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JetBlue"s New York to London Heathrow flights to begin in August

JetBlue said its JFK to London Gatwick Airport flights will start on September 29, and its London service from Boston will start in summer 2022......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 19th, 2021

South African Airways is flying again after its government cut funding last year. Here"s a look at the collapse and revival of the 87-year-old national airline.

The airline has served South Africa since before the country became truly independent from the UK and has a history largely molded by its country's laws. SAA relaunches flights after a year of inactivity Reuters South African Airways relaunched operations with a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town after a year of inactivity. Though not involved in the relaunch, the airline has likely secured a new investor, Takatso Consortium. SAA said it's optimistic about its revival, but it's not without its skeptics. See more stories on Insider's business page. South African Airways was on the brink of disappearance after years of financial struggles, but it may have received a lifeline.On Thursday, the carrier relaunched operations on a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town using money it received from the South African government. After getting in millions from the state, the long-suffering carrier was denied further funding last year, and, as FlightGlobal reported, business rescuers entrusted with the difficult task of rescuing the 87-year-old airline had given it two options: liquidation or a wind-down and sale process.However, SAA has likely secured a private investor, Takatso Consortium, in June 2021, which agreed to funnel up to $243 million into the crippled airline over the next three years. Takatso Consortium CEO Gidon Novick said the relaunch is independent of the negotiations between the consortium and the carrier.Take a look at South African Airways' collapse and rebirth. The airline itself dates back to 1934 when South Africa's Union Airways was nationalized to form the new South African Airways. The state-owned airline would become the flag carrier of South Africa, which was still part of the British Empire at the time. A South African Airways Junkers aircraft. The Print Collector/Print Collector/Getty Source: South African Airways Initial operations for South African included regional flights within Africa. Intra-African and domestic flights were operated by aircraft including the Junkers Ju 52, Douglas DC-3, and Junkers Ju 86. A Douglas DC-3 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways Once World War II ended, South African expanded beyond the shores of its home continent with a multi-stop flight to the heart of the British Empire. The route was known as the "Springbok" service, after the national animal of South Africa. An Avro York aircraft similar to the one used by South African Airways. The Montifraulo Collection/Getty Source: South African Airways The 34-hour, three-day service initially flown by an Avro York aircraft, stopped in Nairobi, Kenya; Khartoum, Sudan; Cairo, Egypt; and Castel Benito, Libya, before arriving in Bournemouth, England. An Avro York aircraft similar to the one used by South African Airways. The Montifraulo Collection/Getty Source: South African Airways Springbok would also become the radio callsign for South African Airways flights. A Douglas DC-3 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com More modern aircraft from Western manufacturers including the Lockheed Constellation L-749 and Douglas DC-4 were later added, helping fuel international expansion. A Douglas DC-4 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways The airline added flight attendants on its services in 1946 and later added in-flight movies to some of its flights in the same decade. A Douglas DC-3 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways South Africa entered the jet age in 1953 with a British Overseas Airways Corporation de Havilland Comet operated by South African Airways that flew from Johannesburg to London. A BOAC de Havilland Comet aircraft. PA Images/Getty Source: South African Airways Intercontinental expansion continued with South African Airways later growing its route network to Australia in 1957 with "Wallaby" service. A Douglas DC-4 painted in South African Airways former colors. Simon_g / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways The 1960s then saw further expansion to South America, with flights to Rio de Janeiro, and then North America, with flights to New York, using the Boeing 707. A South African Airways Boeing 