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JK Rowling Casts Anti-Doxxing Spell Against Trans Activists In Furious Twitter Thread

JK Rowling Casts Anti-Doxxing Spell Against Trans Activists In Furious Twitter Thread.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 25th, 2021

The Equity Talk: Despite the diversity reckoning of 2020, trans voices are still largely missing from corporate plans for the future

This may be the deadliest year for trans people. For Trans Awareness week, Insider spoke with two trans diversity consultants on what CEOs need to do. Samantha Lee/Insider Anti-trans legislation and attacks have reached record highs in 2021. For Trans Awareness Week, Insider spoke with two trans advocates who help educate CEOs. In an Equity Talk, Sean Coleman and Kayden Coleman shared what leaders need to do. Trans people are more visible than ever before in media and pop culture, but with visibility comes increased transphobic violence. Data from Insider's Transgender Homicide Project showed that 2021 is on track to be the deadliest year for trans people in recorded US history. As trans Black women and femmes face unprecedented rates of violence, trans youth are being subjected to anti-trans legislation — bills curtailing their participation in sports and their ability to have gender-affirmation surgeries covered by health insurance. Despite the racial reckoning of 2020, Dave Chappelle's comedy controversy, and some CEOs defending LGBTQ rights, many trans and nonbinary activists say Black and brown trans lives, and more broadly all trans lives, are still not being included in corporate plans to become more diverse. For Trans Awareness Week, which runs from November 13 to 19, Insider's Canela López and Marguerite Ward spoke with two leading activists helping business leaders get serious about protecting trans lives. Sean Ebony Coleman is a diversity, equity, and inclusion consultant and the founder of the LGBTQ nonprofit center Destination Tomorrow, and Kayden Coleman (no relation) is a DEI consultant who educates brands and medical professionals on trans-inclusive language and practices with his company, Papa Seahorse Inc. Both said CEOs need to step up now."This is not something that we should have to be fighting for," Kayden Coleman said. "We are all human beings at the end of the day, whether or not you agree, accept, or understand, we deserve all of the things that make a healthy, safe life."This interview has been edited and condensed. 2020 was a year of racial reckoning. CEOs have been pressured to take diversity, equity, and inclusion seriously. But what about Black trans lives? Do you feel CEOs are recognizing Black trans lives? Kayden Coleman: Black people as a whole are not being listened to by CEOs. So when you add that extra layer of being trans, you really delve into a space of which a lot of people are not used to. You're asking people to step out of this learned behavior that trans people are deviants and things of that nature, while also asking them to step out of learned anti-Blackness. In the work that I do, I get a lot of pushback from people. Sean Coleman: I agree. I think one of the things that any CEO can do is step outside of their circle. If you are constantly going to the same two or three people for advice when it comes to the trans community and they aren't people from the trans community or a Black or brown trans person, that's a problem. You don't have a complete picture of what the trans experience actually means and some of the challenges that Black and brown trans folks experience. So my advice would be to step outside of your immediate circle.I am a subject-matter expert in my life. I need folks to trust that I know what I'm saying when I tell you what I need, and then I need you to invite me into these spaces.2021 is on track to be the deadliest year for trans lives. At the same time, there's been more visibility. Singer Demi Lovato came out as nonbinary. Elliot Page came out as transgender. How are you feeling about the rights of trans and nonbinary people right now? Sean Coleman: I'm hopeful because we're having discussions like this. But I'm also a bit nervous because I don't want folks to conflate being visible with being safe. While it's great that Demi Lovato and Elliot Page are now living in their truth, it doesn't necessarily translate to a trans or nonbinary person who happens to be, maybe, in the South Bronx or somewhere in LA because they don't have the same access to privilege and safe spaces.We need to continue to have layered discussions around what safety looks like for everyone. We need to address what the root causes are behind this kind of violence. The Human Rights Council Foundation led an increase in the number of major US employers offering transgender-inclusive healthcare coverage. It's gone from 49 in 2009 to 949 at the end of 2020. What are additional measures that executives need to take? Kayden Coleman: It's not enough to just provide healthcare. Healthcare doesn't matter if the employees don't exist in your spaces. If you have trans-inclusive healthcare but only one or two trans employees, who's that really benefiting? I'm a firm believer that the "LGB" is one sector and the "T" is another. I exist as a "G entity" as a gay transmasculine person. But that doesn't mean that a cisgender gay man knows my plight. They don't know my experience. I know my experience because I've had to survive it. We need to bring trans people in to do the work with business leaders, and we need to pay them for this work. When you talk about transness, you also need to understand that identities intersect. So we're talking about trans rights, but we also need to be talking about racism, anti-Blackness, disability, etc. Bringing in an able-bodied, palatable white person who qualifies as LGBTQ is not sufficient. For equity to happen, we have to have a serious discussion with our allies. Like, we have all these folks that are allies, but they're taking up space. So if you truly want to be an ally, allow us that platform to come in and say, "This is what's going to work." Lend me your platform. In May, 95 companies voiced their opposition to the wave of anti-LGBTQ bills in this country, in a letter written in partnership with the Human Rights Campaign. However, some large companies did not sign or comment. What's your message to the companies that did not sign? Sean Coleman: I want companies to understand that this is a concentrated effort. It shouldn't be lost on anyone that at the same time that trans athletes and trans youth, a woman's right to choose is being attacked, and voting rights are under attack. They're coming at it from a few different angles, but it's all the same result. And it's to have control over someone else's life. We need to figure out how we work together.For the companies that decided not to speak out against these bills, it's kind of hard to be a voice for a community that you probably don't hire, that you probably don't have any relationship with, right? So what I'm going to say to them is do better. You have the opportunity to be on the right side of history. Kayden Coleman: To the companies that are either remaining silent or just blatantly refusing to stand up for trans people, the message that you're sending is that you don't see us as human beings. You don't think that we deserve to live equal lives.To the people who are standing up for us, I love to see it. Keep it going and advocate for it more. Call these people in power and ask them why they're not doing the things that they should be doing.Editor's note: In the recorded interview, Insider's journalists said Target did not sign the Human Rights Campaign letter, citing a report from Yahoo News. However, a representative from Target told Insider that the retailer did, in fact, sign the letter. Walmart and Disney, the other companies mentioned, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 17th, 2021

Empty Promises, Softened Language, And Demands For Climate Reparations: COP26 Ends In Hypocritical Whimper

Empty Promises, Softened Language, And Demands For Climate Reparations: COP26 Ends In Hypocritical Whimper Negotiations at the UN climate conference in Glasgow are expected to bleed over into the weekend, as countries craft a new draft agreement which - so far, includes softened language 'requesting' (but not 'urging') that nations come back to the drawing board in one year with better climate-action plans for 2030. Bloomberg describes the softened language as a "get-out clause." Activists are sure to be pissed. Good luck with that Other changes include a closely watched line on fossil fuels and coal - which was changed to phasing out "unabated coal" instead of "consigning coal to history" after China and other countries voiced their displeasure. Next, negotiations hit an impasse over the global carbon market Thursday, with countries disagreeing on how to account for emissions credits sold around the world. Climate talks #COP26 in Glasgow are entering the final stage. Negotiators are still far apart on several key issues, including international #carbon markets. Here is what it is about:pic.twitter.com/YCOa9dWb5o — Ewa Krukowska (@E_Krukowska) November 11, 2021 ...the risk is that a weak deal would enshrine in the system rules so loose that they could end up allowing for emissions to rise rather than fall. Talks on carbon trading collapsed in 2019 at the last round of climate talks in Madrid, with Brazil and the European Union at loggerheads on topics including how to avoid counting the same emissions reductions twice. Those accounting issues remain a stumbling block, and other obstacles have also emerged during talks in Glasgow. -Bloomberg Meanwhile, 'vulnerable countries' have railed against Friday's proposed draft - saying they need a more ambitious deal on climate reparations from rich nations responsible for global warming, in order to handle costs from 'worsening storms, droughts and rising sea levels.' The new draft balances the demands of smaller nations and the world's biggest polluters whose economies rely on fossil fuels. As Reuters notes, some countries say the draft would just barely maintain the Paris Agreement's cap on global warming at 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels, the limit at which climate scientists claim the most severe impacts would be averted, however the draft asks countries to 'upgrade' their climate targets in 2022 in order to reach the goal. The COP26 conference has so far not delivered enough emissions-cutting pledges to nail down the 1.5C goal, so the draft asked countries to upgrade their climate targets in 2022. However, it couched that request in weaker language than a previous draft, and failed to offer the rolling annual review of climate pledges that some developing countries have pushed for. It said the upgrade of climate pledges should take into account "different national circumstances", a phrase likely to please some developing countries, which say the demands on them to quit fossil fuels and cut emissions should be lower than on developed economies. -Reuters "If the text that is currently on the table withstands the battering that it may get - yes, we are holding on by our fingernails," said Grenada climate minister Simon Stiell after being asked if the latest proposal maintained the temperature target. According to the draft, the world must cut carbon dioxide emissions from oil, gas and coal by 45% by 2030, and to net zero by 2050, in order to hit the 1.5C target. Bitch better have my money (or else?) Poorer COP26 attendees are reportedly 'furious' that wealthy nations have yet to fulfill a 12-year-old pledge to give $100 billion per year by 2020 to help them line their elites' pockets cut emissions and adapt to climate impacts. The draft expressed "deep regret" at the missed target which rich nations now expect to meet in 2023, but offered no solutions to make sure the money materializes - just that rich nations should double the funding they currently set aside for poor countries. "Loss and damage is too central for us to settle for workshops. We must strengthen action on loss and damage," according to Marshall Islands climate envoy Tina Stege. In addition to the softened language on fossil fuels, the draft calls on nations to pledge to phase out "inefficient" subsidies for fossil fuels in general - changes in language which Arab nations had lobbied for, much to the chagrin of climate activists. "The key line on phasing out coal and fossil fuel subsidies has been critically weakened," said Jennifer Morgan, executive director of Greenpeace International. The United States and China - the world's two largest polluters, unveiled a deal on Wednesday that would see China strengthen its emissions-cutting targets. Beijing has committed to "work jointly and with other parties to ensure a successful COP26 and to facilitate an outcome that is both ambitious and balanced." Climate hypocrites In a hilarious final note, a UK government report reveals that the carbon footprint for COP26 itself is expected to reach the equivalent of 102,500 tons of carbon dioxide - roughly equivalent to the amount of CO2 emitted annually by 10,000 UK households. The document, compiled by sustainability consultant Arup, notes that some 60% of the emissions are related to international air travel of some 39,000 delegates who have taken part in the environmental crisis talks. Other major sources of pollution are cited as accommodation for the delegates, ferrying of guests to and from the summit, and venue catering.  ... The last UN climate change summit in Madrid welcomed some 27,000 people and produced some 51,101 tonnes of carbon dioxide. Data suggest the COP summits have been gradually getting more polluting, with the 2009 COP15 in Copenhagen producing around 26,000. -RT In short, nobody's going to be happy and that was a giant waste of time.  Childhood status: [_] Not Ruined [X] Ruined Tyler Durden Fri, 11/12/2021 - 14:40.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 12th, 2021

Texas abortion law could have "traumatic" consequences for trans and nonbinary people who are forced to carry out a pregnancy, experts say

The legislation only refers to women. Pregnancy is defined as "the human female reproductive condition," according to Texas's abortion ban SB 8. Abortion-rights activists and anti-abortion activists protest alongside each other during a demonstration outside of the Supreme Court on October 4, 2021. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images Reproductive rights experts told Insider that Texas' restrictive abortion law could have "traumatic" consequences for trans and nonbinary people. The text of the law does not explicitly refer to anyone but women. But trans and nonbinary people would still be restricted from abortions past the six-week mark, one expert said. Trans men and nonbinary people in Texas run the risk of body dysphoria and other health-related issues if the state's new abortion law forces them to carry out a pregnancy, according to reproductive rights experts.The law is called SB 8, and it effectively prohibits anyone from obtaining an abortion after six weeks of pregnancy. That's a point at which most people do not yet know they are pregnant. People who violate the law can be sued in court, which would likely result in a minimum of $10,000 in statutory damages per abortion.Abortion clinics in Texas have tried to block the law in court, arguing that it would prohibit care for "at least 85% of Texas abortion patients." That figure includes trans and nonbinary people who have a reproductive system that's capable of pregnancy. Under the law, people are unable "to make their own choices about their medical care" and bodily autonomy, Dr. Ricky Hill, a professor at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, told Insider. "I think it's a way to keep trans and gender-nonconforming, nonbinary folks out of sexual health conversations."Hill said trans and nonbinary people are particularly vulnerable to body dysphoria, a mental condition that occurs when a person identifies as a specific gender but feels that gender is not perceived by others. There may be feelings of dysphoria if a transmasculine individual, for example, were to get pregnant and start to show physical signs of a pregnancy.The law, SB 8, was enacted on September 1, and Texans needing an abortion have since sought out alternative ways to get one, like securing pills or traveling out of state. Some abortion providers in Texas have had to turn away patients seeking the procedure.The text of the legislation does not use language that's inclusive of trans and nonbinary people. Pregnancy, according to the law, "means the human female reproductive condition" that "begins with fertilization," "when the woman is carrying the developing human offspring" and "is calculated from the first day of the woman's last menstrual period."While the text only refers to women, the law itself is broad enough to eliminate abortions for trans and nonbinary people past the six-week mark, according to Columbia University reproductive rights scholar Carol Sanger.But if a trans or nonbinary person tries to challenge that in court, they'll likely lose, Sanger told Insider."What they're trying to protect is the unborn child," Sanger said. "If a judge were hearing this, they would say the intent is to protect the embryo. It's less concerned with the gender of the carrier, of the parent."Abortion is widely regarded as a women's issue, but that label is often not inclusive of trans and nonbinary people who are capable of pregnancy. "Trans people, in general, are not included in conversations around sexual health," Hill said, adding that they believe abortion is a bodily autonomy issue, not exclusively a women's issue.Data on trans and nonbinary healthcare is limited, Hill said. But there are studies that indicate there's a need for more inclusive healthcare for trans and nonbinary people. One study, for example, found that several hundred trans and nonbinary people obtained abortions in 2017. The lack of data represents a vital knowledge gap that can be abused by a law like SB 8, according to experts."Being able to quantify something really does lend to credibility," Hill said.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytNov 7th, 2021

