Rodrigo said. "But I'm also equally as heartbroken over what happened in America yesterday." Rodrigo told the crowd that the SCOTUS decision infringed on a woman's ability to secure a safe abortion, which she called a basic human right. Read Full StoryAfter Roe fell, Steve Bannon called for an 'army of the awakened' to 'shatter' DemocratsIn a Gettr post, Steve Bannon urged "patriots" to take advantage of the "Roe momentum" to win the MAGA movement a "massive victory" at the midterm elections.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRight-wing figure Steve Bannon has called for an "army of the awakened" to "shatter" the Democratic party in post-Roe America. Bannon made a post on Gettr on Saturday lauding the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, a controversial decision that has led to abortion being halted in some states.In his post, Bannon called on "the army of the awakened" to rally and capitalize on the verdict. "This is the key take-away for MAGA … the pro-abortion movement is shattered and is now turning in on itself — because for 50 years they didn't have to work— the Courts and Regime Media covered for them — now The Abyss," Bannon wrote."That's the Democratic Party in November— we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shatter it into a million small pieces," Bannon added, referring to the upcoming midterm elections.Read Full StoryTexas abortion clinic staff describe how patients 'begged for help' when Roe v. Wade was overturned: reportA patient at the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services Clinic in San Antonio, Texas, is informed by a staff member on Friday that the clinic can no longer provide her with an abortion.Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesStaff at an abortion clinic in Texas said they had to turn away people seeking abortions away just minutes after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.Speaking to The 19th, an independent news organization, clinic administrator Andrea Gallegos described how she had to turn away a dozen patients waiting in the lobby of the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services clinic in San Antonio, Texas. Gallegos told The 19th that she and the clinic's staff had to tell the people gathered that, because of the ruling, "unfortunately, your geographical location affects your bodily autonomy." Per the outlet, Gallegos described the scene at the clinic as being one of "complete despair," with people screaming, crying, and begging for help.Read Full Story'Full House' star Jodie Sweetin was thrown to the ground by LAPD during freeway protest for abortion rightsJodie Sweetin told People that she was "proud" of those who showed up to protest.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty ImagesLos Angeles Police Department officers shoved Jodie Sweetin onto the ground of a freeway in Los Angeles on Saturday during an abortion rights protest, video shows.The "Full House" and "Fuller House" star, wearing all black with a black backpack, can be seen in a video of the incident with a megaphone in hand when a couple of LAPD officers shove her to the ground. Protesters can be heard yelling "Jodie, you good?" and  "What the f*** is wrong with you guys?"Sweetin is then picked up and the crowd immediately begins to chant "no justice, no peace."Read Full StorySince the Roe ruling a gynecology clinic in Texas has received increased requests for permanent sterilization: 'I sense that they're scared'Protesters march during an abortion-rights rally on June 25, 2022 in Austin, Texas.Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesA women's health clinic in Austin, Texas, has received dozens of requests for permanent sterilizations after Friday's decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that established a constitutional right to an abortion. After the Women's Health Domain closed on Friday evening for the weekend, it received 109 new patient requests, the majority of which were requesting tubal ligation, or permanent sterilization. Read Full StoryThe impact of Kavanaugh's confirmation on the 2018 elections may reveal how the reversal of Roe v. Wade could impact this year's midtermsU.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAs political analysts seek to understand the possible impact of Roe v. Wade being overturned on this year's midterm elections, some suggest that data from 2018 may reveal possible trends. In 2018, following the contentious confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh — who was accused of sexual assault by Christine Ford — 40 Republican US House seats flipped to Democratic candidates. GOP candidates led in polls taken prior to the hearings and went on to lose in November in 27 of those races, indicating increased mobilization among partisan voters following the hearings.  Read Full StoryLindsey Graham said Alito's abortion opinion was correct for distinguishing Roe from same-sex marriage and contraception rulingsRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham.J. Scott Applewhite/APRepublican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said Sunday that Justice Samuel Alito, unlike Justice Clarence Thomas, was correct for saying same-sex marriage and contraception would not be affected by the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In his concurring opinion on the ruling, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for cases regarding contraceptive access, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage.Read Full StoryAOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Live updates: Texas abortion clinic staff describe how patients "begged for help" when after Roe v. Wade fell — report

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Olivia Rodrigo calls out SCOTUS justices who voted to overturn Roe v. Wade with a rendition of 'F--- You'Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Glastonbury Festival on Saturday.Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage via Getty ImagesPop star Olivia Rodrigo on Saturday sent a message to the Supreme Court justices responsible for overturning Roe v. Wade, calling them out during her set at the Glastonbury music festival. Rodrigo invited her guest, British singer Lily Allen, on stage and the pair performed Allen's 2009 song, "Fuck You" — but not before Rodrigo named all five SCOTUS justices who helped gut the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America."Today is a very, very special day. This is actually my first Glastonbury," Rodrigo said. "But I'm also equally as heartbroken over what happened in America yesterday." Rodrigo told the crowd that the SCOTUS decision infringed on a woman's ability to secure a safe abortion, which she called a basic human right. Read Full StoryAfter Roe fell, Steve Bannon called for an 'army of the awakened' to 'shatter' DemocratsIn a Gettr post, Steve Bannon urged "patriots" to take advantage of the "Roe momentum" to win the MAGA movement a "massive victory" at the midterm elections.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRight-wing figure Steve Bannon has called for an "army of the awakened" to "shatter" the Democratic party in post-Roe America. Bannon made a post on Gettr on Saturday lauding the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, a controversial decision that has led to abortion being halted in some states.In his post, Bannon called on "the army of the awakened" to rally and capitalize on the verdict. "This is the key take-away for MAGA … the pro-abortion movement is shattered and is now turning in on itself — because for 50 years they didn't have to work— the Courts and Regime Media covered for them — now The Abyss," Bannon wrote."That's the Democratic Party in November— we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shatter it into a million small pieces," Bannon added, referring to the upcoming midterm elections.Read Full StoryTexas abortion clinic staff describe how patients 'begged for help' when Roe v. Wade was overturned: reportA patient at the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services Clinic in San Antonio, Texas, is informed by a staff member on Friday that the clinic can no longer provide her with an abortion.Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesStaff at an abortion clinic in Texas said they had to turn away people seeking abortions away just minutes after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.Speaking to The 19th, an independent news organization, clinic administrator Andrea Gallegos described how she had to turn away a dozen patients waiting in the lobby of the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services clinic in San Antonio, Texas. Gallegos told The 19th that she and the clinic's staff had to tell the people gathered that, because of the ruling, "unfortunately, your geographical location affects your bodily autonomy." Per the outlet, Gallegos described the scene at the clinic as being one of "complete despair," with people screaming, crying, and begging for help.Read Full Story'Full House' star Jodie Sweetin was thrown to the ground by LAPD during freeway protest for abortion rightsJodie Sweetin told People that she was "proud" of those who showed up to protest.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty ImagesLos Angeles Police Department officers shoved Jodie Sweetin onto the ground of a freeway in Los Angeles on Saturday during an abortion rights protest, video shows.The "Full House" and "Fuller House" star, wearing all black with a black backpack, can be seen in a video of the incident with a megaphone in hand when a couple of LAPD officers shove her to the ground. Protesters can be heard yelling "Jodie, you good?" and  "What the f*** is wrong with you guys?"Sweetin is then picked up and the crowd immediately begins to chant "no justice, no peace."Read Full StorySince the Roe ruling a gynecology clinic in Texas has received increased requests for permanent sterilization: 'I sense that they're scared'Protesters march during an abortion-rights rally on June 25, 2022 in Austin, Texas.Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesA women's health clinic in Austin, Texas, has received dozens of requests for permanent sterilizations after Friday's decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that established a constitutional right to an abortion. After the Women's Health Domain closed on Friday evening for the weekend, it received 109 new patient requests, the majority of which were requesting tubal ligation, or permanent sterilization. Read Full StoryThe impact of Kavanaugh's confirmation on the 2018 elections may reveal how the reversal of Roe v. Wade could impact this year's midtermsU.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAs political analysts seek to understand the possible impact of Roe v. Wade being overturned on this year's midterm elections, some suggest that data from 2018 may reveal possible trends. In 2018, following the contentious confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh — who was accused of sexual assault by Christine Ford — 40 Republican US House seats flipped to Democratic candidates. GOP candidates led in polls taken prior to the hearings and went on to lose in November in 27 of those races, indicating increased mobilization among partisan voters following the hearings.  Read Full StoryLindsey Graham said Alito's abortion opinion was correct for distinguishing Roe from same-sex marriage and contraception rulingsRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham.J. Scott Applewhite/APRepublican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said Sunday that Justice Samuel Alito, unlike Justice Clarence Thomas, was correct for saying same-sex marriage and contraception would not be affected by the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In his concurring opinion on the ruling, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for cases regarding contraceptive access, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage.Read Full StoryAOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Live updates: Democrats condemn a "crisis of legitimacy" for Supreme Court; Trump praises justices for "courage" amid Roe v. Wade reversal

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. AOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 26th, 2022

Live updates: Democrats call on Biden to declare "a public health emergency" after Roe v. Wade reversal

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights demonstrators hold signs outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., United States on June 24, 2022.Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after Friday's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Senators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 25th, 2022

Live updates: Here are the states where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights demonstrators hold signs outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., United States on June 24, 2022.Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after Friday's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. This map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 24th, 2022

Trump"s Supreme Court picks Amy Coney Barrett and Brett Kavanaugh could decide the fate of Roe v. Wade

"If we're trying to figure out who's going to cast the deciding vote, it's going to be one of them," a legal scholar told Insider. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh; Supreme Court Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett.Chip Somodevilla; Sarah Silbiger via Getty Images The Supreme Court on Wednesday will hear the biggest challenge to abortion rights in decades. Legal scholars told Insider that Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett are the ones to watch. Either of the two justices could cast the deciding vote to overturn or uphold Roe v. Wade, they said. Mississippi on Wednesday will ask the Supreme Court to overrule Roe v. Wade, the law of the land for nearly 50 years. Nine justices will hear arguments on whether to preserve or undo abortion rights, but experts say Americans should pay close attention to two members of the court: Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett.Legal scholars anticipate that either one of them could have an outsize impact in the case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization and determine the fate of reproductive rights in the United States."If we're trying to figure out who's going to cast the deciding vote, it's going to be one of them," Mary Ziegler, a law professor at Florida State University and an abortion historian, told Insider.The closely followed case centers on a 2018 Mississippi law that bans abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, challenging the standard held in Roe, which declared that states cannot prohibit abortion before roughly 24 weeks. After the law was passed, the state's sole abortion provider, Jackson Women's Health Organization, sued Mississippi, and lower courts struck down the law as unconstitutional.But Thomas Dobbs, state health officer for the Mississippi Department of Health, appealed to the Supreme Court, which is now stacked with a 6-3 conservative majority. The Republican-led state contends that Roe and a subsequent 1992 landmark decision that upheld the ruling, Planned Parenthood v. Casey, are "egregiously wrong" and has urged the Supreme Court to overturn them. The Supreme Court is poised to deliver a ruling on the case by next June, and a combination of guesswork and simple math could leave Kavanaugh and Barrett — both appointed to the bench by former President Donald Trump — holding all the cards, according to legal scholars.How the numbers stack upFive votes are required for a majority Supreme Court ruling. The court's three liberals, Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, have long voted to protect abortion rights and are expected to do so again in the Mississippi case. "It's very clear where Justice Kagan, Justice Sotomayor, and Justice Breyer are," I. Glenn Cohen, a professor at Harvard Law School, told Insider. "They are going to vote to strike down the Mississippi law as unconstitutional … They don't want to reverse Roe v. Wade. This has been consistent in their jurisprudence."Of the bench's conservative wing, Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito have explicitly disapproved of the court's decades-long precedent. Thomas, often described as the court's most conservative member, said Roe was wrongly decided in the Casey ruling almost 30 years ago."Justice Thomas and Justice Alito are pretty clear from their prior votes that they are on the side of thinking that the right to abortion in the Constitution is wrong. It doesn't exist," Cohen said. "So their votes are pretty set."Justice Neil Gorsuch, whom Trump appointed in 2017 to replace the late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, has a sparse judicial record on the issue. But, in his few years on the high court, he's sided with abortion restrictions and leans heavily conservative, leading experts to project that he'll likely be in favor of Mississippi's law.By this calculation, three justices are inclined to leave Roe in place and three justices are open to upending it.Chief Justice John Roberts.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThen comes Chief Justice John Roberts, who leans more toward the center than his conservative colleagues. Still, in 2016, he sided with a Texas law that the court's majority voted against, arguing that it imposed an undue burden on abortion rights. More recently, he ruled against the court's decision to uphold an "unprecedented" law in Texas that bans abortion after just six weeks of pregnancy. But Roberts tends to be a believer in stare decisis, a legal principle that translates to sticking with precedent. He is also widely considered an institutionalist, protective of the court's reputation and wary of perceptions that it is partisan or politicized. Legal scholars say it's difficult to predict what side of the Mississippi case he'll land on, but either way, "he's no longer the swing vote" because of Barrett's addition to the court last year, Ziegler told Insider."We'd still be watching for that, essentially to see if he can persuade Kavanaugh and Barrett to come along with him. But he doesn't actually have control. It's more just the possibility that he'll be able to convince his colleagues. He's a lot less powerful than he was," Ziegler said.Roberts could join the liberal justices to block Mississippi's law, but he could still be outvoted 5-4 by the conservative majority, Mark Kende, a professor at Drake University Law School, told Insider. That scenario could be "a little bit of a judicial nightmare" for Roberts, he added. "What gets really interesting," Kende said, is that the crucial vote could then come down to Barrett and Kavanaugh.Kavanaugh and Barrett on abortionThe possible threat to abortion rights hung over Kavanaugh's and Barrett's confirmation hearings after Trump campaigned in 2016 on picking "pro-life" nominees for the Supreme Court.Democrats scrutinized Kavanaugh for his 2017 decision on the DC federal appeals court to postpone an abortion sought by a 17-year-old immigrant held in federal custody, and a 2003 memo he wrote as a Bush administration lawyer speculating whether all legal scholars agreed that Roe was "settled law of the land."President Donald Trump, right, smiles as he stands with Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, left, before a ceremonial swearing in the East Room of the White House on Oct. 8, 2018.Susan Walsh/AP PhotoKavanaugh attempted to tread lightly vis a vis abortion during his confirmation hearing, calling Roe "an important precedent of the Supreme Court" that's "been reaffirmed many times," and describing Casey as "precedent on precedent."Once Trump nominated Barrett in September 2020 to succeed the late liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, abortion-rights supporters criticized her past comments on abortion rights.In 2006, Barrett, then-a law professor at Notre Dame University, signed on to an advertisement by an anti-abortion group to "oppose abortion on demand and defend the right to life from fertilization to natural death." Ten years later, Barrett spoke publicly about abortion at an event, saying Roe's "core holding that women have a right to an abortion" isn't likely to change but questions exist about late-term abortions and restrictions on abortion providers. In her confirmation hearing, Barrett was vague about her position on Roe. "All nominees are united in their belief that what they think about a precedent should not bear on how they decide cases," she said at the time."These justices were appointed with the abortion question looming very strongly in the background," Cohen told Insider. "My sense is that it's very much on people's minds as to these justices' legacies, and I'm sure very much on these justices' minds as to their legacies."Barrett has so far only voted once on abortion, when she ruled in favor of keeping Texas' recent six-week ban in place. That case concerns a technical question related to the law's unique mechanism that calls on private citizens rather than state officials to enforce the law. The justices did not review the constitutionality of the anti-abortion law.However, she appeared skeptical of the law during the case's arguments earlier this month. Kavanaugh, too, seemed reluctant to embrace Texas' position, although he previously voted to temporarily maintain the law. "There's a loophole that's been exploited here or used here," Kavanaugh said of the Texas law. "It could be free speech rights. It could be free exercise-of-religion rights. It could be Second Amendment rights."Cornell Law School professor Sherry Colb, for her part, said the justices' questioning did not indicate any support for abortion rights and pointed to Kavanaugh's comments as evidence."They were concerned about gun rights and about religious freedom," she said. "It had nothing to do with abortion, and they were simply asking those questions because of how the Texas law was written expressly to avoid judicial review."Justice Amy Coney Barrett.Jim Lo Scalzo - Pool/Getty Images'Crystal ball-type speculation'Despite widespread concern over what their appointments would mean for the Supreme Court, Kavanaugh and Barrett have steered toward the middle in recent rulings. They voted to uphold Obamacare against a GOP-backed challenge. In a religious liberty ruling, they stopped short of overturning a previous decision that fellow conservatives Alito, Thomas, and Gorsuch argued was necessary. And they also have signaled some hesitancy to move the law quickly, opting for smaller decisions rather than sweeping ones. Kavanaugh and Barrett are "somewhat cautious justices who have indicated at times that they want to go along with Roberts," Kende said, and "have shown some reluctance to go as far, for example, as Alito and Thomas."Consequently, legal scholars are divided on how the two justices might vote in the Mississippi abortion challenge."It's quite clear that Justice Thomas and Justice Alito are of the view that they'll write an opinion that says Roe v. Wade is not good law, it was never good law. There's no constitutional right here," Cohen said. "It's less clear whether Coney Barrett and Kavanaugh are as interested in writing an opinion like that at this stage of their career, but who knows."Josh Blackman, a professor at the South Texas College of Law, said the newest members of the court are likely to follow Roberts' lead on the Mississippi abortion law. He described the court as a 3-3-3 split, made up of liberals Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan, conservatives Thomas, Alito, and Gorsuch, and moderates Roberts, Kavanaugh, and Barrett."The three moderates will ride together, altogether. They'll do it jointly," Blackman said, but added that the direction they could vote in remains uncertain."I think they're motivated by things that aren't entirely law and that makes them unpredictable. If this was a question of law, then they'd be overruling in five seconds because they think that Roe is wrong. I think they're affected by other factors that are not law, by public perception, by the court's reputation, by whatever you want to call it," he said.Reading the tea leaves of the Supreme Court is a tricky endeavor, experts said. The justices' judicial backgrounds and their questioning on Wednesday could reveal some of their thinking, but it's more of a "crystal ball-type speculation," according to Kende."Candidly, I think the court is going to divide," he said, warning that "predicting the court is always a bit risky."But for Colb, the votes that Barrett and Kavanaugh will cast are crystal clear."Both of them are opposed to Roe. They won't say it … but there's no mystery," she told Insider. "It's just a question of whether it's going to be 5-4 or 6-3."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytDec 1st, 2021