707 aircraft. Antony Matheus Linsen/Fairfax Media/Getty Source: South African Airways South African hit a milestone in the 1970s with its first Boeing 747 aircraft, an aircraft that had begun flying passengers only at the beginning of the decade. The quad engine aircraft quickly became a status symbol for the world's airlines. A South African Airways Boeing 747 aircraft. Rolls Press/Popperfoto/Getty Source: South African Airways Other new arrivals included the Boeing 737… A South African Airways Boeing 737-800 aircraft. JOKER/Hady Khandani/ullstein bild/Getty Source: South African Airways And Airbus A300. A South African Airways Airbus A300 aircraft. STR New/Reuters Source: South African Airways South African was also one of the first commercial operators of a unique Boeing product, the 747SP. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways A shortened version of the popular Jumbo Jet but with the same four engines, the 747SP offering extended ranges unmatched by most aircraft of the time. The range of the 747SP was so great that South African flew it from Seattle to Cape Town nonstop, a distance of over 8,800 nautical miles, on its delivery flight. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways While airlines liked the 747SP for its performance capabilities, South African had a different reason involving the country's apartheid policy. A Boeing 747SP aircraft. Mo Azizi / Shutterstock.com Due to the discriminatory policy, some African countries had restricted South African Airways flights from entering their airspaces and the airline would often have to fly indirect routes to get to Europe. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: New York Times The Boeing 747SP allowed for South African to go around the countries without having to stop for fuel on the way to Europe. Other aircraft frequently used Cape Verde as a refueling stop for flights to Europe, despite the archipelago's location off the coast of West Africa. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: New York Times A route from Johannesburg to Athens on the 747SP, for example, stopped in Lisbon and Rome along the way. The flight flew direct or with one stop to Lisbon, and then headed into the continent. A South African Airways Boeing 747SP aircraft. EQRoy / Shutterstock.com Source: South African Airways The 1980s then saw turbulence for the carrier as Western nations adopted sanctions against South Africa for its apartheid policies. Flights to the US and Australia were revoked in addition to the countries that had barred South African's flights. Australian protests against South Africa's apartheid policy. Robert Pearce/Fairfax Media/Getty Source: South African Airways When apartheid ended in the 1990s, South African was allowed to grow its route network once again and the airline no longer needed to fly the long, costly routes to avoid some nations. A South African Airways Airbus A320 aircraft. Rogan Ward/Reuters Source: South African Airways One of the most notable displays of the new airline came in 1995 during the Rugby World Cups when a South African Airways Boeing 747 did a flyover of the stadium with "Good Luck Bokke," a nickname for the South African team, painted on the belly. The feat was repeated multiple times in later years by other airlines. An aircraft flyover at a 2013 Springboks vs All Blacks rugby match, David Rogers/Getty Source: South African Airways and Safair The decade also saw the airline win the title of Africa's leading airline from 1994 on to 2015. The 1990s, however, also saw the airline begin its financial losing streak. South African Airways aircraft. William F. Campbell/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Source: QZ The 2000s saw South African undergo a fleet renewal where most of its long-haul Boeing jets were retired in favor of European-built Airbus planes. The new long-haul flagships became the Airbus A330… A South African Airways Airbus A330 aircraft. SUMAYA HISHAM/Reuters Source: Planespotters.net And A340-600. A South African Airways Airbus A340-600 aircraft. Bruce Bennett/Getty Source: Planespotters.net South African was later brought into organizations to which it had been denied including the International Civil Aviation Organization and joined the Star Alliance. South African Airways joined Star Alliance in 2006. SIPHIWE SIBEKO/Reuters Source: South African Airways Its new-found praise and acceptance, however, couldn't replace the financial woes of the airline. In 2019, South African entered the equivalent of bankruptcy protection and began restructuring after racking up nearly $3 billion in debt. South African Airways employees protest during the airline's