5 Sinema Advisors Quit, Accuse Her Of "Selling Out" To Big Donors, As Far-Left Backlash Intensifies

5 Sinema Advisors Quit, Accuse Her Of 'Selling Out' To Big Donors, As Far-Left Backlash Intensifies While the New York Times attempts to augur Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema's demands as she and fellow moderate Dem Sen. Joe Manchin continue their battle with progressive House Dems that has left President Biden's "Build Back Better" agenda - an infrastructure bill and accompanying expansion of the social safety net - the backlash against her "obstructionist" stance has just prompted five veterans who once served on her semi-formal "advisory council" to resign in protest. In recent weeks, Sinema has been hounded by progressive activists who tried - but failed - to harangue her as she ran the Boston Marathon. Now, that pressure is likely about to be turned up to '11' as the former advisors accused her of "hanging your own constituents out to dry" in a letter that was just leaked to the New York Times. As President Biden struggles to quell the partisan battle over his agenda and sell it to the American people (as warnings about the potential for stoking further inflationary pressures multiply), progressives are getting increasingly desperate, and ramping up their attacks on Dem moderates who are in the middle of a pitched battle with progressives. According to the NYT, which "obtained" (ie was given) a copy of the letter, the former Sinema aides accuse her of placing the needs of wealthy donors ahead of the needs of her constituents. In a scathing letter obtained by The New York Times, the veterans took Ms. Sinema to task for her refusal to abolish the filibuster and her opposition to parts of Mr. Biden’s multitrillion-dollar social safety net, education, climate and tax plan, stances that have stymied some of his top priorities. "You have become one of the principal obstacles to progress, answering to big donors rather than your own people," the veterans wrote in a letter that is to be featured in a new advertisement by Common Defense, a progressive veterans’ activist group that has targeted Ms. Sinema. "We shouldn’t have to buy representation from you, and your failure to stand by your people and see their urgent needs is alarming," they added. Moreover, the NYT said the letter is the latest in a "crescendo of anger" directed at Sinema over her 'perplexing' tactics during the hectic negotiations, which have most recently centered on the tax hikes Dems' have promised to help offset the cost of both Biden's "bipartisan" infrastructure plan as well as his plan to expand the social safety net. Sinema is a key swing vote in this battle. But it's not just Sinema's stance on the tax hikes that's got the far-left so hot and bothered. There's a groundswell of anger over her opposition to scrapping the filibuster, which progressive Dems want to eliminate to help push through a version of the Biden agenda that they effectively dictate. The resignations add to a crescendo of anger and pressure that Ms. Sinema is facing from erstwhile allies who say they are perplexed by her recent tactics. She has resisted major elements of Democrats’ sprawling social safety net and climate bill, including raising individual income and corporate tax rates to pay for it. Because Democrats control the Senate with only 50 votes, even one defection could spell defeat for the measure, giving Ms. Sinema outsize influence to determine what can be included. Ms. Sinema has also steadfastly opposed changing the Senate’s filibuster rule, which effectively requires 60 votes to move forward on any major bill, even as Republicans have used it as a procedural weapon to block voting rights legislation and a bill to avert a federal debt default. Progressive activists have stepped up their campaign to push Democrats to do away with the rule so they can muscle Mr. Biden’s priorities through Congress on simple majority votes, and they have trained their anger on Ms. Sinema and another centrist holdout, Senator Joe Manchin III of West Virginia. One progressive activist quoted by the NYT said that Dems worked "so hard" to get Sinema elected, and now they feel betrayed. "Democrats were out desperately trying to help her win the seat, and now we feel like, what was it for?” Sylvia González Andersh, one of the veterans who signed the letter, said in an interview. "Nobody knows what she is thinking because she doesn’t tell anybody anything. It’s very sad to think that someone who you worked for that hard to get elected is not even willing to listen." Well, there is one person who knows - Nancy Pelosi. But apparently she won't tell. Despite campaigning on raising tax rates on corporations and high earners, Dems may finance the bill without it given Sinema's position, something Pelosi said was an option. Pelosi says that Dems are exploring options. "Her position is well known," Pelosi said to me of Sinema pic.twitter.com/70JymRP8Kl — Manu Raju (@mkraju) October 21, 2021 As time goes on, pressure on Sinema is only going to get worse. How much longer until she gets "Tucker Carlson'd" - or worse - by Antifa? Tyler Durden Thu, 10/21/2021 - 17:10.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeOct 21st, 2021

Netflix CEO said the company believes content "doesn"t directly translate to real-world harm" in defense of Dave Chappelle special, report says

GLAAD pushed back on the claim, saying media can lead to "real world harm, especially for trans people & LGBTQ people of color." Dave Chappelle's latest special, "The Closer," has been defended by Netflix head Ted Sarandos. David Livingston/Getty Images In an email, Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos said on-screen content doesn't translate to real-world harm. Sarandos cited a decline in violent crime in recent decades despite an increase in violent content. He was defending Dave Chappelle's "The Closer," which has been criticized for transphobic comments. Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos said this week the company believes on-screen content "doesn't directly translate to real-world harm," in another defense of Dave Chappelle's new comedy special, Variety reported.The streaming giant has come under fire from some of its employees for hosting the special, "The Closer," which activists say features transphobic comments. In the special, Chappelle says "gender is a fact" and defends "Harry Potter" author JK Rowling, who has also been criticized for transphobic comments. Chappelle also said he identifies with TERFs, or trans-exclusionary radical feminists.Sarandos initially defended the special in an email sent to company leadership on Friday, according to The Verge. He doubled down on the remarks in a company-wide email sent on Monday and obtained by Variety after Netflix employees protested the special and the decision to keep it on the platform."With 'The Closer,' we understand that the concern is not about offensive-to-some content but titles which could increase real-world harm (such as further marginalizing already marginalized groups, hate, violence, etc.)," Sarandos wrote. "While some employees disagree, we have a strong belief that content on screen doesn't directly translate to real-world harm."He continued: "The strongest evidence to support this is that violence on screens has grown hugely over the last thirty years, especially with first-party shooter games, and yet violent crime has fallen significantly in many countries. Adults can watch violence, assault, and abuse - or enjoy shocking stand-up comedy - without it causing them to harm others."In response to the comments, GLAAD released a statement pushing back against Sarandos's claims about the impact of media: "GLAAD was founded 36 years ago because media representation has consequences for LGBTQ people. Film & TV have been filled with stereotypes and misinformation about us, leading to real-world harm, especially for trans people & LGBTQ people of color."One transgender Netflix employee who spoke out against the special in a viral Twitter thread last week also argued that transphobic content translates to physical harm, listing off transgender people who have been killed.The employee, Terra Field, was suspended by the company but was later reinstated.Chappelle's "The Closer" was the third most-watched piece of content on Netflix in the US on Wednesday.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytOct 14th, 2021

Netflix has suspended 3 employees but says it wasn"t for criticism of its Dave Chappelle special

Dave Chappelle and Netflix have come under fire for his new special in which he makes transphobic comments. Chappelle in "The Closer." Netflix Netflix has suspended three employees for crashing an executive meeting, The Verge and Variety reported. One of the staffers was Terra Field, who criticized Dave Chappelle's new Netflix special on Twitter last week. In the special, called "The Closer," Chappelle makes transphobic comments. Netflix has suspended three employees for attending an executive meeting they were not invited to, including a trans staffer who recently criticized the company's new Dave Chappelle standup special called "The Closer," The Verge and Variety reported on Monday.The trans employee, senior software engineer Terra Field, tweeted a thread on Wednesday that went viral in which she said that Chappelle "attacks the trans community, and the very validity of transness - all while trying to pit us against other marginalized groups."In a statement, Netflix said the employees were not suspended because of anything they tweeted about the special."It is absolutely untrue to say that we have suspended any employees for tweeting about this show," a Netflix spokesperson said. "Our employees are encouraged to disagree openly and we support their right to do so."Field did not return requests for an interview.During the meeting, Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos took questions about how Netflix should address employees and talent being upset about Chappelle's special, according to Variety.Sarandos then sent an internal memo to executives addressing concerns in which he said that Netflix would not be removing the special, The Verge and Variety reported. "Chappelle is one of the most popular stand-up comedians today, and we have a long standing deal with him," Sarandos wrote, in part. "His last special, 'Sticks & Stones,' also controversial, is our most watched, stickiest, and most award winning stand-up special to date. As with our other talent, we work hard to support their creative freedom - even though this means there will always be content on Netflix some people believe is harmful, like 'Cuties,' '365 Days,' '13 Reasons Why,' or 'My Unorthodox Life.'"He added: "Distinguishing between commentary and harm is hard, especially with stand-up comedy which exists to push boundaries. Some people find the art of stand-up to be mean-spirited but our members enjoy it, and it's an important part of our content offering."Netflix declined to comment on the memo.Other Netflix employees also spoke out against the special on Twitter, as did Jaclyn Moore, who is trans and is an executive producer on Netflix's "Dear White People."Moore tweeted that she would "not work with [Netflix] as long as they continue to put out and profit from blatantly and dangerously transphobic content."In the special, Chappelle said that "gender is a fact" and defended "Harry Potter" author JK Rowling - who has been criticized for anti-trans comments - by saying "Team TERF!," which stands for trans-exclusionary radical feminist.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 11th, 2021

AG Garland "Weaponizes" DoJ Against Dissenting Parents After School Board Association Pleas

AG Garland "Weaponizes" DoJ Against Dissenting Parents After School Board Association Pleas One day after a North Carolina school board adopted a policy that would discipline or dismiss teachers if they incorporate critical race theory (CRT) into their teaching of the history of the United States, The Epoch Times' Ivan Pentchoukov reports that Attorney General Merrick Garland on Oct. 4 announced a concentrated effort to target any threats of violence, intimidation, and harassment by parents toward school personnel. The announcement also comes days after a national association of school boards asked the Biden administration to take “extraordinary measures” to prevent alleged threats against school staff that the association said was coming from parents who oppose mask mandates and the teaching of critical race theory. Garland directed the FBI and U.S. attorneys in the next 30 days to convene meetings with federal, state, and local leaders within 30 days to “facilitate the discussion of strategies for addressing threats against school administrators, board members, teachers, and staff,” according to a letter (pdf) the attorney general sent on Monday to all U.S. attorneys, the FBI director, the director of the Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys, and the assistant attorney general of the DOJ’s criminal division. According to the DOJ, further efforts will be rolled out in the coming days, including a task force that will determine how to use federal resources to prosecute offending parents as well as how to advise state entities on prosecutions in cases where no federal law is broken. The Justice Department will also provide training to school staff on how to report threats from parents and preserve evidence to aid in investigation and prosecution. “In recent months, there has been a disturbing spike in harassment, intimidation, and threats of violence against school administrators, board members, teachers, and staff who participate in the vital work of running our nation’s public schools,” Garland wrote. “While spirited debate about policy matters is protected under our Constitution, that protection does not extend to threats of violence or efforts to intimidate individuals based on their views.” School boards across the nation have increasingly become an arena for heated debate over culture, politics, and health. Parents groups have ramped up pressure on boards over the teaching of critical race theory and the imposition of mask mandates. The debate is split sharply along political lines, with Democrats largely in favor of critical race theory and mask mandates, and Republicans opposing both. The amount and severity of the threats against officials are not known, but Garland’s letter suggests the phenomenon is widespread. Full AG Garland Statement (with our thoughts): MEMORANDUM FOR DIRECTOR, FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION; DIRECTOR, EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR U.S. ATTORNEYS ASSISTANT ATTORNEY GENERAL, CRIMINAL DIVISION UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS FROM:       THE ATTORNEY GENERAL SUBJECT:    PARTNERSHIP AMONG FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL, TRIBAL, AND TERRITORIAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TO ADDRESS THREATS AGAINST SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS, BOARD MEMBERS, TEACHERS, AND STAFF In recent months, there has been a disturbing spike in harassment, intimidation, and threats of violence against school administrators, board members, teachers, and staff who participate in the vital work of running our nation's public schools. While spirited debate about policy matters is protected under our Constitution, that protection does not extend to threats of violence or efforts to intimidate individuals based on their views. [ZH: But intimidating parents who dare to have the view that the nation's founding fathers and the founding documents are not in fact systemically racist and does not want their children taught that is the case is ok?] Threats against public servants are not only illegal, they run counter to our nation's core values. Those who dedicate their time and energy to ensuring that our children receive a proper education in a safe environment deserve to he able to do their work without fear for their safety. [ZH: "Dedication" to a "proper education" is admirable; indoctrination in Marxism is not] The Department takes these incidents seriously and is committed to using its authority and resources to discourage these threats, identify them when they occur, and prosecute them when appropriate. In the coming days, the Department will announce a series of measures designed to address the rise in criminal conduct directed toward school personnel. [ZH: What exactly is the crime?] Coordination and partnership with local law enforcement is critical to implementing these measures for the benefit of our nation's nearly 14,000 public school districts. To this end, I am  directing the Federal Bureau of Investigation, working with each United States Attorney, to convene meetings with federal, state, local, Tribal, and territorial leaders in each federal judicial district within 30 days of the issuance of this memorandum. These meetings will facilitate the discussion of strategies for addressing threats against school administrators, board members, teachers, and staff, and will open dedicated lines of communication for threat reporting, assessment, and response. [ZH: We wonder how many local law enforcement officials, while busily watching for vaccine passport offenders, and mask-mandate refusers, will acquiesce to enforcing these new laws to protect the very people who are preaching that America's systemic racism starts with the men (and women) in blue?] The Department is steadfast in its commitment to protect all people in the United States from violence, threats of violence, and other forms of intimidation and harassment. [ZH: Presumably intimidation and emotional harassment of young white boys and girls for their 'whiteness', privilege, and systemic racism is beyond that 'protection'?] As Chris Rufo (@RealChrisRufo) tweeted: "The Biden administration is rapidly repurposing federal law enforcement to target political opposition." The Biden administration is rapidly repurposing federal law enforcement to target political opposition. They want to reclassify dissent as "disinformation" and "domestic terrorism," justifying an unprecedented intervention, both directly and in partnership with tech companies. — Christopher F. Rufo ⚔️ (@realchrisrufo) October 4, 2021 Rufo goes on to note that: "Neither the Attorney General's memo nor the full Justice Department press release cites any significant, credible threat. This is a blatant suppression tactic, designed to dissuade citizens from participating in the democratic process at school boards." Parents have led the charge against controversial issues such as Critical Race Theory (CRT), masking mandates and vaccine requirements. CRT holds that America is fundamentally racist, yet it teaches people to view every social interaction and person in terms of race. Its adherents pursue “antiracism” through the end of merit, objective truth and the adoption of race-based policies. This is Courtney Ann Taylor, a mother in Georgia. She’s one of the many parents who’ve HAD IT with mask mandates, especially for young kids in school. Share this video! pic.twitter.com/pyG3fYmgVI — Errol Webber (@ErrolWebber) April 22, 2021 In Loudoun County, Virginia, two parents were arrested in June for trespassing while protesting CRT and a transgender policy at the school district because they refused to leave the rowdy meeting that was declared an unlawful assembly. In July, a man was arrested at a school board meeting and charged with a felony because a gun reportedly fell out of his pocket, the Indianapolis Star reported.  In Utah, 11 anti-mask protestors were arrested on misdemeanor charges for allegedly disrupting a school board meeting in May, the Salt Lake Tribune reported. The protestors entered the school board meeting and shouted obscenities, which resulted in an early end to the meeting. Senator Tom Cotton  (@SenTomCotton) tweeted his thoughts: "Parents are speaking out against Critical Race Theory in schools. Now the Biden administration is cracking down on dissent." Just this week, Ron Paul explained why it is so important for parents to control the education of their children: During last week’s Virginia gubernatorial debate, Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe promised that as governor he would prevent parents from removing sexually explicit books from school libraries, because he doesn't think “parents should be telling schools what they should teach.” McAuliffe's disdain for parents who think they should have some say in their children’s education is shared by most “progressives,” as well as some who call themselves conservatives. They think parents should obediently pay the taxes to fund the government schools and never question any aspect of the government school program. School officials' refusal to obey the wishes of parents extends to the anti-science mask mandates. Mask mandates are not only useless in protecting children from a virus they are at low risk of becoming sick from or transmitting, the mandated mask-wearing actually makes children sick! Yet school administrators refuse to follow the science if that means listening to parents instead of the so-called experts. Replacing parental control with government control of education (and other aspects of child raising) has been a goal of authoritarians since Plato. After all, it is much easier to ensure obedience if someone has been raised to think of the government as the source of all wisdom and truth, as well as the provider of all of life’s necessities. In contrast to an authoritarian society, a free society recognizes that parents have both the responsibility and the right to provide their children with a quality education that reflects the parents’ values. Teachers who use their positions to indoctrinate children in beliefs that contradict the views of the parents are the ones overstepping their bounds. Restoring parental control of education should be a priority for all who believe in liberty. If government can override the wishes of parents in the name of “education” or “protecting children’s health” then what area of our lives is safe from government intrusion? Fortunately, growing dissatisfaction with government schools is leading many parents to try to change school policies. "It is shameful that activists are weaponizing the US Department of Justice against parents,” Nicole Neily, president of Parents Defending Education told the Daily Caller News Foundation in response to the memorandum. “This is a coordinated attempt to intimidate dissenting voices in the debates surrounding America’s underperforming K-12 education – and it will not succeed. We will not be silenced.” Tyler Durden Tue, 10/05/2021 - 07:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeOct 5th, 2021

