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Multiple shootings on Water Street, near Deer District Friday night injure 21 people

About 21 people were injured Friday evening as a result of a string of shootings on North Water Street and near the Deer District in downtown Milwaukee, just hours after the ending of Milwaukee Bucks playoff game against the Boston Celtics, which drew a sell-out crowd of nearly 18,000 fans and thousands more packed the area around the arena......»»

Category: topSource: bizjournalsMay 14th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Police say GOP lawmaker"s tour of Capitol complex on eve of insurrection was not suspicious

A House select committee is investigating the Capitol riot and the role Donald Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot is set to hold its next hearing on Thursday. The committee released a preview of what to expect during Thursday's hearing. Meanwhile, police said GOP Rep. Barry Loudermilk's tour of the Capitol complex on Jan. 5 was not suspicious. Police say tour of Capitol complex given by GOP lawmaker on eve of the January 6 attack was not suspiciousRep. Barry Loudermilk.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Capitol Police chief confirmed in a letter on Monday that GOP Rep. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia had given 15 people a tour of the Capitol complex on the eve of the January 6 attack, adding that it was not suspicious.Chief J. Thomas Manger also said that the group didn't enter the Capitol building in his letter to Rep. Rodney Davis of Illinois, the ranking Republican member of the House Administration committee."We train our officers on being alert for people conducting surveillance or reconnaissance, and we do not consider any of the activities we observed as suspicious," Manger wrote.Citing security footage, Manger said that Loudermilk had led a group of 12 people, which later grew to 15, through the Rayburn, Cannon, and Longworth buildings, but the group never appeared at "any tunnels that would have led them to the US Capitol."Read Full StoryHeiress to Publix grocery chain sponsored Kimberly Guilfoyle's $60,000 speech on Jan. 6 that lasted 2 minutes, report saysKimberly Guilfoyle gives an address to the Republican National Convention on August 24, 2020 in Washington, DC.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesThe daughter of the Publix grocery chain's founder sponsored the January 6, 2021, speech given by Kimberly Guilfoyle, which lasted two-and-a-half minutes and cost $60,000, The Washington Post reported.Guilfoyle, a former Fox News host who went on to work for former President Donald Trump and is now Donald Trump Jr.'s fiancée, was given $60,000 for the speech by the conservative nonprofit Turning Point Action, The Post reported, citing two sources with knowledge of the matter.The sponsoring donor for that payment was Julie Fancelli, the daughter of Publix founder George Jenkins, The Post reported.Guilfoyle's speech was at a Trump rally in Washington, DC, which preceded the Capitol riot.Read Full StoryMike Lindell says he offered to publicly testify before the January 6 committee but they didn't want to talk to himMike Lindell, political activist and CEO of MyPillow, attends a rally hosted by former President Donald Trump at the Delaware County Fairgrounds on April 23, 2022 in Delaware, Ohio.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says that he tried to get a spot to testify before the January 6 committee and show them his "evidence" to prove former President Donald Trump's baseless claims of voter fraud, but they did not want to talk to him. Lindell made this statement during an appearance on Steve Bannon's podcast, "War Room: Pandemic."Bannon asked Lindell if the committee had reached out to him to go through "all the voluminous material" he has about the 2020 election. "No, they haven't. And it's really — that's sad, too, because I've offered. I'd love to come to your committee as long as you nationally televise it, Ms. Pelosi," Lindell replied, referring to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.Read Full StorySen. Raphael Warnock says that January 6 Capitol attack shows that 'our democracy is in peril'Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock of Georgia speaks to members of the press after a Senate Democratic Caucus meeting on January 18, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSen. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat in Georgia, told NPR that democracy in the US is at risk.Warnock, who is running for reelection against Republican Herchel Walker, serves as Georgia's first Black senator since his election in 2021. He is also a pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, the church where Martin Luther King Jr. attended."Democracy is hard work. Democracy is not a noun, it's a verb. And over the course of time, our democracy expands. It gets a little closer towards those ideals. There are moments when it contracts, but even contractions open the possibility for new birth and new hope," Warnock said to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly.Warnock said that the January 6 Capitol attack, in which hundreds of rioters breached the US Capitol in an effort to overturn the 2020 election, demonstrates the troubled state of democracy.Read Full StoryTrump might have to be prosecuted to save American democracy, an expert on authoritarianism arguesFormer President Donald Trump speaks on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesRuth Ben-Ghiat spends a lot of time thinking about authoritarianism. An historian at New York University, she is an expert on the rise of fascism in Italy and, most recently, author of the the book, "Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present," tracing the erosion of democracy from Russia to the United States of America.She is keenly focused on what happens when those in power lose their grip on it."The authoritarian playbook has no chapter on failure," Ben-Ghiat wrote in a November 2020 piece for The Washington Post. "Nothing prepares the ruler to see his propaganda ignored and his charismatic hold weaken until his own people turn against him."When, two months later, former President Donald Trump urged his supporters to head over to the US Capitol in a last-ditch effort to overturn the 2020 election, Ben-Ghiat was not altogether surprised. Indeed, she had told people to expect it, arguing: "the rage that will grow in Trump as reality sinks in may make for a rocky transition to Biden's presidency. Americans would do well to be prepared."What stopped a failed insurrection from being a successful coup, she recently told CNN, was — at least in part — one of the lies Trump said on January 6: "I'll be there with you," he told supporters as they prepared to march on Congress.He never showed.In an interview with Insider, Ben-Ghiat expanded on why she thinks January 6 was an "attempted coup," why it did not succeed, and what the future holds.Read Full StoryConservative lawyer John Eastman was told to 'get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer': House January 6 testimonyJohn Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.Charles Dharapak/APConservative lawyer John Eastman previously wrote a memo to former Vice President Mike Pence urging him to overturn the 2020 election results.White House lawyer Eric Herschmann told Eastman to "get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer" the day after the Capitol attack."You're going to need it," Herschmann recounted to the January 6 House committee.Read Full StoryTrump releases 12-page statement bashing the Jan. 6 investigation, saying it is merely to stop him from running for president againVideo of former President Donald Trump is played during a hearing by the Select Committee in Washington, DC, on June 13, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump released a 12-page statement after the committee's second hearing on Monday.He spent nearly nine pages of the statement pushing bogus claims that the 2020 election was rigged against him.He also bashed the panel and claimed it was trying to stop him from running again in 2024. He has repeatedly teased a 2024 run for president.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushes back on testimony that he was drunk on election night 2020, says he was drinking Diet CokeRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APRudy Giuliani responded to claims that he was drunk on election night 2020 in a tweet on Monday night, insisting he "was drinking diet coke all night."The claim about the former New York City mayor's behavior at the White House election night party resurfaced during Monday's January 6 committee hearings.In a taped deposition, former advisor to then-President Donald Trump Jason Miller said: "I think the mayor was definitely intoxicated, but I do not know his level of intoxication when he spoke with the president, for example."After, Giuliani's media office tweeted about his drinking Diet Coke, attributing the claim to an unnamed "fellow guest."Read Full StoryJan. 6 committee members push back on chair Bennie Thompson's claim that they won't ask the DOJ to indict TrumpRep. Bennie Thompson at the Jan. 6 committee's first public hearing on June 9, 2022.Andrew Harnik/APRep. Bennie Thompson, chair of the January 6 committee, said it was not the group's job to refer Trump or anyone else to the Justice Department for charges."No, that's not our job," Thompson said on Monday, according to CNN. "Our job is to look at the facts and circumstances around January 6, what caused it and make recommendations after that."But some committee members disagreed with that approach, showing rare public cracks within the committee."The January 6th Select Committee has not issued a conclusion regarding potential criminal referrals. We will announce a decision on that at an appropriate time," tweeted Rep. Liz Cheney, a Republican serving as the committee's vice chair.And Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democrat, told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday that he had not seen Thompson's comment but was not aware a decision on referrals had been made yet.Read Full Story Rudy Giuliani continued to make false claims to the January 6 panel that if they gave him 'the paper ballots,' he could overturn Biden's victoryRudy Giuliani continued to make false claims about election fraud during his testimony to the January 6 panel.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump-allied lawyer Rudy Giuliani continued to make bizarre false claims about voter fraud in the 2020 election during his testimony to the January 6 panel, claiming he had evidence of a "big truck" of fraudulently-cast Biden votes. Giuliani's testimony to the House panel investigating the Capitol riot was aired on Monday, during the second of the committee's six public hearings on January 6. The former New York mayor doubled down on outlandish and unproven election fraud claims. "They saw a big truck bringing in 100,000 ballots in garbage cans, in wastepaper baskets, in cardboard boxes, and in shopping baskets," Giuliani claimed without substantiation.Read Full StoryFormer AG Bill Barr says Trump was fixated on 'crazy' voter fraud allegations and had no interest 'in what the actual facts were'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General William Barr said that former President Donald Trump was more fixated on "crazy" allegations of voter fraud than knowing the "actual facts" on the matter.Barr's testimony to the House panel investigating the January 6 Capitol riot was aired on Monday as part of the second of the committee's six public hearings on their investigation.In a videotaped deposition, Barr recounted a meeting with Trump on December 14, 2020. Barr said Trump "went off on a monologue" during the meeting about what he claimed to be "definitive evidence" of election fraud being carried out via the Dominion voting machines.According to Barr, Trump then "held up the report" and claimed it showed "absolute proof that the Dominion machines were rigged." Barr added that Trump then declared that the report meant that he would have a second term.Read Full StoryTrump campaign lawyer says Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being 'an agent of the deep state' for questioning baseless Dominion voter fraud conspiracy theoriesFormer Trump aide Peter NavarroAlex Wong/Getty ImagesAlex Cannon, a former Trump campaign lawyer, testified in front of the House Committee on January 6 and said that Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being a "deep state" operative because he expressed doubt over Dominion voting machine conspiracy theories. Cannon's testimony was broadcast on Monday as part of the second of six public hearings on the committee's investigation. During his deposition, Cannon said that he had a conversation with Navarro in mid-November, after the 2020 presidential election, about voter fraud allegations.Cannon said he spoke to Navarro specifically regarding the conspiracy theory that Dominion voting machines were used to flip votes from Trump to Biden. This conspiracy has continually been pushed by Trump-allied lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, as well as MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. Dominion named all three in a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit.Read Full StoryTrump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — 'Team Normal' and 'Team Giuliani'Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien (left) says he did not mind being called part of "Team Normal," as opposed to "Team Giuliani".Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images; Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien says the Trump team was split into two camps after the election – "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani." The House Select Committee to Investigate January 6 played a clip of Stepien's testimony on Monday during the second of the committee's six public hearings. During his deposition, Stepien was asked if he had pulled back from the Trump camp to preserve his professional reputation. "You didn't want to be associated with some of what you were hearing from the Giuliani team and others that — that sort of stepped in in the wake of your departure?" an unidentified questioner asked Stepien. "I didn't mind being categorized. There were two groups of them. We called them kind of my team and Rudy's team. I — I didn't mind being characterized as being part of Team Normal, as — as reporters, you know, kind of started to do around that point in time," Stepien said.Read Full StoryFired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan WalshFormer Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection. Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call. The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.READ FULL STORYWhite House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty ImagesTrump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday."I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.Read Full StoryThere's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr saysFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud."I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."Trump campaign manager says why he quitThen-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.Read Full StoryBarr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesBill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election nightRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election nightFormer New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty ImagesFormer New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted."Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do."Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.Read Full StoryFox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearingImages of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted ShaffreyAs the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote."We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 15th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Mike Lindell says he offered to publicly testify before the January 6 committee but they didn"t want to talk to him