bankruptcy. Siyabonga Sishi/Reuters Source: QZ Despite being in the midst of restructuring, South African leased a new aircraft, the Airbus A350-900 XWB, which ultimately launched on the Johannesburg-New York route in January 2020. A South African Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. South African Airways Read More: Bankrupt South African Airways just debuted its newest plane, the Airbus A350, weeks early despite verging on the brink of collapse The swanky new aircraft would be ideal for the ultra-long-haul routes that South African planned to use them for. A South African Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. South African Airways With the new aircraft in the air and flying passengers, the hope was that South African might have a plan to save itself from collapse. A South African Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. South African Airways South Africa's government, which has been incrementally providing relief, however, ultimately pulled the plug in April 2020. A South African Airways Airbus A340-600. Fabrizio Gandolfo/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Source: FlightGlobal Without intervention from either the government or a private buyer willing to keep the airline going, South African Airways looked like it was going to disappear from the skies for good. A South African Airways Airbus A350-900 XWB. Sumaya Hisham/Reuters However, the airline is back up and running after over a year of inactivity. SAA relaunched operations on September 23 with a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town using an A320 aircraft, which carried 123 passengers on the maiden journey. SAA's first flight in over a year Reuters Source: Aerotime Hub The relaunch came after months of restructuring, which included reducing its debt and cutting its workforce by 80%, down from 4,000 to 802. SAA relaunch at Johannesburg airport Reuters Source: Aerotime Hub, ch-aviation The airline will be backed by Takatso Consortium, a joint-venture between Harith General Partners and Global Aviation, which is in late stage talks to buy the majority stake from the South African government in June. South African union buildings Burhan Ay Photography/Shutterstock Source: africannews Takatso Consortium is set to be SAA's lifeline, though is not reportedly involved in the airline's management, relaunch, or funding. However, Takatso CEO Gidon Novick said in a statement that negotiations to take a 51% share are "substantially complete." SAA A320 at Johannesburg airport Thiago B Trevisan/Shutterstock Source: ch-aviation The consortium's deal made with South Africa's Department of Public Enterprises includes investing up to $243 million into the airline over the next three years. SAA A330 takes off from Lusaka, Zambia Vidit Luthra Source: africannews Without its private funds yet secured, the company is using $33.8 million of the $712.3 million bailout it received from the state to restart operations. SAA A320 Thiago B Trevisan/Shutterstock Source: ch-aviation SAA's interim CEO Thomas Kgokolo said the company needs a modern fleet of aircraft if it is going to be competitive outside of Africa. Currently, its all-Airbus fleet has an average age of more than 15 years. SAA plane in Namibia Felix Lipov/Shutterstock Source: africannews However, Kgokolo said ticket sales are promising and early numbers indicate flights could be 75% full. SAA passengers Reuters Source: africannews The airline's fleet has shrunk, having only six of the original 44 it had before insolvency. SAA will start with a small network, operating one domestic route and five regional routes, including to Accra, Ghana; Kinshasa, DRC; Harare, Zimbabwe; Lusaka, Zambia; and Maputo, Mozambique. SAA plane in Johannesburg Reuters Source: ch-aviation While it still has a long way to go, SAA's relaunch has brought pride and excitement for its employees. Crew members danced and sang at the Johannesburg airport before the maiden flight. SAA employees dance after relaunch Reuters Source: Reuters While the airline is optimistic about its return, skeptics believe it will be short-lived. According to Efficient Group economist Dawie Roodt, Takatso Consortium's absence from the relaunch is not a good sign. SAA A340 wing Vidit Luthra/Shutterstock Source: jacarandafm He explained that the slow deal with the consortium makes him wonder where the money to keep SAA in the air is going to come from. Without the agreement finalized, the airline will likely have its wings clipped again soon, according to Roodt. SAA tail at Frankfurt airport Vytautas Kielaitis/Shutterstock Source: jacarandafm Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 23rd, 2021