Arizona Authorities Probing "Unacceptable" Bathroom Recording Of Sen. Sinema

Arizona Authorities Probing "Unacceptable" Bathroom Recording Of Sen. Sinema Update (1445ET): Authorities in Arizona are now probing the illegal bathroom recording of Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), officials confirmed with The Epoch Times on Monday. “The ASU Police Department is working with Senator Sinema and conducting a full investigation of the incident that occurred Sunday,” Adam Wolfe, the public information officer for the university, told The Epoch Times in an email. “Due to the active status of the investigation, we are unable to provide more information at this time,” he added. A state statute makes it illegal for any person to film another without their consent in a restroom or bathroom. Violators can be charged with a class 5 felony. Violators can be sentenced to up to 2.5 years in jail. The person who was filming appears to be with Living United for Change in Arizona (LUCHA), an activist group that supports drastically loosening laws against illegal immigration. LUCHA did not respond to a request for comment, nor did the offices of Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich or Sen. Mark Kelly (D-Ariz.). Sgt. Vincent Cole, a spokesman for the Phoenix Police Department, indicated that the investigation would be taken care of by university police. “Arizona State University has their own Police Department and are the investigating agency for this incident,” he told The Epoch Times via email. In that case, we won't be holding our breath. Sinema denounced what happened in a lengthy statement released Monday. “Yesterday’s behavior was not legitimate protest. It is unacceptable for activist organizations to instruct their members to jeopardize themselves by engaging in unlawful activities such as gaining entry to closed university buildings, disrupting learning environments, and filming students in a restroom,” she said. *  *  * As The Epoch Times' Katabella Roberts detailed earlier, activists have harassed Sens. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) and Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) in a bid to get them to support a mammoth spending bill. At Arizona State University on Friday, a group of so-called progressive activists followed Sinema into a bathroom as they confronted her over her opposition to the $3.5 trillion Build Back Better Act and demand she support it. Protesters followed Sen. Sinema into the bathroom at Arizona State University to confront her on Build Back Better and immigration pic.twitter.com/NDSmeu0h2M — Jennifer Epstein (@jeneps) October 3, 2021 The incident came just days after Sinema on Sept. 30 doubled down on her position not to support the Democratic leadership’s proposed spending bill, which includes mass amnesty for illegal aliens, as well as funding for social programs like Medicare and the Child Tax Credit, which Sinema wants Democrats to spend less on. While the economic agenda has been largely supported by Sinema’s Democratic colleagues, Sinema has joined Manchin in indicating that they would not back the bill without adjustments. Both votes are critical to the bill’s passage, and they have long maintained that the price tag is too high. The activists allegedly confronted the Democrat outside the classroom where she teaches on Friday and followed her to the nearby bathroom while filming the encounter, which was then shared on Twitter. Sinema initially told the group she was “heading out” and couldn’t speak at the time but they continued to follow her into the restroom and confronted her. One member of the group threatened to get Sinema removed from office if she didn’t support the Build Back Better Act “right now.” “We knocked on doors for you, to get you elected. And just how we got you elected, we can get you out of office if you don’t support what you promised us,” the activist shouted. “My name is Blanca, I was brought here to the United States when I was three years old and in 2010, my grandparents both got deported because of SB 1070 and I’m here because I absolutely believe we need a path to citizenship,” the same activist continued. “My grandfather passed away two weeks ago and I couldn’t go to Mexico to visit him because there is no way to citizenship. And if we now have the chance to pass it on, then we need  do it, because there are millions of undocumented migrants, like me, who share the same story or even worse things that happened to them because of SB 1070 and because of anti-immigrant legislation.” “This is an opportunity to pass it right now and we need to hold you accountable to what you told us, what you promised us you were going to pass when we knocked on doors for you, it’s not right.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) talks with reporters as she leaves a lengthy Democratic caucus meeting in the U.S. Capitol building as negotiations continue on the fate of the bipartisan infrastructure bill on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 1, 2021. (Leah Millis/Reuters) A second activist also told Sinema that they were a survivor of human trafficking, noting that this was due to the “lack of protection at work that we do not have,” while urging the Democrat to “assist the workers.” The video then ends. Sinema did not appear to respond to the activists throughout the encounter. Footage of the incident prompted a response from Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) who shared the video on Twitter alongside the caption, “#DeportBlanca.” Former Trump administration adviser Stephen Miller also shared the video on Twitter, writing: “An illegal alien is stalking a US Senator to demand passage of Biden’s reconciliation bill b/c it includes mass amnesty for illegals. In a functioning democracy, ICE would swiftly deport this person, but under Biden’s new edict (as the lawbreaker knows) she’s immune from removal.” Conservative journalist Jack Posobiec said the “attack” on Sinema was a “textbook example of stochastic targeting.” “Media and Dems spent the week demonizing her, then radicalized leftists stalked her down.” He later shared a second video that claimed to show the same group of activists protesting outside Sinema’s home later that evening. The video shows members of the group chanting “build back better, back to build.” It is unclear if the footage was taken outside of Sinema’s home or at an event. Manchin, meanwhile, has faced harassment on his houseboat in Washington. A group of kayakers went near the boat last week and began yelling, prompting Manchin to go to the back, lean over the side, and speak to them. “We just passed a Pentagon budget of $788 billion,” one activist said. “And that over 10 years is $6 trillion.” “How much do you think that we spend on non-discretionary, basically non-defense? Just as much,” Manchin responded. He said he did agree with the group on some of the comments, including the alleged need to tax the rich. West Virginians kayak to Joe Manchin's YACHT and demand he explain why he's stopping the reconciliation bill from advancing. Once again, reality outruns satire. pic.twitter.com/sciePTrJfy — Darby Desper (@PlatoPox) October 1, 2021 On Saturday, Sinema condemned her own party for its “inexcusable” failure to hold a vote on the bipartisan infrastructure plan after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) cancelled the vote, stating that “more time is needed.” The Congressional Progressive Caucus, a bloc of nearly 100 House members, doesn’t want to pass infrastructure without the lower chamber first passing the mammoth budget piece, but moderates say the proposals should be considered separately and have urged a vote on the infrastructure bill. “The failure of the U.S. House to hold a vote on the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act is inexcusable, and deeply disappointing for communities across our country,” Sinema wrote in a statement on Twitter. “Denying Americans millions of good-paying jobs, safer roads, cleaner water, more reliable electricity, and better broadband only hurts everyday families.” She also claimed progressives are holding legislation “hostage.” “My vote belongs to Arizona, and I do not trade my vote for political favors—I vote based only on what is best for my state and the country,” she continued. “I have never, and would never, agree to any bargain that would hold one piece of legislation hostage to another.” Sinema also noted that her desire to see the House approve the bill has driven “good-faith negotiations” on the reconciliation package even as she and Manchin have opposed the giant price tag. Tyler Durden Mon, 10/04/2021 - 14:47.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeOct 4th, 2021

Activists Harass Sens. Sinema, Manchin Over $3.5 Trillion Budget Bill

Activists Harass Sens. Sinema, Manchin Over $3.5 Trillion Budget Bill Authored by Katabella Roberts via The Epoch Times, Activists have harassed Sens. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) and Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) in a bid to get them to support a mammoth spending bill. At Arizona State University on Friday, a group of so-called progressive activists followed Sinema into a bathroom as they confronted her over her opposition to the $3.5 trillion Build Back Better Act and demand she support it. Protesters followed Sen. Sinema into the bathroom at Arizona State University to confront her on Build Back Better and immigration pic.twitter.com/NDSmeu0h2M — Jennifer Epstein (@jeneps) October 3, 2021 The incident came just days after Sinema on Sept. 30 doubled down on her position not to support the Democratic leadership’s proposed spending bill, which includes mass amnesty for illegal aliens, as well as funding for social programs like Medicare and the Child Tax Credit, which Sinema wants Democrats to spend less on. While the economic agenda has been largely supported by Sinema’s Democratic colleagues, Sinema has joined Manchin in indicating that they would not back the bill without adjustments. Both votes are critical to the bill’s passage, and they have long maintained that the price tag is too high. The activists allegedly confronted the Democrat outside the classroom where she teaches on Friday and followed her to the nearby bathroom while filming the encounter, which was then shared on Twitter. Sinema initially told the group she was “heading out” and couldn’t speak at the time but they continued to follow her into the restroom and confronted her. One member of the group threatened to get Sinema removed from office if she didn’t support the Build Back Better Act “right now.” “We knocked on doors for you, to get you elected. And just how we got you elected, we can get you out of office if you don’t support what you promised us,” the activist shouted. “My name is Blanca, I was brought here to the United States when I was three years old and in 2010, my grandparents both got deported because of SB 1070 and I’m here because I absolutely believe we need a path to citizenship,” the same activist continued. “My grandfather passed away two weeks ago and I couldn’t go to Mexico to visit him because there is no way to citizenship. And if we now have the chance to pass it on, then we need  do it, because there are millions of undocumented migrants, like me, who share the same story or even worse things that happened to them because of SB 1070 and because of anti-immigrant legislation.” “This is an opportunity to pass it right now and we need to hold you accountable to what you told us, what you promised us you were going to pass when we knocked on doors for you, it’s not right.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) talks with reporters as she leaves a lengthy Democratic caucus meeting in the U.S. Capitol building as negotiations continue on the fate of the bipartisan infrastructure bill on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Oct. 1, 2021. (Leah Millis/Reuters) A second activist also told Sinema that they were a survivor of human trafficking, noting that this was due to the “lack of protection at work that we do not have,” while urging the Democrat to “assist the workers.” The video then ends. Sinema did not appear to respond to the activists throughout the encounter. Footage of the incident prompted a response from Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) who shared the video on Twitter alongside the caption, “#DeportBlanca.” Former Trump administration adviser Stephen Miller also shared the video on Twitter, writing: “An illegal alien is stalking a US Senator to demand passage of Biden’s reconciliation bill b/c it includes mass amnesty for illegals. In a functioning democracy, ICE would swiftly deport this person, but under Biden’s new edict (as the lawbreaker knows) she’s immune from removal.” Conservative journalist Jack Posobiec said the “attack” on Sinema was a “textbook example of stochastic targeting.” “Media and Dems spent the week demonizing her, then radicalized leftists stalked her down.” He later shared a second video that claimed to show the same group of activists protesting outside Sinema’s home later that evening. The video shows members of the group chanting “build back better, back to build.” It is unclear if the footage was taken outside of Sinema’s home or at an event. Manchin, meanwhile, has faced harassment on his houseboat in Washington. A group of kayakers went near the boat last week and began yelling, prompting Manchin to go to the back, lean over the side, and speak to them. “We just passed a Pentagon budget of $788 billion,” one activist said. “And that over 10 years is $6 trillion.” “How much do you think that we spend on non-discretionary, basically non-defense? Just as much,” Manchin responded. He said he did agree with the group on some of the comments, including the alleged need to tax the rich. West Virginians kayak to Joe Manchin's YACHT and demand he explain why he's stopping the reconciliation bill from advancing. Once again, reality outruns satire. pic.twitter.com/sciePTrJfy — Darby Desper (@PlatoPox) October 1, 2021 On Saturday, Sinema condemned her own party for its “inexcusable” failure to hold a vote on the bipartisan infrastructure plan after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) cancelled the vote, stating that “more time is needed.” The Congressional Progressive Caucus, a bloc of nearly 100 House members, doesn’t want to pass infrastructure without the lower chamber first passing the mammoth budget piece, but moderates say the proposals should be considered separately and have urged a vote on the infrastructure bill. “The failure of the U.S. House to hold a vote on the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act is inexcusable, and deeply disappointing for communities across our country,” Sinema wrote in a statement on Twitter. “Denying Americans millions of good-paying jobs, safer roads, cleaner water, more reliable electricity, and better broadband only hurts everyday families.” She also claimed progressives are holding legislation “hostage.” “My vote belongs to Arizona, and I do not trade my vote for political favors—I vote based only on what is best for my state and the country,” she continued. “I have never, and would never, agree to any bargain that would hold one piece of legislation hostage to another.” Sinema also noted that her desire to see the House approve the bill has driven “good-faith negotiations” on the reconciliation package even as she and Manchin have opposed the giant price tag. Tyler Durden Mon, 10/04/2021 - 08:42.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytOct 4th, 2021

The recent slew of anti-trans bills shows the GOP brand is built on blocking progress and keeping marginalized people down

The GOP brand stands for standing against other Americans. The new law out of Arkansas is the latest attack on American's civil rights. L.G.B.T. activists an.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderApr 18th, 2021

Disney Under Fire For Blocking Simpsons Episode From Hong Kong Streaming Services

Disney Under Fire For Blocking Simpsons Episode From Hong Kong Streaming Services A month ago we reported that Hong Kong's new pro-China film censorship law could see an eventual ban on Netflix and Amazon and other streaming services. The legislation was part of the continuing unfolding of the sweeping pro-China 'national security law' of June 2020, with the film censorship even working retroactively for any movies or programming "found to be contrary to national security interests". Questions are now being asked about why Disney's streaming service in Hong Kong, Disney Plus, has blocked a popular episode of the "Simpsons". The episode in question features reference to the famous "tank man" photo from the June 1989 Tiananmen Square protests and massacre. The episode entitled "Goo Goo Gai Pan" also features jokes or references that could be deemed offensive to people of Chinese or Asian descent. The Simpsons The censorship law which was enacted late last month brings Hong Kong in closer to conformity to the kind of blatant censoring and wholesale blocking of content that's long existed on the mainland. The law spells out that films are prohibited from any content aiming to "endorse, support, glorify, encourage and incite activities that might endanger national security." According to The Wall Street Journal on Monday: Disney launched its streaming service, Disney+, earlier in November in Hong Kong featuring an array of programming owned by the entertainment giant, including 32 seasons of the animated comedy series. Yet one episode is missing from "The Simpsons" lineup: Titled "Goo Goo Gai Pan," the episode from season 16 centers on a trip to China by the show’s namesake family. Along the way they encounter a plaque at Tiananmen Square in Beijing that reads: "On this site, in 1989, nothing happened." The scene is an obvious sarcastic shot aimed directly at Chinese Communist propaganda and its well-known whitewashing of the whole events of June 4, when the PLA military declared martial law and occupied central parts of Beijing, forcibly quelling the protests through gunfire. In the episode the family actually takes a trip to China where they happen upon the iconic square where "nothing happened".  Chinese state official have downplayed the death toll, saying in the past that up to 200 civilians died in the mayhem, while activists and student leaders have said over 3,000 or more deaths resulted in the PLA crackdown, which included live ammunition, and use of tanks against civilian crowds. Official Chinese media and politicians tens to only reference what they dub "the incident". Confirmed this second by a friend in Hong Kong. S16E12 of The Simpsons is removed from Disney+ in Hong Kong. pic.twitter.com/9QIp2vcOCD — Thor J (@thorcmd) November 27, 2021 The WSJ notes that it's as yet unclear if Disney caved to pressure from China, as the US company has yet to publicly comment on why the episode in question remains blocked. But there's little doubt Disney has in the recent past shown its willingness to "play nice" and avoid offending Beijing while protecting its billions in revenue there: "Disney has huge business interests in China, a market that it and other Hollywood studios are careful not to offend for fear of losing access," the WSJ report describes. "Disney, with resorts in China and Hong Kong and extensive sales from its movie business in the region, has moved aggressively to maintain the peace with China over the years, a fact that has brought it some controversy in the U.S." Shortly after the HK policy was enacted, there were questions over how it would impact US-based streaming services. The AFP observed at the time: "Pro-Beijing lawmakers criticized the government for not including online streaming companies in the current wording, meaning services like Netflix, HBO and Amazon may not be covered but the new rules." But "In response, Commerce Secretary Edward Yau said all screenings, both physical and online, were covered by the new national security law." Tyler Durden Mon, 11/29/2021 - 19:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedge12 hr. 14 min. ago