The panel is investigating the Capitol riot and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot held its second hearing on Monday. The next hearing is scheduled for Thursday, June 16, after Wednesday's hearing was postponed. Meanwhile, the committee released a preview of what to expect during Thursday's hearing. Mike Lindell says he offered to publicly testify before the January 6 committee but they didn't want to talk to himMike Lindell, political activist and CEO of MyPillow, attends a rally hosted by former President Donald Trump at the Delaware County Fairgrounds on April 23, 2022 in Delaware, Ohio.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says that he tried to get a spot to testify before the January 6 committee and show them his "evidence" to prove former President Donald Trump's baseless claims of voter fraud, but they did not want to talk to him. Lindell made this statement during an appearance on Steve Bannon's podcast, "War Room: Pandemic."Bannon asked Lindell if the committee had reached out to him to go through "all the voluminous material" he has about the 2020 election. "No, they haven't. And it's really — that's sad, too, because I've offered. I'd love to come to your committee as long as you nationally televise it, Ms. Pelosi," Lindell replied, referring to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.Read Full StorySen. Raphael Warnock says that January 6 Capitol attack shows that 'our democracy is in peril'Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock of Georgia speaks to members of the press after a Senate Democratic Caucus meeting on January 18, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSen. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat in Georgia, told NPR that democracy in the US is at risk.Warnock, who is running for reelection against Republican Herchel Walker, serves as Georgia's first Black senator since his election in 2021. He is also a pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, the church where Martin Luther King Jr. attended."Democracy is hard work. Democracy is not a noun, it's a verb. And over the course of time, our democracy expands. It gets a little closer towards those ideals. There are moments when it contracts, but even contractions open the possibility for new birth and new hope," Warnock said to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly.Warnock said that the January 6 Capitol attack, in which hundreds of rioters breached the US Capitol in an effort to overturn the 2020 election, demonstrates the troubled state of democracy.Read Full StoryTrump might have to be prosecuted to save American democracy, an expert on authoritarianism arguesFormer President Donald Trump speaks on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesRuth Ben-Ghiat spends a lot of time thinking about authoritarianism. An historian at New York University, she is an expert on the rise of fascism in Italy and, most recently, author of the the book, "Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present," tracing the erosion of democracy from Russia to the United States of America.She is keenly focused on what happens when those in power lose their grip on it."The authoritarian playbook has no chapter on failure," Ben-Ghiat wrote in a November 2020 piece for The Washington Post. "Nothing prepares the ruler to see his propaganda ignored and his charismatic hold weaken until his own people turn against him."When, two months later, former President Donald Trump urged his supporters to head over to the US Capitol in a last-ditch effort to overturn the 2020 election, Ben-Ghiat was not altogether surprised. Indeed, she had told people to expect it, arguing: "the rage that will grow in Trump as reality sinks in may make for a rocky transition to Biden's presidency. Americans would do well to be prepared."What stopped a failed insurrection from being a successful coup, she recently told CNN, was — at least in part — one of the lies Trump said on January 6: "I'll be there with you," he told supporters as they prepared to march on Congress.He never showed.In an interview with Insider, Ben-Ghiat expanded on why she thinks January 6 was an "attempted coup," why it did not succeed, and what the future holds.Read Full StoryConservative lawyer John Eastman was told to 'get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer': House January 6 testimonyJohn Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.Charles Dharapak/APConservative lawyer John Eastman previously wrote a memo to former Vice President Mike Pence urging him to overturn the 2020 election results.White House lawyer Eric Herschmann told Eastman to "get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer" the day after the Capitol attack."You're going to need it," Herschmann recounted to the January 6 House committee.Read Full StoryTrump releases 12-page statement bashing the Jan. 6 investigation, saying it is merely to stop him from running for president againVideo of former President Donald Trump is played during a hearing by the Select Committee in Washington, DC, on June 13, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump released a 12-page statement after the committee's second hearing on Monday.He spent nearly nine pages of the statement pushing bogus claims that the 2020 election was rigged against him.He also bashed the panel and claimed it was trying to stop him from running again in 2024. He has repeatedly teased a 2024 run for president.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushes back on testimony that he was drunk on election night 2020, says he was drinking Diet CokeRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APRudy Giuliani responded to claims that he was drunk on election night 2020 in a tweet on Monday night, insisting he "was drinking diet coke all night."The claim about the former New York City mayor's behavior at the White House election night party resurfaced during Monday's January 6 committee hearings.In a taped deposition, former advisor to then-President Donald Trump Jason Miller said: "I think the mayor was definitely intoxicated, but I do not know his level of intoxication when he spoke with the president, for example."After, Giuliani's media office tweeted about his drinking Diet Coke, attributing the claim to an unnamed "fellow guest."Read Full StoryJan. 6 committee members push back on chair Bennie Thompson's claim that they won't ask the DOJ to indict TrumpRep. Bennie Thompson at the Jan. 6 committee's first public hearing on June 9, 2022.Andrew Harnik/APRep. Bennie Thompson, chair of the January 6 committee, said it was not the group's job to refer Trump or anyone else to the Justice Department for charges."No, that's not our job," Thompson said on Monday, according to CNN. "Our job is to look at the facts and circumstances around January 6, what caused it and make recommendations after that."But some committee members disagreed with that approach, showing rare public cracks within the committee."The January 6th Select Committee has not issued a conclusion regarding potential criminal referrals. We will announce a decision on that at an appropriate time," tweeted Rep. Liz Cheney, a Republican serving as the committee's vice chair.And Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democrat, told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday that he had not seen Thompson's comment but was not aware a decision on referrals had been made yet.Read Full Story Rudy Giuliani continued to make false claims to the January 6 panel that if they gave him 'the paper ballots,' he could overturn Biden's victoryRudy Giuliani continued to make false claims about election fraud during his testimony to the January 6 panel.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump-allied lawyer Rudy Giuliani continued to make bizarre false claims about voter fraud in the 2020 election during his testimony to the January 6 panel, claiming he had evidence of a "big truck" of fraudulently-cast Biden votes. Giuliani's testimony to the House panel investigating the Capitol riot was aired on Monday, during the second of the committee's six public hearings on January 6. The former New York mayor doubled down on outlandish and unproven election fraud claims. "They saw a big truck bringing in 100,000 ballots in garbage cans, in wastepaper baskets, in cardboard boxes, and in shopping baskets," Giuliani claimed without substantiation.Read Full StoryFormer AG Bill Barr says Trump was fixated on 'crazy' voter fraud allegations and had no interest 'in what the actual facts were'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General William Barr said that former President Donald Trump was more fixated on "crazy" allegations of voter fraud than knowing the "actual facts" on the matter.Barr's testimony to the House panel investigating the January 6 Capitol riot was aired on Monday as part of the second of the committee's six public hearings on their investigation.In a videotaped deposition, Barr recounted a meeting with Trump on December 14, 2020. Barr said Trump "went off on a monologue" during the meeting about what he claimed to be "definitive evidence" of election fraud being carried out via the Dominion voting machines.According to Barr, Trump then "held up the report" and claimed it showed "absolute proof that the Dominion machines were rigged." Barr added that Trump then declared that the report meant that he would have a second term.Read Full StoryTrump campaign lawyer says Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being 'an agent of the deep state' for questioning baseless Dominion voter fraud conspiracy theoriesFormer Trump aide Peter NavarroAlex Wong/Getty ImagesAlex Cannon, a former Trump campaign lawyer, testified in front of the House Committee on January 6 and said that Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being a "deep state" operative because he expressed doubt over Dominion voting machine conspiracy theories. Cannon's testimony was broadcast on Monday as part of the second of six public hearings on the committee's investigation. During his deposition, Cannon said that he had a conversation with Navarro in mid-November, after the 2020 presidential election, about voter fraud allegations.Cannon said he spoke to Navarro specifically regarding the conspiracy theory that Dominion voting machines were used to flip votes from Trump to Biden. This conspiracy has continually been pushed by Trump-allied lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, as well as MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. Dominion named all three in a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit.Read Full StoryTrump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — 'Team Normal' and 'Team Giuliani'Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien (left) says he did not mind being called part of "Team Normal," as opposed to "Team Giuliani".Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images; Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien says the Trump team was split into two camps after the election – "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani." The House Select Committee to Investigate January 6 played a clip of Stepien's testimony on Monday during the second of the committee's six public hearings. During his deposition, Stepien was asked if he had pulled back from the Trump camp to preserve his professional reputation. "You didn't want to be associated with some of what you were hearing from the Giuliani team and others that — that sort of stepped in in the wake of your departure?" an unidentified questioner asked Stepien. "I didn't mind being categorized. There were two groups of them. We called them kind of my team and Rudy's team. I — I didn't mind being characterized as being part of Team Normal, as — as reporters, you know, kind of started to do around that point in time," Stepien said.Read Full StoryFired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan WalshFormer Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection. Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call. The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.READ FULL STORYWhite House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty ImagesTrump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday."I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.Read Full StoryThere's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr saysFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud."I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."Trump campaign manager says why he quitThen-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.Read Full StoryBarr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesBill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election nightRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election nightFormer New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty ImagesFormer New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted."Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do."Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.Read Full StoryFox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearingImages of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted ShaffreyAs the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote."We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 15th, 2022