What "packing" the Supreme Court means — and why it"s unlikely to happen to save Roe v. Wade

Activists are renewing calls to expand the Supreme Court in response to its decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Activists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand Justice Activists are renewing calls to expand the Supreme Court in response to its decision overturning Roe v. Wade. Court expansion is unlikely to happen given President Joe Biden's opposition and a lack of congressional support for the idea. The court currently holds a 6-3 conservative majority.  The Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority. But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The monumental ruling means abortion is no longer a constitutional right, giving states the authority to ban the procedure. Since then, a slew of Republican-led states — with more to follow — have already enacted restrictions on abortions, impacting nearly half of the country. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court. "We can do it! We can at least TRY," Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, a progressive Democrat, tweeted this week along with a list of possible responses to the reversal of abortion rights. —Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) June 25, 2022 There is nothing in the Constitution about the number of justices on the Supreme Court. Congress has the power to decide its size. Since 1869, that number has been nine. Before that, it historically ranged between five and 10 justices. The last major attempt to expand the court, under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, failed in Congress.Any effort to increase the court's size now is nearly guaranteed to fail as well. That's largely because Biden, who's previously rejected the idea, remains against it."That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters over the weekend.Besides Biden, congressional Democrats simply do not have enough support to pass a bill that would add more justices to the court. The party only holds a slim majority in the Senate, which requires 60 votes to overcome the filibuster and advance legislation. And Democratic Sens. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona and Joe Manchin of West Virginia have long been against eliminating the filibuster to push through the party's priorities. Democratic leaders, such as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, have also been reluctant to embrace court expansion. She dismissed a bill introduced last year by a group of Democratic lawmakers that would have raised the court's size to 13 justices, but said the idea isn't completely off the table for the future. In response to the Supreme Court's decision on Friday, Pelosi focused the discussion on legislation that would restore abortion rights rather than expand the court. She called on voters to elect Democrats this November so they can push for such a bill in Congress. Biden urged for the same in a speech on Friday. Liberal advocates have previously proposed court expansion in a bid to exert some judicial control as the Supreme Court's makeup became more conservative. President Donald Trump's appointment of three justices in his one term prompted outbursts on the left that the court's newly expanded 6-3 conservative majority could threaten a number of constitutional rights, including abortion. To prevent that scenario, some Democrats floated the idea of adding more seats to the bench. Republicans, widely opposed to such a move, repeatedly characterized it as "court packing," attempting to cast the effort as a partisan power-grab of the Supreme Court.Biden last year created a bipartisan commission to study court reforms in response to widespread pressure from members of his party to look into this issue. The commissioners examined increasing the court's size, setting term limits for justices, and other issues, providing an analysis but not recommendations for what the White House should consider. The report, released in December, largely flew under the radar and Biden's position on court expansion has stood.Although most Americans disagree with the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade, a majority of the country does not want more justices on the bench, according to a national poll by NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist released Monday.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

What "packing the court" means — and why it"s unlikely to happen to save Roe v. Wade

Activists are renewing calls to expand the Supreme Court in response to its decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Activists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand Justice Activists are renewing calls to expand the Supreme Court in response to its decision overturning Roe v. Wade. Court expansion is unlikely to happen given President Joe Biden's opposition and a lack of congressional support for the idea. The court currently holds a 6-3 conservative majority.  The Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority. But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The monumental ruling means abortion is no longer a constitutional right, giving states the authority to ban the procedure. Since then, a slew of Republican-led states — with more to follow — have already enacted restrictions on abortions, impacting nearly half of the country. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court. "We can do it! We can at least TRY," Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, a progressive Democrat, tweeted this week along with a list of possible responses to the reversal of abortion rights. —Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) June 25, 2022 There is nothing in the Constitution about the number of justices on the Supreme Court. Congress has the power to decide its size. Since 1869, that number has been nine. Before that, it historically ranged between five and 10 justices. The last major attempt to expand the court, under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, failed in Congress.Any effort to increase the court's size now is nearly guaranteed to fail as well. That's largely because Biden, who's previously rejected the idea, remains against it."That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre told reporters over the weekend.Besides Biden, congressional Democrats simply do not have enough support to pass a bill that would add more justices to the court. The party only holds a slim majority in the Senate, which requires 60 votes to overcome the filibuster and advance legislation. And Democratic Sens. Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona and Joe Manchin of West Virginia have long been against eliminating the filibuster to push through the party's priorities. Democratic leaders, such as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, have also been reluctant to embrace court expansion. She dismissed a bill introduced last year by a group of Democratic lawmakers that would have raised the court's size to 13 justices, but said the idea isn't completely off the table for the future. In response to the Supreme Court's decision on Friday, Pelosi focused the discussion on legislation that would restore abortion rights rather than expand the court. She called on voters to elect Democrats this November so they can push for such a bill in Congress. Biden urged for the same in a speech on Friday. Liberal advocates have previously proposed court expansion in a bid to exert some judicial control as the Supreme Court's makeup became more conservative. President Donald Trump's appointment of three justices in his one term prompted outbursts on the left that the court's newly expanded 6-3 conservative majority could threaten a number of constitutional rights, including abortion. To prevent that scenario, some Democrats floated the idea of adding more seats to the bench. Republicans, widely opposed to such a move, repeatedly characterized it as "court packing," attempting to cast the effort as a partisan power-grab of the Supreme Court.Biden last year created a bipartisan commission to study court reforms in response to widespread pressure from members of his party to look into this issue. The commissioners examined increasing the court's size, setting term limits for justices, and other issues, providing an analysis but not recommendations for what the White House should consider. The report, released in December, largely flew under the radar and Biden's position on court expansion has stood.Although most Americans disagree with the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade, a majority of the country does not want more justices on the bench, according to a national poll by NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist released Monday.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

A step-by-step guide for moving to Canada and becoming a citizen there

Becoming a Canadian citizen requires language, history, and physical residency requirements. Here are the factors you need to consider. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau assumed office on November 4, 2015.Chris Wattie/Reuters Some Americans are talking about moving to Canada after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. The Canadian government has a handy tool that helps you figure out if you're eligible to become a permanent resident. Becoming a Canadian citizen is difficult with many factors to consider, such as language, history, and residency rules.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. After the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, some Americans are considering moving to CanadaGoogle searches for "How to move to Canada from US" spiked by more than 850% following the decision that overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550%.If the Supreme Court's ruling has you thinking about making a move to the US's northern neighbor, it is theoretically possible — but certainly not easy — to move to Canada.Becoming a Canadian citizen is tough. You need to first be a permanent resident and have lived in Canada for three out of the last five years, among other requirements.For those who actually want to head up north, here's how you become a permanent resident and citizen of Canada.Preface: Make sure you're not already a Canadian citizen.The quiz asks about your parents, where you were born, your marriage status, and more.Shaun Best/ReutersBefore you go through the hassle of applying for citizenship or permanent residency, take a short quiz to see if you may already be Canadian.The government outlines several caveats for being a citizen even if you weren't born there, many of which depend on your parents' citizenship. Maybe you secretly inherited their status at some point along the way. Be at least 18 years old.Rules for minors are more stringent.John Moore/GettyIf you're not a legal adult, you've got an uphill climb ahead of you.To become a citizen, minors need their parent or legal guardian to fill out the application for them, they need to already be permanent residents in Canada, and the parent must either be a citizen or apply to become one at the same time. Become a permanent resident.There are approximately 321,000 permanent residents residing in Canada.Malcolm HasmanThe Canadian government created a handy tool to help you figure out if you're eligible to be a permanent resident, which is required to become a Canadian citizen. There are several avenues available to becoming a permanent resident. For example, you can apply through a specific province, go down a special entrepreneur route, get help from a family member or spouse who lives in Canada or go through Quebec, which has special immigration requirements.Permanent residents are entitled to healthcare coverage and can work, study, and travel anywhere in Canada. You just can't vote, run for office, or hold some jobs with top security clearance.If you're a skilled worker, consider Canada's Express Entry system.Canada launched its Express Entry system in 2015.Thomson ReutersCanada has a fast-track system for immigration called Express Entry. It's how skilled workers transition into a new role in the country.All applicants into Express Entry are given specific scores based on their talents and job prospects and then ranked with other applicants. Those at the top of the rankings are invited to become permanent residents.Declare your intent to reside.Someone who resides in Canada temporarily, like a student or foreign worker, is not a permanent resident.Justin Sullivan / Getty ImagesIf you're invited to become a permanent resident, you must confirm your plans to stay Canadian. If you don't spend that much time within the borders, you could lose your permanent residence status and your chance to become a citizen.If you don't live in Canada, you must work outside Canada as a public official known as a Crown Servant or live abroad with certain family members who are Crown Servants.Spend enough time physically present in Canada.You have to prove that you've been in the country for a long enough period of time in order to become a citizen.Jesse33 / Shutterstock.comPermanent residents don't always become citizens. The bar for citizenship is higher.If you're living in Canada, you must have been a permanent resident and physically present in Canada for at least 1,095 days during the five years right before the date you sign your application. In other words, your time in Canada needs to stay relatively consistent.Provide your income tax filing.Canadian officials require applicants to submit a few financial documents.Canadian Finance BlogLike the residence requirement, you must be able to provide three years' worth of tax returns in the five-year period leading up to the date of your application.Basically, they want to see if your job is legit.Speak English or French.As long as you're proficient in English or French, this step should not be an issue.ShutterStockAlong with dozens of other countries, Canada has two official languages: English and French.To become a citizen, you need to know just one. You don't need to be fluent, just conversational enough to make small talk, give directions, use basic grammar, and know your vocab well enough to describe yourself.You'll send along written documents with your application, but a citizenship officer will make the final call whether your English or French is up to snuff.Know a thing or two about Canada.There's a Canadian culture test, so study up.Wikimedia CommonsYou should probably brush up on your Canadian history anyway, but the government issues a formal quiz to applicants on the history, values, institutions, and symbols of Canada.You take the test if you're between 16 and 64 years old. Typically, it's a written test, but the citizenship officer may also ask questions orally.There are no real surprises. Everything you'd need to know can be found here: Discover Canada: The Rights and Responsibilities of Citizenship.Know why your application might get denied.It takes several months to hear back about your application.Reuters/Carlo AllegriThere are a number of reasons your past may prohibit you from becoming a Canadian citizen.For instance, the government looks down upon granting citizenship to people who have committed a crime within four years of submitting their application or are on trial for a crime.Invest in durable clothes for your local climate.Canada is a big place, so make sure you know what type of clothes to bring!Getty/Jan HetfleischCanada is the second-largest country on earth by total area, behind Russia. As such, there is no singular "Canadian climate," even if people may think it's just cold most of the time.Depending on how close you live to the British Columbian coast, for example, spring can begin as early as February and summer temperatures can rise into the 90s.So if you're looking for places to take up permanent residence, research what the weather's like. You won't waste money or space buying unnecessary items.Take advantage of the customs of your new life.From great hockey to maple syrup, there's a lot of culture in Canada to absorb.Bruce Bennett/Getty ImagesNow that you've left your home country behind, embrace what makes Canada unique.Many Canadians express deep fondness for Tim Hortons, quirky slang, celebrity ambassadors, and hockey.No one will expect you to dive headfirst into this new world, but if you want to become a genuine citizen, formal requirements are only the start.Chris Weller contributed to an earlier version of this post. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 25th, 2022

New Republican Bill Would Criminalize Supreme Court Leaks

New Republican Bill Would Criminalize Supreme Court Leaks Authored by Matthew Vadum via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), A group of 12 House Republicans introduced a bill in Congress this week that would make knowingly sharing confidential information from the Supreme Court a crime punishable by a fine or as many as five years in prison. A double layer of barricades surrounds the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on May 10, 2022. (Jackson Elliott/The Epoch Times) The legislation comes a month after a leaked draft majority opinion indicated the Supreme Court was preparing to overturn Roe v. Wade, the seminal 1973 precedent that federalized abortion policy, overriding the states and making the procedure lawful throughout the entire United States. The landmark 7-2 decision held that a woman’s right to an abortion was safeguarded by her right to privacy under the Fourteenth Amendment. Politico published the draft decision written by Justice Samuel Alito in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization on May 2. Left-wing critics were outraged that the high court is considering overturning Roe v. Wade, while conservatives were angered that the leak, perpetrated by a person or persons still unknown, appeared calculated to inflame public opinion and persuade the justices to reconsider reversing the 49-year-old abortion precedent. Some have argued the unprecedented leak of the full opinion is a kind of terrorist attack on the judicial branch of the federal government. The proposed Leaker Accountability Act is a three-page bill (pdf) whose principal sponsor is House Republican Conference vice chairman Mike Johnson (R-La.). GOP Conference Chair Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.) is also a sponsor. The bill was introduced May 31. “The unauthorized leak of the draft opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health constitutes a grave breach of judicial ethics and a deliberate attack on the independence of the Supreme Court,” Johnson said in a statement. “This legislation is now, unfortunately, a necessary step to discourage future such attempts to intimidate justices during their deliberative process and restore independence to the Court so that it can ensure the American people are afforded equal and impartial justice under the law,” Johnson said. “The institution of the court has been damaged and we must do what we can to try to repair it.” The bill states that any officer or employee of the Supreme Court who is engaged in “knowingly publishing, divulging, disclosing, or making known in any manner or to any extent not authorized by law any confidential information coming to that officer or employee in the course of the employment or official duties of that officer or employee shall be imprisoned not more than 5 years or fined … or both.” The measure defines confidential information as including “internal notes on cases heard by the Supreme Court, any communication between a Justice of the Supreme Court and an employee or officer of the Supreme Court or communication between officers and employees of the Supreme Court on a matter pending before the Supreme Court, a draft opinion, a final opinion prior to the date on which such opinion is released to the public, personal information of a Justice of the Supreme Court that is not otherwise legally available to the public, and any other information designated to be confidential by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.” Supreme Court law clerks, who assist the court’s nine justices, have been asked by court investigators to produce personal cellphone records and swear affidavits. Some clerks are reportedly considering retaining outside legal counsel to safeguard their legal rights, according to CNN. A legal expert consulted by The Epoch Times said the proposed Leaker Accountability Act seems like a good idea. Curt Levey, president of the Committee for Justice, said in an interview that federal laws already prevent employees in the government’s executive branch from leaking certain information. “Why should that not apply to [Supreme Court] clerks as well?” The leak has “shaken the collegiality of the court and trust in the court,” Levey said. This bill “could definitely restore that.” “I would definitely think [the bill is] a step in the right direction,” Levey said, adding he hoped it would enjoy bipartisan support. “I know that there’s plenty of people on the left who consider the leaker to be a hero,” but they should realize “the next leak could come from a conservative clerk, assuming this one came from a clerk.” “Everyone really does have a stake in the legitimacy of the Supreme Court. I know the left doesn’t feel that way, but just think about all the Supreme Court rulings that the left cherishes that may not have been adhered to if people didn’t consider the Supreme Court legitimate.” “This is not a conservative or liberal bill,” Levey said. “It’s common sense.” Levey’s nonprofit describes itself as “devoted to restoring the Founders’ vision of a federal judiciary governed by the rule of law and anchored by the Constitution.” It is unclear when the Supreme Court will release its decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. At issue is Mississippi’s Gestational Age Act, which allows abortions after 15 weeks’ gestation only for medical emergencies or severe fetal abnormality. Citing Roe v. Wade, lower courts held that the state statute was unconstitutional. Oral arguments in the Dobbs case were heard by the Supreme Court on Dec. 1, 2021. Tyler Durden Fri, 06/03/2022 - 18:20.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 3rd, 2022

SafeGraph said it will stop selling location data about Planned Parenthoods to avoid the "potential misuse of its data" after Roe decision leak