Southwest (LUV) to Expand Austin & Hawaii Services in 2022

Southwest (LUV) plans to add nearly two dozen new flights to Austin and increase frequencies on its existing Hawaii services in 2022. Southwest Airlines LUV is expanding its network to offer customers additional services to Hawaii, nearly two dozen new flights to Austin, TX, as well as new international services. The airline has extended its bookable flight schedule through Apr 24, 2022. With air-travel demand rebounding, the services are expected to attract substantial traffic, which in turn should boost the airline’s top line.Austin Service ExpansionStarting Mar 10, 2022, Southwest will initiate daily nonstop services between Austin and Amarillo, TX; Charleston, SC; Columbus, OH; Midland/Odessa, TX and Ontario, CA. The carrier plans to operate the Austin-Columbus service during the peak holiday travel period in 2021 as well.Subject to government approval, the airline plans to begin a service connecting Austin and Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, Mar 12, 2022 onward. The Dallas, TX-based carrier also plans to resume its seasonal weekly flights from Austin to Panama City Beach, FL; Sarasota/Bradenton and Destin/Fort Walton Beach from Mar 12, 2022 onward. Following the commencement of the abovementioned services, the airline will offer nonstop services to a total of 46 destinations from Austin.Southwest Airlines Co. Price Southwest Airlines Co. price | Southwest Airlines Co. QuoteHawaii Service ExpansionSouthwest is expanding its Hawaii service offerings by increasing frequencies on the existing routes. Effective Feb 17, 2022, the carrier will operate two daily flights between Phoenix, AZ and Honolulu, one daily flight between San Diego, CA and Kona; four weekly flights between Sacramento, CA and Kona; one daily flight between San Jose, CA and Lihue; two daily flights between San Diego and Maui; as well as daily flights connecting Sacramento with Maui.International Service ExpansionSouthwest intends to begin a new nonstop service connecting Burbank, CA with Albuquerque, NM, starting Jan 17, 2022. The airline also plans to resume its seasonal daily nonstop service between Fort Lauderdale, FL and Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, effective Feb 17, 2022. Subject to government approval, the low-cost carrier plans to introduce a seasonal nonstop service to connect Denver, CO with Cozumel, Mexico.Zacks Rank & Key PicksSouthwest carries a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold). Some better-ranked stocks in the airline space are Copa Holdings CPA, Corporacion America Airports CAAP and SkyWest SKYW, each carrying a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy). You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank (Strong Buy) stocks here.Shares of Copa Holdings, Corporacion America Airports and SkyWest have rallied more than 43%, 100% and 50% in a year’s time, respectively. 5 Stocks Set to Double Each was handpicked by a Zacks expert as the #1 favorite stock to gain +100% or more in 2021. Previous recommendations have soared +143.0%, +175.9%, +498.3% and +673.0%. Most of the stocks in this report are flying under Wall Street radar, which provides a great opportunity to get in on the ground floor.Today, See These 5 Potential Home Runs >>Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV): Free Stock Analysis Report Copa Holdings, S.A. (CPA): Free Stock Analysis Report SkyWest, Inc. (SKYW): Free Stock Analysis Report Corporacion America Airports S.A. (CAAP): Free Stock Analysis Report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 21st, 2021