Another US Food Processing Plant Erupts In Flames

Another US Food Processing Plant Erupts In Flames Another food processing plant went up in flames. According to local news Stevens Point Journal, a fire ripped through a pizza-making plant in Wisconsin on Monday.  More than 70 firefighters from multiple fire departments battled a massive fire at Festive Foods in eastern Portage County that began around 0900 local time. The American Red Cross arrived on the scene shortly after to provide food and water to firefighters. They snapped two pictures of the blaze, showing flames erupting from the facility's roof and a column of thick dark smoke pouring into the air.  Waupaca manufacturing fire: Red Cross disaster volunteers are canteening for more than 70 firefighters & first responders on the scene of a large manufacturer fire on County Highway D. Additional details here as they're available. pic.twitter.com/HdTT1vvLK1 — American Red Cross of Wisconsin (@RedCrossWIS) June 13, 2022 Firefighters were able to get the blaze under control in the early evening, and damage to the food processing plant has yet to be fully assessed. However, Festive Foods' Facebook page indicates the plant is "temporarily closed."  "Today festive foods experienced a heartbreaking event. As many of you have seen in the news we have had a terrible fire run through our plant," a post on Festive Foods' Facebook read.  Festive Foods manufactures frozen pizzas for supermarkets in a 120,000 sq. feet facility and considers itself a "leading co-packer of USDA-certified frozen-topped pizza, sandwiches, dough products, and stuffed appetizers." The company sells its products to supermarkets nationwide.  Walmart is a seller of at least one of the company's brands.  While the fire seems insignificant, it's part of a much larger issue of a spate of "accidental fires," one by one, taking out America's food supply chain over the past year (source of the list via The Gateway Pundit):  1/11/21 A fire that destroyed 75,000-square-foot processing plant in Fayetteville 4/30/21 A fire ignited inside the Smithfield Foods pork processing plant in Monmouth, IL 7/25/21 Three-alarm fire at Kellogg plant in Memphis, 170 emergency personnel responded to the call 7/30/21 Firefighters on Friday battled a large fire at Tyson's River Valley Ingredients plant in Hanceville, Alabama 8/23/21 Fire crews were called to the Patak Meat Production company on Ewing Road in Austell 9/13/21 A fire at the JBS beef plant in Grand Island, Neb., on Sunday night forced a halt to slaughter and fabrication lines  10/13/21 A five-alarm fire ripped through the Darigold butter production plant in Caldwell, ID 11/15/21 A woman is in custody following a fire at the Garrard County Food Pantry 11/29/21 A fire broke out around 5:30 p.m. at the Maid-Rite Steak Company meat processing plant 12/13/21 West Side food processing plant in San Antonio left with smoke damage after a fire 1/7/22 Damage to a poultry processing plant on Hamilton's Mountain following an overnight fire 1/13/22 Firefighters worked for 12 hours to put a fire out at the Cargill-Nutrena plant in Lecompte, LA 1/31/22 a fertilizer plant with 600 tons of ammonium nitrate inside caught on fire on Cherry Street in Winston-Salem 2/3/22 A massive fire swept through Wisconsin River Meats in Mauston 2/3/22 At least 130 cows were killed in a fire at Percy Farm in Stowe 2/15/22 Bonanza Meat Company goes up in flames in El Paso, Texas 2/15/22 Nearly a week after the fire destroyed most of the Shearer's Foods plant in Hermiston 2/16/22 A fire had broken at US largest soybean processing and biodiesel plant in Claypool, Indiana 2/18/22 An early morning fire tore through the milk parlor at Bess View Farm 2/19/22 Three people were injured, and one was hospitalized, after an ammonia leak at Lincoln Premium Poultry in Fremont 2/22/22 The Shearer's Foods plant in Hermiston caught fire after a propane boiler exploded 2/28/22 A smoldering pile of sulfur quickly became a raging chemical fire at Nutrien Ag Solutions 2/28/22 A man was hurt after a fire broke out at the Shadow Brook Farm and Dutch Girl Creamery 3/4/22 294,800 chickens destroyed at farm in Stoddard, Missouri 3/4/22 644,000 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Cecil, Maryland 3/8/22 243,900 chickens destroyed at egg farm in New Castle, Delaware 3/10/22 663,400 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Cecil, MD 3/10/22 915,900 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Taylor, IA 3/14/22 The blaze at 244 Meadow Drive was discovered shortly after 5 p.m. by farm owner Wayne Hoover 3/14/22 2,750,700 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Jefferson, Wisconsin 3/16/22 A fire at a Walmart warehouse distribution center has cast a large plume of smoke visible throughout Indianapolis. 3/16/22 Nestle Food Plant extensively damaged in fire and new production destroyed Jonesboro, Arkansas 3/17/22 5,347,500 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Buena Vista, Iowa 3/17/22 147,600 chickens destroyed at farm in Kent, Delaware 3/18/22 315,400 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Cecil, Maryland 3/22/22 172,000 Turkeys destroyed on farms in South Dakota 3/22/22 570,000 chickens destroyed at farm in Butler, Nebraska 3/24/22 Fire fighters from numerous towns are battling a major fire at the McCrum potato processing facility in Belfast. 3/24/22 418,500 chickens destroyed at farm in Butler, Nebraska 3/25/22 250,300 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Franklin, Iowa 3/26/22 311,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota 3/27/22 126,300 Turkeys destroyed in South Dakota 3/28/22 1,460,000 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Guthrie, Iowa 3/29/22 A massive fire burned 40,000 pounds of food meant to feed people in a food desert near Maricopa 3/31/22 A structure fire caused significant damage to a large portion of key fresh onion packing facilities in south Texas 3/31/22 76,400 Turkeys destroyed in Osceola, Iowa 3/31/22 5,011,700 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Osceola, Iowa 4/6/22 281,600 chickens destroyed at farm in Wayne, North Carolina 4/9/22 76,400 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota 4/9/22 208,900 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota 4/12/22 89,700 chickens destroyed at farm in Wayne, North Carolina 4/12/22 1,746,900 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Dixon, Nebraska 4/12/22 259,000 chickens destroyed at farm in Minnesota 4/13/22 fire destroys East Conway Beef & Pork Meat Market in Conway, New Hampshire 4/13/22 Plane crashes into Gem State Processing, Idaho potato and food processing plant 4/13/22 77,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota 4/14/22 Taylor Farms Food Processing plant burns down Salinas, California. 4/14/22 99,600 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota 4/15/22 1,380,500 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Lancaster, Minnesota 4/19/22 Azure Standard nation's premier independent distributor of organic and healthy food, was destroyed by fire in Dufur, Oregon 4/19/22 339,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota 4/19/22 58,000 chickens destroyed at farm in Montrose, Color 4/20/22 2,000,000 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Minnesota 4/21/22 A small plane crashed in the lot of a General Mills plant in Georgia 4/22/22 197,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota 4/23/22 200,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota 4/25/22 1,501,200 chickens destroyed at egg farm Cache, Utah 4/26/22 307,400 chickens destroyed at farm Lancaster Pennsylvania 4/27/22 2,118,000 chickens destroyed at farm Knox, Nebraska 4/28/22 Egg-laying facility in Iowa kills 5.3 million chickens, fires 200-plus workers 4/28/22 Allen Harim Foods processing plant killed nearly 2M chickens in Delaware 4/2822 110,700 Turkeys destroyed Barron Wisconsin 4/29/22 1,366,200 chickens destroyed at farm Weld Colorado 4/30/22 13,800 chickens destroyed at farm Sequoia Oklahoma 5/3/22 58,000 Turkeys destroyed Barron Wisconsin 5/3/22 118,900 Turkeys destroyed Beadle S Dakota 5/3/22 114,000 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania 5/3/22 118,900 Turkeys destroyed Lyon Minnesota 5/7/22 20,100 Turkeys destroyed Barron Wisconsin 5/10/22 72,300 chickens destroyed at farm Lancaster Pennsylvania 5/10/22 61,000 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania 5/10/22 35,100 Turkeys destroyed Muskegon, Michigan 5/13/22 10,500 Turkeys destroyed Barron Wisconsin 5/14/22 83,400 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania 5/17/22 79,00 chickens destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania 5/18/22 7,200 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania 5/19/22 Train carrying limestone derailed Jensen Beach FL 5/21/22 57,000 Turkeys destroyed on farm in Dakota Minnesota 5/23/22 4,000 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania 5/29/22 A Saturday night fire destroyed a poultry building at Forsman Farms 5/31/22 3,000,000 chickens destroyed by fire at Forsman facility in Stockholm Township, Minnesota 6/2/22 30,000 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania 6/7/22 A fire occurred Tuesday evening at the JBS meat packing plant in Green Bay. 6/8/22 Firefighters from Tangipahoa Fire District 1 respond to a fire at the Purina Feed Mill in Arcola 6/9/22 Irrigation water was canceled in California (the #1 producer of food in the US) and storage water flushed directly out to the delta. 6/12/22 Largest Pork Company in the US Shuts Down California Plant Due to High Costs 6/13/22 Fire Breaks Out at a Food Processing Plant West of Waupaca County in Wisconsin Tyler Durden Tue, 06/14/2022 - 23:45.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 15th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Conservative lawyer John Eastman was told to "get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer," per the House January 6 testimony