SafeGraph's announcement follows a Motherboard report which exposed that the data could be used to potentially track who visits Planned Parenthood. The outside of the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis as seen on Tuesday, March 8, 2022. The clinic is the last location in the state of Missouri performing abortions.Neeta Satam for The Washington Post via Getty Images SafeGraph announced Wednesday it would stop selling data related to family planning centers, like Planned Parenthood locations. SafeGraph is self-serve and offers anyone the opportunity to purchase its aggregated data. The decision followed the leaked Supreme Court opinion that suggests it's poised to overturn Roe v. Wade. The data broker SafeGraph on Wednesday said it stopped offering for sale data related to family planning centers, including Planned Parenthood locations, following the leaked Supreme Court opinion that indicated the court was poised to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. "In light of potential federal changes in family planning access, we're removing Patterns data for locations classified as NAICS code 621410 ('Family Planning Centers') from our self-serve "shop" and API to curtail any potential misuse of its data" Auren Hoffman, the CEO of SafeGraph said in a blog post on Wednesday.  The announcement followed a Tuesday report from VICE's Motherboard, which exposed that the data broker could be used to purchase information on the locations of people who used Planned Parenthood services.SafeGraph had labeled Planned Parenthood as a "brand" that it tracked, according to Motherboard. Planned Parenthood did not return Insider's request for comment on Wednesday. Politico on Monday published a leaked draft opinion written in February by Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito. The opinion, which had the support of the majority of the court, according to the report, would overturn the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision and its 1992 decision counterpart, Casey v. Planned Parenthood. The two decisions have cemented the right to abortion in the US for decades. Nearly two dozen states already have  laws in place that would outlaw or limit access abortion if the Supreme Court overturned its previous rulings.Data brokers, like SafeGraph, are companies that collect or otherwise aggregate data about people and businesses and sell it. According to Motherboard, it was possible for anyone to purchase aggregated location data from SafeGraph that indicated how many people were visiting family planning centers, how long they were there, where they were before they came there, and where they went after they left.Earlier this week, the outlet said it had purchased data about a week's worth of activity at over 600 Planned Parenthood locations for $160. SafeGraph allows users to purchase data in a self-serve capacity, meaning the company does not verify who is purchasing the location data and for what purpose, according to the report.That data is aggregated from typical apps people have installed on their phones, according to Motherboard. In addition to being aggregated, the data is also anonymized, according to SafeGraph. "We have had many academics that have used this type of data for really good purposes," Hoffman said on Wednesday in the blog post. "Taking away this data will impact many academics that want to study this topic (like understanding the impact of legislation on family planning visits)." Hoffman said the company made the decision to suspend sales for family planning centers "given the current climate." Other data available for purchase from SafeGraph includes aggregated transaction data that indicates how much money people spend at certain businesses, the Motherboard report said.Hoffman said the company did not have "any indication" that data from SafeGraph had been "used for bad purposes." The company says it does not sell data about individuals, though it does sell some device-specific data, per Motherboard."SafeGraph has always committed to the highest level of privacy practices ensuring individual privacy is NEVER compromised," Hoffman wrote. "We use differential privacy to ensure anonymity." SafeGraph said it would still provide data about the locations and operating hours of family planning centers because that data is already publicly available.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 4th, 2022

Sen. Marco Rubio"s new bill wouldn"t let employers deduct travel expenses that pay for abortion or trans care for minors

The No Tax Breaks for Radical Corporate Activism Act comes as companies such as Disney and Amazon have spoken out on social issues. Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican of Florida, speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference at The Rosen Shingle Creek on February 25, 2022 in Orlando, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty Images The Supreme Court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade, according to a leaked draft. In response, some large corporations said they'd pay for workers' abortion travel costs. Rubio has introduced a bill to prevent companies from deducting the travel in their taxes.  Employers wouldn't be allowed to deduct travel expenses for their workers' abortions under a bill Sen. Marco Rubio introduced Wednesday. The Florida Republican's bill, the No Tax Breaks for Radical Corporate Activism Act, comes as several major corporations including Citi, Apple, Yelp, Lyft, Levi's, and Amazon announced they'd reimburse travel costs for employees to access abortion if they live in a state where it becomes illegal.The bill would also extend to transgender care for minors as Disney is considering ways to help employees and their children receive coverage. "Our tax code should be pro-family and promote a culture of life," Rubio said in a statement announcing his legislation. "Instead, too often our corporations find loopholes to subsidize the murder of unborn babies or horrific 'medical' treatments on kids. My bill would make sure this does not happen."Under current tax law, businesses can deduct benefits from an employee compensation package, including for healthcare plans or medical expenses.Other companies are likely to follow in offering coverage for abortion or transgender care travel, Rubio wrote in an editorial he published in Newsweek. "These corporations may be able to help their employees kill their unborn children or transition their son into a daughter tax-free," he wrote, adding later in the piece, "If executive elites think they can force the rest of the country to support their insane policies, they have another thing coming."The legislation contains exceptions for workers who receive care because they would otherwise face serious health problems or death.Rep. Brian Mast, a Republican of Florida, is introducing the House version of the bill. In a statement, Mast said corporations "should not be allowed to use taxpayer funds to support dangerous procedures that harm our kids and kill innocent babies."GOP and Big Business clashThe new bill represents an escalation by Rubio against Big Business.The two-term senator introduced another bill in September that would require corporate directors to prove that certain social initiatives he calls "woke" are in the best interest of shareholders.Rubio has also called for other Republicans to break against big businesses who are pushing for "woke policies" that will lead to "Marxism." Rubio is the son of Cuban parents who immigrated to the US just ahead of Fidel Castro's rise, and has often invoked his personal story in explaining his position against large businesses' policies. Rubio ran for the GOP nomination for president in 2016 but lost to Trump. If he wins reelection in November — when he's likely to face off against Democratic Rep. Val Demings of Orlando — he is expected to be in the mix for the 2024 presidential nomination.Clashes between Republicans and corporations have become more common. For decades, the GOP was aligned with American corporations and delivered them millions of dollars worth of federal tax breaks. But former President Donald Trump frequently attacked large companies and their CEOs, shaking up the GOP playbook and ushering in an era of populist ideology.Businesses, too, have evolved as younger employees are demanding that their bosses take stronger stances on social and political causes, from Black Lives Matter to the climate crisis and even abortion. The calculus over how far to wade into such topics is risky for businesses, who risk losing employees or customers, or drawing the ire of lawmakers.Last month, top CEOs paid attention when Disney spoke out against Florida's controversial sex education bill. In response, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, signed a bill into law to terminate the theme park and entertainment company's special tax district. The latest corporate push for abortion access in particular comes after a leaked draft opinion Politico obtained from the Supreme Court showed the justices were poised to overturn Roe v. Wade. In response, the Senate is preparing to vote on a bill that would codify Roe into law and undo all state restrictions on abortion. Rubio opposes abortion and voted against the legislation when it came to the floor in February.  Rubio told reporters at the Capitol on Tuesday that he hadn't read the Supreme Court's draft opinion. "I'm not going to read a leaked document," he said. "It's not the final opinion of the court."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 4th, 2022