Meet the typical Gen Zer, who is quitting their job, has over $17,000 in student debt, and is influencing nearly everything you buy

Gen Z has entered the spotlight. From fashion to work, they're setting the tone for the 2020s and poised to take over the economy in a decade. Gen Z is ready for the spotlight.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/Getty Images Gen Z, the oldest of whom turn 24 this year, is the new "it" generation. They're setting trends in fashion and in the workplace, influencing consumer and worker behavior. And they're saving more than they're spending and set to dominate the economy in 20 years. Gen Z has stolen the crown from millennials as the media darling of the moment. The generation, the oldest of whom turn 24 this year, is in the spotlight as they begin to wield influence over lifestyle, work, and consumer trends. Look no further than various headlines promising how-to meet Gen Z demands in the workforce or market beauty brands to them.It's a coming-of-age story, and Gen Z is shaking things up as they enter young adulthood. They're the first digitally native generation and they're best reached online, where they're often catapulting new trends. They're innovative, entrepreneurial social activists, ready to create and shape a better world.They were hit by the pandemic during some of their most formative years, which could shape their futures over the long term. The oldest members of the "TikTok generation," who graduated into a recession, run the risk of repeating millennials' economic plight, but they're already showing signs of behaviors that could define them for years, trying to save and invest early and embrace a lifestyle based on thrift.By size and spending power, they're set to take over the economy in a decade, but their spending restraint and skepticism about markets could make that economy very different.While it's hard to capture an entire generation when some members are still teens and others are adults — demographic differences that produce data filled with caveats — here's what life looks like for the typical Gen Zer in 2021.Gen Z emerged in the limelight during the pandemic, taking over as the latest "it" generation.ViewApart / Getty ImagesGen Z is the most ethnically diverse generation in history and set to unseat millennials as the most educated generation, too. But Jason Dorsey, who runs the research firm Center for Generational Kinetics (CGK), says they're not millennials 2.0."They are really a distinctive generation with a different set of parents raised at a different time, that are coming into the world with some different views," he said, adding that the oldest members are entering the life stage in which they're exerting enough influence to take the mantle as the "it" generation.Society feels like it finally understands millennials, he explained, and is switching focus to the next generation, which remains a mystery. That leaves Gen Z "shifting and driving much of the conversation," and he predicted they'll do so for the next 15 years.They're the first generation to grow up in a wholly digital era, making them tech-savvy and mobile-first.Roy Rochlin/Getty ImagesGen Z was born into a world marked by technology, the internet, and social media. The average Gen Zer got their first smartphone just before their 12th birthday. They communicate primarily through social media and texts, and spend as much time on their phones as older generations do watching television.The pandemic heightened their digital behaviors. With ample time to scroll on their phones, they digitally bonded with one another as many moved back home during the pandemic at a similar life stage, Dorsey said.This helped TikTok, Gen Z's favored platform, blow up during the pandemic. By September 2020, the social media app had grown by 75%, and expanded into intergenerational use. It signals the growing influence of Gen Z in leading consumer behavior, much like millennials did with Instagram.Like millennials before them, the typical Gen Zer has had — and will have — their share of economic troubles.Brothers91/Getty ImagesThe pandemic put Gen Z on track to repeat millennials' money problems. As is typical with recessions, the youngest workers were hit hardest. Gen Z students could lose $10 trillion of life cycle earnings due to Covid lockdowns, the World Bank has estimated.A Bank of America Research report called "OK Zoomer" found that the pandemic will impact Gen Z's financial and professional future in a similar way to how the Great Recession did for millennials."Like the financial crisis in 2008 to 2009 for millennials, Covid will challenge and impede Gen Z's career and earning potential," the report reads, adding that a significant portion of Gen Z entered adulthood in the midst of a recession, just as a cohort of millennials did."I'm a little worried about ending up like those who graduated around 2008," Maya Tribitt, a junior at the University of Southern California, previously told Insider. "A lot of the fear people my age have about getting jobs right out of college have come from the horror stories of people 10 years older than us. It's really scary to think that might be our new reality."But the typical Gen Zer is already trying to build wealth, hoping to avoid millennials' record of falling behind.Klaus Vedfelt/Getty ImagesAs of 2017, 70% of Gen Zers were already earning their own spending money, per a CGK survey. That's the same amount as millennials, who are 10 years older on average. A follow-up CGK survey in 2020 found that the pandemic has taught Gen Z how to be frugal. They've begun saving money and investing earlier than previous generations did, and they're seeking good job benefits, Dorsey said.More than half (54%) of Gen Zers are saving more since the pandemic began than prior to it, according to the State of Gen Z report. Thirty-eight percent have opened an online investment account, while 39% have opened an online bank account.Despite investing earlier, though, Gen Z is going to have to work harder to get a return. They're set to earn less than previous generations on stocks and bonds, as Credit Suisse's global investment returns yearbook found Gen Z can expect average annual real returns of just 2% on their investment portfolios — a third less than the 5%-plus real returns that millennials, Gen X, and baby boomers have seen. Their average credit-card debt is $1,963, less than any other generation.Noam Galai/Getty ImagesGen X has the most debt because they're in their prime spending years, followed by boomers, according to an Experian Consumer Debt study. It makes sense. With the oldest members of the generation in their early 20s, and the majority of the cohort still in its teen years, Gen Z has yet to enter their prime earning years or come into full spending power. The oldest are still getting their feet off the ground in the workplace, and most don't have assets like a house and a car as older generations do.That's not to say Gen Z is debt-free. On average, they carry loan debt of $15,574.They have less student-loan debt than other generations — an average of $17,338 — but that's likely to grow as the generation ages into college life.Gen Z has a smaller student-debt burden than other generations.Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe/Getty ImagesSo says the Experian study.What was once largely viewed as a millennial problem is now becoming an issue for Gen Z. The generation holds 7.37% of the national $1.57 trillion student loan debt, but college is only getting more expensive. That share is expected to grow as more Gen Zers enroll in college.The future of student debt is highly uncertain, as President Joe Biden campaigned on canceling thousands of debt for each student, but he's been reluctant to actually do it since his election. The Democratic Party is in something of a civil war over Biden's authority to cancel debt unilaterally, leaving borrowers at a standstill. Despite their good money habits, the typical Gen Zer drove debt growth during the pandemic. They owe $16,043 on average.Tim P. Whitby/Getty ImagesGen Z had the most debt growth of any generation between 2019 and 2020, with the average balance increasing by 67.2% from $9,593, per the Experian report. But that's still less debt than all other generations have, and Experian said the increase "seemed to track with age — the greatest growth occurred among the youngest consumer group."That growth was mainly across mortgage and personal loan debt; Gen Z owe $169,470 and $6,004, respectively. It seems, then, that homebuying Gen Zers are leading the charge in their generation's debt upswing.But the typical Gen Zer is still set to take over the economy in a decade.Charmedlightph/ Getty ImagesBank of America Research's "OK Zoomer" report found that Gen Z will fare well in the long run. The generation currently earns $7 trillion across its 2.5 billion-person cohort, it stated. By 2025, that income will grow to $17 trillion, and by 2030, it will reach $33 trillion, representing 27% of the world's income and surpassing that of millennials the following year.Research and advisory firm Gen Z Planet recently found that the generation is saving and investing more than it's spending, and now holds $360 billion in disposable income. They're already influencing consumer behavior. The typical Gen Zer is rebelling against all things 2010s, while reviving the trends of the early millennium.Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty ImagesResearch has shown that, in moments of economic turmoil, humans are more likely to feel nostalgia. Gen Z's version of a nostalgic escape from the pandemic is reviving the fashions from the time before social media took over. From wired headphones to claw clips and baggy jeans, they're reviving the Y2K trends of yore in what Sara Fischer of Axios has deemed a "throwback economy." Corded headphones instead of AirPods, for example, are a way for Gen Z to make an "anti-finance bro" statement.They've also been lusting after an "old money" aesthetic characterized by Oxford shirts, tennis skirts, and tweed blazers, a sharp contrast from the "California rich" look of the Kardashians and the casual outfits of the new millennial billionaire class that characterized the 2010s. Prior to the pandemic, the VSCO girl had the internet buzzing. Characterized by a natural look that embodied a crossover between '90s fashion and a surfer lifestyle, she was a contrast to the contoured faces and lip fillers of Instagram influencers. Gen Z's continued embrace of nostalgia is showing she was no fluke, but the harbinger of a new (old) look.Their love for nostalgia explains why the typical Gen Zer likes to shop at thrift stores.Westend61/Getty ImagesThrifting is booming thanks to Gen Zers in search of sustainable, stylish clothes."I've kind of stopped buying clothes from traditional stores," Gen Zer Grace Snelling told Axios. "People almost respect you if what you're wearing is thrifted, and it looks good because you've managed to pull off a cool outfit, and it's sustainable."Recycling and reselling clothes helps the digitally native generation wear new-to-them outfits on a budget they haven't yet posted to social, avoiding repeating looks. It's also a tool to start a lucrative side hustle, in which some are raking in as much as $300,000 a year on apps like Depop and Poshmark.The trend goes beyond clothing. Gen Z (and millennials) are even increasingly eschewing mass-market home decor for vintage furniture, Insider's Avery Hartmans reported. It's not just fashion. The typical post-college Gen Zer is taking their contrarian views to the workplace.Su Arslanoglu/Getty ImagesGen Z is asserting new norms in the workplace, and eschewing the ones implemented by millennials before them. The New York Times' Emma Goldberg wrote that young 20-somethings are challenging tradition by delegating work to their boss, asking for mental health days, working less once they've accomplished their tasks for the day, and setting their own hours. It's part of what Erika Rodriguez called a "slow-up" in a recent opinion piece for the Guardian, referring to a permanent shift in slowing down productivity with the aim of having more separation from work. But some Gen Zers are quitting their jobs altogether, in what LinkedIn CEO Ryan Roslansky called a "Great Reshuffle." He said his team tracked the percentage of LinkedIn members who changed the jobs listed in their profile and found that Gen Z's job transitions have increased by 80% during that time frame.In August, a study by Personal Capital and The Harris Poll found that a whopping 91% of Gen Zers were keen to switch jobs, more than any other generation. While some are seeking greener pastures in other jobs, others are opting out of working altogether, bolstering the "antiwork" movement that embraces a work-free lifestyle.While the vast majority of Gen Zers haven't yet entered the workforce, it stands to reason they'll be just as, if not more so, progressive than their older peers.They're also creative, entrepreneurial, and innovative both inside and outside work.Part of the Students for Hospitals team.Jalen Xing"Gen Z is innovative and powerful," Emma Havighorst, a 2020 graduate, told Insider last year. "The way we see the world is very different from prior generations."For three years, Havighorst has hosted the podcast "Generation Slay," which profiles Gen Z creators and entrepreneurs like mental-health advocate Gabby Frost and nonprofit founder Ziad Ahmed. She said she thinks the pandemic will produce even more innovators."Necessity breeds invention," she said. "We'll be trying to figure out solutions to problems that plagued past generations."Consider high schoolers Daniel Lan and Jalen Xing, who created homemade face shields for hospitals during the pandemic, starting the initiative Students for Hospitals.More than half (58%) of Gen Z respondents in a DoSomething Strategic survey said that, since the pandemic, they had picked up a new activity or were doing more of something they already enjoyed.But perhaps most significantly of all, the typical Gen Zer is ready for change — and they'll do what it takes to make that happen.RODGER BOSCH/AFP via Getty ImagesA generation whose childhood was defined by international protest movements including Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring, Gen Z has been at the forefront of activism, from the March for Our Lives anti-gun protest and the climate change movement. Arguably its most famous member is the climate-crisis activist Greta Thunberg.2020 also put the generation front and center in the anti-police-brutality demonstrations sparked by the killing of George Floyd, a Black man who was murdered by a white police officer in Minneapolis. Social networking app Yubo and Insider polled 38,919 US-based Gen Zers, and found that 77% of respondents had attended a protest to support equality for Black Americans.The generation also played a pivotal role in the 2020 election, Insider's Juliana Kaplan reported, which may have finally captured the elusive youth turnout. Tufts University's Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning & Engagement (CIRCLE) revealed youth voter turnout for 2020 was up by at least 5% from 2016 — and could have been up by as much as 9%.It seems, then, that change may start with Gen Z.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 28th, 2021

"The Omicron Variant" – Magic Pills, Or Solving The Africa Problem?

"The Omicron Variant" – Magic Pills, Or Solving The Africa Problem? Authored by Kit Knightly via Off-Guardian.org, Yesterday the WHO labelled the sars-cov-2 variant B.1.1.529 as a “variant of concern” and officially named it “Omicron”. This was as entirely predictable as it is completely meaningless. The “variants” are just tools to stretch the story out and keep people on their toes. If you want to know exactly how the Omicron variant is going to affect the narrative, well The Guardian has done a handy “here’s all the bullshit we’re gonna sell you over the next couple of weeks” guide: The Omicron variant is more transmissable, but they don’t know if it’s more dangerous yet (keeping their options open) It originated in Africa, possible mutating in an “untreated AIDS patient” (sick people are breeding grounds for dangerous “mutations”) “it has more than double the mutations of Delta…scientists anticipate that the virus will be more likely to infect – or reinfect – people who have immunity to earlier variants. (undermining natural immunity, selling more boosters, keeping the scarefest going) “Scientists are concerned” that current vaccines may not be as effective against the new strain, they may need to be “tweaked” (get your boosters, and the new booster we haven’t invented yet) “Scientists expect that recently approved antiviral drugs, such as Merck’s pill, will work as effectively against the new variant” (more on this later) It’s already spreading around the world, and travel bans may be needed to prevent the need for another lockdown We’re already seeing preparations for more “public health measures”, with the press breathlessly quoting “concerned” public health officials. We’re being told that a new lockdown won’t be necessary…as long as we remember to get boosted and wear masks and blah blah blah. Generally speaking, it’s all fairly boilerplate scary nonsense. Although it is quite funny that the Biden administration has already put a bunch of African nations on a travel ban list, when Biden called Trump a racist for doing the same thing in 2020. pic.twitter.com/AJBoDKU37p — Defiant L’s (@DefiantLs) November 26, 2021 AFRICA It’s interesting that the new variant has allegedly come from Africa, perhaps “mutating in the body of an AIDS patient”, since Africa has been the biggest hole in the Covid narrative for well over a year. Africa is by far the poorest continent, it is densely populated, malnourishment and extreme poverty are endemic across many African nations, and it is home to more AIDS patients than the entire rest of the world combined. And yet, no Covid crisis. This is a weak point in the story, and always has been. Last Summer, the UK’s virus modeller-in-chief Neil Ferguson attempted to explain it by arguing that African nations have, on average, younger populations than the rest of the world, and Covid is only a threat to the elderly. But five minutes of common sense debunks that idea. The reason Africa has a younger population, on average, is that – on average – they are much sicker. There are diseases endemic to large parts of Africa that are all but wiped out in most of the Western world. Cholera, typhus, yellow fever, tuberculosis, malaria. Access to clean water, and healthcare are also much more limited. And while it has been nailed into the public mind that being elderly is the biggest risk factor for Covid, that is inaccurate. In fact, the biggest risk factor for dying “of Covid” is, and always has been, already dying of something else. The truth is that any REAL dangerous respiratory virus would have cut a bloody swath across the entire continent. Instead, as recently as last week, we were getting articles about how Africa “escaped Covid”, and the continent’s low covid deaths with only 6% of people vaccinated is “mystifying” and “baffling” scientists. Politically, African nations have shown themselves far less likely to buy into the “pandemic” narrative than their European, Asian or American counterparts. At least two “Covid denying” African presidents – Pierre Nkurunziza of Burundi and John Magufuli of Tanzania – have died suddenly in the last year, and seen their successors immediately reverse their covid policies. So maybe the Omicron Variant is a way of trying to fold Africa into the covid narrative that the other continents have already fully embraced. That will become clear as the story develops. Of course, it’s also true that being “African” is media shorthand for being scary, relying on the deeply-seated xenophobia of Western audiences. See: “Africanized killer bees”. But, either way, Africa is the long game. There’s a more obvious, and more cynical, short term agenda here. THE MAGIC PILLS Let’s go back to the Guardian’s “Omicron” bullet points, above: Scientists are concerned by the number of mutations and the fact some of them have already been linked to an ability to evade existing [vaccine-created] immune protection. Scientists expect that recently approved antiviral drugs, such as Merck’s pill, [will work effectively] against the new variant The “new variant” is already being described as potentially resistant to the vaccines, but NOT the new anti-viral medications. Pharmaceutical giants Merck and Pfizer are both working on “Covid pills”, which as recently as three days ago, were being hyped up in the press: US may have a ‘game changer’ new Covid pill soon, but its success will hinge on rapid testing In the US, an emergency use authorisation can only be issued if there is no effective medication or treatment already available, so the vaccines not being proof against Omicron would be vital to rushing the pills onto the US market, at least. If Omicron is found to be “resistant to the vaccines”, but NOT the pills, that will give governments an excuse to rush through approving the pills on an EUA, just as they did with the vaccines. So, you bet your ass that testing is gonna be “rapid”. Super rapid. Blink-and-you’ll-miss-it rapid. Rapid to the point you’re not even sure it definitely happened. And now they have an excuse. Really, it’s all just more of the same. A scare before the new year. An excuse to make people believe their Christmas could be in peril. An exercise in flexing their control muscles a bit, milking even more money out of the double-jabbed and boosted crowd, now newly terrified of the Omicron variant, and a nice holiday bump to Pfizer’s ever-inflating stock price. At this point either you can see the pattern, or you can’t. You’re free of the fear machinery, or you’re not. There is one potential silver lining here: It feels rushed and frantic. Discovered on Tuesday, named on Friday, travel bans on Saturday. It is hurried, and maybe that’s a reaction to feeling like the “pandemic” is losing its grip on the public mind. Hopefully, as the narrative becomes more and more absurd, more and more people will wake up to reality. It has been pointed out that “Omicron” is an anagram of “moronic”. One wonders if that’s deliberate and they’re making fun of us. Tyler Durden Sat, 11/27/2021 - 23:45.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 28th, 2021