The panel is investigating the Capitol riot and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot held its second hearing on Monday. The next hearing is scheduled for Thursday, June 16, after Wednesday's hearing was postponed. Meanwhile, the committee released a preview of what to expect during Thursday's hearing. Conservative lawyer John Eastman was told to 'get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer': House January 6 testimonyJohn Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.Charles Dharapak/APConservative lawyer John Eastman previously wrote a memo to former Vice President Mike Pence urging him to overturn the 2020 election results.White House lawyer Eric Herschmann told Eastman to "get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer" the day after the Capitol attack."You're going to need it," Herschmann recounted to the January 6 House committee.Read Full StoryTrump releases 12-page statement bashing the Jan. 6 investigation, saying it is merely to stop him from running for president againVideo of former President Donald Trump is played during a hearing by the Select Committee in Washington, DC, on June 13, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump released a 12-page statement after the committee's second hearing on Monday.He spent nearly nine pages of the statement pushing bogus claims that the 2020 election was rigged against him.He also bashed the panel and claimed it was trying to stop him from running again in 2024. He has repeatedly teased a 2024 run for president.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushes back on testimony that he was drunk on election night 2020, says he was drinking Diet CokeRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APRudy Giuliani responded to claims that he was drunk on election night 2020 in a tweet on Monday night, insisting he "was drinking diet coke all night."The claim about the former New York City mayor's behavior at the White House election night party resurfaced during Monday's January 6 committee hearings.In a taped deposition, former advisor to then-President Donald Trump Jason Miller said: "I think the mayor was definitely intoxicated, but I do not know his level of intoxication when he spoke with the president, for example."After, Giuliani's media office tweeted about his drinking Diet Coke, attributing the claim to an unnamed "fellow guest."Read Full StoryJan. 6 committee members push back on chair Bennie Thompson's claim that they won't ask the DOJ to indict TrumpRep. Bennie Thompson at the Jan. 6 committee's first public hearing on June 9, 2022.Andrew Harnik/APRep. Bennie Thompson, chair of the January 6 committee, said it was not the group's job to refer Trump or anyone else to the Justice Department for charges."No, that's not our job," Thompson said on Monday, according to CNN. "Our job is to look at the facts and circumstances around January 6, what caused it and make recommendations after that."But some committee members disagreed with that approach, showing rare public cracks within the committee."The January 6th Select Committee has not issued a conclusion regarding potential criminal referrals. We will announce a decision on that at an appropriate time," tweeted Rep. Liz Cheney, a Republican serving as the committee's vice chair.And Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democrat, told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday that he had not seen Thompson's comment but was not aware a decision on referrals had been made yet.Read Full Story Rudy Giuliani continued to make false claims to the January 6 panel that if they gave him 'the paper ballots,' he could overturn Biden's victoryRudy Giuliani continued to make false claims about election fraud during his testimony to the January 6 panel.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump-allied lawyer Rudy Giuliani continued to make bizarre false claims about voter fraud in the 2020 election during his testimony to the January 6 panel, claiming he had evidence of a "big truck" of fraudulently-cast Biden votes. Giuliani's testimony to the House panel investigating the Capitol riot was aired on Monday, during the second of the committee's six public hearings on January 6. The former New York mayor doubled down on outlandish and unproven election fraud claims. "They saw a big truck bringing in 100,000 ballots in garbage cans, in wastepaper baskets, in cardboard boxes, and in shopping baskets," Giuliani claimed without substantiation.Read Full StoryFormer AG Bill Barr says Trump was fixated on 'crazy' voter fraud allegations and had no interest 'in what the actual facts were'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General William Barr said that former President Donald Trump was more fixated on "crazy" allegations of voter fraud than knowing the "actual facts" on the matter.Barr's testimony to the House panel investigating the January 6 Capitol riot was aired on Monday as part of the second of the committee's six public hearings on their investigation.In a videotaped deposition, Barr recounted a meeting with Trump on December 14, 2020. Barr said Trump "went off on a monologue" during the meeting about what he claimed to be "definitive evidence" of election fraud being carried out via the Dominion voting machines.According to Barr, Trump then "held up the report" and claimed it showed "absolute proof that the Dominion machines were rigged." Barr added that Trump then declared that the report meant that he would have a second term.Read Full StoryTrump campaign lawyer says Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being 'an agent of the deep state' for questioning baseless Dominion voter fraud conspiracy theoriesFormer Trump aide Peter NavarroAlex Wong/Getty ImagesAlex Cannon, a former Trump campaign lawyer, testified in front of the House Committee on January 6 and said that Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being a "deep state" operative because he expressed doubt over Dominion voting machine conspiracy theories. Cannon's testimony was broadcast on Monday as part of the second of six public hearings on the committee's investigation. During his deposition, Cannon said that he had a conversation with Navarro in mid-November, after the 2020 presidential election, about voter fraud allegations.Cannon said he spoke to Navarro specifically regarding the conspiracy theory that Dominion voting machines were used to flip votes from Trump to Biden. This conspiracy has continually been pushed by Trump-allied lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, as well as MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. Dominion named all three in a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit.Read Full StoryTrump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — 'Team Normal' and 'Team Giuliani'Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien (left) says he did not mind being called part of "Team Normal," as opposed to "Team Giuliani".Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images; Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien says the Trump team was split into two camps after the election – "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani." The House Select Committee to Investigate January 6 played a clip of Stepien's testimony on Monday during the second of the committee's six public hearings. During his deposition, Stepien was asked if he had pulled back from the Trump camp to preserve his professional reputation. "You didn't want to be associated with some of what you were hearing from the Giuliani team and others that — that sort of stepped in in the wake of your departure?" an unidentified questioner asked Stepien. "I didn't mind being categorized. There were two groups of them. We called them kind of my team and Rudy's team. I — I didn't mind being characterized as being part of Team Normal, as — as reporters, you know, kind of started to do around that point in time," Stepien said.Read Full StoryFired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan WalshFormer Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection. Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call. The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.READ FULL STORYWhite House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty ImagesTrump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday."I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.Read Full StoryThere's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr saysFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud."I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."Trump campaign manager says why he quitThen-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.Read Full StoryBarr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesBill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election nightRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election nightFormer New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty ImagesFormer New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted."Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do."Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.Read Full StoryFox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearingImages of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted ShaffreyAs the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote."We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 14th, 2022