Gordon Chang: What To Do About China

Gordon Chang: What To Do About China Authored by Gordon Chang via The Gatestone Institute, Since about 2018, Chinese officials have been talking about the moon and Mars as sovereign Chinese territory, part of the People's Republic of China. This means that China considers those heavenly bodies to be like the South China Sea. This also means that China will exclude other nations from going to the moon and Mars if they have the capability to do so. We do not have to speculate about that: Chinese officials say this is what they are going to do. [W]hen Biden says, "Oh, the Chinese just want to compete with us," he is wrong. They do not want to "compete" within the international system. They do not even want to change that system... They want to overthrow it altogether, period. Is Xi Jinping really that bold... to start another war? ... First, China considers the United States to be its enemy. Second the United States is no longer deterring China. China feels it has a big green light to do whatever it wants. We Americans don't pay attention to propaganda... After all, these are just words. At this particular time, these words... [suggest] to me that China is laying the justification for a strike on the United States. We keep ignoring what Beijing is saying. We kept ignoring what Osama bin Laden was saying. We have to remember that the Chinese regime, unlike the Japanese, always warn its adversaries about what it is going to do The second reason war is coming is that America's deterrence of China is breaking down. Di's message was that with cash, China can do anything it wants, and that all Americans would take cash. He mentioned two words in this regard: Hunter Biden. In February, [Biden] had a two‑hour phone call with Xi Jinping. By Biden's own admission, he didn't raise the issue of the origins of COVID‑19 even once. If you are Xi Jinping, after you put down the receiver, your first thought is, "I just got away with killing hundreds of thousands of Americans." We have news that China is building something like 345 missile silos in three locations: in Gansu, Xinjiang, and in Inner Mongolia. These silos are clearly built to accommodate the DF‑41. The DF‑41 has a range of about 9,300 miles, which means that it can reach any part of the United States. The DF‑41 carries 10 warheads. This means that China could, in about two years..., have a bigger arsenal than ours. ...we have to assume the worst because Chinese leaders and Chinese generals, on occasion, unprovoked, have made threats to nuke American cities. In July, 2021 China tested a hypersonic glide warhead, which circled the world. This signals China intends to violate the Outer Space Treaty, to which China is a party. As of today, more than eight million people have died outside China. What happened? No one imposed costs on China. For at least a half‑decade, maybe a little bit longer, Chinese military researchers have been openly writing about a new type of biological warfare....They talk about a new type of biological warfare of "specific ethnic genetic attacks." In other words, pathogens that will leave the Chinese immune but sicken and kill everybody else, which means that the next disease from China can be a civilization killer. A lot of military analysts talk about how the first seconds of a war with China are going to be fought in outer space. They are going to blind our satellites, take them down, do all sorts of stuff. Those statements are wrong. The first day of war against the United States occurs about six months earlier, when they release pathogens in the United States. Then we are going to have that day in space. The war starts here, with a pathogen ‑‑ a virus, a microbe, a bug of some kind. That is where it begins. The One‑China policy is something many people misunderstand. Probably because Beijing uses propaganda to try to fuzzy up the issue.... China has a One‑China principle: that Taiwan is part of the People's Republic of China, full stop. We have a One‑China policy..., that the status of Taiwan is unresolved.... that the resolution of the status of Taiwan must be with the consent of people on both sides of the Strait. We need a policy of "strategic clarity," where we tell China that we will defend Taiwan. We also say we will extend a mutual defense treaty to Taiwan if it wants it, and we will put American troops on the island as a tripwire. We are Americans. We naturally assume that there are solutions, and good solutions, to every problem. After three decades of truly misguided China policy, there are no ... solutions that are "undangerous." ...The current trend of policy is unsustainable. There will be no American republic if we continue to do what we are currently doing and if we continue to allow China to do what it does. I do not think that enforcing a trade deal will start World War III. China has not met its obligations. As of a few months ago, China had met about 62% of its commitments..... We should be increasing the tariffs that President Trump imposed under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974. Remember, those tariffs are meant to be a remedy for the theft of US intellectual property. China has continued to steal US IP. As matter of fact, it has gotten worse... I do not think that we should be trying to foster integration of Wall Street into China's markets.... Do not take it from me, just look at their failure to comply with very simple, easy‑to‑comply-with requirements. It was a mistake. The best response would be if we hit them with everything at once because China right now is weak. If we were going to pick the number one thing to do, I would think trade. China now has a debt crisis, so they are not going to invest their way out of this crisis, which means the only way they can save their economy is net exports. We should stop buying their stuff. China has bought the political establishment in the Solomon Islands, except for one brave man named David Suidani. Recently, somebody got the bright idea of publishing all of the specific payments that Beijing has made to Solomon Islands politicians.... We should be doing this with payments to American politicians, we should be doing this across the board. What bothers me is that, although their assumptions about China have demonstrably been proven wrong, American policymakers still continue with the same policies. There is, in some people's mind, an unbreakable view that we have to cooperate with China.... This is what people learn in international relations school when they go to Georgetown, and they become totally stupid. Clearly, Nike and Apple and other companies are now, at this very moment, trying to prevent Congress from enacting toughened rules on the importation of forced‑labor products into our country. Moreover, the Chinese regime is even more casualty‑averse than we are. Even if Beijing thinks it can take Taiwan by force, it is probably not going to invade because it knows an invasion would be unpopular with most people in China. It is not going to risk hundreds of thousands of casualties that would result from an invasion. Unfortunately..., we taught the Chinese that they can without cost engage in these dangerous maneuvers of intercepting our planes and our ships. That is the problem: because as we have taught the Chinese to be more aggressive, they have been. [W]e should have made it clear to the Chinese leadership that they cannot kill Americans without cost. Hundreds of thousands Americans have been killed by a disease that China deliberately spread. From October 2020 to October 2021, more than 105,000 Americans died from fentanyl -- which China has purposefully, as a matter of state and Communist Party policy -- sold to Americans... we have to change course. I would close China's four remaining consulates. I would also strip the Chinese embassy down to the ambassador and his personal staff. The thousands who are in Washington, DC, they would be out. I would also raise tariffs to 3,600%, or whatever. This is a good time to do it. We have supply chain disruptions. We are not getting products from China anyway. We can actually start to do this sort of stuff. I would... just hammer those guys all the time verbally. People may think, "Those are just words." For communists, words are really important, because they are an insecure regime where propaganda is absolutely critical. I would be going after the Communists on human rights, I would be going after them on occupying the South China Sea, on Taiwan, unrelentingly -- because I would want to show the world that the United States is no longer afraid of China.... State Department people, they are frightened. We need to say to the Chinese regime, like Dulles, "I'm not afraid of you. I'm going after you, and I'm going to win." Is Xi Jinping really that bold... to start another war?... First, China considers the United States to be its enemy. Second the United States is no longer deterring China. China feels it has a big green light to do whatever it wants. All the conditions for history's next great war are in place. Jim Holmes, the Wiley Professor at the Naval War College, actually talks about this period as being 1937. 1937 was the year in which if you were in Europe or America, you could sense the trouble. If you were in Asia in 1937, you would be even more worried, because that year saw Japan's second invasion of China that decade. No matter where you lived, however, you could not be sure that the worst would happen, that great armies and navies around the world would clash. There was still hope that the situation could be managed. As we now know, the worst did happen. In fact, what happened was worse than what anyone thought at the time. We are now, thanks to China, back to 1937. We will begin our discussion in Afghanistan. Beijing has had long‑standing relations with the Afghan Taliban, going back before 9/11, and continuing through that event. After the US drove the Taliban from power and while it was conducting an insurgency, China was selling the group arms, including anti‑aircraft missiles, that were used to kill American and NATO forces. China's support for killing Americans has continued to today. In December 2020, Indian Intelligence was instrumental, in Afghanistan, in breaking up a ring of Chinese spies and members of the Haqqani Network. The Trump administration believed that the Chinese portion of that ring was actually paying cash for killing Americans. What can happen next? We should not be surprised if China gives the Taliban an atomic weapon to be used against an American city. Would they be that vicious? We have to remember that China purposefully, over the course of decades, proliferated its nuclear weapons technology to Pakistan and then helped Pakistan sell that Chinese technology around the world to regimes such as Iran's and North Korea's. Today, China supports the Taliban. We know this because China has kept open its embassy in Kabul. China is also running interference for the Taliban in the United Nations Security Council. It is urging countries to support that insurgent group with aid. It looks as if the Taliban's main financial backers these days are the Chinese. Beijing is hoping to cash in on its relationship in Central Asia. Unfortunately, there is a man named Biden, who is helping them. In early August, Biden issued an executive order setting a goal that by 2030, half of all American vehicles should be electric‑powered. To be electric‑powered, we need rare earth minerals, we need lithium. As many people have said, Afghanistan is the Saudi Arabia of rare earths and lithium. If Beijing can mine this, it makes the United States even more dependent on China. It certainly helps the Taliban immeasurably. Unfortunately, Beijing has more than just Afghanistan in mind. The Chinese want to take away our sovereignty, and that of other nations, and rule the world. They actually even want to rule the near parts of the solar system. Yes, that does sound far‑fetched, but, no, I'm not exaggerating. Chinese President Xi Jinping would like to end the current international system. On July 1, in a landmark speech, in connection with the centennial of China's ruling organization, he said this: "The Communist Party of China and the Chinese people, with their bravery and tenacity, solemnly proclaim to the world that the Chinese people are not only good at taking down the old world, but also good in building a new one." By that, China's leader means ending the international system, the Westphalian international system. It means he wants to impose China's imperial‑era notions of governance, where Chinese emperors believed they not only had the Mandate of Heaven over tianxia, or all under Heaven, but that Heaven actually compelled the Chinese to rule the entire world. Xi Jinping has been using tianxia themes for decades, and so have his subordinates, including Foreign Minister Wang Yi, who in September 2017 wrote an article in Study Times, the Central Party School's influential newspaper. In that article, Wang Yi wrote that Xi Jinping's thought on diplomacy ‑‑ a "thought" in Communist Party lingo is an important body of ideological work ‑‑ Wang Yi wrote that Xi Jinping's thought on diplomacy made innovations on and transcended the traditional theories of Western international relations of the past 300 years. Take 2017, subtract 300 years, and you almost get to 1648, which means that Wang Yi, with his time reference, was pointing to the Treaty of Westphalia of 1648, which established the current system of sovereign states. When Wang Yi writes that Xi Jinping wants to transcend that system, he is really telling us that China's leader does not want sovereign states, or at least no more of them than China. This means that when Biden says, "Oh, the Chinese just want to compete with us," he is wrong. They do not want to "compete" within the international system. They do not even want to change that system so it is more to their liking. They want to overthrow it altogether, period. China is also revolutionary with regard to the solar system. Since about 2018, Chinese officials have been talking about the moon and Mars as sovereign Chinese territory. In other words, as part of the People's Republic of China. This means that China considers those heavenly bodies to be like the South China Sea: theirs and theirs alone. This also means that China will exclude other nations from going to the moon and Mars if they have the capability to do so. We do not have to speculate about that: Chinese officials say this is what they are going to do. Let us return to April 2021. Beijing announced the name of its Mars rover. "We are naming the Mars rover Zhurong," the Chinese said, "because Zhurong was the god of fire in Chinese mythology, " How nice. Yes, Zhurong is the god of fire. What Beijing did not tell us is that Zhurong is also the god of war—and the god of the South China Sea. Is Xi Jinping really that bold or that desperate to start another war? Two points. First, China considers the United States to be its enemy. The second point is that the United States is no longer deterring China. China feels it has a big green light to do whatever it wants. On the first point, about our enemy status, we have to go back to May 2019. People's Daily, the most authoritative publication in China, actually carried a piece that declared a "people's war" on the US. This was not just some isolated thought. On August 29th 2021, People's Daily came out with a landmark piece that accused the United States of committing "barbaric" acts against China. Again, this was during a month of hostile propaganda blasts from China. On the August 29th, Global Times, which is controlled by People's Daily, came right out and also said that the United States was an enemy or like an enemy. We Americans don't pay attention to propaganda. The question is, should we be concerned about what China is saying? After all, these are just words. At this particular time, these words are significant. The strident anti‑Americanism suggests to me that China is laying the justification for a strike on the United States. We keep ignoring what Beijing is saying. We kept ignoring what Osama bin Laden was saying. We have to remember that the Chinese regime, unlike the Japanese, always warn its adversaries about what it is going to do. Jim Lilley, our great ambassador to Beijing during the Tiananmen Massacre, actually said that China always telegraphs its punches. At this moment, China is telegraphing a punch. That hostility, unfortunately, is not something we can do very much about. The Chinese Communist regime inherently idealizes struggle, and it demands that others show subservience to it. The second reason war is coming is that America's deterrence of China is breaking down. That is evident from what the Chinese are saying. In March of 2021, China sent its top two diplomats, Yang Jiechi and Wang Yi, to Anchorage to meet our top officials, Secretary of State Antony Blinken and National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan. Yang, in chilling words, said the US could no longer talk to China "from a position of strength." We saw the same theme during the fall of Kabul. China then was saying, "Look, those Americans, they can't deal with the insurgent Taliban. How can they hope to counter us magnificent Chinese?" Global Times actually came out with a piece referring to Americans: "They can't win wars anymore." We also saw propaganda at that same time directed at Taiwan. Global Times was saying, again, in an editorial, an important signal of official Chinese thinking, "When we decide to invade, Taiwan will fall within hours and the US will not come to help." It is probably no coincidence that this propaganda came at the time of incursions into Taiwan's air-defense identification zone. We need to be concerned with more than just the intensity and with the frequency of these flights, however. We have to be concerned that China was sending H‑6K bombers; they are nuclear‑capable. Something is wrong. Global Times recently came out with an editorial with the title, "Time to warn Taiwan secessionists and their fomenters: war is real." Beijing is at this moment saying things heard before history's great conflicts. The Chinese regime right now seems to be feeling incredibly arrogant. We heard this on November 28th in 2020, when Di Dongsheng, an academic in Beijing, gave a lecture live-streamed to China. Di showed the arrogance of the Chinese elite. More importantly, he was showing that the Chinese elite no longer wanted to hide how they felt. Di, for instance, openly stated that China could determine outcomes at the highest levels of the American political system. Di's message was that with cash, China can do anything it wants, and that all Americans would take cash. He mentioned two words in this regard: Hunter Biden. Unfortunately, President Joe Biden is reinforcing this notion. China, for instance, has so far killed nearly one million Americans with a disease that it deliberately spread beyond its borders. Yet, what happened? Nothing. We know that China was able to spread this disease with its close relationship with the World Health Organization. President Trump, in July of 2020, took us out of the WHO. What did Biden do? In his first hours in office, on January 20th, 2021, he put us back into the WHO. In February, he had a two‑hour phone call with Xi Jinping. By Biden's own admission, he didn't raise the issue of the origins of COVID‑19 even once. If you are Xi Jinping, after you put down the receiver, your first thought is, "I just got away with killing hundreds of thousands of Americans." Then there's somebody named John Kerry. Our republic is not safe when John Kerry carries a diplomatic passport, as he now does. He is willing to make almost any deal to get China to sign an enhanced climate arrangement. Kerry gave a revealing interview to David Westin of Bloomberg on September 22, 2021. Westin asked him, "What is the process by which one trades off climate against human rights?" Climate against human rights? Kerry came back and said, "Well, life is always full of tough choices in the relationship between nations." Tough choices? We Americans need to ask, "What is Kerry willing to give up to get his climate deal?" Democracies tend to deal with each other in the way that Kerry says. If we are nice to a democracy, that will lead to warm relations; warm relations will lead to deals, long‑standing ties. Kerry thinks that the Chinese communists think that way. Unfortunately, they do not. We know this because Kerry's successor as Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, in February 2009, said in public, "I'm not going to press the Chinese on human rights because I've got bigger fish to fry." She then went to Beijing a day after saying that and got no cooperation from the Chinese. Even worse, just weeks after that, China felt so bold that it attacked an unarmed US Navy reconnaissance vessel in the South China Sea. The attack was so serious that it constituted an act of war. The Chinese simply do not think the way that Kerry believes they do. All of this, when you put it together, means that the risk of war is much higher than we tend to think. Conflict with today's aggressor is going to be more destructive than it was in the 1930s. We have news that China is building something like 345 missile silos in three locations: in Gansu, Xinjiang, and in Inner Mongolia. These silos are clearly built to accommodate the DF‑41. The DF‑41 has a range of about 9,300 miles, which means that it can reach any part of the United States. The DF‑41 carries 10 warheads. This means that China could, in about two years, as some experts think, have a bigger arsenal than ours. China has built decoy silos before. We are not sure they are going to put all 345 missiles into these facilities, but we have to assume the worst because Chinese leaders and Chinese generals, on occasion, unprovoked, have made threats to nuke American cities. This, of course, calls into question their official no‑first‑use policy, and also a lot of other things. China will not talk to us about arms control. We have to be concerned that China and Russia, which already are coordinating their military activities, would gang up against us with their arsenals. In July, 2021 China tested a hypersonic glide warhead, which circled the world. This signals China intends to violate the Outer Space Treaty, to which China is a party. It also shows that in hypersonic technology, which was developed by Americans, China is now at least a decade ahead of us in fielding a weapon. Why is China doing all this now? The country is coming apart at the seams. There is, for instance, a debt crisis. Evergrande and other property developers have started to default. It is more than just a crisis of companies. China is basically now having its 2008. Even more important than that, they have an economy that is stumbling and a food crisis that is worsening year to year. They know their environment is exhausted. Of course, they also are suffering from a continuing COVID‑19 epidemic. To make matters worse, all of this is occurring while China is on the edge of the steepest demographic decline in history in the absence of war or disease. Two Chinese demographers recently stated that China's population will probably halve in 45 years. If you run out those projections, it means that by the end of the century, China will be about a third of its current size, basically about the same number of people as the United States. These developments are roiling the political system. Xi Jinping is being blamed for these debacles. We know he has a low threshold of risk. Xi now has all the incentive in the world to deflect popular and regime discontent by lashing out. In 1966, Mao Zedong, the founder of the People's Republic, was sidelined in Beijing. What did he do? He started the Cultural Revolution. He tried to use the Chinese people against his political enemies. That created a decade of chaos. Xi Jinping is trying to do the same thing with his "common prosperity" program. The difference is that Mao did not have the means to plunge the world into war. Xi, with his shiny new military, clearly does have that ability. So here is a 1930s scenario to consider. The next time China starts a conflict, whether accidentally or on purpose, we could see that China's friends -- Russia, North Korea, Iran, Pakistan -- either in coordination with China or just taking advantage of the situation, move against their enemies. That would be Ukraine in the case of Russia, South Korea in the case of North Korea, Israel in the case of Iran, India in the case of Pakistan, and Morocco in the case of Algeria. We could see crises at both ends of the European landmass and in Africa at the same time. This is how world wars start. *  *  * Question: Why do you believe China attacked the world with coronavirus? Chang: I believe that SARS‑CoV‑2, the pathogen that causes COVID‑19, is not natural. There are, for example, unnatural arrangements of amino acids, like the double‑CGG sequence, that do not occur in nature. We do not have a hundred percent assurance on where this pathogen came from. We do, however, have a hundred percent assurance on something else: that for about five weeks, maybe even five months, Chinese leaders knew that this disease was highly transmissible, from one human to the next, but they told the world that it was not. At the same time as they were locking down their own country ‑‑ Xi Jinping by locking down was indicating that he thought this was an effective way of stopping the disease -- he was pressuring other countries not to impose travel restrictions and quarantines on arrivals from China. It was those arrivals from China that turned what should have been an epidemic confined to the central part of China, into a global pandemic. As of today, more than eight million people have died outside China. What happened? No one imposed costs on China. For at least a half‑decade, maybe a little bit longer, Chinese military researchers have been openly writing about a new type of biological warfare. This was, for instance, in the 2017 edition of "The Science of Military Strategy," the authoritative publication of China's National Defense University. They talk about a new type of biological warfare of "specific ethnic genetic attacks." In other words, pathogens that will leave the Chinese immune but sicken and kill everybody else, which means that the next disease from China can be a civilization killer. Remember, Xi Jinping must be thinking, "I just got away with killing eight million people. Why wouldn't I unleash a biological attack on the United States? Look what the virus has done not only to kill Americans but also to divide American society." A lot of military analysts talk about how the first seconds of a war with China are going to be fought in outer space. They are going to blind our satellites, take them down, do all sorts of stuff. Those statements are wrong. The first day of war against the United States occurs about six months earlier, when they release pathogens in the United States. Then we are going to have that day in space. The war starts here, with a pathogen ‑‑ a virus, a microbe, a bug of some kind. That is where it begins. Question: You mentioned 1939. Taiwan is the Poland of today. We get mixed signals: Biden invites the Taiwanese foreign minister to his inauguration, but then we hear Ned Price, his State Department spokesman, say that America will always respect the One‑China policy. Meaning, we're sidelining defending Taiwan? Chang: The One‑China policy is something many people misunderstand. Probably because Beijing uses propaganda to try to fuzzy up the issue. China has a One‑China principle: that Taiwan is part of the People's Republic of China, full stop. We have a One‑China policy, which is different. We recognize Beijing as the legitimate government of China. We also say that the status of Taiwan is unresolved. Then, the third part of our One‑China policy is that the resolution of the status of Taiwan must be with the consent of people on both sides of the Strait. In other words, that is code for peace, a peaceful resolution. Our policies are defined by the One‑China policy, the Three Communiques, Reagan's Six Assurances, and the Taiwan Relations Act. Our policy is difficult for someone named Joe Biden to articulate, because he came back from a campaign trip to Michigan, and he was asked by a reporter about Taiwan, and Biden said, "Don't worry about