Dow Surges 2.3% as Boeing Begins Testing the 737 Max

Dow Surges 2.3% as Boeing Begins Testing the 737 Max SPECIAL ALERT: We’ve just released this quarter’s Ultimate Four report which includes four stocks our team believes have the greatest upside potential over the upcoming quarter. This latest report features favorite stocks from David Bartosiak, Tracey Ryniec, Jeremy Mullin and Madeleine Johnson. Log on to Zacks.com to see these stocks today. Coronavirus cases continued to rise over the weekend, but the market decided not to worry about it on Monday. Instead, the major indices each gained well over 1% to begin a holiday-shortened week. The biggest winner was the Dow, which soared 2.32% (or about 580 points) to 25,595.80. The index got a lot of help from Boeing (BA), which soared 14.4% as test flights for the beleaguered 737 Max began today. The airline giant has been a drag on the index for more than a year now, since a pair of crashes in early 2019 grounded the aircraft and led to several lawsuits. Meanwhile, the S&P jumped 1.47% to 3053.24, while the NASDAQ improved 1.2% (or nearly 117 points) to 9874.15. The indices rallied into the close. Stocks are coming back from their second negative week in the past three. This was the penultimate session for the month of June and each of the indices are heading into the final day with gains for the month. It’s been a wild ride as stocks were very optimistic to start the month before growing increasingly skeptical of the recovery in the back half. Unfortunately, we won’t see as strong a month as May (when each of the indices soared by more than 4%), but a positive result would still be encouraging given the herky-jerky recovery amid a rise in virus cases. We also got some help today from really positive pending home sales, which soared 44.3% in May. That’s the largest one-month spike in the survey’s history and showed that buyers were willing – even eager – to put their money to work. This might be a short week since the market is closed on Friday, but it won’t be an uneventful one. The government employment situation report will be released a day early on Thursday. You may remember that the last one was unexpectedly and impressively positive, with the economy adding 2.5 million jobs and the unemployment rate moving lower to 13.3%. It should be a big factor in sentiment as we begin the three-day, July 4th weekend. Today's Portfolio Highlights: Insider Trader: The E&Ps aren't doing nearly as badly as you’d think from their stocks, so Tracey decided to make another buy in the volatile energy space on Monday. The editor picked up Magnolia (MGY), a small-cap, Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) exploration & production company that’s well off its March lows but still down 52% year-to-date. Several companies from this space will likely declare bankruptcy, but Tracey doesn’t think MGY will be one of them. And neither does their CEO apparently, who bought shares of his own company FIVE times this month in a series of 'confidence' buys. The stock was added today with a 10% allocation. However, the editor warns that this one will be a wild ride, so get ready to be “whipped around”. The complete commentary has a lot more on this new addition. TAZR Trader: The portfolio kicked off the week with a pair of buys: Ciena (CIEN) and Inseego (INSG). CIEN is a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) provider of optical networking equipment that reported a beat-and-raise quarter early this month. Analysts have upgraded their outlooks, and the stock is expected to see profit growth of 38% this year. INSG is a small-cap “pioneer” in 5G and intelligent IoT device-to-cloud solutions. It got a lot of attention and a share price surge after partnering with Verizon to rollout 5G in San Diego. It also reported a beat-and-raise quarter, while its 2020 sales consensus is up 37% to more than $300 million. Kevin put 10% into CIEN and 7% in INSG. Read his complete commentary for much more on these moves. Surprise Trader: This portfolio will see a “major purge” this week as Dave gets ready for the beginning of earnings season. Yep, it’s almost that time once again! The editor started today by selling CarMax (KMX) for an approximately 0.65% profit in about two-and-a-half weeks. The new buy is MSC Industrial (MSM), a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) distributor of metalworking and maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) supplies to industrial customers. It has a positive Earnings ESP of 4.95% for the quarter coming before the bell on Wednesday, July 8. The editor added MSM on Monday with a 12.5% allocation. Read more about today’s moves in the full write-up. Healthcare Innovators: Two innovative companies with tons of potential were added on Monday: Acadia Pharmaceuticals (ACAD) and Axcella Health (AXLA). ACAD has a central nervous system drug that's already approved for Parkinson’s disease psychosis, but might also be used for dementia-related psychosis, depression, and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. These opportunities hold billions of dollars of potential, though there is some event risk with the FDA and clinical trial data. Sales of ACAD are expected to grow 30% this year and another 67% next. AXLA is a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) emerging pharma company focused on liver diseases, especially the development of EMMs for NASH, sickle cell, muscle atrophy and others. This stock has a highly speculative risk/reward profile, but Kevin is taking a chance given the potential upside for research into NASH, which is begging for a partnership with a big pharma name. Read the editor’s full write-up for a lot more on these new buys. Black Box Trader: This week's adjustment included three swaps. The stocks that were sold included: • Louisiana-Pacific (LPX, +0.66%) • Herbalife (HLF) • Lennar (LEN) The new buys that replaced these names were: • Commercial Metals (CMC) • Dine Brands (DIN) • Phillips 66 (PSX) Read the Black Box Trader’s Guide to learn more about this computer-driven service designed to take the emotion out of investing. All the Best, Jim Giaquinto Recommendations from Zacks' Private Portfolios: Believe it or not, this article is not available on the Zacks.com website. The commentary is a partial overview of the daily activity from Zacks' private recommendation services. If you would like to follow our Buy and Sell signals in real time, we've made a special arrangement for readers of this website. Starting today you can see all the recommendations from all of Zacks' portfolios absolutely free for 7 days. Our services cover everything from value stocks and momentum trades to insider buying and positive earnings surprises (which we've predicted with an astonishing 80%+ accuracy). Click here to "test drive" Zacks Ultimate for FREE >>  Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksSep 21st, 2021

JetBlue"s New York to London Heathrow flights to begin in August

JetBlue said its JFK to London Gatwick Airport flights will start on September 29, and its London service from Boston will start in summer 2022......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 19th, 2021

Delta Air Lines to begin selling all seats on flights starting May 1, CNBC says

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallMar 31st, 2021

Southwest Airlines flights begin at at O’Hare

A flight from Nashville became the first Southwest Airlines plane .....»»