Jan. 6 Prisoner Who Was Denied Cancer Treatment Now "In Dire Straits"

Jan. 6 Prisoner Who Was Denied Cancer Treatment Now 'In Dire Straits' Authored by Patricia Tolson via The Epoch Times (emphasis ours), A Jan. 6 prisoner who was released by a federal judge after being denied cancer treatment for eight months is now “in dire straights,” according to his girlfriend. After a federal judge ordered his release and held jail staff in contempt of court, Jan. 6 defendant Chris Worrell receives the medical treatment that was denied to him while incarcerated for over eight months. (Courtesy of Trish Priller) On March 10, 2021, Chris Worrell was arrested and charged with alleged offenses related to his presence at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. According to the March 10, 2021, criminal complaint, Worrell is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds, engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct in a restricted building, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. According to the statement of facts (pdf), the FBI received a tip alleging that Worrell had participated in the breach at the Capitol, but there is no evidence that Worrell entered the Capitol building. The statement includes photos of Worrell spraying pepper gel while standing in a crowd outside the Capitol, with police nearby. An arrest warrant (pdf) was issued for Worrell on March 10, 2021, charging him with the aforementioned alleged offenses, as well as charges for allegedly engaging in acts of physical violence in a restricted building or grounds and obstruction of Congress. Priller’s Story Worrell’s girlfriend, Trish Priller, was also in Washington that day. In an exclusive interview with The Epoch Times, Priller shared her story of what happened on Jan. 6, 2021, and the disturbing events that have transpired over the subsequent 17 months. “We were just there,” Priller insisted. “We were there with family members and friends. We had some ladies in their 70s that were with us. The ladies wanted to go down and hear President Trump speak at the ellipse and I had never been to anything like that so I went with them.” As Priller explained, there was a large crowd there that day and once you were in a spot at the ellipse, you could not move out of it—even to go to the restroom—because you would never find your people again or be allowed back in through the crowd. They stood there for several hours, waiting to hear President Donald Trump speak. “I was at the ellipse with Chris and we were separated for seven and a half hours because the crowd was so enormous we couldn’t meet up with each other,” Priller recalled, adding that while the cell towers weren’t working and they couldn’t communicate by phone, they could get the occasional text “here and there.” Chris Worrell, a Jan. 6 defendant who was released from pretrial detention to undergo cancer treatment, is with his girlfriend Trish Priller. (Courtesy of Trish Priller) “I don’t know what he did during that time because we weren’t in the same area,” she said. Two months later, on March 11, Worrell and some of his friends headed off for a weekend canoeing trip in northern Florida. It was a Friday, and Priller was home alone when the FBI raided the house. “They flash banged me and held me at gunpoint,” Priller recalled. “When I went outside I had all of the lasers on me. They held me in my home for seven and a half hours. During that time they were rifling through everything in the house and I had to sit in a chair and watch them. I couldn’t go anywhere. If I wanted something to drink, they would bring it to me. When I had to go to the restroom I had to go with two agents with me into the bathroom. I was held prisoner in my home for all that time.” Five hours into the ordeal, Priller said she was allowed to call Worrell and give the phone to the FBI. The agents agreed that Worrell could come home. During the 3-hour drive back home, Worrell checked in about every 30 minutes to let the FBI know where he was, Priller said. When Worrell arrived, he was immediately handcuffed, searched, and brought into the house. Documents (pdf) show Worrell was taken to Fort Meyers, Florida. He was originally granted pretrial release on bond, but a second judge ordered a stay on Worrell’s release, and Worrell was instead transferred to Charlotte County, Florida, where he was held for three weeks. Worrell has a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a type of blood cancer, and had been managing the illness since he was diagnosed in 2007. He remained at stage one of the illness for several years. But Priller said that when Worrell was being held in Charlotte County, he didn’t have access to his medications during that time. “They wouldn’t allow the doctor to bring them in,” Priller asserted. “They said I should go get them, but you can’t do that. You can’t bring medicines into a prison. They won’t let you do that. So our doctor wrote a prescription and sent it to them and they didn’t process it. It took almost the whole three weeks. At that point he was transferred to Oklahoma by Con-Air, I guess, where he stayed for another couple of days, still with no meds.” As Priller explained, Worrell was then transferred to Northern Neck, Virginia, where he stayed for another couple of days. It was there that Worrell contracted the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) virus, commonly known as the novel coronavirus. At the time, it was already known the facility had many COVID cases. Then he was transported to the Correctional Treatment Facility in Washington (pdf), referred to by Priller and many Jan. 6 prisoners as “the gulag.” At that point, Worrell had gone 75 days without his medications. “They basically said his physician wasn’t qualified, even though he had been in the practice and treated cancer patients,” Priller charged. “They didn’t feel like he was qualified so he continued on with no meds. They would send him to doctors for visits but they falsified that.” As Priller explained, Worrell would be taken from the prison and taken to the university hospital where he would see a doctor. The guards who went with him had paperwork they needed to have filled out, so the doctor would fill out the paperwork and hand it to the guards to return it to the prison where it was given to their medical team, she said. “The notes from the doctor were then transcribed by jail personnel, who fabricated things, changed notes switched it up and then gave it to the medical facility in the jail,” Priller asserted. “They kept using the word ‘treatment.’ But the word ‘treatment’ means you’re actually receiving some sort of medicine. He didn’t have any ‘treatment.’ He had a consultation, not a ‘treatment’ for his cancer.” Priller said Worrell Chris filed hundreds of grievances through the jail, not just for the lack of medical care for his cancer and broken hand but for the deplorable conditions he and other Jan. 6 prisoners were forced to live under. “They told him if he keeps putting in grievances they were going to put him in the hole,” Priller said. “and they did. They kept him there for 16 days.” As described by Liberty Nation, “the hole”—solitary confinement—is where detainees are allegedly sent to be punished for daring to talk to the media about what is really going on inside the prison. Lawyers John Pierce and Steven Metcalf II, who represent several of the defendants, told EpochTV’s “The Nation Speaks” that among the nearly people 500 arrested so far in connection with Jan. 6, more than 50 are being held in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day, in conditions that are “unconstitutional” and violate “every single basic human right.” “Anything that they do, or if anybody speaks up on their behalf, all of a sudden, they get targeted even further and then get put into a dangerous, unsanitary condition,” Metcalf said. The Epoch Times has reached out to corrections officials in Charlotte County, Florida, and in Washington, requesting comment about these allegations. The Legal Fight On May 26, 2021, Worrell’s attorney filed a reply to the government’s supplemental brief pursuant to the district court’s order (pdf), stating that “the essential undisputed fact of this case is that Mr. Worrell has cutaneous follicular b-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and has been held by the Government without treatment for his white blood cell cancer for seventy-five days.” It further asserted that the government was intentionally refusing “to issue the prescription authorized by Dr. Rucker, a licensed medical doctor in the state of Florida” and has “failed to issue an alternative medication.” On Sept. 24, 2021, Worrell’s attorney John Pierce was replaced by Alex Stavrou. As the second attorney, Stavrou noted the numerous prior steps taken to seek conditions of release for Worrell. “Of course, from a legal perspective,” Stavrou told The Epoch Times in an exclusive interview, “the government and the courts were extremely reluctant to grant any of those conditions and I think that’s pretty evident by the fact you can see the number of individuals who are still incarcerated in various jails across the country waiting to be sent to the Northern Neck Regional Jail in Virginia or the Washington D.C. jail. Mr. Worrell, of course, received what could be argued as horrendous medical care while at the jail, and there were numerous attempts to thwart that medical care or to thwart the physicians of Mr. Worrell in regards to what treatment was needed.” Aside from the cancer, one of the biggest issues Stavrou cited in Worrell’s case was the fact that his hand was broken while in jail and there was a surgical recommendation in writing. While jail officials tried to argue that they never recommended surgery, it had been in writing and the doctor changed his original position, saying he never recommended surgery. “Of course, there was no follow-up care for several months,” Stavrou said (pdf). “And at the end of the day, the judge was not overly impressed with the overall care that Mr. Worrell was not receiving and then started to force the issue, which culminated with Chris receiving conditions of release.” More importantly, Stavrou said what came out of Worrell’s plight was the exposure of “borderline medical malpractice” and caused the judge to order an inspection regarding the conditions inside the jail. “The long and short of it was, not only were these conditions subhuman in the Jan. 6 pods but they were equally and even more so in other parts of the jail,” Stavrou asserted. Stavrou described how there was rampant availability of drugs, primarily marijuana. While they knew inmates were buying drugs, they could only be coming in through staff. Jail staff would also allegedly turn off the water in the Jan. 6 pods for days at a time. “Without water, you can’t flush a toilet,” Stavrou noted. “You can’t have drinking water. You can’t bathe. So you can imagine the beyond-subhuman conditions when in an 8-by-10 or a 6-by-6 [foot] cell. The smell of unflushed, clogged toilets and the smell of marijuana, fecal matter, urine and unbathed, unshaved gentlemen. These are completely atrocious conditions, especially in a country that supposedly prides itself on human rights.” In response to the repeated complaints and reports regarding the deplorable “subhuman” conditions at the Washington jail, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia “directed the Clerk of the Court to transmit the civil contempt order to the Attorney General for appropriate inquiry into potential civil rights violations of January 6 defendants, as exemplified in this case.” (pdf) The judge also held the prison warden and the director of the D.C. Department of Corrections in contempt for failure to promptly produce Worrell’s medical records On Nov. 3, a statement by the U.S. Marshals Service (pdf) said that their inspection of the Central Treatment Facility (CTF)—where some of the Jan. 6 prisoners are being held—”did not identify conditions that would necessitate the transfer of inmates from that facility.” However, the U.S. Marshals did admit that “based on the results of the unannounced inspection” of the Central Detention Facility, where an additional 400 detainees were held in the custody of the United States Marshals Service (USMS), it was determined “that conditions there do not meet the minimum standards of confinement as prescribed by the Federal Performance-Based Detention Standards. Therefore, working with the Lewisburg Bureau of Prisons, the USMS agreed to transfer those detainees to United States Penitentiary in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.” Stavrou said he would argue that the conditions and treatment of inmates was being swept under the rug and that the “same kind of nonsense” was still taking place. “While they may have cleaned up the deplorable conditions, now they will do things like claim the internet is down for two to five days so the inmates can’t communicate with loved ones through email messages or there is something wrong with the phones. So now there are gentlemen in the prison who haven’t received release who can’t get in touch with their families.” It was further noted in the U.S. Marshals’ statement that “the Lewisburg Bureau of Prisons facility provides attorney and visitor areas, medical care, and video teleconferencing capabilities.” When Worrel was released from prison, he hadn’t had any medications for eight months. At that point, he had gone from stage one cancer to stage three. The Fight for His Life “Chris just finished five rounds of chemotherapy and has a follow-up appointment in July for further diagnostic tests,” Priller said, noting that some of his symptoms are already returning. “His medical condition has deteriorated dramatically. His teeth, his skin, so many issues that could have been prevented. Chris is in dire straights.” Trish Priller sits with her boyfriend, Jan. 6 defendant Chris Worrell, while he goes through chemotherapy for cutaneous follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. (Courtesy of Trish Priller) As Priller explained, Worrell now needs multiple surgeries on his mouth and teeth due to radiation treatments “and further complications due to the fact he was using a very specific type of toothpaste that he could not get while incarcerated.” The cost is estimated at about $30,000. Then there is the additional chemotherapy to treat the returning symptoms. For that, he will need at least another $50,000. There is a GiveSendGo account to raise money for Worrell’s treatment. In the meantime, Priller said their daily lives are stressed with the constant threat of another visit from the government. “The marshals and pretrial services can just show up any time they want and do a search,” Priller said, “and they do, and you have to let them in. They’re looking to violate you, to see what you’ve done wrong. We have parameters, we have to call in every single day. There’s a lot of rules we have to follow. We have to submit a weekly schedule and call in every Tuesday.” She described how there was one instance where she was on the phone with the pretrial officer trying to get their schedule filed on time. Shortly after, the pretrial service officer filed an order (pdf) claiming Worrell violated the conditions of his conditions of release “because he heard keystrokes,” Priller said. Stavrou filed a response (pdf) explaining that it was Priller typing in an effort to submit the weekly schedule on time while “on the phone simultaneously with Pre-trial services Officer Tad Parks.” Judge Royce Lamberth accepted the explanation (pdf). “I’m being watched and monitored and I wasn’t even the one arrested,” Priller said. “So I am basically imprisoned also.” Tyler Durden Tue, 06/14/2022 - 08:44.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 14th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Trump releases 12-page statement pushing bogus voter-fraud theory as committee split over whether to seek Trump indictment