Greenwald: The Cynical And Dangerous Weaponization Of The "White Supremacist" Label

Greenwald: The Cynical And Dangerous Weaponization Of The "White Supremacist" Label Authored by Glenn Greenwald via greenwald.substack.com, Within hours of the August 25, 2020, shootings in Kenosha, Wisconsin — not days, but hours — it was decreed as unquestioned fact in mainstream political and media circles that the shooter, Kyle Rittenhouse, was a "white supremacist.” Over the next fifteen months, up to and including his acquittal by a jury of his peers on all charges, this label was applied to him more times than one can count by corporate media outlets as though it were proven fact. Indeed, that Rittenhouse was a "white supremacist” was deemed so unquestionably true that questioning it was cast as evidence of one's own racist inclinations (defending a white supremacist). A protester with a sign is seen outside of the Hall of Justice during the Reject the Verdict rally on November 20, 2021 in Louisville, Kentucky. Demonstrators from Black Lives Matter Louisville and Louisville 'Showing Up for Racial Justice' held the rally to refute the recent acquittal of Kyle Rittenhouse, who claimed self defense after killing two protesters and injuring another on August 25, 2020 in Kenosha, Wisconsin. (Photo by Jon Cherry/Getty Images) Yet all along, there was never any substantial evidence, let alone convincing proof, that it was true. This fact is, or at least should be, an extraordinary, even scandalous, event: a 17-year-old was widely vilified as being a white supremacist by a union of national media and major politicians despite there being no evidence to support the accusation. Yet it took his acquittal by a jury who heard all the evidence and testimony for parts of the corporate press to finally summon the courage to point out that what had been Gospel about Rittenhouse for the last fifteen months was, in fact, utterly baseless. A Washington Post news article was published late last week that was designed to chide "both sides” for exploiting the Rittenhouse case for their own purposes while failing to adhere carefully to actual facts. Ever since the shootings in Kenosha, they lamented, "Kyle Rittenhouse has been a human canvas onto which the nation’s political divisions were mapped.” In attempting to set the record straight, the Post article contained this amazing admission: As conservatives coalesced around the idea of Rittenhouse as a blameless defender of law and order, many on the left just as quickly cast him as the embodiment of the far-right threat. Despite a lack of evidence, hundreds of social media posts immediately pinned Rittenhouse with extremist labels: white supremacist, self-styled militia member, a “boogaloo boy” seeking violent revolution, or part of the misogynistic “incel” movement.  “On the left he’s become a symbol of white supremacy that isn’t being held accountable in the United States today,” said Becca Lewis, a researcher of far-right movements and a doctoral candidate at Stanford University. “You see him getting conflated with a lot of the police officers who’ve shot unarmed Black men and with Trump himself and all these other things. On both sides, he’s become a symbol much bigger than himself.” Soon after the shootings, then-candidate Joe Biden told CNN’s Anderson Cooper that Rittenhouse was allegedly part of a militia group in Illinois. In the next sentence, Biden segued to criticism of Trump and hate groups: “Have you ever heard this president say one negative thing about white supremacists? Valuable though this rather belated admission is, there were two grand ironies about this passage. The first is that The Post itself was one of the newspapers which published multiple articles and columns applying this evidence-free "white supremacist" label to Rittenhouse. Indeed, four days after this admission by The Post's newsroom, their opinion editors published an op-ed by Robert Jones that flatly asserted the very same accusation which The Post itself says is bereft of evidence: “Despite his boyish white frat boy appearance, there was plenty of evidence of Rittenhouse’s deeper white supremacist orientation.” In other words, Post editors approved publication of grave accusations which, just four days earlier, their own newsroom explicitly stated lacked evidence. The second irony is that while the Post article lamented everyone else's carelessness with the facts of this case, the publication itself — while purporting to fact-check the rest of the world — affirmed one of the most common falsehoods: namely, that Rittenhouse carried a gun across state lines. The article thus now carries this correction at the top: “An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that Kyle Rittenhouse brought his AR-15 across state lines. He has testified that he picked up the weapon from a friend’s house in Wisconsin. This article has been corrected.” It continues to be staggering how media outlets which purport to explain the Rittenhouse case get caught over and over spreading utter falsehoods about the most basic facts of the case, proving they did not watch the trial or learn much about what happened beyond what they heard in passing from like-minded liberals on Twitter. There is simply no way to have paid close attention to this case, let alone have watched the trial, and believe that he carried a gun across state lines, yet this false assertion made it past numerous Post reporters, editors and fact-checkers purporting to "correct the record” about this case. Yet again, we find that the same news outlets which love to accuse others of “disinformation” — and want the internet censored in the name of stopping it — frequently pontificate on topics about which they know nothing, without the slightest concern for whether or not it is true. Those who continue to condemn Rittenhouse as a white supremacist — including the author of The Post op-ed published four days after the paper concluded the accusation was baseless — typically point to his appearance at a bar in January, 2021, for a photo alongside members of the Proud Boys in which he was photographed making the “okay” sign gesture. That once-common gesture, according to USA Today, “has become a symbol used by white supremacists.” Rittenhouse insists that the appearance was arranged by his right-wing attorneys Lin Wood and John Pierce — whom he quickly fired and accused of exploiting him for fund-raising purposes — and that he had no idea that the people with whom he was posting for a photo were Proud Boys members ("I thought they were just a bunch of, like, construction dudes based on how they looked”), nor had he ever heard that the “OK” sign was a symbol of "white power.” Rittenhouse's denial about this once-benign gesture seems shocking to people who spend all their days drowning in highly politicized Twitter discourse — where such a claim is treated as common knowledge — but is completely believable for the vast majority of Americans who do not. In fact, the whole point of the adolescent 4chan hoax was to convert one of the most common and benign gestures into a symbol of white power so that anyone making it would be suspect. As The New York Times recounted, the gesture has long been “used for several purposes in sign languages, and in yoga as a symbol to demonstrate inner perfection. It figures in an innocuous made-you-look game. Most of all, it has been commonly used for generations to signal 'O.K.,’ or all is well.” But whatever one chooses to believe about that episode is irrelevant to whether these immediate declarations of Rittenhouse's "white supremacy” were valid. That bar appearance took place in January, 2021 — five months after the Kenosha shootings. Yet Rittenhouse was instantly declared to be a "white supremacist” — and by “instantly,” I mean: within hours of the shooting. “A 17 year old white supremacist domestic terrorist drove across state lines, armed with an AR 15,” was how Rep. Ayanna Pressley (D-MA) described Rittenhouse the next day in a mega-viral tweet; her tweet consecrated not only this "white supremacist” accusation which persisted for months, but also affirmed the falsehood that he crossed state lines with an AR-15. It does not require an advanced degree in physics to understand that his posing for a photo in that bar with Proud Boys members, flashing the OK sign, five months later in January, 2020, could not serve as a rational evidentiary basis for Rep. Pressley's accusation the day after the shootings that he was a "white supremacist,” nor could it serve as the justification for five consecutive months of national media outlets accusing him of the same. Unless his accusers had the power to see into the future, they branded him a white supremacist with no basis whatsoever — or, as The Post put it this week, “despite a lack of evidence.” A 17 year old white supremacist domestic terrorist drove across state lines, armed with an AR 15. He shot and killed 2 people who had assembled to affirm the value, dignity, and worth of Black lives. Fix your damn headlines. — Ayanna Pressley (@AyannaPressley) August 27, 2020 The only other “evidence” ever cited to support the rather grave accusation that this 17-year-old is a "white supremacist” were social media postings of his in which he expressed positive sentiments toward the police and then-President Trump, including with the phrase "Blue Lives Matter." That was all that existed — the entirety of the case — that led the most powerful media outlets and politicians to stamp on this adolescent's forehead the gravest accusation one can face in American culture. This is really the heart of the matter: this episode vividly demonstrates how cheapened and emptied and cynically wielded this "white supremacist" slogan has become. The oft-implicit but sometimes-explicit premise in liberal discourse is that everyone who deviates in any way from liberal dogma is a white supremacist by definition. Within this rubric, perhaps the most decisive "evidence" that one is a white supremacist is that one supports the Republican Party and former President Trump — i.e., that half of the voting electorate in the U.S. at least are white supremacists. A subsidiary assumption is that anyone who views the police as a necessary, positive force in U.S. society is inherently guilty of racism (it is fine to revere federal policing agencies such as the FBI and other federal security forces such as the CIA, as most Democrats do; the hallmark of a white supremacist is someone who believes that the local police — the ones who show up when citizens call 911 — is a generally positive rather than negative force in society). An illustration of how casually and recklessly this accusation is tossed around occurred last year, shortly after the George Floyd killing, when my long-time friend and colleague, Intercept journalist Lee Fang, was widely vilified as a racist and white supremacist, first by his own Intercept colleague, journalist Akela Lacy, and then — in one of the most stunningly mindless acts of herd behavior — by literally hundreds if not thousands of members of the national press, including many who barely knew who Lee was but nonetheless were content to echo the accusation (that Lee is himself not white is, of course, not an impediment, not even a speed bump, on the road to castigating him as a modern-day KKK adherent). As Matt Taibbi wrote in disgust about this shameful media episode: [Lacy's accustory] tweet received tens of thousands of likes and responses along the lines of, “Lee Fang has been like this for years, but the current moment only makes his anti-Blackness more glaring,” and “Lee Fang spouting racist bullshit it must be a day ending in day.” A significant number of Fang’s co-workers, nearly all white, as well as reporters from other major news organizations like the New York Times and MSNBC and political activists (one former Elizabeth Warren staffer tweeted, “Get him!”), issued likes and messages of support for the notion that Fang was a racist. Writing in New York Magazine, Jonathan Chait documented that “Lacy called him racist in a pair of tweets, the first of which alone received more than 30,000 likes and 5,000 retweets.” What was the evidence justifying Lee Fang's conviction by mob justice of these charges? He (like Rittenhouse) has expressed the view that police, despite needing reforms, are largely a positive presence in protecting innocent people from violent crime; he suggested violence harms rather than helps social justice causes; and he published a video interview he conducted of a young BLM supporter complaining that many liberals only care when white police officers kill black people but not when black people in his neighborhood are killed by anyone who is not white. Now-deleted tweets from Intercept reporter Akela Lacy, accusing her Intercept colleague Lee Fang of being a racist, June 3, 2020. That such banal and commonly held views are woefully insufficient to justify the reputation-destroying accusation that someone is a white supremacist should be too self-evident to require any explanation. But in case such an explanation is required, consider that polls continually and reliably show that the pro-police sentiments of the type that caused Rittenhouse, Fang, and so many others to be vilified by liberal elites as "white supremacists” are held not only by a majority of Americans, but by a majority of black and brown Americans, the very people on whose behalf these elite accusers purport to speak. For years, polling data has shown that the communities which want at least the same level of policing if not more are communities composed primarily of Black, Brown and poor people. It is not hard to understand why. If the police are defunded or radically reduced, rich people will simply hire private security (even more than they already employ for their homes, neighborhoods and persons), and any resulting crime increases will fall most heavily on poorer communities. Thus, polling data reliably shows that it is these communities that want either the same level of policing or more — the exact view which, if you express, will result in guardians of elite liberal discourse declaring you to be a "white supremacist.” Indeed — according to one Gallup poll taken in the wake of the George Floyd killing, when anti-police sentiment was at its peak — the groups that most want a greater police presence in their communities are Black and Latino citizens: In the wake of anger over the Floyd and Jacob Blake cases, several large liberal cities succeeded in placing referendums on the ballot for this year that proposed major defunding or restructuring of local police. They failed in almost all cases, including ones with large Black populations such as Minneapolis, where Floyd died, precisely because non-white voters rejected it. In other words, expressing the same views about policing that large numbers of Black residents hold somehow subjects one to accusations of "white supremacy” in the dominant elite liberal discourse. What all of this demonstrates is that insult terms like "white supremacist” and "racist” and "white nationalist” have lost any fixed meaning. They are instead being trivialized and degraded into little more than discourse toys to be tossed around for fun and reputation-destruction by liberals, who believe they have ascended to a place of such elevated racial enlightenment that they are now the sole and exclusive owners of these terms and thus free to hurl them in whatever manner they please. It is not an overstatement to observe that in elite liberal discourse, there are literally no evidentiary requirements that must be fulfilled before one is free to malign political adversaries with those accusatory terms. That is why editors at The Washington Post published an op-ed proclaiming Rittenhouse was plagued by “deeper white supremacist orientation” just four days after its news division explicitly concluded that such an accusation "lacks evidence” — because it it permissible to accuse people of racism and white supremacy without any evidence needed. It is inherently disturbing and destructive any time a person is publicly branded as something for which there is no evidence. That is intrinsically something we should collectively abhor. But this growing trend in liberal discourse is not just ethically repellent but dangerous. By so flagrantly cheapening and exploiting the "white supremacist” accusation from what it should be (a potent weapon deployed to stigmatize and ostracize actual racists) into something far more tawdry (a plaything used by Democrats to demean and destroy their enemies whenever the mood strikes), its cynical abusers are draining the term of all of its vibrancy, potency and force, so that when it is needed, for actual racists, people will have tuned it out, knowing that is used deceitfully, recklessly and for cheap entertainment. A similar dynamic emerged with accusations of anti-semitism and the weaponization of it to demonize criticisms of Israel. It is, of course, true that some criticisms of the Israeli government are partially grounded or even largely motivated by anti-semitism — just as it is true that some championing of the local police or support for Trump grows out of racist sentiments. But the converse is just as true: one can vehemently criticize the actions of the Israeli government the same as any other government without being driven by an iota of anti-semitism (indeed, many of the most vocal critics of Israel are proudly Jewish), in exactly the same way as one can be highly supportive of the local police or Donald Trump without an iota of racism (a proposition that should need no proof, but is nonetheless highlighted by the uncomfortable fact that growing number of non-whites supporting both Trump and the police). But the cynical, manipulative weaponization of anti-semitism accusations to smear all critics of Israel has rendered the accusation far weaker and more easily dismissible than it once was — exactly as is now happening to the accusatory terms "white supremacist” and “white nationalist” and "racist,” which are being increasingly understood, validly so, not as a grave and sincere condemnation but a cheap tactic to be applied recklessly, for the tawdry entertainment one derives from public rituals of reputation-destruction. BBC, Nov. 22, 2020 Ever since his acquittal, Rittenhouse has made a series of public statements directly at odds with the dark, hateful image constructed of him by the national press over the last sixteen months, while he was forced to remain silent by the charges he faced. He has professed support for the Black Lives Matter movement, argued that the U.S. is plagued by structural racism, and suggested that he would have suffered a worse fate if he had been Black. The same people who are smugly certain that his entire character and soul was permanently captured by that fleeting moment in a bar when he was seventeen and flashed an “okay" symbol — and who are certain that his denials that he knew what it meant or with whom he was posing are false — have, of course, scoffed at these recent statements of his as self-serving and insincere, even though they offer far greater insight into Rittenhouse's actual views on questions of race than anything thus far presented. But that is the point. The political and media faction that casually and recklessly brands people as "white supremacists” the way normal people utter “excuse me” while navigating a large crowd have no interest at all in whether the accusation is true. They are devoted to reducing everyone whose political ideology diverges from their own to their worst possible moment — no matter how long ago it happened or how unrepresentative of their lives it is — in order to derive the most ungenerous and destructive meaning from it. It is a movement that is at once driven by rigorous rules resulting in righteous decrees of sin and sweeping denunciations, yet completely bereft of the possibility of grace or redemption. And its most cherished weapon is accusing anyone who they decide is an enemy or even just an adversary of being a white supremacist, a white nationalist, a racist — to the point where these terms now sound like reflexively recited daily prayer slogans than anything one needs to take seriously or which has the possibility to engage on the merits. For fifteen months, it was gospel in political and media circles that Kyle Rittenhouse was a "white supremacist terrorist” only for The Washington Post to suddenly announce that this claim persisted “despite a lack of evidence.” But that lack of evidence really does not matter, which is why that announcement by The Post received so little notice. Under the rules of this rotted discourse, evidence is not a requirement to affirm this accusation. All that is needed is an intuition, a tingly sensation, and — above all else — the realization that hurling the accusation will yield some personal or political advantage. Like all cynical weapons, it worked for awhile, but is rapidly running out of efficacy as its manipulative usage becomes more and more visible. The term is still needed as a tool to fight actual racism, but those who most vocally and flamboyantly proclaim themselves solemnly devoted to that cause have rendered that tool virtually useless, thanks to their self-interested misuse and abuse of it. To support the independent journalism we are doing here, please subscribe, obtain a gift subscription for others and/or share the article Tyler Durden Sat, 11/27/2021 - 20:45.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 27th, 2021