Category: topSource: chicagotribuneFeb 14th, 2021

U.S. airlines start cutting flights due to UK, Ireland restrictions

United Airlines Co said late Saturday it would begin cutting flights to the United Kingdom after Washington expanded travel restrictions to Britain and Ireland, and Southwest Airlines moved toward flight cuts as the coronavirus outbreak sapped demand......»»

Category: topSource: reutersMar 14th, 2020

Condor extends seasonal flights from Phoenix to Germany

Condor, the European airline that operates direct flights from Arizona to Germany, will begin its seasonal service this year to Frankfurt from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport earlier than ever. In its third year of operations, Condor will .....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsFeb 20th, 2020

FAA lowered bar for approvals, whistleblower alleges

U.S. air-safety regulators likely acted improperly in the way they authorized Southwest Airlines to begin flights between California and Hawaii, according to the government agency that handles federal whistleblower complaints......»»

Category: topSource: moneycentralJan 22nd, 2020

FAA lowered bar for approvals, whistleblower alleges

U.S. air-safety regulators likely acted improperly in the way they authorized Southwest Airlines to begin flights between California and Hawaii, according to the government agency that handles federal whistleblower complaints......»»

Category: topSource: moneycentralJan 22nd, 2020

Whistleblower says FAA lowered bar for Southwest flights

U.S. air-safety regulators likely acted improperly in the way they authorized Southwest Airlines to begin flights between California and Hawaii, according to the government agency that handles federal whistleblower complaints......»»

Category: topSource: moneycentralJan 22nd, 2020

Whistleblower says FAA lowered bar for Southwest flights

U.S. air-safety regulators likely acted improperly in the way they authorized Southwest Airlines to begin flights between California and Hawaii, according to the government agency that handles federal whistleblower complaints......»»

Category: topSource: moneycentralJan 22nd, 2020

JetBlue plans to go completely carbon neutral on all U.S. flights

The initiative, which will begin in July, is a first for a major U.S. airline......»»

Category: topSource: washpostJan 9th, 2020

Chinese All-Cargo Carrier To Start US Operations In 2020

The U.S. Department of Transportation has approved Shenzhen, China-based SF Airlines to begin scheduled and charter cargo flights between any U.S. and Chinese points. 0 read more.....»»

Category: blogSource: benzingaDec 18th, 2019

Southwest announces another city will begin Hawaii flights in April

Southwest Airlines will fly to Hawaii from a fourth California city next spring, the airline announced Wednesday. Flights between San Diego and Kahului begin April 14, 2020, and between San Diego and Honolulu on April 20, 2020. This means more th.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsOct 30th, 2019

Southwest adds Hawaii flights in time for the holidays

Southwest Airlines is bumping up the timeline for its Hawaii expansion. Last month, Southwest Airlines Co. (NYSE: LUV) said it would begin service between Sacramento and Honolulu and inter-island service between Honolulu and Lihue starting Jan. 19, 202.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsSep 28th, 2019

American Airlines increasing service from Alabama to DC

American Airlines (Nasdaq: AAL0 will begin offering same-day, non-stop return flights between Montgomery Regional Airport to Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C. next year. The airline will alter its existing schedule from MGM to DCA, which typ.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsJul 31st, 2019

Delta adding overdose-reversal drug on planes to combat opioid crisis

Delta Air Lines will begin carrying naloxone, a medication that can reverse a narcotic overdose, on flights while the country grapples with its opioid crisis. The Atlanta-based airline said it has had plans since the beginning of the year to add nalo.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsJul 19th, 2019

(PHOTOS) A look inside Delta"s newest plane: Airbus A330-900neo

Delta's newest widebody aircraft – the Airbus A330-900neo – will begin flying Thursday from Seattle to Shanghai. Delta is the first U.S. airline to operate the A330-900neo, and will also use it for flights connecting Seattle with Seoul beginning.....»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsJul 12th, 2019

No longer fiction: Flying car startups aim to begin test flights as early as next year

The ride-sharing giant Uber and smaller startups like  Alaka'i Technologies an.....»»

Category: topSource: usatodayJun 19th, 2019