The panel is investigating the Capitol riot and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot held its second hearing on Monday. Trump reacted by pushing bogus voter-fraud theories and claiming the panel is trying to stop him from running in 2024. Meanwhile, committee members pushed back on the chair's claim that they won't ask DOJ to indict Trump. Trump releases 12-page statement bashing the Jan. 6 investigation, saying it is merely to stop him from running for president againVideo of former President Donald Trump is played during a hearing by the Select Committee in Washington, DC, on June 13, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump released a 12-page statement after the committee's second hearing on Monday.He spent nearly nine pages of the statement pushing bogus claims that the 2020 election was rigged against him.He also bashed the panel and claimed it was trying to stop him from running again in 2024. He has repeatedly teased a 2024 run for president.Read Full StoryJan. 6 committee members push back on chair Bennie Thompson's claim that they won't ask the DOJ to indict TrumpRep. Bennie Thompson at the Jan. 6 committee's first public hearing on June 9, 2022.Andrew Harnik/APRep. Bennie Thompson, chair of the January 6 committee, said it was not the group's job to refer Trump or anyone else to the Justice Department for charges."No, that's not our job," Thompson said on Monday, according to CNN. "Our job is to look at the facts and circumstances around January 6, what caused it and make recommendations after that."But some committee members disagreed with that approach, showing rare public cracks within the committee."The January 6th Select Committee has not issued a conclusion regarding potential criminal referrals. We will announce a decision on that at an appropriate time," tweeted Rep. Liz Cheney, a Republican serving as the committee's vice chair.And Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democrat, told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday that he had not seen Thompson's comment but was not aware a decision on referrals had been made yet.Read Full Story Rudy Giuliani continued to make false claims to the January 6 panel that if they gave him 'the paper ballots,' he could overturn Biden's victoryRudy Giuliani continued to make false claims about election fraud during his testimony to the January 6 panel.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump-allied lawyer Rudy Giuliani continued to make bizarre false claims about voter fraud in the 2020 election during his testimony to the January 6 panel, claiming he had evidence of a "big truck" of fraudulently-cast Biden votes. Giuliani's testimony to the House panel investigating the Capitol riot was aired on Monday, during the second of the committee's six public hearings on January 6. The former New York mayor doubled down on outlandish and unproven election fraud claims. "They saw a big truck bringing in 100,000 ballots in garbage cans, in wastepaper baskets, in cardboard boxes, and in shopping baskets," Giuliani claimed without substantiation.Read Full StoryFormer AG Bill Barr says Trump was fixated on 'crazy' voter fraud allegations and had no interest 'in what the actual facts were'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General William Barr said that former President Donald Trump was more fixated on "crazy" allegations of voter fraud than knowing the "actual facts" on the matter.Barr's testimony to the House panel investigating the January 6 Capitol riot was aired on Monday as part of the second of the committee's six public hearings on their investigation.In a videotaped deposition, Barr recounted a meeting with Trump on December 14, 2020. Barr said Trump "went off on a monologue" during the meeting about what he claimed to be "definitive evidence" of election fraud being carried out via the Dominion voting machines.According to Barr, Trump then "held up the report" and claimed it showed "absolute proof that the Dominion machines were rigged." Barr added that Trump then declared that the report meant that he would have a second term.Read Full StoryTrump campaign lawyer says Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being 'an agent of the deep state' for questioning baseless Dominion voter fraud conspiracy theoriesFormer Trump aide Peter NavarroAlex Wong/Getty ImagesAlex Cannon, a former Trump campaign lawyer, testified in front of the House Committee on January 6 and said that Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being a "deep state" operative because he expressed doubt over Dominion voting machine conspiracy theories. Cannon's testimony was broadcast on Monday as part of the second of six public hearings on the committee's investigation. During his deposition, Cannon said that he had a conversation with Navarro in mid-November, after the 2020 presidential election, about voter fraud allegations.Cannon said he spoke to Navarro specifically regarding the conspiracy theory that Dominion voting machines were used to flip votes from Trump to Biden. This conspiracy has continually been pushed by Trump-allied lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, as well as MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. Dominion named all three in a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit.Read Full StoryTrump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — 'Team Normal' and 'Team Giuliani'Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien (left) says he did not mind being called part of "Team Normal," as opposed to "Team Giuliani".Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images; Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien says the Trump team was split into two camps after the election – "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani." The House Select Committee to Investigate January 6 played a clip of Stepien's testimony on Monday during the second of the committee's six public hearings. During his deposition, Stepien was asked if he had pulled back from the Trump camp to preserve his professional reputation. "You didn't want to be associated with some of what you were hearing from the Giuliani team and others that — that sort of stepped in in the wake of your departure?" an unidentified questioner asked Stepien. "I didn't mind being categorized. There were two groups of them. We called them kind of my team and Rudy's team. I — I didn't mind being characterized as being part of Team Normal, as — as reporters, you know, kind of started to do around that point in time," Stepien said.Read Full StoryFired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan WalshFormer Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection. Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call. The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.READ FULL STORYWhite House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty ImagesTrump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday."I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.Read Full StoryThere's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr saysFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud."I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."Trump campaign manager says why he quitThen-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.Read Full StoryBarr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesBill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election nightRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election nightFormer New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty ImagesFormer New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted."Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do."Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.Read Full StoryFox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearingImages of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted ShaffreyAs the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote."We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 14th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Rudy Giuliani continued to make false claims to the January 6 panel that if they gave him "the paper ballots," he could overturn Biden"s victory