A Scared Nu World: Here"s What We Know About The COVID "Omicron" Strain

A Scared Nu World: Here's What We Know About The COVID "Omicron" Strain Summarizing of our post from last might (which we urge everyone to read) for those who are just now waking up to the global chaos resulting from the B.1.1.529 variant, which today got the Greek letter designation Omicron... Omicron sounds like the name of an 80s movie's evil Robot King. — Edward Snowden (@Snowden) November 26, 2021 ... skipping the widely expected letter Nu (and certainly the one following it, Xi), here is what we know, courtesy of Newsquawk, Credit Suisse and Citi. Background Regarded as the most heavily mutated variant of the Coronavirus, thus far, as it has 32 mutations in the spike protein and 50 overall. More specifically, scientists have highlighted that there are 10 mutations vs 2 in the Delta variant regarding the receptor binding domain, which is the portion of the virus that makes initial contact with cells. The Omicron variant was identified 5 days ago initially in Botswana with subsequent confirmation and sequencing in South Africa with about 100 confirmed cases. Cases have been detected in Israel and Hong Kong and as of this morning, in Belgium. Sequencing data suggests 8.1.1.529 has a different evolutionary pathway, but shares a few common mutations with the C.1.2, Beta and Delta variants. That said, as we cautioned last night, a significant number of mutations may not necessarily be a ‘negative’ as it is dependent on how these mutations function, which scientists are yet to establish. Then again, since it is the job of science to fearmonger so that Pfizer can buy an even bigger yacht, assume it will be "very very horrifying" until proven innocuous. Is it more deadly It is currently too early to determine if the new variant has higher mortality than previous variants. Reported cases only started rising in South Africa on 19 November, so any impact on hospitalizations and COVID-related deaths will not have yet emerged. Testing and Detectability Tulio de Oliveria, the Director of the Centre for Epidemic Response & innovation (CERI), South Africa, has written that the variant can be detected by a normal PCR test and as such it will be "easy for the world to track it". It wasn't immediately clear if this is one of those "excess false positive PCR tests" but it's safe to assume for now that it is. According to Credit Suisse, "one silver lining may come in the ease of identifying this variant via qPCR tests. B.1.1.529 has a deletion within the s-gene which can be identified easily via widely-used PCR tests. More complex sequencing analysis is needed to differentiate the delta variant. This will help track the spread of B.1.1.529, both within Southern Africa and across the globe." How widespread is it As of Thursday there were almost 100 cases detected in South Africa, where it’s become the dominant strain among new infections. Early PCR test results showed that 90% of 1,100 new cases reported Wednesday in the South African province that includes Johannesburg were caused by the new variant, according to de Oliveira. In neighboring Botswana, officials recorded four cases on Monday in people who were fully vaccinated. In Hong Kong, a traveler from South Africa was found to have the variant, and another case was identified in a person quarantined in a hotel room across the hall. Israel has also identified one case in a man who recently traveled to Malawi. Belgium has also reported two new cases. According to de Oliveira, this new variant, B.1.1.529 "seems to spread very quick! In less than 2 weeks now dominates all infections following a devastating Delta wave in South Africa (Blue new variant, now at 75% of last genomes and soon to reach 100%)" This new variant, B.1.1.529 seems to spread very quick! In less than 2 weeks now dominates all infections following a devastating Delta wave in South Africa (Blue new variant, now at 75% of last genomes and soon to reach 100%) pic.twitter.com/Z9mde45Qe0 — Tulio de Oliveira (@Tuliodna) November 25, 2021 Transmission Oliveria, explains that the new variant is spreading very quickly, in under two-weeks it is now dominating all infections in South Africa following the Delta waves domination – writing that it the variant is “now at 75% of last genomes and soon to reach 100%”. Additionally, the virus contains mutations that have been seen in other variants and appear to make transmission easier. Outside of Africa, two cases have been reported in Hong Kong, one from a traveller from the region and another who was quarantining in the adjacent hotel room. Most recently, a case has been reported in Israel. In response to this, the UK has placed much of southern Africa on the red list, with Israel India, Japan and Singapore also taking similar measures. Additionally, EU Commission President von der Leyen is to propose activation of the emergency air brake, to halt travel from southern Africa. Vaccines It is too early to accurately determine the vaccine response to the new variant. However, the significant number of variants increase the likelihood that current vaccines, which were designed with the original COVID-19 strain in mind, may be less effective. Known variants include those that make it more challenging for antibodies to recognise their presence. Laboratory testing is already underway according to the South Africa National Institute for Communicable Diseases Initial thoughts from the institute are that partial immune escape is likely, a view that seems possible given the numerous mutations in comparison to the sequence that existing vaccines were designed against. The first view on this to be from in vitro immunogenicity test or perhaps from computer modelling of the sequence. Credit Suisse estimates initial lab data could take less than 1 week to generate given the sequence is already known and work is already ongoing. New Vaccine Would be Available in 100 days According to Pfizer, if a vaccine-escape variant emerges, the company expects to develop, produce a tailor-made vaccine against that variant in 100 days. Impact of efficacy of existing drugs antibodies is unknown. There have been significant advances in treatment of COVID since it emerged in the disease waves of 2020: the use of widely-available steroids, and anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Roche's Actemra have significantly improved survival outcomes. More recently, antibody therapies targeting COVID (LLY, REGN/Roche, AZN) have significantly improved outcomes against COVID variants to date. It will need to be seen if their efficacy is equal against the new B1.1.529 variant. Lastly the recent positive data from oral anti-viral agents (PFE, MRK/Ridgeback) may also have the potential to slow the spread of any new waves of COVID. The effectiveness of these treatments against new variants of concern will need to be tested, but lab results should be expected relatively quickly. In-human studies should also yield results relatively quickly if they are run in areas where the prevalence of 8.1.1.529 is high. What's next According to Citi, concern over Omicron needs to be balanced against the failure of other concerning variants such as Beta (also first identified in Africa) to out-compete delta. The next two weeks will be critical to: (i) determine whether Omicron outcompetes delta in high delta prevalence countries (2-3 weeks), (ii) engineered pseudoviruses for Omicron to determine neutralization by serum of vaccination and previously infected patients (2-4 weeks), and (iii) real world data to determine rates of hospitalisation and death (c. 6-8 weeks). The implementation of travel restrictions and public health measures may push back some of the above timeline estimates. Novel oral anti-virals should retain activity against Omicron but resistance may emerge with time. Tyler Durden Fri, 11/26/2021 - 09:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 26th, 2021

A Scared Nu World: Here"s What We Know About The New COVID Strain

A Scared Nu World: Here's What We Know About The New COVID Strain Summarizing of our post from last might (which we urge everyone to read) for those who are just now waking up to the global chaos resulting from the B.1.1.529 variant, which later today is expected to be named with the Greek letter Nu, here is what we know, courtesy of Newsquawk, Credit Suisse and Citi. Background Regarded as the most heavily mutated variant of the Coronavirus, thus far, as it has 32 mutations in the spike protein and 50 overall. More specifically, scientists have highlighted that there are 10 mutations vs 2 in the Delta variant regarding the receptor binding domain, which is the portion of the virus that makes initial contact with cells. The Nu variant was identified 5 days ago initially in Botswana with subsequent confirmation and sequencing in South Africa with about 100 confirmed cases. Cases have been detected in Israel and Hong Kong and as of this morning, in Belgium. Sequencing data suggests 8.1.1.529 has a different evolutionary pathway, but shares a few common mutations with the C.1.2, Beta and Delta variants. That said, as we cautioned last night, a significant number of mutations may not necessarily be a ‘negative’ as it is dependent on how these mutations function, which scientists are yet to establish. Then again, since it is the job of science to fearmonger so that Pfizer can buy an even bigger yacht, assume it will be "very very horrifying" until proven innocuous. Is it more deadly It is currently too early to determine if the new variant has higher mortality than previous variants. Reported cases only started rising in South Africa on 19 November, so any impact on hospitalizations and COVID-related deaths will not have yet emerged. Testing and Detectability Tulio de Oliveria, the Director of the Centre for Epidemic Response & innovation (CERI), South Africa, has written that the variant can be detected by a normal PCR test and as such it will be "easy for the world to track it". It wasn't immediately clear if this is one of those "excess false positive PCR tests" but it's safe to assume for now that it is. According to Credit Suisse, "one silver lining may come in the ease of identifying this variant via qPCR tests. B.1.1.529 has a deletion within the s-gene which can be identified easily via widely-used PCR tests. More complex sequencing analysis is needed to differentiate the delta variant. This will help track the spread of B.1.1.529, both within Southern Africa and across the globe." How widespread is it As of Thursday there were almost 100 cases detected in South Africa, where it’s become the dominant strain among new infections. Early PCR test results showed that 90% of 1,100 new cases reported Wednesday in the South African province that includes Johannesburg were caused by the new variant, according to de Oliveira. In neighboring Botswana, officials recorded four cases on Monday in people who were fully vaccinated. In Hong Kong, a traveler from South Africa was found to have the variant, and another case was identified in a person quarantined in a hotel room across the hall. Israel has also identified one case in a man who recently traveled to Malawi. Belgium has also reported two new cases. According to de Oliveira, this new variant, B.1.1.529 "seems to spread very quick! In less than 2 weeks now dominates all infections following a devastating Delta wave in South Africa (Blue new variant, now at 75% of last genomes and soon to reach 100%)" This new variant, B.1.1.529 seems to spread very quick! In less than 2 weeks now dominates all infections following a devastating Delta wave in South Africa (Blue new variant, now at 75% of last genomes and soon to reach 100%) pic.twitter.com/Z9mde45Qe0 — Tulio de Oliveira (@Tuliodna) November 25, 2021 Transmission Oliveria, explains that the new variant is spreading very quickly, in under two-weeks it is now dominating all infections in South Africa following the Delta waves domination – writing that it the variant is “now at 75% of last genomes and soon to reach 100%”. Additionally, the virus contains mutations that have been seen in other variants and appear to make transmission easier. Outside of Africa, two cases have been reported in Hong Kong, one from a traveller from the region and another who was quarantining in the adjacent hotel room. Most recently, a case has been reported in Israel. In response to this, the UK has placed much of southern Africa on the red list, with Israel India, Japan and Singapore also taking similar measures. Additionally, EU Commission President von der Leyen is to propose activation of the emergency air brake, to halt travel from southern Africa. Vaccines It is too early to accurately determine the vaccine response to the new variant. However, the significant number of variants increase the likelihood that current vaccines, which were designed with the original COVID-19 strain in mind, may be less effective. Known variants include those that make it more challenging for antibodies to recognise their presence. Laboratory testing is already underway according to the South Africa National Institute for Communicable Diseases Initial thoughts from the institute are that partial immune escape is likely, a view that seems possible given the numerous mutations in comparison to the sequence that existing vaccines were designed against. The first view on this to be from in vitro immunogenicity test or perhaps from computer modelling of the sequence. Credit Suisse estimates initial lab data could take less than 1 week to generate given the sequence is already known and work is already ongoing. New Vaccine Would be Available in 100 days According to Pfizer, if a vaccine-escape variant emerges, the company expects to develop, produce a tailor-made vaccine against that variant in 100 days. Impact of efficacy of existing drugs antibodies is unknown. There have been significant advances in treatment of COVID since it emerged in the disease waves of 2020: the use of widely-available steroids, and anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Roche's Actemra have significantly improved survival outcomes. More recently, antibody therapies targeting COVID (LLY, REGN/Roche, AZN) have significantly improved outcomes against COVID variants to date. It will need to be seen if their efficacy is equal against the new B1.1.529 variant. Lastly the recent positive data from oral anti-viral agents (PFE, MRK/Ridgeback) may also have the potential to slow the spread of any new waves of COVID. The effectiveness of these treatments against new variants of concern will need to be tested, but lab results should be expected relatively quickly. In-human studies should also yield results relatively quickly if they are run in areas where the prevalence of 8.1.1.529 is high. What's next According to Citi, concern over Nu needs to be balanced against the failure of other concerning variants such as Beta (also first identified in Africa) to out-compete delta. The next two weeks will be critical to: (i) determine whether Nu outcompetes delta in high delta prevalence countries (2-3 weeks), (ii) engineered pseudoviruses for Nu to determine neutralization by serum of vaccination and previously infected patients (2-4 weeks), and (iii) real world data to determine rates of hospitalisation and death (c. 6-8 weeks). The implementation of travel restrictions and public health measures may push back some of the above timeline estimates. Novel oral anti-virals should retain activity against Nu but resistance may emerge with time. Tyler Durden Fri, 11/26/2021 - 09:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 26th, 2021