this. We got it covered. I had a phone call with Xi Jinping and he agreed to abide by the Taiwan agreement." In official US discourse, there is no such thing as a "Taiwan agreement." Some reporter then asked Ned Price what did Biden mean by the Taiwan agreement. Ned Price said, "The Taiwan agreement means the Three Communiques the Six Assurances, the Taiwan Relations Act, and the One‑China policy." Ned Price could not have been telling the truth because Xi Jinping did not agree to America's position on Taiwan. That is clear. There is complete fuzziness or outright lying in the Biden administration about this. Biden's policies on Taiwan are not horrible, but they are also not appropriate for this time. decades, we have had this policy of "strategic ambiguity," where we do not tell either side what we would do in the face of imminent conflict. That worked in a benign period. We are no longer in a benign period. We are in one of the most dangerous periods in history. We need a policy of "strategic clarity," where we tell China that we will defend Taiwan. We also say we will extend a mutual defense treaty to Taiwan if it wants it, and we will put American troops on the island as a tripwire. Question: You think he is not saying that because he has no intention of actually doing it, so in a way, he is telling the truth? Chang: The mind of Biden is difficult to understand. We do not know what the administration would do. We have never known, after Allen Dulles, what any administration would do, with regard to Taiwan. We knew what Dulles would have done. We have got to be really concerned because there are voices in the administration that would give Taiwan, and give other parts of the world, to China. It would probably start with John Kerry; that is only a guess. Question: You mentioned earlier the growing Chinese economic problems. Would you use taking action on the enormous trade deficits we run with China to contribute to that problem? Chang: Yes, we should absolutely do that. Go back to a day which, in my mind, lives in infamy, which is January 15th, 2020, when President Trump signed the Phase One trade deal, which I think was a mistake. In that Phase One trade deal, it was very easy for China to comply, because there were specific targets that China had to meet in buying US goods and services. This was "managed trade." China has not met its obligations. As of a few months ago, China had met about 62% of its commitments. That means, they have dishonored this deal in a material and significant way. If nothing else, China has failed to meet its Phase One trade deal commitments. We should be increasing the tariffs that President Trump imposed under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974. Remember, those tariffs are meant to be a remedy for the theft of US intellectual property. China has continued to steal US IP. As matter of fact, it has gotten worse: for instance, these Chinese anti‑lawsuit injunctions, which they have started to institute. We need to do something: China steals somewhere between $300 to $600 billion worth of US intellectual property each year. That is a grievous wound on the US economy, it is a grievous wound on our society in general. We need to do something about it. Question: As a follow‑up on that, Japan commenced World War II because of the tariffs Roosevelt was strapping on oil imports into Japan, do you think that might well have the same effect on China, where we do begin to impose stiffer tariffs on American imports? Chang: That is a really important question, to which nobody has an answer. I do not think that China would start a war over tariffs. Let me answer this question in a different way. We are Americans. We naturally assume that there are solutions, and good solutions, to every problem. After three decades of truly misguided China policy, there are no good solutions. There are no solutions that are "undangerous." Every solution, going forward, carries great risk. The current trend of policy is unsustainable. There will be no American republic if we continue to do what we are currently doing and if we continue to allow China to do what it does. I do not think that enforcing a trade deal will start World War III. The point is, we have no choice right now. First, I don't think the Chinese were ever going to honor the Phase One agreement . This was not a deal where there were some fuzzy requirements. This deal was very clear: China buys these amounts of agricultural products by such and such date, China buys so many manufactured products by such and such date. This was not rocket science. China purposefully decided not to honor it. There are also other issues regarding the trade deal do not think that we should be trying to foster integration of Wall Street into China's markets, which is what the Phase One deal also contemplated. Goldman Sachs ran away like a bandit on that. There are lot of objections to it. I do not think we should be trading with China, for a lot of reasons. The Phase One trade deal, in my mind, was a great mistake. Do not take it from me, just look at their failure to comply with very simple, easy‑to‑comply-with requirements. It was a mistake. Question: Concerning cybersecurity, as we saw in the recent departure of a Pentagon official, ringing the alarm on how we are completely vulnerable to China's cyberattacks. From your perspective, what would an attack look like on China that would hurt them? What particular institutions would be the most vulnerable? Is it exposing their secrets? Is it something on their financial system? Is it something on their medical system or critical infrastructure? What does the best way look like to damage them? Also, regarding what you mentioned about Afghanistan, we know that China has been making inroads into Pakistan as a check on American hegemony in relationships with India and Afghanistan. Now that the Afghanistan domino is down, what do you see in the future for Pakistan's nuclear capability, in conjunction with Chinese backing, to move ever further westward towards Afghanistan, and endangering Middle East security? Chang: Right now, India has been disheartened by what happened, because India was one of the main backers of the Afghan government. What we did in New Delhi was delegitimize our friends, so that now the pro‑Russian, the pro‑Chinese elements in the Indian national security establishment are basically setting the tone. This is terrible. What has happened, though, in Pakistan itself, is not an unmitigated disaster for us, because China has suffered blowback there. There is an Afghan Taliban, and there is a Pakistani Taliban. They have diametrically‑opposed policies on China. The Afghan Taliban is an ally of China; the Pakistani Taliban kill Chinese. They do that because they want to destabilize Pakistan's capital, Islamabad. Beijing supports Islamabad. The calculation on part of the Pakistani Taliban is, "We kill Chinese, we destabilize Islamabad, we then get to set up the caliphate in Pakistan." What has happened is, with this incredible success of the Afghan Taliban, that the Pakistani Taliban has been re‑energized -- not good news for China. China has something called the China‑Pakistan Economic Corridor, part of their Belt and Road Initiative. Ultimately that is going to be something like $62 billion of investment into Pakistani roads, airports, electric power plants, utilities, all the rest of it. I am very happy that China is in Pakistan, because they are now dealing with a situation that they have no solutions to. It's like Winston Churchill on Italy, "It's now your turn." We should never have had good relations with Pakistan. That was always a short‑term compromise that, even in the short term, undermined American interests. The point is that China is now having troubles in Pakistan because of their success in Afghanistan. Pakistan is important to China for a number of reasons. One of them is, they want it as an outlet to the Indian Ocean that bypasses the Malacca Strait -- a choke point that the US Navy ‑‑ in their view ‑‑ could easily close off, which is correct. They want to bypass that, but their port in Gwadar is a failure in many respects. Gwadar is in Pakistan's Baluchistan. The Baluchs are one of the most oppressed minorities on earth. They have now taken to violence against the Chinese, and they have been effective. Pakistan is a failure for China. The best response would be if we hit them with everything at once because China right now is weak. If we were going to pick the number one thing to do, I would think trade. Trade is really what they need right now. Their economy is stalling. There are three parts to the Chinese economy, as there are to all economies: consumption, investment, and net exports. Their consumption right now is extremely weak from indicators that we have. The question is can they invest? China now has a debt crisis, so they are not going to invest their way out of this crisis, which means the only way they can save their economy is net exports. We should stop buying their stuff. We have extraordinary supply chain disruptions right now. It should be pretty easy for us to make the case that we must become self‑sufficient on a number of items. Hit them on trade. Hit them on investment, publicize the bank account details of Chinese leaders. All these things that we do, we do it all at the same time. We can maybe get rid of these guys. Question: In the Solomon Islands, they published China's under-the-table payments to political figures. Should we do the same thing with China's leaders? Chang: Yes. There is now a contest for the Solomon Islands, which includes Guadalcanal. China has bought the political establishment in the Solomon Islands, except for one brave man named David Suidani. Recently, somebody got the bright idea of publishing all of the specific payments that Beijing has made to Solomon Islands politicians. This was really good news. We should be doing this with payments to American politicians, we should be doing this across the board. Why don't we publish their payments to politicians around the world? Let's expose these guys, let's go after them. Let's root out Chinese influence, because they are subverting our political system. Similarly, we should also be publishing the bank account details of all these Chinese leaders, because they are corrupt as hell. Question: Could you comment, please, on what you think is the nature of the personal relationships between Hunter Biden, his father, and Chinese financial institutions. How has it, if at all, affected American foreign policy towards China, and how will it affect that policy? Chang: There are two things here. There are the financial ties. Hunter Biden has connections with Chinese institutions, which you cannot explain in the absence of corruption. For instance, he has a relationship with Bohai Harvest Partners, BHR. China puts a lot of money into the care of foreign investment managers. The two billion, or whatever the number is, is not that large, but they only put money with people who have a track record in managing investments. Hunter Biden only has a track record of being the son of Joe Biden. There are three investigations of Hunter Biden right now. There is the Wilmington US Attorney's Office, the FBI -- I don't place very much hope in either of these – but the third one might actually bear some fruit: the IRS investigation of Hunter Biden. Let us say, for the moment, that Biden is able to corrupt all three of these investigations. Yet money always leaves a trail. We are going to find out one way or another. Peter Schweizer, for instance, is working on a book on the Biden cash. Eventually, we are going to know about that. What worries me is not so much the money trail -- and of course, there's the art sales, a subject in itself, because we will find out. What worries me is that Hunter Biden, by his own admission, is a troubled individual. He has been to China a number of times. He has probably committed some embarrassing act there, which means that the Ministry of State Security has audio and video recordings of this. Those are the things that can be used for blackmail. We Americans would never know about it, because blackmail does not necessarily leave a trail. This is what we should be most concerned about. Biden has now had two long phone calls with Xi Jinping. The February call, plus also one a few months ago. We do not know what was said. I would be very worried that when Xi Jinping wants to say something, there will be a phone call to Biden, and it would be Xi doing the talking without note takers. Question: Please tell us about the China desk over the 30 years, the influence of the bureaucracy on politics; what can they affect? Chang: I do not agree with our China policy establishment in Washington, in general, and specifically the State Department and NSC. This a complicated issue. First, there is this notion after the end of the Cold War, that the nature of governments did not matter. You could trade with them, you could strengthen them, and it would not have national security implications. That was wrong for a number of reasons, as we are now seeing. What bothers me is that, although their assumptions about China have demonstrably been proven wrong, American policymakers still continue with the same policies. There is, in some people's mind, an unbreakable view that we have to cooperate with China. You hear this from Blinken all the time: "We've got to cooperate where we can." It is this formulation which is tired, and which has not produced the types of policies that are necessary to defend our republic. That is the unfortunate thing. This is what people learn in international relations school when they go to Georgetown, and they become totally stupid. We Americans should be upset because we have a political class that is not defending us. They are not defending us because they have these notions of China. George Kennan understood the nature of the Soviet Union. I do not understand why we cannot understand the true nature of the Chinese regime. Part of it is because we have Wall Street, we have Walmart, and they carry China's water. There are more of us than there are of them in this country. We have to exercise our vote to make sure that we implement China policies that actually protect us. Policies that protect us are going to be drastic and they will be extreme, but absolutely, we have now dug ourselves into such a hole after three decades of truly misguided views on China, that I don't know what else to say. This is not some partisan complaint. Liberals and conservatives, Republicans and Democrats, all have truly misguided China policies. I do not know what it takes to break this view, except maybe for the deaths of American servicemen and women. Question: Is the big obstacle American businesses which, in donations to Biden, are the ones stopping decoupling of commerce, and saying, "Do not have war; we would rather earn money"? Chang: It is. You have, for instance, Nike. There are a number of different companies, but Nike comes to mind right now, because they love to lecture us about racism. For years they were operating a factory in Qingdao, in the northeastern part of China, that resembled a concentration camp. The laborers were Uighur and Kazakh women, brought there on cattle cars and forced to work. This factory, technically, was operated by a South Korean sub‑contractor, but that contractor had a three‑decade relationship with Nike. Nike had to know what was going on. This was forced labor, perhaps even slave labor. Clearly, Nike and Apple and other companies are now, at this very moment, trying to prevent Congress from enacting toughened rules on the importation of forced‑labor products into our country. One of the good things Trump did was, towards the end of his four years, he started to vigorously enforce the statutes that are already on the books, about products that are made with forced and slave labor. Biden, to his credit, has continued tougher enforcement. Right now, the big struggle is not the enforcement, but enhancing those rules. Apple and all of these companies are now very much trying to prevent amendment of those laws. It's business, but it's also immoral. Question: It is not just big Wall Street firms. There are companies that print the Bible. Most Bibles are now printed in China. When President Trump imposed the tariffs, a lot of the Bible printers who depended on China actually went to Trump and said, "You cannot put those tariffs in because then the cost of Bibles will go up." Chang: Most everyone lobbies for China. We have to take away their incentive to do so. Question: What are the chances that China's going to invade Taiwan? Chang: There is no clear answer. There are a number of factors that promote stability. One of them is that, for China to invade Taiwan, Xi Jinping has to give some general or admiral basically total control over the Chinese military. That makes this flag officer the most powerful person in China. Xi is not about to do that. Moreover, the Chinese regime is even more casualty‑adverse than we are. Even if Beijing thinks it can take Taiwan by force, it is probably not going to invade because it knows an invasion would be unpopular with most people in China. It is not going to risk hundreds of thousands of casualties that would result from an invasion. The reason we have to be concerned is because it is not just a question of Xi Jinping waking up one morning and saying, "I want to invade Taiwan." The danger is the risk of accidental contact, in the skies or on the seas, around Taiwan. We know that China has been engaging in hostile conduct, and this is not just the incursions into Taiwan's air-defense identification zone. There are also dangerous intercepts of the US Navy and the US Air Force in the global commons. One of those accidents could spiral out of control. We saw this on April 1st, 2001, with the EP‑3, where a Chinese jet clipped the wing of that slow‑moving propeller plane of the US Navy. The only reason we got through it was that George W. Bush, to his eternal shame, paid China a sum that was essentially a ransom. He allowed our crew to be held for 11 days. He allowed the Chinese to strip that plane. This was wrong. This was the worst incident in US diplomatic history, but Bush's craven response did get us through it. Unfortunately, by getting through it we taught the Chinese that they can without cost engage in these dangerous maneuvers of intercepting our planes and our ships. That is the problem: because as we have taught the Chinese to be more aggressive, they have been. One of these incidents will go wrong. The law of averages says that. Then we have to really worry. Question: You don't think Xi thinks, "Oh well, we can sacrifice a few million Chinese"? Chang: On the night of June 15th, 2020, there was a clash between Chinese and Indian soldiers in Ladakh, in the Galwan Valley. That was a Chinese sneak attack on Indian-controlled territory. That night, 20 Indian soldiers were killed. China did not admit to any casualties. The Indians were saying that they killed about 45 Chinese soldiers that night. Remember, this was June 15th of 2020. It took until February of 2021 for China to admit that four Chinese soldiers died. TASS, the Russian news agency, recently issued a story reporting that 45 Chinese soldiers actually died that night. This incident shows you how risk‑averse and casualty‑averse the Chinese Communist Party is. They are willing to intimidate, they are willing to do all sorts of things. They are, however, loath to fight sustained engagements. Remember, that the number one goal of Chinese foreign policy is not to take over Taiwan. The number one goal of Chinese foreign policy is to preserve Communist Party rule. If the Communist Party feels that the Chinese people are not on board with an invasion of Taiwan, they will not do it even if they think they will be successful. Right now, the Chinese people are not in any mood for a full‑scale invasion of Taiwan. On the other hand, Xi Jinping has a very low threshold of risk. He took a consensual political system where no Chinese leader got too much blame or too much credit, because everybody shared in decisions, and Xi took power from everybody, which means, he ended up with full accountability, which means -- he is now fully responsible. In 2017, when everything was going China's way, this was great for Xi Jinping because he got all the credit. Now in 2021, where things are not going China's way, he is getting all the blame. The other thing, is that Xi has raised the cost of losing a political struggle in China. In the Deng Xiaoping era, Deng reduced the cost of losing a struggle. In the Maoist era, if you lost a struggle, you potentially lost your life. In Deng's era, if you lost a struggle, you got a nice house, a comfortable life. Xi Jinping has reversed that. Now the cost of losing a political struggle in China is very high. So there is now a combination of these two developments. Xi has full accountability. He knows that if he is thrown out of power, he loses not just power. He loses his freedom, his assets, potentially his life. If he has nothing to lose, however, it means that he can start a war, either "accidentally" or on purpose. He could be thinking, "I'm dying anyway, so why don't I just roll the dice and see if I can get out of this?" That is the reason why this moment is so exceedingly risky. When you look at the internal dynamics inside China right now, we are dealing with a system in crisis. Question: China has a conference coming up in a year or so. What does Chairman Xi want to do to make sure he gets through that conference with triumph? Chang: The Communist Party has recently been holding its National Congresses once every five years. If the pattern follows -- and that is an if -- the 20th National Congress of the Communist Party will be held either October or November of next year. This is an important Congress, more so than most of them because Xi Jinping is looking for an unprecedented third term as general secretary of the Communist Party. If you go back six months ago, maybe a year, everyone was saying, "Oh, Xi Jinping. No problem. He's president for life. He's going to get his third term. He will get his fourth term. He will get his fifth term, as long as he lives. This guy is there forever." Right now, that assumption is no longer valid. We do not know what's going to happen because he is being blamed for everything. Remember, as we get close to the 20th National Congress, Xi Jinping knows he has to show "success." Showing "success" could very well mean killing some more Indians or killing Americans or killing Japanese or something. We just don't know what is going to happen. Prior to the National Congress, there is the sixth plenum of the 19th Congress. Who knows what is going to happen there. The Communist Party calendar, as you point out, does dictate the way Xi Jinping interacts with the world. Question: Going back to the wing-clip incident, what should Bush have done? Chang: What Bush should have done is immediately demand the return of that plane. What he should have done was to impose trade sanctions, investment sanctions, whatever, to get our plane back. We were fortunate, in the sense that our aviators were returned, but they were returned in a way that has made relations with China worse, because we taught the Chinese regime to be more aggressive and more belligerent. We created the problems of today and of tomorrow. I would have imposed sanction after sanction after sanction, and just demand that they return the plane and the pilots. Remember, that at some point, it was in China's interests to return our aviators. The costs would have been too high for the Chinese to keep them. We did not use that leverage on them. While we are on this topic, we should have made it clear to the Chinese leadership that they cannot kill Americans without cost. Hundreds of thousands Americans have been killed by a disease that China deliberately spread. In one year, from 2020 to 2021, nearly 80,000 Americans died from fentanyl, which China has purposefully, as a matter of state and Communist Party policy -- sold to Americans. China is killing us. We have to do something different. I'm not saying that we have good solutions; we don't. But we have to change course. Question: Biden is continuing this hostage thing with Huawei, returning the CFO of Huawei in exchange for two Canadians. Have we taught the Chinese that they can grab more hostages? Chang: President Trump was right to seek the extradition of Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies. Biden, in a deal, released her. She did not even have to plead guilty to any Federal crime. She signed a statement, which I hope we'll be able to use against Huawei. As soon as Meng was released, China released the "two Michaels," the two Canadians who were grabbed within days of our seeking extradition of Meng Wanzhou. In other words, the two Michaels were hostages. We have taught China that any time that we try to enforce our own laws, they can just grab Americans. They have grabbed Americans as hostages before, but this case is high profile. They grabbed Americans, and then they grabbed Canadians, and they got away with it. They are going to do it again. We are creating the incentives for Beijing to act even more dangerously and lawlessly and criminally in the future. This has to stop. Question: On the off-chance that the current leader does not maintain his position, what are your thoughts on the leaders that we should keep an eye on? Chang: There is no one who stands out among the members of the Politburo Standing Committee. That is purposeful. Xi Jinping has made sure that there is nobody who can be considered a successor; that is the last thing he wants. If there is a change in leadership, the new leader probably will come from Jiang Zemin's Shanghai Gang faction. Jiang was China's leader before Hu Jintao, and Hu came before Xi Jinping. There is now a lot of factional infighting. Most of the reporting shows that Jiang has been trying to unseat Xi Jinping because Xi has been putting Jiang's allies in jail. Remember, the Communist Party is not a monolith. It has a lot of factions. Jiang's faction is not the only one. There is something called the Communist Youth League of Hu Jintao. It could, therefore, be anybody. Question: Double question: You did not talk about Hong Kong. Is Hong Kong lost forever to the Chinese Communist Party? Second question, if you could, what are the three policies that you would change right away? Chang: Hong Kong is not lost forever. In Hong Kong, there is an insurgency. We know from the history of insurgencies that they die away -- and they come back. We have seen this in Hong Kong. The big protests in Hong Kong, remember, 2003, 2014, 2019. In those interim periods, everyone said, "Oh, the protest movement is gone." It wasn't. China has been very effective with its national security law, but there is still resistance in Hong Kong. There is still a lot of fight there. It may not manifest itself for quite some time, but this struggle is not over, especially if the United States stands behind the people there. Biden, although he campaigned on helping Hong Kong, has done nothing. On the second question, I would close China's four remaining consulates. I would also strip the Chinese embassy down to the ambassador and his personal staff. The thousands who are in Washington, DC, they would be out. I would also raise tariffs to 3,600%, or whatever. This is a good time to do it. We have supply chain disruptions. We are not getting products from China anyway. We can actually start to do this sort of stuff. The third thing, I would do what Pompeo did, just hammer those guys all the time verbally. People may think, "Those are just words." For communists, words are really important, because they are an insecure regime where propaganda is absolutely critical. I would be going after the Communists on human rights, I would be going after them on occupying the South China Sea, on Taiwan, unrelentingly -- because I would want to show the world that the United States is no longer afraid of China. We have taught the world that we are afraid of dealing with the Chinese. State Department people, they are frightened. We need to say to the Chinese regime, like Dulles, "I'm not afraid of you. I'm going after you, and I'm going to win." Tyler Durden Sun, 05/01/2022 - 23:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeMay 2nd, 2022