The panel is investigating the Capitol riot and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot held its second hearing on Monday. Rudy Giuliani doubled down on his outlandish and unproven election fraud claims.  Bill Barr said Trump was more fixated on "crazy" voter fraud allegations than knowing the "actual facts." Rudy Giuliani continued to make false claims to the January 6 panel that if they gave him 'the paper ballots,' he could overturn Biden's victoryRudy Giuliani continued to make false claims about election fraud during his testimony to the January 6 panel.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump-allied lawyer Rudy Giuliani continued to make bizarre false claims about voter fraud in the 2020 election during his testimony to the January 6 panel, claiming he had evidence of a "big truck" of fraudulently-cast Biden votes. Giuliani's testimony to the House panel investigating the Capitol riot was aired on Monday, during the second of the committee's six public hearings on January 6. The former New York mayor doubled down on outlandish and unproven election fraud claims. "They saw a big truck bringing in 100,000 ballots in garbage cans, in wastepaper baskets, in cardboard boxes, and in shopping baskets," Giuliani claimed without substantiation.Read Full StoryFormer AG Bill Barr says Trump was fixated on 'crazy' voter fraud allegations and had no interest 'in what the actual facts were'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General William Barr said that former President Donald Trump was more fixated on "crazy" allegations of voter fraud than knowing the "actual facts" on the matter.Barr's testimony to the House panel investigating the January 6 Capitol riot was aired on Monday as part of the second of the committee's six public hearings on their investigation.In a videotaped deposition, Barr recounted a meeting with Trump on December 14, 2020. Barr said Trump "went off on a monologue" during the meeting about what he claimed to be "definitive evidence" of election fraud being carried out via the Dominion voting machines.According to Barr, Trump then "held up the report" and claimed it showed "absolute proof that the Dominion machines were rigged." Barr added that Trump then declared that the report meant that he would have a second term.Read Full StoryTrump campaign lawyer says Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being 'an agent of the deep state' for questioning baseless Dominion voter fraud conspiracy theoriesFormer Trump aide Peter NavarroAlex Wong/Getty ImagesAlex Cannon, a former Trump campaign lawyer, testified in front of the House Committee on January 6 and said that Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being a "deep state" operative because he expressed doubt over Dominion voting machine conspiracy theories. Cannon's testimony was broadcast on Monday as part of the second of six public hearings on the committee's investigation. During his deposition, Cannon said that he had a conversation with Navarro in mid-November, after the 2020 presidential election, about voter fraud allegations.Cannon said he spoke to Navarro specifically regarding the conspiracy theory that Dominion voting machines were used to flip votes from Trump to Biden. This conspiracy has continually been pushed by Trump-allied lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, as well as MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. Dominion named all three in a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit.Read Full StoryTrump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — 'Team Normal' and 'Team Giuliani'Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien (left) says he did not mind being called part of "Team Normal," as opposed to "Team Giuliani".Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images; Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien says the Trump team was split into two camps after the election – "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani." The House Select Committee to Investigate January 6 played a clip of Stepien's testimony on Monday during the second of the committee's six public hearings. During his deposition, Stepien was asked if he had pulled back from the Trump camp to preserve his professional reputation. "You didn't want to be associated with some of what you were hearing from the Giuliani team and others that — that sort of stepped in in the wake of your departure?" an unidentified questioner asked Stepien. "I didn't mind being categorized. There were two groups of them. We called them kind of my team and Rudy's team. I — I didn't mind being characterized as being part of Team Normal, as — as reporters, you know, kind of started to do around that point in time," Stepien said.Read Full StoryFired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan WalshFormer Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection. Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call. The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.READ FULL STORYWhite House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty ImagesTrump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday."I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.Read Full StoryThere's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr saysFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud."I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."Trump campaign manager says why he quitThen-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.Read Full StoryBarr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesBill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election nightRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election nightFormer New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty ImagesFormer New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted."Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do."Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.Read Full StoryFox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearingImages of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted ShaffreyAs the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote."We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 14th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Former AG Bill Barr says Trump was fixated on "crazy" voter fraud allegations and had no interest "in what the actual facts were"

The panel is investigating the Capitol riot and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot held its second hearing on Monday. Bill Barr said Trump was more fixated on "crazy" voter fraud allegations than knowing the "actual facts." Bill Stepien said Trump's team was split into "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani" after the election. Former AG Bill Barr says Trump was fixated on 'crazy' voter fraud allegations and had no interest 'in what the actual facts were'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General William Barr said that former President Donald Trump was more fixated on "crazy" allegations of voter fraud than knowing the "actual facts" on the matter.Barr's testimony to the House panel investigating the January 6 Capitol riot was aired on Monday as part of the second of the committee's six public hearings on their investigation.In a videotaped deposition, Barr recounted a meeting with Trump on December 14, 2020. Barr said Trump "went off on a monologue" during the meeting about what he claimed to be "definitive evidence" of election fraud being carried out via the Dominion voting machines.According to Barr, Trump then "held up the report" and claimed it showed "absolute proof that the Dominion machines were rigged." Barr added that Trump then declared that the report meant that he would have a second term.Read Full StoryTrump campaign lawyer says Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being 'an agent of the deep state' for questioning baseless Dominion voter fraud conspiracy theoriesFormer Trump aide Peter NavarroAlex Wong/Getty ImagesAlex Cannon, a former Trump campaign lawyer, testified in front of the House Committee on January 6 and said that Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being a "deep state" operative because he expressed doubt over Dominion voting machine conspiracy theories. Cannon's testimony was broadcast on Monday as part of the second of six public hearings on the committee's investigation. During his deposition, Cannon said that he had a conversation with Navarro in mid-November, after the 2020 presidential election, about voter fraud allegations.Cannon said he spoke to Navarro specifically regarding the conspiracy theory that Dominion voting machines were used to flip votes from Trump to Biden. This conspiracy has continually been pushed by Trump-allied lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, as well as MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. Dominion named all three in a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit.Read Full StoryTrump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — 'Team Normal' and 'Team Giuliani'Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien (left) says he did not mind being called part of "Team Normal," as opposed to "Team Giuliani".Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images; Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien says the Trump team was split into two camps after the election – "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani." The House Select Committee to Investigate January 6 played a clip of Stepien's testimony on Monday during the second of the committee's six public hearings. During his deposition, Stepien was asked if he had pulled back from the Trump camp to preserve his professional reputation. "You didn't want to be associated with some of what you were hearing from the Giuliani team and others that — that sort of stepped in in the wake of your departure?" an unidentified questioner asked Stepien. "I didn't mind being categorized. There were two groups of them. We called them kind of my team and Rudy's team. I — I didn't mind being characterized as being part of Team Normal, as — as reporters, you know, kind of started to do around that point in time," Stepien said.Read Full StoryFired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan WalshFormer Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection. Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call. The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.READ FULL STORYWhite House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty ImagesTrump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday."I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.Read Full StoryThere's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr saysFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud."I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."Trump campaign manager says why he quitThen-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.Read Full StoryBarr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesBill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election nightRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election nightFormer New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty ImagesFormer New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted."Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do."Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.Read Full StoryFox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearingImages of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted ShaffreyAs the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote."We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 14th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Trump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani"

The panel is investigating the Capitol riot and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot held its second hearing on Monday. Bill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony Monday. Bill Stepien said he quit his job managing Trump's campaign after it espoused baseless fraud allegations post-election. Trump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — 'Team Normal' and 'Team Giuliani'Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien (left) says he did not mind being called part of "Team Normal," as opposed to "Team Giuliani".Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images; Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien says the Trump team was split into two camps after the election – "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani." The House Select Committee to Investigate January 6 played a clip of Stepien's testimony on Monday during the second of the committee's six public hearings. During his deposition, Stepien was asked if he had pulled back from the Trump camp to preserve his professional reputation. "You didn't want to be associated with some of what you were hearing from the Giuliani team and others that — that sort of stepped in in the wake of your departure?" an unidentified questioner asked Stepien. "I didn't mind being categorized. There were two groups of them. We called them kind of my team and Rudy's team. I — I didn't mind being characterized as being part of Team Normal, as — as reporters, you know, kind of started to do around that point in time," Stepien said.Read Full StoryFired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan WalshFormer Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection. Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call. The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.READ FULL STORYWhite House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty ImagesTrump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday."I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.Read Full StoryThere's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr saysFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud."I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."Trump campaign manager says why he quitThen-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.Read Full StoryBarr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesBill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election nightRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election nightFormer New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty ImagesFormer New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted."Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do."Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.Read Full StoryFox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearingImages of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted ShaffreyAs the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote."We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 14th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Fired Fox News political editor Stirewalt wasn"t expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate 2020 election projection