Mississippi banned most abortions to be the "safest state" for the unborn. Meanwhile, one in three Mississippi kids live in poverty

Mississippi will defend its abortion ban before the Supreme Court on December 1. Back home, one in three Mississippi kids live in poverty. Drusilla Hicks, a single mom in Mississippi, with her two youngest kids.Rory Doyle for Insider Mississippi lawmakers said the ban on most abortions after 15 weeks would make Mississippi 'the safest state in the country' for the unborn.  The Supreme Court will hear a challenge to Mississippi's abortion law on Dec. 1. Advocates say Mississippi, the poorest state in the country, offers little support for children 'once they're here.' Brandon, Mississippi – Drusilla Hicks sinks into her couch. A week ago, she and her three young kids moved into their new home. After unloading the moving truck herself, unpacking all the boxes, and hanging photos on the wall, she's exhausted. All around her, stacks of folded laundry are perched on every available surface. Hicks wakes at five o'clock every morning and doesn't get home from work until dark. Between her daughter's cheerleading practice, her son's homework, and the baby's bath time, she rarely gets time to herself. The only reason she was home alone on a late October morning was because she'd been in a car accident the day before. Her body aching, Hicks, who's 28, was supposed to be resting. But the laundry won't fold itself. As a single mom with no child support, Hicks struggles. Her mother and the kids' grandmothers help out with childcare when they can. But the salary she earns from her job as an office manager for the county isn't enough to cover her bills. Her income is just a bit over the threshold for her to qualify for state aid. After trying repeatedly to request some kind of assistance, she's stopped asking. Instead, a friend helps her pay the bills each month. Without him, she's not sure where she and her children would be living. Right now, she's worried about how she will pay the $1,000 deductible to repair her car from the accident. To provide for her children, she often "pinches," or goes without."I'm trying to give my children a better life than I had," Hicks says. "It's hard because I'm trying to make sure they do the extra stuff they want to do, as well as make sure my bills are paid. If I don't have something, I go without and they'll just never know."After a moment, she gets up again. Soon, it will be time to pick up the kids. The children that are hereIn March of 2019, Mississippi drew national headlines when Governor Phil Bryant signed into law one of the most restrictive abortion bans in the country, making Mississippi – as backers of the bill frequently put it – "the safest place in the country for unborn babies." A challenge to the law, which bans most abortions after 15 weeks, has made it to the US Supreme Court and oral arguments are scheduled for Dec 1. It will be the first major challenge to abortion rights that the court has heard since Justice Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative Trump appointee, was seated. Drusilla Hicks walks with her son.Rory Doyle for InsiderIn the meantime, Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch has been making the rounds on the national Christian media circuit—she rarely speaks with media in the state—touting the "empowering" options and opportunities that would stem from overturning Roe v. Wade.  "You have the option in life to really achieve your dream and goals, and you can have those beautiful children as well," Flynn said in September. But community leaders and organizers left with filling in the gaps left from the absence of state aid tell another story. They point to past legislative sessions where Mississippi leaders have repeatedly passed laws that make it harder for families to access aid, while stonewalling on bills that are designed to address income gaps. All of this puts Mississippi on the path to forcing women to have children, then providing little to no safety net once the children are born."We've had so many state leaders who have talked about wanting Mississippi to be the safest state in the country for unborn babies. Every time I hear that, I think, 'Oh my god, let's make this state the safest in the country for born babies,'" said Carol Burnette, executive director of the nonprofit Mississippi Low-Income Child Care Initiative. "They're so determined about their anti-abortion stance; there's just no similar match to being concerned about children once they're here."A domino effect Mississippi is the poorest state in the nation. Around 600,000 people here, nearly 20 percent of Mississippians, live in poverty. It's even higher for kids: one in three Mississippi children live in poverty.In Mississippi, maternal deaths occur in 33.2 of every 100,000 births – nearly twice the national average of 17 deaths per 100,000 – and the state has the highest rate of infant mortality. Mississippi classrooms teach abstinence as sex education; there is no promotion of safe sex or contraceptives. The state has one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in the nation. Additionally, Mississippi is the only state without a law requiring equal pay, which advocates say especially disadvantages Black women and single moms. The Annie E. Casey Foundation, a  consistantly lists Mississippi last in its annual state ranking of overall child well-being. The issues facing poor Mississippi families are interconnected, creating a domino effect, so one issue exacerbates another.A wall of family photos at Drusilla Hicks' new home.Rory Doyle for InsiderAccording to Lea Anne Brandon, a former spokeswoman for the Mississippi Department of Children and Families, the overwhelming majority of children removed from their homes were living in poverty. "It wasn't 'I don't want to take care of this child,'" Brandon said. "It's 'I don't have the resources to or I don't have money to put them in daycare,' or 'I don't have enough money to buy them food or clothes or medicine.'"Based on the thousands of children and families she's seen, Brandon said the state often swoops in to "rescue" children instead of addressing the issue on the front end. "We're pro-birth. Are we pro-life? We want them born but once they're born, what do we do? 'Here's a pack of diapers' and 'Isn't your child cute?'" Brandon said. Nakeitra Burse, a maternal health advocate who works with pregnant women and mothers, has a unique vantage point of seeing both the administrative hurdles and the myriad of consequences that stem from a patchwork of care. Hospital closures in rural areas, and funding issues at hospitals across the state, for example, puts pregnant women at greater peril, she said.Burse points to a recent tragedy, where a young pregnant woman suffered a heart attack. The family lived in a rural part of the state that doesn't have a county hospital, and so the woman's husband attempted to drive her to a neighboring county. They didn't make it. The husband performed CPR on his dying wife on the side of the road. She and the baby died four days before her due date. "When you think about rural Mississippi, those access and quality issues are a big problem," Burse said. She continues: "Mississippi is so small, I know people that know her."A brigade of helpersThe tight group of activists, organizers and policy experts who work in this area come together to provide, in many instances, what the state does not. Born out of necessity, they've formed a unique brigade. Cassandra Welchlin with the Black Women's Roundtable is the voice in the room when it comes to equal pay and how the disparity impacts Black mothers. She'll defer to Burse when it comes to maternal health; Burse rattles off statistics with barely a breath in between, and can talk for hours about the importance of doulas. Cassandra Overton Welchlin (right) at a 2018 event to boost voter participation in Mississippi.Rogelio V. Solis/AP PhotoAnd childcare once those babies are born? That's Burnette's wheelhouse. If childcare isn't available or a mom needs help paying her bills that month, it's over to Laurie Bertram Roberts, co-founder of the Mississippi Reproductive Freedom Fund and executive director of the Yellowhammer Fund in Alabama, which also advocates for abortion access. Each of the women has dedicated their life to helping Mississippi women and families. Each of them also express frustration that the state isn't doing more, and, they feel in some instances, making it harder for women to get the help they so desperately need. Republican lawmakers in the state say their thinking comes down to responsible and sustainable budgeting. Burnette says that she spends a lot of her days navigating the red tape that state lawmakers have put up that makes it more difficult for Mississippians to access federal services. Take the Child Care Certificate Program, a federal block grant. More than 100,000 Mississippi children should be eligible, but in 2019 – the most recent year for which there's data – just 20,900 benefited from the program. The federal program is most commonly used by single mothers, but the state added an additional requirement: single parents have to cooperate with child support enforcement in order to enroll, meaning they have to provide information about the children's father so the state can track him down. Many are reluctant to do so. Laurie Bertram Roberts, left, confronts an abortion opponent blocking the driveway at Jackson Women's Health Organization in 2013. It's the sole abortion clinic in the state.Rogelio V. Solis/AP PhotoPrudent spending and a fair sliceWhile those on the ground have no shortage of suggestions to help push the state forward, on the top of almost everyone's wish lists is expanding access to Medicaid, a federally funded health care program for the poor. But it remains a major, if unreachable, priority for state Democrats. Currently, low-income women in the state can qualify for Medicaid coverage during their pregnancy and for 60 days after the birth of the child, and two thirds of births in the state are covered by Medicaid.Under the Affordable Care Act, states could opt-in to expand Medicaid coverage. But Mississippi lawmakers opted against it, joining 11 other states to date. In the 2021 legislative session, a proposal to expand Medicaid coverage to mothers for one year after the birth of the child postpartum failed to make it out of committee. From the top down, Mississippi Republican leaders have repeatedly spoken out against Medicaid expansion, including the state's current governor, Tate Reeves, and Speaker of the House Phillip Gunn. In his budget proposal for the 2022 fiscal year, Reeves said, "I remain adamantly opposed to Medicaid expansion in Mississippi. I firmly believe that it is not good public policy to place 300,000 additional Mississippians on government-funded health care."His spokesperson Bailey Martin told Insider, "Governor Reeves remains opposed to the expansion of Obamacare and Medicaid in Mississippi."Other issues impact affordability, too. According to the National Low Income Housing Coalition, Mississippi is short 42,000 affordable housing units for families in need. Single-mother households with children under the age of 18 are in the most danger of facing eviction within the next few months, according to Matthew Carpenter of the NAACP. "We see the linkage between quality affordable housing and pretty much everything," he said. "The state being a low-income, low wage state, that impacts housing prospects for a lot of people, and it impacts the well-being of the kids.In Mississippi, eight out of ten Black women are heads of household, and many of the state's problems, from poverty to bad health outcomes, would be made more manageable if women's work – and especially Black women's work – was made more valuable, Welchlin said.Drusilla Hicks collects her youngest child from the car.Rory Doyle for InsiderTo push that debate along, every year members of the Black Women's Roundtable take slices of pie to the state legislature and leave them on the desks of representatives and senators. The message: we want our slice of the pie.For Burnette, The resistance to bolstering the state's social safety net is "inextricably tied to race" and a false narrative of the "welfare queen.""Mississippi has a long history of resisting federal programs and federal funding that comes in with the intent to improve things for poor people," she said. In fact, she said, "single moms have incredible work ethic." But they have to make ends meet with minimum wage jobs, while navigating the lack of affordable housing and affordable and flexible childcare. "They're working, they're just working in jobs that pay too little and because they're a single mom and the sole earner, they're hampered – not only by low wages but being the only wage earner," Burnette said.A full house Back in Brandon, it's been a week since Hicks' car accident. After work, she picks up the kids, and a pizza for dinner. Settled at the kitchen table, each of the older children grab a plate. Hicks does not, feeding the baby instead. Hicks has been in her new house for a week but already it has a warm, lived-in look, like they've been there for years. There are framed photos of the children on the wall, mirrors are hung just so, and a pumpkin is arranged on the front porch for fall. They clear the plates. In the living room, Hicks' daughter practices a cheer routine, which Hicks videos on her phone. Her son circles them on his skateboard. He's energetic, a showman. Later, as she helps him with homework, she worries about his grades.The worrying never really goes away. Hicks wonders if she's doing enough as a mom, and what more she can do to provide for her kids. Dinnertime at the Hicks home.Rory Doyle for InsiderDrusilla Hicks making a cellphone video of her daughter's cheer routine.Rory Doyle for InsiderDrusilla Hicks with her three kids.Rory Doyle for InsiderDrusilla Hicks gives her youngest kid a bath while her daughter looks on.Rory Doyle for InsiderDrusilla Hicks putting her son to bed.Rory Doyle for InsiderDrusilla Hicks getting a rare moment to herself.Rory Doyle for InsiderThe night winding down, she bathes the baby in the kitchen sink and tucks her son into bed in his Spiderman sheets. For a moment, it's quiet and Hicks takes a minute to herself, sitting with her phone in the dark. Hicks is stressed, but she's too exhausted at the end of each day for it to keep her awake at night. "I go to sleep as soon as my head hits the pillow," she says. She has to sleep sometime. In just a few short hours, it starts all over again. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 26th, 2021