A leaked video exemplifies what Black migrants endure in US detention centers

Detainees and immigration lawyers say there is a disturbing and overlooked problem of anti-Black racism in immigration detention. Brandon fled his native Cameroon at the age of 26.Anna Watts for Insider A leaked video obtained by Insider shows guards violently tackling a Black asylum seeker at a  Louisiana detention center. Detainees and immigration lawyers say there is a disturbing and overlooked problem of anti-Black racism in immigration detention. The criminalization of immigration has meant that migrants and asylum seekers are placed in a system with a long history of mistreatment.  In the fall of 2020, Brandon was playing the FIFA 2020 video game in the rec room of the LaSalle Correctional Center in Louisiana, where he had been locked up for five months.  A Salvadoran man, watching the action over Brandon's shoulder, started joking around, covering Brandon's eyes and distracting him from the game. "It was annoying," said Brandon, an asylum seeker from Cameroon. He lifted up his hand to mock punch the Salvadoran. The horseplay never escalated into anything serious, and, after a little while, the Salvadoran left Brandon alone and he finished his game. He lost, 2–1.What neither of them realized was that the mock punch had been caught on LaSalle's video monitors. A few minutes later, guards entered the rec room and approached Brandon. They told him he was being transferred to a new dorm – which meant away from fellow Cameroonians and the other Africans he had befriended. Brandon asked to stay where he was. Being with other Cameroonians was a lifeline for him in detention. "I felt like family with them," he said. Calmly, he continued trying to explain himself. "I never even raised my voice," he said. In a video obtained by Insider, Brandon is seen walking down a hallway and being followed by three guards. As he approaches the camera, one of the guards grabs him by the shoulder and pushes him against the wall. In the next few seconds, they ram his head into the wall, put him in a chokehold, spin him around, throw him to the floor, and pin him down. One of the guards briefly puts his knee on Brandon's neck. With the guards dog-piled on top of him, he felt like he was fighting to survive: "I was struggling to breathe. I couldn't move. I was feeling so weak."Six guards from the LaSalle Detention Center, which is privately run by LaSalle Corrections, kept Brandon pinned to the floor as one of them slapped handcuffs on him. They then yanked him to his feet and pushed him back against the wall. "Why are you treating me like I'm not a human being?" Brandon recalled asking them. After the guards tackled him, Brandon was thrown into a solitary confinement cell, where he remained for three days.Brandon suspected bias was at work when the guard shoved him against the wall. "He was doing it because I was Black and from Africa," Brandon said. LaSalle Corrections did not respond to repeated requests for comment. ICE spokesperson Sarah Loicano also declined to discuss the specifics of Brandon's case but commented: "U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) does not tolerate the mistreatment of anyone in the agency's custody and takes all allegations of abuse seriously," Loicano said. "Allegations of misconduct by ICE employees or contractors are reported to ICE's Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) and are reviewed by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office of the Inspector General (OIG)." Months later, after two transfers, Brandon was finally released from detention and allowed to continue pressing his asylum case while out on bond. When he opened his package of personal effects, he was surprised to find an unlabeled CD tucked in with the clothes he'd been wearing when he was first taken into custody. It took him a few weeks to find a player, but when he finally did he discovered it was a video of the guards tackling him. He has no idea who had slipped the CD into his things, or why.Less food, longer stays in solitaryBrandon was born in Cameroon, a country in West Africa that, since 2016, has been locked in a bloody civil war between the ruling Francophone party and separatist Anglophones. The government's crackdown, including extrajudicial killings, has led to charges of genocide. At age 26, he fled the country after his mother was killed by government agents, and he was subsequently targeted. "They tried to extinguish my life," he said. "But I never participated in anything like politics." In August of 2019, he crossed the US border at Brownsville, Texas, and told Customs and Border Patrol officials he was seeking asylum. He was promptly handcuffed and taken into custody. Soon thereafter, he was sent to Louisiana, the country's incarceration capital and, more recently, host to a vast network of immigrant detention facilities. According to Brandon, the mistreatment of detained Black people at LaSalle went beyond physical violence. It was more pervasive, more quotidian, more constant than any explosion that could be caught on video. "Officers didn't attend to Black detainees," Brandon explained, trying to capture the extent of the discrimination. "They didn't give us the same privileges," he said. While he saw other detainees occasionally get a little extra food, one or two additional slices of bread, or new razors for shaving, Black detainees were rarely if ever on the receiving end of these gestures.Brandon entered the US in August of 2019 at Brownsville, Texas, and was taken into custody.Anna Watts for InsiderBrandon's story points to a larger problem. The increasing criminalization of immigration has meant that migrants and asylum seekers – men and women who have not been convicted of any crime – are placed in jails and prisons, sometimes for years. They're also subjected to punishing conditions like solitary confinement, medical neglect, unpaid labor, and the kind of excessive force by guards that prison reform advocates have long documented and decried. For advocates, tracking the scope and severity of abuse in the immigration detention system can be daunting. Latinos are ensnared — and sometimes mistreated — at rates higher than any other demographic. But the U.S. immigration system levies particular violence against darker-skinned migrants, no matter their ethnicity. The numbers of migrants from Africa and the Caribbean showing up to or crossing the U.S.-Mexico border has been increasing in the last decade — leading to more detentions for Black migrants and, advocates claim, greater chances of abuses born out of bias. Detainees are frequently kept out of view by being locked up or swiftly deported, and their stories are rarely heard, or come filtered through NGO reports or official complaints to the government."The treatment of Black immigrants is normalized so much, to a point where departments and staff are numb to it," said Allen Morris, an attorney with Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, or RAICES, an immigrant rights organization based in Texas. Morris said that he's heard of other Black migrants suffering similar racist abuse at LaSalle, where Brandon was detained, but this was the first time he'd seen it captured on video. ("This is just despicable," Morris said after viewing Brandon's video.)A report published this year by Human Rights Watch documented 24 cases of abuse against 18 Cameroonian asylum seekers who were later deported, including "forced fingerprints on documents, pepper spray, painful restraints, and abusive solitary confinement, isolation, or segregation." Current and former Black detainees, as well as advocates and researchers, have responded to the appalling detention conditions and alleged discriminatory treatment by filing official complaints about their mistreatment, as well as reaching out to the media and organizing and staging protests both within and outside of detention centers. Last month, yet another official complaint was filed alleging racist abuse of Black migrants — including frequent use of the N-word and claiming that "Africans have a certain kind of smell" — as well as generalized violence and medical neglect, in New York state. 56 of the detained migrants recently went on hunger strike in protest. And still, the abuse continues. In 2018, Freedom for Immigrants conducted the first national study on hate and bias in U.S. immigration detention centers and documented at least 800 complaints of abuse in 34 different jails and prisons based on race, ethnicity, or nationality. It included the examples of someone detained in southern Texas being called a "monkey" before being thrown into solitary confinement. At an ICE facility in New Jersey, according to a complaint from American Friends Service Committee, a sergeant locked a detained Black migrant in his cell, told him, "You're never going home" —  then added, "White power." In another watchdog report, the Southern Poverty Law Center documented racial slurs and the use of pepper-spray at Florida's Glades County Detention Center. "When it comes to us, the Africans, they have a problem with us," one of the abused detainees said. A peer-reviewed study published in "Punishment and Society" found that Black immigrants were six times more likely than others in ICE detention to be sent to solitary confinement. The study further found that African and Caribbean immigrants represented "24 percent of all people subjected to solitary confinement," even though they made up just 4 percent of those in ICE detention. A report from Freedom for Immigrants looked at ankle shackling in a sample population, and found that 31 percent of those subjected to that treatment were Black even though they made up just 15 percent of the population of that sample.Lawmakers are finally starting to take notice. In January, Representative Cori Bush (D-MO) and Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) called for a "holistic review of the disparate treatment of Black migrants." 'Eat his dog food'In autumn 2021, Insider sent an informal survey to immigration attorneys and advocates to ask about a wide range of discriminatory and abusive practices. We then spoke with more than two dozen attorneys, advocates, and currently or formerly detained migrants, all of whom described a pattern of widespread bias and discriminatory treatment of Black detainees in U.S. immigration detention centers. Two attorneys echoed Brandon's complaint about not getting enough to eat, and reported that their clients were given insufficient food, or were placed at the back of the line to receive food, for no reason other than that they were Black. Other responses noted that Black detainees sometimes struggled to access basic supplies, such as soap, were subjected to solitary confinement at a high rate, and faced racist and abusive language by guards and other staff."In detention facilities where immigrants are held alongside individuals in criminal custody, Black immigrants are type-cast as being in criminal custody rather than ICE custody," said attorney Romelia Solano, co-founder of the immigrants' rights organization Mariposa Legal.Brandon was held at the LaSalle Correctional Center in Louisiana, Louisiana, which is the country's incarceration capital.Anna Watts for InsiderSolano said that one of her clients, a Black man held at a facility in Kentucky, told her that requests for cleaning supplies and other necessities needed to go through Latino or white inmates because his requests were ignored. That same client was not provided with a mattress and forced to sleep on the floor when the detention center was overcrowded, Solano said.A guard in another detention center called a Black man a dog and told him to "eat his dog food."Another detained Black man, according to his attorney's response to our survey, had a pepper ball thrown in his cell, wasn't allowed to follow his Rastafarian vegan diet, was repeatedly thrown in solitary confinement — once for complaining of a headache — and was regularly subjected to strip searches that kept occurring around visits from his attorney. "After 7 years of practice, I can confidently say that the Black clients I have represented or whose representation I have supervised are consistently subjected to greater degrees of abuse and discrimination," his attorney said.The incarceration capital of the world No state better illustrates the criminalization of immigration detainees, and its collision with longstanding patterns of racism, than Louisiana. It's both the incarceration capital of the world and the solitary confinement capital of the world: 19 percent of prisoners in the state experience some form of solitary confinement, a rate that's four times higher than the national average.It's also been at the forefront of the private prison industry. Across the state, eight new immigration detention centers have been opened in the past three years – all privately run. There are now 11 in total, including the LaSalle Correctional Center where Brandon was detained. Some of these detention centers are operating within state prisons or jails that also detain non-immigrants charged or convicted of crimes.And some of these immigration-only facilities are run by the same staff that used to run the prisons — and the anti-Black bias remains, says ACLU attorney Eunice Cho, who co-authored "Justice Free Zones," an extensive report on conditions in immigration detention centers, "It's just a new phase of mass incarceration of Black folks, whether they are citizens or non-citizens," Cho said."It should not be surprising that Black people continue to suffer disproportionate consequences and treatment in U.S. immigrant detention facilities," said Sami Disu, an adjunct lecturer at the Department of Africana Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. "The routine abuses of imprisoned Black peoples in the regular criminal justice system is extended to Black immigrants in U.S. detention facilities, whether in custody of CBP or stewards in private detention facilities."While the flourishing of private prisons is often associated with the Trump administration, its history extends to prior administrations, and Biden has given for-profit companies a pass to detain migrants.  Just days into office, President Joe Biden signed an executive order to "eliminate the use of privately operated criminal detention facilities," which was welcome news to critics of mass-incarceration. Private prison companies, however, have found ways to circumvent the order and continue operations, and immigration facilities were exempt from the order. Most immigrants today are detained in facilities run by for-profit companies which largely follow the prison model of restrictive and punitive conditions.Since the 2010s, immigration detention has increasingly come to rely on prisons and jails — the brick-and-mortar manifestations of a mass incarceration system that has notoriously and disproportionately targeted Black people. Even as states and the federal government dialed down the number of people held in for-profit prisons, ICE stepped in to contract out and fill recently emptied beds. In Louisiana, after prison reform measures in 2019 led to a drop of 9,000 fewer people in prisons, ICE obtained contracts to detain 6,000 more people in the state. In just Texas and Louisiana, 11 separate facilities in recent years have shifted from prisons or jails to immigration detention centers.Brandon was released from custody In the summer of 2021.Anna Watts for InsiderAnd while the Biden administration has promised to reform and humanize immigration policy, "for the most part they're continuing the detention agenda," said Silky Shah, the executive director of Detention Watch Network. One Black immigrant who spent more than two years in a Louisiana jail and who asked not to be identified because of an ongoing immigration case and a history of retaliation against him, said guards pitted Black and Latino detainees against one another, frequently separating detainees by race. He described how detained Black people were consistently shorted food, passed over for jobs, not given new or clean clothes, subjected to invasive and humiliating body searches, and threatened to be sent to "the hole" — solitary confinement. Though he's been released now for over a year, he continues to have nightmares of his treatment there. "The racial profiling was scary," he said. "I've never experienced racism like that in my life."A 2021 Civil Rights complaint brought by the ACLU and over a dozen partner organizations called for "immediate intervention into the abusive and racially discriminatory pattern of treatment, unlawful conduct, and lack of oversight and accountability" at facilities in five southern states, including Louisiana, that were under the jurisdiction of the New Orleans ICE Field Office.  "Anti-Black racism underlies most of the abuses described in this letter and is an inherent aspect of the US immigration system itself," the report said. At one facility, majority-Black dorms deal with more frequent water shortages, for example.Last May, in Winn Correctional Center — which is operated by LaSalle Corrections, the same company that runs the facility where Brandon was detained — the anti-Black racism reached a pitch, harking back to some of the most vile practices of the Jim Crow South. As detained men were cutting down trees, according to a lawyer who visited the facility, ICE personnel made a joking comment to the effect of "now we can't lynch them." That same attorney reported another incident that occurred when two Cameroonian men asked guards at Winn if they would wear masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19. One of the guards responded by saying "fuck Black people" and pushed one of the detained men, injuring him enough that he had to use a wheelchair. Last July, the SPLC filed a complaint to the head of the Department of Homeland Security and the attorney general on behalf of four formerly detained people who described the persistent abuse and racial discrimination they faced in Allen Parish Public Safety Complex and Pine Prairie ICE Processing Center, both in Louisiana. They said they suffered severe medical abuse, ridicule, and punishment for expressing their support for Black Lives Matter. Among a host of disturbing complaints, the migrants were also refused water when they asked for it. When one of the Black men was attacked by a group of other detained people, "instead of the attackers, the Black victim was locked up [in solitary] for more than 4 days," according to the complaint. Sarah Decker, staff attorney at RFK Human Rights, described the use of these carceral facilities as part of the "Southern Strategy," referencing Nixon's move to appeal to racist sentiments in the south to turn out white voters: transferring detained immigrants to detention centers in the South, where they face much higher asylum denial rates, are more isolated from attorneys and advocacy groups, and suffer more abuse. Over half of all detained immigrants now are locked up in just four states: Texas, Louisiana, Arizona, and Georgia. Those four states also have some of the strictest immigration judges, granting asylum at rates far below the national average. In the New Orleans immigration court, among five judges, the denial rate averages almost 90 percent, whereas the national average is far lower, at 73 percent.Louisiana has become a "place of no return" for migrants, said Decker. "It's where folks, when they get transferred there, have this really intense fear reaction because they know that not only do they have a lot less likelihood of winning their case, but they're also going to experience really enhanced racism while they're waiting for their case in detention." DHS's own Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties recommended that ICE stop sending immigrants to Louisiana's Winn Correctional Center due to a culture of egregious abuse and "serious concerns expressed about the health and safety of detainees."Abuse 'at all stages of the process'Racism in the U.S. immigration enforcement regime is nothing new. The very first federal immigration laws, passed in the late 19th century, specifically targeted Chinese women. The Chinese Exclusion acts, which effectively barred almost all immigration from Asia, were on the books from the early 1880s until 1943. Until 1952, US law (even if it was not always enforced) held that only a "free white person" could naturalize, or become a U.S. citizen.In the 1980s, after Ellis and Angel Island, the country's first immigration detention centers were used  mostly to lock up Haitian asylum seekers as they fled US-backed dictators regimes. Years before the post-9/11 era, when the US Naval base in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, was used to indefinitely detain and torture "enemy combatants," it was established as a detention center for Haitians seeking asylum. "I felt like they saw me like I was an animal from Africa," Brandon said of his time in detention.Anna Watts for InsiderRebekah Wolf, an attorney with the American Immigration Council, who previously managed a legal access program for a detention center in rural New Mexico, calls the modern U.S. detention system "a response to anti-Haitian animus" or "the fear that Black people would come here in boats." To be sure, no person locked in the network of U.S. immigration detention centers — over 200 facilities run largely in the shadows by a mix of government and government-contracted private corporations — has it easy. To be imprisoned, frequently in poor conditions and sometimes for years is one of the poignant cruelties of the increasingly militarized immigration enforcement regime. In the U.S., where more migrants are imprisoned than in any other country in the world, there are certain groups who face particular difficulties. Detained Indigenous people from Central America and elsewhere are often overlooked and left without access to proper interpretation or counsel. Transgender people are brutalized and frequently forced to live, sleep, and even bathe with people not corresponding to their gender. People from countries less represented in the detention system, such as those from South Asia or Eastern Europe, can face serious linguistic and cultural obstacles, as well as isolation. Muslims and Sikhs allege that they are often not offered religiously appropriate diets and are singled out on the basis of their religion.Amid all the systematic and acute cruelties, the treatment of Black migrants from Africa, the Caribbean, and Central and South America in immigration detention, advocates say, reflects the longstanding societal racism in the United States, and particularly in its carceral system.That bias came into sharp relief last September, when thousands of Haitians crossed the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas. Images of Border Patrol agents on horseback whipping and chasing down adults and children seeking asylum were roundly condemned. Critics held it up as a bald-faced example of anti-Black racism. This culminated in one of the largest mass expulsions from the United States in recent history: around 4,000 Haitians were deported from the country in just over one week.The mistreatment of Haitian migrants not only renewed the public's attention to immigration enforcement, but demonstrated who is most negatively affected by the brutality of U.S. immigration enforcement. Part of the reason that Black people suffer disproportionately in immigration detention is that their experience, and they themselves, are largely ignored. "They're not believed," Morris said. "We're not listening to Black immigrants." Anti-Black racism "is so normalized, especially anti-Haitian sentiment, on behalf of career ICE officials," said Wolf. She said a high-ranking ICE detention center official in the state told her that, because Haitians "didn't know how to behave," they needed to be detained under more restrictive circumstances. According to other statistics also compiled by RAICES, among the 10 nationalities with the most asylum decisions from 2012-2017, Haitians had the second-highest denial rate, at 87 percent, despite coming from an extremely politically unstable country beset by persistent violence. In the years before that period, Jamaicans had the highest asylum denial rate. According to the American Bar Association, Somalis also had one of the highest asylum denial rates, as well the highest rates of deportation over the same time period. Between June 2018 and June 2020, the average bond paid by RAICES to get immigrants out of detention was $10,500. But bonds paid for Haitian immigrants averaged $16,700, or 54 percent higher than for other immigrants. Overall, Black immigrants from various countries pay significantly higher bond prices, the researchers found.An American flag blows in the wind near where Brandon is living.Anna Watts for Insider'They saw me like I was an animal from Africa'In the summer of 2021, Brandon was released from detention. With Black people disproportionately being denied asylum, he knows the odds are stacked against him, but he is still fighting for his claim.His next court hearing isn't for another 18 months. During the wait, he is living with a cousin and spending his time helping around the house. Despite repeated requests, he has yet to receive his work permit. Though he is free, for now, his memory of what happened to him still stings. At the same time, the anxiety of what may happen if he is deported, makes it hard to exercise and enjoy that freedom. Back in Cameroon, the repression against anyone labeled a political dissident continues, with stories of denied and deported asylum seekers being imprisoned and tortured. Knowing that others like him were being detained, disappeared, or killed, he headed for refuge in the U.S. "My mind and my head was on one thing: my freedom," he said. That's not what he found. "I felt like they saw me like I was an animal from Africa."On January 14, 2021, five officers in Winn Correctional Center in Louisiana, in an episode hauntingly similar to what happened to Brandon, attacked Cameroonian asylum seeker Acheleke Fuanya "without provocation," according to a complaint filed in U.S. federal court. The complaint says that "the officers surrounded Mr. Fuanya, tripped him to the ground, and kneeled on his neck." The government has not yet responded to the complaint, and ICE spokesperson Sarah Loicano declined to comment on pending litigation.Fuanya said it felt like "they were trying to break every part of my body." As he pleaded for his life and struggled to breathe, the officers "continued to choke him until they grabbed his fingers and forcibly fingerprinted him," according to the complaint, allegedly trying to forcibly deport him. ICE has deported dozens of Cameroonian asylum seekers over the past year in similar ways, even resorting to using a medical restraining device called The Wrap, to threaten and punish asylum seekers during their long deportation flights. Fuanya said the officers' assault against him was rooted in racism. "They way they would talk to you," he explained. "'You people are Black, you are from Africa,'" ICE officers would say to them, according to Fuanya, "like you were shit, like you were nothing."Additional reporting from Sophia Diez-Zhang.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMar 26th, 2022