Shellenberger: Why Anti-Police Activism Kills

Shellenberger: Why Anti-Police Activism Kills Authored by Michael Shellenberger via Substack, In response to anti-police protests, many officers quit, resulting in shortages and a spike in avoidable deaths, from homicides to heart attacks, of innocents... Will Yurek with three of his four children including Drew (far right) who called 911 when his father suffered a heart attack. First responders say the city of Seattle failed to save Will’s life because of a police shortage. At 1:24pm on Nov. 2, 13-year-old Drew Yurek called 911 to report an emergency: his father Will didn’t feel well and needed help. Medics arrived six minutes later, but were told by dispatch to wait for the police before entering; there was a cautionary note that flagged the occupant of the address as being hostile to first responders. But the note was outdated, and referred to a previous tenant. Because of a shortage of police officers first reported by Seattle journalist Jason Rantz, the medics were left to wait outside the house until cops could arrive. At 1:37pm, Drew called 911 again, desperate. He needed help. Medics waited two more minutes before deciding to ignore the order and enter the building. They found Will and started to perform CPR and apply a defibrillator. But by then it was too late. Despite their best efforts, Will, 45 and a father of four, died of a heart attack as Drew looked on. The police did not arrive until 1:45pm. Now Drew’s mother, Meagan Petersen, is planning to sue the city of Seattle. “People need to know how the city let this happen,” said Meagan, who is divorced from Will and lives in Utah. “They could have saved Will if the system was working like it should.” Firefighters and police officers I spoke to said they believe they could have saved the man’s life had there not been a shortage of cops. By the end of 2020, 200 police officers had left the Seattle police force. What happened to Will Yurek and what his son had to suffer is a tragic but cautionary tale of what happens when activism and moral cowardice at the top of government destroys public safety and common sense in society. It has happened in Seattle, but many other parts of the country have also fallen victim — with many more in peril, too. Before a vaccine mandate took 100 police officers off the street in mid-October, the Seattle police department was short at least 400 police officers to be at the minimum considered necessary to protect public safety. Why is that? The overwhelming and unavoidable reason is anti-police protests by Black Lives Matter activists. This happened nationwide, but was worse in Seattle, where Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan and progressive members of the Seattle City Council allowed anarchists to briefly take over the downtown Capitol Hill neighborhood in the summer of 2020. Durkan did so to show solidarity with anti-police protests in the wake of the killing of George Floyd by a police officer in Minneapolis. The anti-police protests in Seattle were surprising because in 2018 the City Council had hired a black woman, Carmen Best, for the first time to serve as the city’s police chief. Best opened up for the first time about what happened last summer in an interview with me for my book, “San Fransicko,” earlier this year. Best is also one of the candidates NYC’s Mayor-Elect Eric Adams is considering for NYPD Commissioner. Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best, left, talks with activist Raz Simone, right front, and others near a plywood-covered and closed police precinct behind them on June 9, 2020. “I refuse to work for this socialist City Council and their political agenda,” said one officer. “It ultimately will destroy the fabric of this once fine city.” Another said the city’s progressive City Council “will be the downfall of the city of Seattle.”  Anti-police protests took a toll around the country. At least two dozen other police chiefs or senior officers resigned, retired, or took disability leave in America’s 50 biggest cities in 2020, while 3,700 beat officers left. Today there are fewer police officers per capita in America than at any time since 1992. In 2020, the homicide rate increased on average by more than one-third in America’s 57 largest cities. Homicides rose in 51 cities and declined in just six of them. Homicides rose 35 percent in Los Angeles, 31 percent in Oakland, 74 percent in Seattle, 63 percent in Portland, 60 percent in Chicago, and 47 percent in New York City.  Some blamed the coronavirus pandemic, and higher gun sales, which rose in March. But homicides in 2020 only started to rise in June, after Black Lives Matter protests, not March. And there had been a similar spike in homicides in 2015 when there was no coronavirus pandemic.  The lack of sufficient police may have made communities more vulnerable to the spikes in homicides seen in 2015 and 2020, as police were redirected to deal with anti-police protests. “When you have your officers and detectives every night on the front line dealing with demonstration after demonstration after demonstration,” said former police chief Best, “they are not engaging with community members. They are not talking to young people. All of that is not happening because the focus now is on the nightly demonstrations.”  “When people believe the procedures of formal social control are unjust,” notes University of Missouri criminologist Richard Rosenfeld, whose research is relied upon by the Department of Justice, “they are less likely to obey the law.”  Counter to the claims of those who advocate defunding the police as a way to reduce violence, the evidence suggests that fewer cops may mean more police misconduct, because the remaining officers must work longer and more stressful hours. Research has found that fatigue predicts a rise in public complaints against cops: a 13-hour rather than 10-hour shift significantly boosts their prevalence, while back-to-back shifts quadruple their odds. The people who suffer most from anti-police activism are black. Nationally, 30 times more African Americans were killed by civilians than by police in 2019. Today, black Americans are seven to eight times more likely to die from homicide than white Americans. If anti-police protests increase homicides, why do groups like Black Lives Matter do it? Because they are after radical system change, not less violence. Radical thinkers, from anarchists to socialists, have for 200 years blamed our capitalist system for crime, and justified crime as a revolutionary act. Crime is a rational response to the high levels of inequality created by capitalism, they argue. For the most part, societies, including in Seattle, have dismissed these radical arguments. “The anarchists had always been a cosplay clown joke,” Seattle Police officer Christopher Young told me earlier this year. “On May Day they would come and fight the police and break some windows. We’d be like, ‘Okay guys, go back to your mother’s basement.’” But after the election of Donald Trump as president in 2016, the anarchists rebranded themselves as “anti-fascists,” said Young, and that increased their legitimacy in the eyes of Seattle’s progressive voters. “They said, ‘We’re here to fight the racists and fascists.’” “The community really wanted more cops,” she told me. “At least three City Council members campaigned on more cops. They wanted better response times.” They also wanted more racial and gender diversity and so, said Best, she created a plan “to have a lot more diversity with our hiring, for women and people of color both. We got to almost 40 percent of either minority or women representation as new hires.” But after the Floyd killing, Seattle anarchists started attacking the police. “Within that large group of people who were there peacefully protesting,” said Best, “there were groups there to create mayhem, throw rocks, bottles, and incendiary stuff, and point lasers at the officers.”  In June, somebody removed a police barricade that had prevented demonstrators from protesting in front of the East Precinct downtown. “It was decided,” said Best, “to remove the barricade and to allow the demonstrators to fill in the street in front of the precinct. We didn’t want to give up the precinct. I have to tell you it was not my decision.”  Progressive members of the Seattle City Council had pressured Mayor Durkan to order the police to abandon their precinct building.  “The next morning,” said Best, “there were these folks out there armed with long rifles, telling the officers who responded that it was their ‘sovereign land.’ ‘What sovereign property are they talking about?’” Best asked her colleagues. “Well, they’re talking about Twelfth Avenue.” She laughed. “We had never experienced anything like that.”  And therein began CHAZ, the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone. Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan and Chief Carmen Best Later, the organizers would rename the area CHOP, for Capitol Hill Occupied Protest. The anarchist leaders invited hundreds of Seattle’s homeless residents to move into the occupied zone, and many did. When asked, Seattle’s mayor insisted that everything would work out fine.  “How long do you think Seattle and those few blocks [will] look like this?” CNN’s Chris Cuomo asked Seattle’s mayor. “I don’t know,” she replied. “We could have a summer of love!”  But soon after, said Best, “We were getting reports of rape, robbery, assault… I don’t know what the Wild West was like, but it couldn’t have been any worse than that.”  Armed residents at CHOP shot two teenage boys just before it was shut down. At least one of them could have been saved. But CHOP’s unelected leaders didn’t allow first responders in until hours later. The homicides led Chief Best to demand permission from the City Attorney to retake the neighborhood, which she did a few days later.  But then, in August 2020, a few weeks later, the Seattle City Council voted to cut the budget of the Seattle Police Department. “That means that all these new people that we hired who are black, people of color, and women will be the first ones to go,” Best told the City Council. “Because it’s first in, first out.”  The council said they wanted Best to go through and pick the people to fire.  “Let me get this straight,” she said she told the council. “You want me to pick the white people to go? Are you crazy?’ They were highly dismissive. It was the most bizarre thing that I had ever dealt with.”  Best criticized the City Council. “I said that they were being reckless and dangerous and that people are going to suffer for it,” she said. “The next day, one of the city councilors said, ‘We need to cut her salary by 40 percent.’ It wasn’t even on the agenda for them to talk about. It was highly punitive and retaliatory.” And so Best resigned. By the end of 2020, 200 police officers had left the Seattle police force.  In truth, much of what people believe about the police is wrong. Police killings of African Americans in our 58 largest cities declined from 217 per year in the 1970s to 157 per year in the 2010s. And there are no racial differences in police killings when accounting for whether or not the suspect was armed or a threat (“justified” vs “unjustified” shooting). Reducing homicides and other crimes will require more police, and that will require community and political leaders to educate voters, and publicly apologize for their role in unfairly demonizing police officers. Most of all, we should seek to make amends to the victims of anti-police activism, including the Yurek family, who are mourning the loss of a young father at Thanksgiving time. “Mr. Yurek’s young son acted quickly and competently. Unfortunately, the city of Seattle was neither quick nor competent,” said the family’s attorney, Mark Lindquist of the Herrmann Law Group. But Will Yurek’s death could gain new meaning if it helps us, as Americans, to view police officers as vital, if imperfect, public servants, and take the measures necessary to affirm their role, and recruit them back into our city police forces. *  *  * Michael Shellenberger is a Time Magazine "Hero of the Environment,"Green Book Award winner, and the founder and president of Environmental Progress. He is author of just launched book San Fransicko (Harper Collins) and the best-selling book, Apocalypse Never (Harper Collins June 30, 2020). Subscribe To Michael's substack here Tyler Durden Wed, 11/24/2021 - 23:30.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 25th, 2021

We Don"t Get A Vote On The Woke Revolution

We Don't Get A Vote On The Woke Revolution Authored by J.Peder Zane via RealClearPolitics.com, You don’t get to vote on the revolution. That’s kind of the point. From the happy example of Colonial America to the terrors that mutilated and murdered innocents in France, Russia, and China, revolutionaries work outside the established system to impose a new order. So it is with today’s woke revolution. The potent cultural forces that have mainstreamed radical concepts such as “white privilege,” “microaggressions,” and “gender fluidity” are beyond the reach of American democracy. No one voted for any of it; it cannot be stopped at the ballot box. Electing anti-woke politicians in 2022 and 2024 will not turn the tide. The embrace of woke ideology by many prestigious news outlets – as symbolized by the New York Times’ 1619 Project, which recasts American society through the cramped lens of racism and oppression – is not subject to popular approval. Neither is the American Medical Association’s move to view health disparities between blacks and other Americans as the result of “systemic racism” (rather than biology, personal behavior, or cultural influences). We don’t get to vote on the decision by the National Institutes of Health, the nation’s largest funder of biomedical research, to commit $90 million in funding along with “every tool at our disposal to remediate the chronic problem of structural racism.” The same goes for the diktat in corporate America to mandate race and gender into their hiring decisions, or the woke-saturated culture that predominates at most American colleges and universities, where faculty applicants are asked to sign loyalty oaths to diversity and equity. Parental opposition to the influence of critical race theory in public schools shows that pushback is possible. School board meetings are one of the few public venues where ordinary Americans can voice their discontent to this ideology, which casts white kindergarteners as oppressors and non-white tots as victims. But these critics are labeled “domestic terrorists” for their efforts — and it’s still not clear what, if any, impact the parents will have on what and how children are taught. In fairness, broad swaths of the culture always operate and evolve outside of politics. The world of ideas and entertainment – the books we read, movies we watch, groups we join – must never be subject to electoral will. But the woke revolution feels different. First, it is an explicitly political ideology that is, at bottom, about power. Second, it is remarkably ambitious: It seeks a wholesale transformation of America’s past, present and future. Third, while some of its ideas resonate with plenty of people, it is a top-down movement that seeks to impose alien ways of thinking and being on everyone – hence the rise of cancel culture and other illiberal mechanisms to silence and punish those who fail to conform. One of the great paradoxes of the social justice movement is that even as it claims to fight inequality, it is itself a reflection of the growing inequality in America: both of wealth and culture. Like most revolutions, it is not led by the downtrodden but by the elites. It is not the person of color on the streets but the swells at the top (most of them white) who are imposing the new order. Although it might seem that the woke revolution erupted in 2020 with George Floyd’s murder, or with the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement following Michael Brown’s shooting in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014, its intellectual framework – which includes critical race theory, postmodernism, anti-colonialism, black power and queer/gender studies – emerged at America’s universities in the 1960s and 1970s. Heavily influenced by Marxism, leftist scholars suffered a crisis of confidence after communism was discredited 30 years ago as the Soviet Union collapsed. In response, activist academics essentially repackaged their old ideas. They still saw politics as a zero-sum battle between oppressors and the oppressed, with themselves in the moral vanguard, but they replaced the concept of class with new identity markers: racial and sexual identity. The struggle was no longer between capitalists and the proletariat, but privileged “cisgendered heteronormative” whites versus the rest of humanity. There was always a kernel of truth to this narrative – America, like every other nation, has unequal distributions of wealth and power (hierarchy is inevitable; even the communists, who pledged to create true equality, simply replaced the tsar’s hierarchy with their own, one dominated by party leaders and apparatchiks). But the expansion of rights and opportunities we’ve achieved over the last half-century – the fact that legions of people defined as “oppressed” enjoy status, respect, wealth and power only dreamed of in most corners of the globe – exposes the absurdity of the claim that race and gender determine one’s fate. Nevertheless, this narrative increasingly informs the education delivered at Western colleges and universities, especially at elite schools. The graduates of these institutions, in turn, become the professors, journalists, managers, administrators and other moral enforcers using their positions to advance the woke revolution from within. The key question – why would seemingly intelligent people commit to an ideology so at odds with reality? – requires a complex set of answers. The collapse of traditional social norms, the offshoring of the blue-collar sector, the baneful influence of social media, the realignment of legacy media into tribal factions, the creation of overeducated citizens saddled with crippling debt, rapidly rising living standards that create rising expectations — all this and more play a part. Radicalism is opportunistic, lying dormant for decades until the right combination of conditions presents itself. But a pivotal, if underappreciated, force is the rise of the information-based global economy, which has doubled the number of millionaires in the United States in just a decade, opening a chasm of envy between the haves and the super-haves. Statista reports that there were close to 6 million U.S. households with financial assets worth more than $1 million in 2019; more than double the number in 2008. At the same time, Pew reports that “as of 2016, the latest year for which data are available, the typical American family had a net worth of $101,800.” This growing inequality is not based on the false claim that the wealthy are benefiting at the expense of non-rich – they are, more accurately, getting a bigger slice of a growing pie in a world where living standards continue to rise. But this increase does make it easier for radicals to exploit the false argument, insistently advanced by prestigious news and information outlets, that the current system is unjust and that, given America’s history, today’s disparities stem from race. To buy peace, and peace of mind, many well-off Americans – especially the well-educated ones who now call the Democrat Party home – are happy to acquiesce to ideas that, as a practical matter, will have little immediate impact on their own comfortable lives: agreeing that the American Revolution was fought over slavery, that social justice requires reparations, that gender identities are malleable, that reality is socially constructed, that “silence is violence.” It costs them nothing to spout these slogans, which allow them to feel morally superior. In the long run, I hope, truth will out. But those who oppose the revolution should know they are battling powerful and entrenched forces that are, in significant ways, beyond their reach. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/24/2021 - 20:30.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 24th, 2021

Black Supremacist Darrell Brooks Rapped About Being A "Terrorist" And Called For Violence Against White People

Black Supremacist Darrell Brooks Rapped About Being A 'Terrorist' And Called For Violence Against White People The black supremacist ex-con charged in the deaths of six people at a Wisconsin Christmas parade rapped about being a 'terrorist,' and posted online that 'Hitler was right' to have killed Jews because 'the negroes ... are the true hebrews,' while also calling for violence against white people. Darrell Brooks Jr, 39, is charged with five counts of first-degree intentional homicide, and has more charges pending according to prosecutors in Waukesha, Wisconsin, after eight-year-old Jackson Sparks was named by relatives as the sixth victim to have died from his injuries after Brooks allegedly plowed into a Christmas parade. More than 60 people were injured in the massacre, which has already become non-news among mainstream outlets. One person died in the Charlottesville car attack. Six have died already in the Christmas parade attack in Waukesha, which was carried out by a man who had posted anti-Trump diatribes to social media and shared his support for BLM related causes. Where is Chris Wray? — Cernovich (@Cernovich) November 23, 2021 Brooks, an aspiring rapper, left quite the social media footprint in which he posted black nationalist rhetoric, support for Black Lives Matter, and shared memes targeting Trump supporter Kanye West. In one Facebook post screencapped by the Daily Mail, Brooks - aka "MathBoi Fly" - wrote: "LEARNED ND TAUGHT BEHAVIOR!! so when we start bakk knokkin white people TF out ion wanna hear it...the old white ppl 2, KNOKK DEM TF OUT!! PERIOD.." Screenshot via the Daily Mail Heavy.com describes Brooks' post as 'black nationalist rhetoric' Brooks also shared a meme about Adolf Hitler which claims that negroes are "the true Hebrews," and that America has moved "false white Jews into a state of Israel." A psychopath with years of Black Hebrew Israelite and anti-white social media posts was just arrested for plowing through a Christmas parade hitting over 60 people but the media wants to talk about Kyle Rittenhouse making a hand gesture one time — Jack Posobiec ✝️ (@JackPosobiec) November 24, 2021 He also rapped about being a "terrorist" and a "killer in the city," according to The Sun, citing lyrics Brooks posted online. Wannabe rapper Brooks had said "yeh we terrorists" and "killers in the city" according to his song Loudmouths. The track - posted to Brooks' soundcloud page under the name MathBoi Fly - goes on "hope you right with god cos casket with you headed for." Brooks also wrote an anti-Donald Trump rap and declared "f*** the pigs", it emerged on Monday. One of his songs includes the lyrics: "They gonna need a cleaner for the s*** we did, all my killers Gacey where them bodies hid." -The Sun In another song, Brooks can be seen waving a gun in front of what appears to be the red SUV used in the attack. Yes this is Darrell Brooks aka Mathboi Fly rapping with a gun in front the same vehicle used in a mass homicide. Case closed I'd say#Waukesha#waukeshaChristmasParade@FoxNews @benshapiro @cnn pic.twitter.com/zVbZbFsbOU — TrentCannon (@TheTrentCannon) November 22, 2021 Wisconsin police said on Sunday that there's no evidence that there was a terrorist attack. Meanwhile... Kamala Harris visited Jacob Blake in the hospital and raised bail money for violent criminals She has no plans to visit the families of Waukesha and has not supported any of their fundraisers — Jack Posobiec ✝️ (@JackPosobiec) November 24, 2021 Tyler Durden Wed, 11/24/2021 - 11:45.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytNov 24th, 2021