Tick, Tick, Tick...: The Supreme Court Readies An Explosive Docket For 2022

Tick, Tick, Tick...: The Supreme Court Readies An Explosive Docket For 2022 Authored by Jonathan Turley, Below is my column in the Hill on upcoming year for the Supreme Court. The Court’s docket is likely to put the institution at ground zero of a heated election year. Major decisions on abortion and gun rights are expected by June 2022. Even with Chief Justice John Roberts denouncing attempts at “inappropriate political influence” on the Court, the threats of Court packing and other measures are likely to become even more shrill as these decisions rollout in the new year. Here is the column: The late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once observed that “it’s hard not to have a big year at the Supreme Court.” However, there are some years that are bigger than others. That’s what 2022 is likely to be. The court has accepted a series of transformative cases with few available exit ramps. It recently added to that list. In other words, it is likely to issue historic rulings on abortion, gun rights and an assortment of other issues. The fact that the Supreme Court is going to hand down such decisions in a major election year is also noteworthy. The court tends to be more conservative in the selection of cases before major elections, but 2022 will put the court at ground zero in one of the most heated elections in history. For those calling to pack the court to ensure a liberal majority, the already furious commentary is likely to reach near hysteria if the conservative majority rules as expected in some of these cases in the first half of 2022. Here’s just a partial list of what is coming in the new year: Abortion The country is awaiting a decision by June in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. At issue is whether Mississippi can impose a 15-week limit on abortions. That is earlier than previously allowed by the court, but the United States is one of only seven among the world’s 198 countries to allow abortions after 20 weeks. While the court could simply overturn Roe v. Wade and return the area to the states, it is more likely that the court will increase the authority of the states while recognizing constitutional protections for such reproductive rights. That could result in a major reframing of “previability” cases. After Dobbs was accepted, advocates sought to enjoin a Texas law that banned abortion after just six weeks. The court ruled 5-4 to allow the Texas law to be enforced. The Biden administration and other litigants then forced a reconsideration of that decision. The court — as expected — allowed the appeal to go forward for some of the litigants in the lower court but again refused to enjoin the law. To make matters worse, it declared the Biden administration’s appeal to be “improvidently granted.” Gun rights If Dobbs is a frightening thought for abortion advocates, New York State Rifle and Pistol Association Inc. v. Bruen is a virtual heart attack for gun control advocates. In the latest badly drafted gun law to go before the court, New York has forced a challenge that could result in a major ruling reinforcing individual rights under the Second Amendment. The case deals with the Sullivan Act of 1911, giving local officials discretion over who can carry concealed guns based on a showing of “proper cause.” Bruen is likely to reinforce rights for concealed carry permits — negating a host of laws across the country. Agency deference While not often discussed with the “matinee” cases of the term, one case on the docket could bring sweeping impacts across various areas — from the environment to financial regulations to public health. American Hospital Association (AHA) v. Becerra raises a highly technical question of a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services rule that cut outpatient drug reimbursements to hospitals. The rule is based on an agency interpretation of vague statutory provisions — an interpretation that was defended under the deference afforded to agency decisions. (Notably, the court has accepted a variety of other cases that could curtail agency authority, including West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency, which could also curtail efforts on climate change.) The case is technically about outpatient care for Medicare Part B recipients; however, for some justices, particularly Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch, it is all about Chevron and agency deference. Chevron USA Inc. v. Natural Resources Defense Council Inc. is a 1984 administrative law case that has come to embody the role of federal agencies in not just enforcing but creating law. The “Chevron Doctrine” has insulated agency decisions for decades from substantive review, giving federal agencies an overwhelming degree of authority in our system of government. For some of us, the dominance of federal agencies has become equivalent to a fourth branch of government. The question is whether a critical mass has formed on the court to substantially curtail that decision. If so, AHA v. Becerra could be a torpedo in the water for the Chevron Doctrine. New cases With these and other important cases on the docket, it is hardly necessary to add anything new to such a momentous year. Yet the court is not done — by a long shot. At the end of 2021, the Supreme Court dove into the raging debate over vaccine mandates. It ordered an expedited argument in three such cases for Jan. 7. The appeal raises the legality of the emergency temporary standard issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration requiring a vaccine-or-test mandate for private employers with more than 100 employees. The case, again, raises core issues of agency deference as well as federal authority in this area. Courts have split on what White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain admits was a “workaround” of the limits on the president’s authority. The court is still mulling the case of Students for Fair Admissions Inc. v. President & Fellows of Harvard College, a Title VI case in which Harvard University is accused of rigging its admissions process against Asian American students. It’s the flip side of past racial preference cases in college admission, an area that has remained a morass of fractured or conflicting decisions for the court. This is just a partial listing of what is coming in the new year. It is perhaps not surprising that Democratic members of Congress and liberal groups are threatening the justices of “consequences” or even a “revolution” if they do not vote with the left of the court. Such threats, however, may backfire. Not only is Chief Justice John Roberts the most popular public official today, but even liberal justices have chafed at the claim that this is a “conservative” or biased court. The new year will test the design of our constitutional system in insulating the court from such public pressures, even direct threats to the court or individual justices from politicians. With some of the most important decisions coming by June 2022, there will be plenty of time to weaponize the opinions for the midterm elections. Former President and Chief Justice William Howard Taft once observed that “presidents come and go, but the Supreme Court goes on forever.” That may be reassuring to some justices as the Supreme Court enters one of the most existential years of its history. Tyler Durden Mon, 01/03/2022 - 12:42.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJan 3rd, 2022

4 Marijuana Stocks to Watch as Legalization Efforts Intensify

Legalization at state level is ramping up and once federal legalization is achieved marijuana stocks like Tilray, Inc. (TLRY), Sundial Growers (SNDL), Block Inc. (SQ) and Innovative Industrial Properties, Inc. (IIPR) are poised to perform well. Marijuana stocks started the year on a high but have lately faced ups and downs. However, the euphoria hasn’t died out and even without federal legalization, pot stocks are doing well.Domestic pot stocks had particularly performed well in the first half of this year. However, Canadian companies that showed promise earlier on in 2021 are facing some roadblocks. Canadian pot producers are now betting on the U.S. market but making inroads would be a challenge as marijuana isn’t fully legalized in the country. Thus, domestic players like Tilray, Inc. TLRY,  Sundial Growers SNDL, Block Inc. SQ and Innovative Industrial Properties, Inc. IIPR are likely to dominate the space in the coming days.Wait for LegalizationThe pandemic saw cannabis stocks flourishing, with the sector hitting a record $17.5 billion in sales last year. The positive trend continued and investors expected the sector to benefit after the 2020 Presidential election and eventual Democratic victories in Congress. This saw marijuana stocks peaking in February.However, the pace of federal legalization has somewhat slowed down. Marijuana investors had hoped that Biden would keep his campaign promise and his administration would push for marijuana legalization through Congress in 2021. That hasn’t happened and legalization can now become reality only in 2022.Efforts to Legalize Marijuana ContinueA little patience can prove beneficial for those who are hopeful about the sector’s future. Earlier this year, the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act (MORE Act) and the Medical Marijuana Act was passed by the Democrat-led House, hinting at legalization of marijuana in the coming days.The two acts have paved the way for banks and other financial institutions to provide services to marijuana companies in legalized states without penalty. Now the wait is for the decriminalization of marijuana at the federal level, while state level legalization continues to ramp up. States like Ohio have been pushing for legalizing marijuana and although slow, the process is on.While a few Democrats are strongly pushing for federal-level legalization in the near term, President Biden needs to take a call. According to a report in Marijuana.Moments.net, Rep. Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez has urged Biden to bypass Congressional inaction and decriminalize marijuana by a de facto law through his executive orders.“Biden needs to lean on his executive authority now. He has been delaying and underutilizing it so far. There is an enormous amount he can do on climate, student debt, immigration, cannabis, health care, and more,” Ocasi-Cortez tweeted on Dec 21.At present, with prohibition on, it means higher taxes, higher cost of capital alongside compliance costs. Legalization of marijuana would boost free flow of cash, leading to a higher valuation.The hope of marijuana getting legalized has also seen top companies buying other entities. Legalization at the federal level is only likely to supercharge growth for the sector in 2022. Also, longer regulatory timelines will allow marijuana stocks with strong fundamentals to cement their position in the industry.In fact, there are multiple catalysts in place that are likely to help marijuana stocks in 2022. According to BDSA, cannabis sales in the United States is projected to surpass $24 billion in 2021. This reflects 38% year-over-year growth. Moreover, it expects U.S. sales to reach $47.6 billion in 2026 at a CAGR of 14%.Experts believe that the marijuana industry is likely to experience a domino effect soon with more states legalizing it. The states that have now made marijuana legal will create pressure on their neighbouring states to follow suit so that they can curb tax revenues. As more states legalize marijuana, the government will be under pressure to decriminalize pot at the federal level.4 Stocks to Watch in 2022Tilray, Inc. is a pharmaceutical company. TLRY develops cannabis-based medicines, drugs, drops and oil products. Tilray  provides medical and adult-use cannabis products; pharmaceutical and wellness products; beverage alcohol products; and hemp-based food and other wellness products. Currently, Tilray has a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold). TLRY’s expected earnings growth rate is 41.3% for the current year and 44.4% for next year. You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank stocks here.Sundial Growers operates as a pharmaceutical company. SNDL produces and grows cannabis strains. Sundial produces and distributes inhalable products, such as flower, pre-rolls, and vapes. The company offers its products under the Top Leaf, Sundial Cannabis, Palmetto, and Grasslands brands.Currently, SNDL has a  Zacks Rank #3. SNDL’s expected earnings growth rate is 69.3% for the current year and more than 100% for next year.Block Inc. provides payment and point-of-sale solutions in the United States and internationally. But Block introduced CBD early-access program that permits business houses in the United States to sell CBD products.Zacks Rank #3 SQ has an expected earnings growth rate of 94.1% for the current year and 8.6% for next year.Innovative Industrial Properties, Inc.  is a real estate investment trust. IIPR is focused on the acquisition, ownership and management of specialized industrial properties leased to experienced, state-licensed operators for medical-use cannabis facilities. In this process, Innovative Industrial Properties is reaping rental income.Currently, IIPR has a Zacks Rank #3. Innovative Industrial Properties’ expected earnings growth rate for the current and next year is 35% and 36.1%, respectively. The Zacks Consensus Estimate for its current-year earnings has climbed 0.6% over the past 90 days. Zacks Top 10 Stocks for 2022 In addition to the investment ideas discussed above, would you like to know about our 10 top picks for the entirety of 2022? From inception in 2012 through November, the Zacks Top 10 Stocks gained an impressive +962.5% versus the S&P 500’s +329.4%. Now our Director of Research is combing through 4,000 companies covered by the Zacks Rank to handpick the best 10 tickers to buy and hold. Don’t miss your chance to get in on these stocks when they’re released on January 3.Be First to New Top 10 Stocks >>Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report Block Inc. (SQ): Free Stock Analysis Report Innovative Industrial Properties, Inc. (IIPR): Free Stock Analysis Report Tilray, Inc. (TLRY): Free Stock Analysis Report Sundial Growers Inc. (SNDL): Free Stock Analysis Report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksDec 23rd, 2021

Texas Party Switcher Is Latest Ominous Sign For Democrats

Texas Party Switcher Is Latest Ominous Sign For Democrats Authored by Susan Crabtree via RealClearPolitics.com, Ryan Guillen had been a Democratic member of the Texas legislature, representing a sprawling district south of San Antonio, for nearly two decades. This week he jumped ship for the Republican Party, blaming Democrats for leaving him, not the other way around. Normally such a move would make local and state news, but certainly not prime-time national coverage. Yet, on Wednesday night, Fox News’ Laura Ingraham gleefully cited the defection as further proof that “truly smart” Democrats are abandoning a sinking ship. While Guillen is a state lawmaker whose switch won’t impact which party holds power in Washington, there’s one sign that this may not be an isolated example: At least nine congressional House Democrats have  announced they are not seeking reelection next year. More are expected to follow. Highlighting the shifting political terrain in South Texas isn’t just a partisan exercise. The New York Times’ Tom Edsall this week cited evidence that President Biden’s immigration record and Democrats’ progressive agenda is hurting them with traditional-base voters, especially Hispanics in Texas border counties. “Democrats shouldn’t panic,” Edsall wrote. “They should go into shock.” Explaining his switch to the GOP, Guillen provided more fodder for veteran campaign consultant James Carville and others warning Democrats to rein in their left wing. The 44-year-old anti-abortion and pro-gun lawmaker cited the defund-the-police push and the climate change movement, which he said is “destroying” the Lone Star state’s oil and gas industry, along with the “chaos at the border.” “Friends, something is happening in South Texas, and many of us are waking up to the fact that the values of those in Washington, D.C., are not our values, not the values of most Texans,” he said at a press conference Monday with Gov. Greg Abbott and House Speaker Dade Phelan, both Republicans. Democrats quickly pointed out that Guillen made the switch only after the GOP-led redistricting process turned his already Republican-leaning district scarlet. Texas is the only state to gain two congressional seats after the 2020 census, and Republicans control the state legislature and governor’s mansion, and thus the redistricting process.   Yet Guillen wasn’t exaggerating when he said there’s a significant political sea change taking place in South Texas. His move was the latest sign of a rightward shift in the Rio Grande region in recent years. Donald Trump won Guillen’s district by 13 percentage points in 2020; just four years earlier, Hillary Clinton carried it by the same margin. The voters still chose Guillen by 17 points last year, but the new map could have threatened such margins for him in the future. The newly formed district voted for Trump by 25 points. Republicans are heavily targeting three South Texas congressional seats held by Democrats and are encouraged by Guillen’s switch and other signs of GOP inroads in traditionally more liberal areas of the state. That trio of districts voted for Joe Biden by just two to four percentage points in 2020, down from the 17-to-22-point margins Clinton garnered in 2016. The first signs of Democratic vulnerability in districts along the U.S.-Mexico border came earlier this year when Rep. Filemon Vela, who represents Texas’ 34th Congressional District, announced his retirement. Then, in June, the traditionally Democratic border city of McAllen elected a Republican mayor in Javier Villalobos, a former Hidalgo County GOP chairman. (The county had gone for Biden by 17 percentage points over Trump.) Another warning for Democrats came a few weeks ago when Democratic Rep. Vicente Gonzalez announced he would run in the adjacent 34th district because he no longer felt confident about holding onto Texas’ 15th. Gonzalez won the 15th by nearly 20 percentage points in 2016 but by just 2.9 points last year. Gonzalez publicly claimed he didn’t have much of a choice after Republicans made his district redder, but the Texas Tribune reported the decision was more deliberate than Gonzalez let on. A Democratic amendment to the redistricting process moved his home into the 34th district. In early November, Republicans also picked up an additional Democratic-friendly state House seat in San Antonio, an area where Biden won comfortably but still underperformed expectations last year. After Guillen’s jump to the GOP this week, liberal groups assailed aggressive GOP redistricting tactics as a prime motivating factor. Common Cause, a liberal nonprofit that advocates for easier voting access, accused Texas Republicans of “whitewashing” state legislative and congressional districts to dilute the power of minority voters. Anthony Gutierrez, who heads Common Cause’s Texas office, said Republicans revealed the new maps just three days before a scheduled vote on them, “providing almost no time for people to assess the maps or go talk to impacted communities.” Democrats are now fighting the redrawn districts in court. Eric Holder, who served as attorney general in the Obama administration, now chairs the National Democratic Redistricting Committee. The committee filed a suit arguing the new congressional districts lines violate Voting Rights Act protections for minority populations and are gerrymandered to give Republicans an advantage. It’s a familiar refrain. In most states, the power to create new congressional maps lies with the state legislature after the decennial U.S. Census, and the majority party in power often attempts to redraw them to benefit their members. But election experts counter that Democrats are trying offset Republican redistricting gains in Texas and Florida in areas where they control the state legislatures, such as California, New York and Illinois. In these states and in most areas across the country, heavily Democratic urban areas are growing while rural GOP areas are losing population. The stakes this year are particularly high with Republicans only needing to gain five seats in 2022 to win control of the House. Republicans are hoping the path to regaining the majority runs through South Texas and they point to Guillen’s decision to switch parties as the latest bad omen for Democrats. “Texas Democrats are retiring or becoming Republicans because they know they’re doomed in in 2022,” said Torunn Sinclair, a spokeswoman for the National Republican Congressional Committee. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee didn’t respond to a request for comment. It’s not surprising that Biden’s plummeting poll numbers are worse in Texas than they are nationally. A recent University of Texas and Texas Tribune survey, released Nov. 8, found only 35% of Texans approve of the way Biden is handling his job while 55% of voters disapprove. The survey showed that Texas voters, more than a third of whom are Hispanic, rank Biden the lowest on his handling of immigration and border security with only 22% of respondents saying they approve of his record on that issue and 63% saying they disapprove. Democrats are hoping to bolster Biden’s sinking popularity by pushing through a massive $1.85 trillion climate and social spending bill known as Build Back Better. Last month, Biden warned Democrats that their “House and Senate majorities and my presidency” will be determined “by what happens” to the latest version of the measure. “I don’t think it’s hyperbole,” he said, referring to polls indicating many of the individual provisions are popular with voters. The legislation, which White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain has described as “twice as big in real dollars as the New Deal,” would provide free preschool for all children, expand the child tax credit and bolster liberals’ green agenda with numerous consumer rebates and tax credits for clean energy investments. To help pay for the spending package, Democrats are proposing to increase taxes on wealthy Americans and corporations, including new taxes on oil and gas producers. It’s a  controversial move in Texas, even among some Democrats. At least 620,000 jobs are connected to the oil and gas industry across the state, and oil production in South Texas has helped transform the relatively poor region into a boom area over the past decade. The plan would penalize oil and gas companies for leaks of methane from wellheads, pipelines, storage and other facilities to the tune of $1 billion to $10 billion annually. Proponents say the tax would serve as incentive for companies to stop leaks and avoid wasting methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Vela and Gonzalez, who founded the House Oil and Gas Caucus, as well as Texas Democratic Rep. Henry Cuellar, sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer in late September asking them not to include the methane tax. Another controversial piece of the House version of the bill would allow illegal immigrants to obtain child tax credits. The final House version of the Build Back Better bill, which the House could vote on as soon as Friday, still includes these two provisions. Despite this, Gonzalez and Cuellar have signaled they will vote in favor of it, a point Republicans will inevitably hammer home in ads to voters for months to come. Tyler Durden Fri, 11/19/2021 - 21:40.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 20th, 2021

Buchanan: Are Democrats Looking To The Lifeboats?

Buchanan: Are Democrats Looking To The Lifeboats? Authored by Pat Buchanan, Not so long ago, President Joe Biden was being talked of as a transformative president, a second Franklin D. Roosevelt in terms of the domestic agenda he would enact. And there was substance to the claim. Early in his presidency, Biden had passed a $1.9 trillion stimulus package. While his majorities in both houses of Congress were razor-thin, they proved sufficient to push through a $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill. Clusters of Republicans backed the Biden infrastructure bill. A follow-on $3.5 trillion Build Back Better social spending bill to rival New Deal and Great Society measures has broad support — though not for its sticker price — and, even today, still seems possible. So, how are Biden and the administration he leads doing with the American people who put them into office? According to a stunning Washington Post-ABC News poll this weekend, not well, not well at all. If the 2022 elections were held this November, registered voters would back Republican candidates over Democratic opponents 51-41. The GOP voter advantage would translate into a rout of Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s House Democrats, loss of the Senate, two years of gridlock and a lame-duck Biden presidency through 2023 and 2024. If that Post-ABC poll is accurate, Democrats are staring into the abyss. According to the poll, 70% of Americans have a negative view of how the economy is doing under Biden, while 38%, almost 4 in 10, believe the economy is in “poor” condition. “About half of Americans overall and political independents blame Biden for fast-rising inflation,” writes the Post, ” … with more than 6 in 10 saying he has accomplished ‘not much’ or ‘little or nothing.'” Seven in 10 independent voters believe Biden’s presidency lacks any real achievements. Is this Biden likely to enter the history books alongside FDR? Probably not. Only 8% of the nation thinks he has done a “great deal” in his first year, which corresponds to FDR’s famous “First 100 Days” in 1933. On how he is handling his presidency overall, Biden has the approval of 41% and the disapproval of 53% of all Americans. Biden is 12 points underwater. While he has suffered attrition in his own Democratic Party, it is among independent voters that his losses have been staggering. On the issues of whether the government is spending too much and whether parents should play a role in deciding what their children are taught in public schools, the GOP stance is overwhelmingly supported. That same Sunday edition of the Post that described the Biden polls contained a lengthy political analysis of the relative strength of Vice President Kamala Harris and Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg as potential Democratic nominees in 2024. The unstated premise of the piece seemed to be that Biden’s first term is his last, if he makes it through to 2024. About the plunge in support for Biden’s presidency, the questions are coming fast. Can he turn this around? Is the attrition inexorable? Are we headed for a broken presidency? To answer the questions, consider the root causes of Biden’s decline. Four of the issue areas where Biden and the Democrats are on the defensive are: inflation, immigration, crime and education. In October, the consumer price index was 6.2% above a year ago, the highest surge in inflation in 31 years. The family necessities of food and gasoline are showing some of the steepest price increases. Several months ago, Democrats were saying the price surge was “transitory.” Few are saying that now. The choked supply chain for commodities from abroad looks like it will take a long time to unravel. Americans are looking at a Thanksgiving with fewer turkeys and a Christmas with fewer toys. As for the border crisis, which was put in Harris’ portfolio, it is seeing the highest rates of illegal entries in decades, with more than a million having crossed our southern border since Biden took the oath. And they are still coming. In the aftermath of the “Defund the Police!” protests and riots in the wake of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis in 2020, resignations and retirements of cops have gone hand in hand with an explosion of murders and homicides in America’s major cities. Chicago has become notorious for its weekly casualty count. On the education issue, which now embraces the rights of parents to review what their children are being taught about race, sex and morality in their public schools — the issue probably cost Terry McAuliffe his chance to return as governor of Virginia. And Republicans now seem in step with suburban parents as Democrats appear to be on the side of leftist teachers unions. The returns from Virginia and New Jersey on Election Day seem to confirm what ABC and the Post found in their poll: A tidal wave may be coming, and if it does not crest and break before November 2022, it will swamp Nancy Pelosi’s House and Chuck Schumer’s Senate, and it will sink Joe Biden’s White House. That’s the climate change Democrats ought to be worrying about. Tyler Durden Tue, 11/16/2021 - 16:45.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytNov 16th, 2021

At one of the last abortion clinics in South Texas, people are learning they"re pregnant when it"s already too late to get an abortion

In Texas' Rio Grande Valley - one of the poorest regions in the country - getting an abortion was already difficult. Now, it's nearly impossible. Protesters hold signs supporting abortion clinic access on March 2, 2016 in Washington, DC. Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images In the Rio Grande Valley, one of the poorest regions in the US, getting an abortion was already hard. After Texas passed a law banning abortions after 6 weeks of pregnancy, it's nearly impossible. The 19th visited the only abortion provider south of San Antonio to see what it's like for people. See more stories on Insider's business page. McAllen, TX - Karla S. knew she was pregnant almost right away. She could tell by the smells: "Everything was rancid," Karla said.She texted her boyfriend, who bought her a test that she took that same night. When the result was positive, she didn't know what to do. "It made me very nervous," said Karla, whose full name has been withheld for privacy. "But it also made me very determined. I was not in any type of way prepared to have a child. I had to be very sure of what I was going to do." Karla, 23, was on birth control - she hadn't been trying to conceive. For two weeks, she sat with the decision of whether or not to have the baby, trying to picture herself with a child. It didn't click. She wants to have children someday, but she wants to finish college first. So she made an appointment at Whole Woman's Health in McAllen, Texas, the only abortion clinic serving the Rio Grande Valley, which spans about 4,250 square miles and includes a large portion of the state's border with Mexico. It was a little over two weeks after Senate Bill 8, Texas' new law banning abortion after six weeks, went into effect.Even before SB 8, Texans were already facing an uphill battle when it came to access. The burden is especially acute in the Valley, a remote part of the state which is one of the poorest areas not just in the state of Texas, but in the entire country.The McAllen clinic is Texas' only abortion provider south of San Antonio, close to 250 miles away. It draws people from all over the region - which is home to almost 1.4 million people, predominantly Latinx - many traveling close to 200 miles each way for an appointment. Every doctor who performs abortions here travels from somewhere else - Austin or Houston or California - and the clinic's appointment schedule depends in large part on when they are able to practice.While clinics in Oklahoma, Kansas, and New Mexico are all reporting surges in Texas-based patients, it's particularly difficult to make the journey from the Valley. The closest out-of-state option from McAllen is in Mexico City, at least two hours on a plane, or close to 600 miles driving. It's a journey that simply isn't feasible for many people who come to Whole Woman's Health. Now that getting an abortion is nearly impossible under the best of circumstances, what happens if something goes wrong? That's what Karla, a lifelong resident of the Valley, had to figure out.Karla lives a city over from McAllen, in Mission. She went to Whole Woman's Health for the first time on September 17, and was still under that gestational limit. Texas requires anyone seeking an abortion to wait 24 hours after their initial consult, so the next day, on Friday, September 18, she went back and was given the set of pills that would induce an abortion: One to take in the clinic, and the other at home.After 24 hours, nothing had happened. Karla didn't bleed or experience cramps or any of the symptoms indicating the abortion had worked. The following Monday, the soonest she could get an appointment, she went to the McAllen clinic and took more pills. Still, nothing happened. Tuesday, she came in one more time, hoping to get a surgical abortion instead. She knew she was running out of time."I'm hoping this will work," she told The 19th that day through tears. "I was already at five weeks. I don't want to get closer to six, or even seven." At Whole Woman's Health, the network of abortion clinics, the procedure and necessary appointments cost at least $800 - far more than what it costs in many other states - and abortions in Texas are rarely covered by health insurance. There are financial resources available that, in theory, would be even better equipped now to offer support. The Frontera Fund, which helps people in the Valley pay for abortions and associated travel, was overwhelmed with donations after the Texas law took effect. But requests for aid have fallen sharply, said Zaena Zamora, the fund's executive director. Before SB 8 went into effect, three to five people would call each day to request help paying for an abortion, she said. Now they get one call a day if they're lucky. Zamora believes that's a byproduct of people being unable to book appointments in the state. And for many, she said, leaving to get an abortion elsewhere isn't possible. They don't have time off from work. They can't risk forgoing the wages. Most of the callers Frontera Fund does get are parents, so going out of state means bringing their kids with them or finding child care. Abortion remains stigmatized, and it's harder to explain where someone is going, and why they might have to leave the state for a few days. And anyone traveling north of McAllen will face immigration checkpoints - a deterrent in particular for people who are undocumented. About 136,000 undocumented people live in the Valley's two largest counties, per the Migration Policy Institute. That means that, for many, there is no point in asking for help to pay for out-of-state travel - they can't go anywhere.I can be broke now, or I can be broke the next 18 years of my life. Karla S."I can't make up for lost wages. I can't find a nanny or someone to take care of your children for you. I can't call your boss and ask for your time off," Zamora said. "And people from the Valley - some of us never leave the Valley. We're a very close, tight-knit community, and some people never leave here."In that way, Karla is one of the lucky ones. Traveling to get an abortion would pose a substantial hardship, to be sure. It would drain her savings, but it would be doable. Right now, she works as a cashier at a grocery store. But she had been feeling sick recently, and that, combined with the time off she sought to recover from her first attempt at an abortion, meant she hadn't worked in more than a week. She wasn't sure she would be put back on the schedule until October - until, the day after her abortion, she received a lucky, unexpected call asking her to come back. If she had had to travel, her boyfriend would accompany her, helping drive to Mexico, or to a clinic in New Mexico. That would require him missing days of work - foregoing income - to say nothing of the money needed for traveling, for housing and for the abortion itself. Though a fund like Frontera could have helped, nobody had told Karla such organizations existed, or helped her get in touch with one. "We would definitely struggle. We would have to play catch up for a while," she said. But compared to the alternative? There's no question, she said. "I can be broke now, or I can be broke the next 18 years of my life."When Karla went in for her appointment, she found she was able to expel the embryo, even without any visible bleeding. The abortion had worked after all.People coming in to the clinic to find out if they're pregnant are learning they're too far along to get an abortion Whole Woman's Health in McAllen, seen here in 2016, is the only abortion clinic serving the Rio Grande Valley, which spans about 4,250 square miles and includes a large portion of Texas's border with Mexico. Ilana Panich-Linsman for the Washington Post via Getty Images In the days before SB 8 took effect, calls to the McAllen's Whole Woman's Health clinic surged - one day, there were close to 50 back-to-back, a clinic staffer recalled.The clinic is open Monday through Saturday, with procedures typically performed on Mondays and Tuesdays and the other days open for follow-ups, counseling and visits from patients seeking medications like the morning-after pill. Before SB 8, between 40 to 50 patients would come in on any given service day for a consultation and then, after the 24-hour waiting period, an abortion. Now, that number has fallen by close to half, said Veronica Hernandez, the clinic director. Maybe 20 to 30 people will come for a consultation. Of those patients, typically half will be able to get an abortion under SB 8."It's heartbreaking," she said. "There are patients you want to help, but you can't. And they're emotional, or they start crying, and you want to help, but your hands are tied." The decline was visible the week of Monday, September 20, when The 19th visited the clinic. That Monday, Hernandez estimated eight patients came for ultrasounds to see how far along in their pregnancy they were. Only two of them were under the six-week mark, and could, if they wanted to, schedule an abortion for the next day. That same day, another 23 patients, who believed they were earlier than six weeks, came in for an initial consultation with the doctor, planning to get an abortion the next day, Hernandez said. Of the 23, only about half qualified. The rest were later in their pregnancy than they realized. More from The 19th Abortion providers ask Supreme Court to quickly intervene in challenge to Texas law The 19th wants to know how the Texas abortion law has impacted you and your community 'We're seeing shock.' Texas abortion clinics are now operating as trauma centers Most of the remaining patients came back the next day for an abortion. Those who couldn't, Hernandez said, either couldn't find child care or get away from work for the appointment.The window of eligibility to get an abortion in Texas is infinitesimal. Functionally, pregnant people have about a one-week window in which an abortion is feasible - even smaller than the two-week period experts initially forecast as a best-care scenario.It has to be late enough in pregnancy that something can show up on an ultrasound, but early enough that the abortion can be done before the six-week deadline. Patients, skittish about the new law, are calling and coming in too early in their pregnancy, undergoing a sonogram that will not show anything, and having to reschedule to return a week later. Laura M. was one of the people able to make it back to the clinic. A 32-year-old teacher and parent to a 5-year-old son, Laura took two days off work, and her boyfriend drove her more than an hour both days to make it to the clinic. When Laura first suspected she was pregnant, her home test came back negative. A week later, on September 8, she went to her doctor, who did a transvaginal ultrasound. Nothing appeared on the screen. But the nagging feeling wouldn't disappear. So on Friday, September 17, she took one more test. This time, it was positive. The previous test and ultrasound had just been too early in the pregnancy to detect anything. She made an appointment for a week later - September 24. But she was worried. It felt like she was waiting too long. So she came earlier. On September 20, she had her initial consultation and ultrasound at Whole Woman's Health, where she learned she was 5.3 weeks pregnant. She just made it. "I had only a few days to work with," she said on September 21, from the clinic's waiting room. "And I know I got really, really lucky."Experts worry more people will buy abortion pills from flea markets or Mexico because they can't legally access care in TexasLaura's journey was one of the easier ones. She had the $800 because she had been saving up for a house, but had she not been, she isn't sure whether the procedure would have been affordable. And in the Valley, an hour-long drive isn't necessarily so far.But for other patients, the distances are far greater. Dr. Blair Cushing, a California-based OB/GYN and one of the main abortion providers at the clinic, saw another patient that Tuesday morning who had traveled more than 100 miles to come to the clinic. Because she lived far away, the patient was eligible to do her initial appointment over the phone the day prior. But she still had to get an ultrasound when she came in. No embryo appeared on the screen. She was still too early in her pregnancy, and had made the two-hour drive - each way - for nothing. Abortion rights activists rally at the Texas State Capitol against SB 8, which prohibits abortions in Texas after a fetal heartbeat is detected on an ultrasound, on September 11, 2021 in Austin, Texas. Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images "Now, she's got to do it all over again with another doctor later this week," Cushing said. "If she doesn't come back until next week when I'm here, that's 10 days from now? Eight days from now? That leaves her open to the possibility she could be too far."Cushing worries that the law has decimated a system that, for many patients in the Valley, was already inaccessible. Even before SB 8, coming to the McAllen clinic meant a particularly long journey and an expensive procedure. "We were already patients' not even their Plan B, their Plan C," Cushing said. "My patients are like, 'I tried emergency contraception and that failed.' And then, 'I went to Mexico and took pills, and that failed. And now I'm here.'"Self-managed abortions are particularly common in the area, in large part because it's a far cheaper option. Medication abortion pills from the nearby flea markets, or from a pharmacy across the border, might cost $40. A 2018 study found that about a third of McAllen-based respondents knew of somewhere other than a medical establishment where they might find abortion pills. Self-managed abortion can be done safely. But patients buying the pills elsewhere frequently get wrong information about how to take the pills - which can in turn result in complications, often in the form of excessive bleeding that results in them having to seek emergency care. And often, pills taken incorrectly won't work to actually end a pregnancy. It's too early to tell if SB 8 is driving more people in the Valley to those self-managed abortions. But evidence suggests it's a strong possibility, said Kari White, an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin, and the lead researcher for its Texas Policy Evaluation Project.In the spring of 2020, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott temporarily barred abortion providers from practicing in the state, citing the emerging COVID-19 crisis and the need to preserve medical supplies. The order only lasted a month, but in that time, the number of Texans who got abortions fell dramatically, compared to previous years. She anticipates a similar pattern the longer SB 8 stays in effect. "It's possible, because of what we have observed in some of our prior studies, that people may be able to get medications in Mexico or try to access medications online," she said. Through her research, she has interviewed many Texans who buy those pills outside of medical settings. Often, she said, they aren't properly instructed on how to take the medication - putting them at risk of complications, or the abortion simply not working."They may not know how many pills to take or in what time period," she said. "They may get very concerned about how much bleeding they're having or maybe they didn't take as many as they needed to, so it's not effective."The greatest stress test has yet to emerge, Hernandez said. September is usually a slower month. But if the Texas law stays in effect throughout the year - if it's still being enforced come December or January, the busiest time of year for the clinic - she is worried about the implications. The federal Department of Justice has stepped in, suing the state of Texas over the law, which does not appear to comply with the precedent established by the Supreme Court's 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling. The DOJ is seeking a temporary injunction to block the law. But the case won't be heard until October 1, and a ruling won't come until after that.Even if the law is blocked, the state of Texas is likely to appeal to the next court, the conservative 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. The uncertainty means that Whole Woman's Health hasn't yet decided if it would start offering abortions after six weeks, even with a favorable ruling.Hernandez can't let herself process that reality. It's too hard to think past tomorrow, and maybe the day after."I never expected this to happen," she said. "It's just like everything - everything is crumbling down." Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 27th, 2021