The panel is investigating the Capitol riot and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot held its second hearing on Monday. Bill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony Monday. Bill Stepien said he quit his job managing Trump's campaign after it espoused baseless fraud allegations post-election. Fired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan WalshFormer Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection. Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call. The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.READ FULL STORYWhite House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty ImagesTrump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday."I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.Read Full StoryThere's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr saysFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud."I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."Trump campaign manager says why he quitThen-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.Read Full StoryBarr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesBill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election nightRudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/APTrump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.Read Full StoryRudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election nightFormer New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty ImagesFormer New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted."Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do."Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.Read Full StoryFox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearingImages of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted ShaffreyAs the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote."We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 13th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Hearings resume Monday as some in GOP seek "off-ramp" from Trump"s lies about 2020 election

The panel is investigating the Capitol riot and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot is holding its second hearing around 10:30 a.m. Monday. Witnesses include the former Fox editor who called Arizona for Biden and became the target of Trump supporters. On Sunday, committee members said they had enough evidence to ask the DOJ to indict Trump, the AP reported. The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 13th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: Hearing resumes at 10 a.m. ET with testimony from former Trump campaign manager and Fox News editor

The panel is investigating the January 6 events and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Capitol riot is holding its second hearing at 10 a.m. ET Monday. Witnesses include former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien and former Fox editor Chris Stirewalt. On Sunday, committee members said they had uncovered enough evidence to ask the DOJ to indict Trump, the AP reported. The second public hearing is due 10 a.m. ET on Monday. Here's who to expect.The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNNThe second public hearing by the committee is due to start at 10 a.m. ET on Monday.Witnesses include the former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt, and GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNNJanuary 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.He said the details would emerge later.When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."Read Full Story GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claimsArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen. Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol. He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud. "For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict TrumpLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory."I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential electionRudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. READ FULL STORYLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 13th, 2022

"Panic, Depression... Everyone Who Dies Out There Dies Of Confusion": A Market Of "Devastating Disorientation"

"Panic, Depression... Everyone Who Dies Out There Dies Of Confusion": A Market Of "Devastating Disorientation" By Eric Peters, CIO of One River Asset Management “Reflect frequently upon the instability of things, and how very fast the scenes of nature are shifted,” wrote Marcus Aurelius, last of the Five Good Emperors, in 170 AD. I wandered through the Colosseum after dark, Rome’s oppressive heat slowly fading,  Goldman’s European Financials Conference approaching. “Matter is in perpetual flux,” wrote Aurelius, an inspired leader, a stoic philosopher. “Change is always and everywhere at work; it strikes through causes and effects, and leaves nothing fixed and permanent.”   Disorientation: “People who are lost may experience different types of reactions,” writes William Syrotuck in Analysis of Lost Person Behavior. “They may panic, become depressed, or suffer from woods-shock.” The book is a study of 229 people who were lost in the wilderness. “Most go through some of the stages,” he writes. “If they do not totally exhaust or injure themselves during outright panic, they may eventually get a grip and decide on some plan of action. What they decide to do may appear irrational to a calm observer but does not seem so nearly unreasonable to the lost person who is now totally disoriented.” “Even people who while lost appeared to use good judgement with no suggestion of overt panic, exhibit woods-shock,” explains Syrotcuk. Of the 229 in his study, 11% died, nearly all in the first 48 hours, mostly attributed to panic and the cascade of catastrophic decisions that follow and compound. “Many persons found mobile and well will seem to converse in a completely normal manner. Only upon close questioning does it become evident that they are unable to remember where they spent the first night, whether they had any water to drink or whether they crossed the river yesterday, or maybe the day before.” Italian Premier Draghi reminded his former colleagues, moments before this week’s ECB meeting of “signs that there is still spare capacity in the economy.” North-South inflation tension leave the ECB in treacherous territory, searching for a path out. Central bankers told markets that they know precisely how to tame inflation should it arrive. For years, policy was calibrated guard too strongly against deflation. Now Germany’s inflation challenge is more extreme than the 1970s. The tools to tame it are known. The force required is clear. Action is postponed, as the ECB hopes for a rescue. Climate change is an urgent priority. But policies around ESG were introduced before economies and consumers were provided a sufficiently wide off-ramp away from fossil fuels. Policy is discouraging oil production. US output is well below its highs and oil and gas rig counts, which would normally be in the 1000s at current prices, are sitting at 733. A timely alternative has not been provided. Panicked policies can worsen the disorientation - price caps, soliciting foreign production, and taxing profits of oil producers reduce investment capital, compounding the emergency. Revolutions are rarely fought on full stomachs. The fear of food shortages is leading to national hoarding policies with hopes of preventing domestic social unrest. The cascading impact on other countries does the exact opposite of its intent, encouraging other nations to close borders and hold larger inventories of agriculture commodities. The solution is found in the problem – more investment and more trade, not less. This is unfamiliar terrain for every living politician. Self-injury is a common consequence of disorientation – food policies embody it. In the decades since the last great inflation, investors came to rely on an inexorable trend toward rising equity and bond prices. In times of economic stress, the two tended to move in opposite directions, and this rewarded portfolios that were leveraged long. Amplifying this dynamic was a mega macro trend toward globalization, which encouraged investors to structure businesses and portfolios to optimize for higher returns. But all choices incur costs, and the price was an increase in economic and market fragility. It now appears that these mega macro trends are reversing. This is utterly unfamiliar territory.   “The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority,” wrote Marcus Aurelius in 170 AD. I stood on the rebuilt floor of the Colosseum, looking up at the emperor’s podium, now a crumbled mass of travertine, white gulls darting above in the Roman night, as they have through the ages. “…but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.”     Anecdote “Everyone who dies out there dies of confusion,” wrote Laurence Gonzales in Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why. The book explores what separates survivors from the others. Those who die when lost in the wilderness often do so spontaneously, for no clear medical reason. Disorientation is psychologically devastating for those unable to adjust rapidly. Children are often better suited than adults. “If things don’t go according to plan, revising a robust mental model may be difficult. In an environment that has high objective hazards, the longer it takes to dislodge the imagined world in favor of the real one, the greater the risk,” explains Gonzales. I’ve always found survival stories more useful than economic textbooks and central banker memoirs. It is not that the latter are useless, it’s rather that in markets and business those who fail to steel themselves for extreme adverse events are unlikely to survive them. Studying survival stories, examining the psychological journeys they reveal, can help us prepare and better position ourselves and teams to endure. My favorite and most terrifying is Into the Land of White Death, by Valerian Albanov. Shackleton’s story of The Endurance is required reading. Into Thin Air by Krakauer is terrific for us climbers. So is The Climb, by Anatoli Boukreev, lead guide on Krakauer’s tragic Everest expedition. Reading those two in succession reveals how people often experience the same events so differently, particularly in times of crisis, and this can destroy cooperation when it is most needed. I include Moby Dick in the survival genre. Melville’s genius helps us to understand ourselves, our wild ambitions, our undoing. In bull markets, it is easy to forget that this game is ultimately won by the living. When you’re dead, nothing good can happen. Death is forever. “The world won’t adapt to me. I must adapt to it,” wrote Gonzales, explaining the critical mindset found in survivors. “To experience humility is the true survivor’s correct response to catastrophe. A survival emergency is a Rorschach test. It will quickly tell you who you are.” Tyler Durden Sun, 06/12/2022 - 21:30.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 12th, 2022

Jan. 6 live updates: House committee to zero in on Trump, says there"s enough to indict

The panel is investigating the January 6 events and the role former President Trump and his allies played in trying to overturn the 2020 election. Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images The House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, insurrection held its first public hearing Thursday. Lawmakers are examining Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election. Trump responded to the hearing by attacking the House committee and promoting his bogus fraud claim. House Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member saysUS President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty ImagesThe upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said. Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him. "We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing. "There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said."So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."Read Full StoryRepublican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riotArkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden. During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection. "Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.    A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: reportDonald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty ImagesA lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico. Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act. According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported. Read Full StoryGiuliani says Trump 'had nothing to do' with Jan 6. attack and that the Democratic party 'needs to be destroyed at the top'Rudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty ImagesRudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, said in an episode of his podcast the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power. Read Full StoryLaura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 millionPresident Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/APFox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers. Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6. Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar."Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars." Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times." Read Full StoryWhat is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/ReutersEnrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government. Read Full StoryThe public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ETLawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageIn a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.Read Full StoryMore than 19 million people watched first public hearingFormer US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesMore than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimonyFormer Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached." Read Full StoryTrump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claimIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen."Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."Read Full StoryTrump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrectionFormer President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims."So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning. He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!" Read Full StoryFox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against TrumpTucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox NewsFox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision."The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along.""This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."Read Full StoryTrump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theoriesLiz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.Read Full StorySeveral Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon.""Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.Read Full StoryRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day. Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played. "Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote. Read Full StoryA Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyA high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by." Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by." A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group. Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments. "Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually." Read Full StoryNew video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with copsHouse Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesThe January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building. The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers. Read Full StoryEx-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump posesFormer DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.Read Full Story'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officerU.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCapitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene."I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."Read Full StoryEx-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate commentEnrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//GettyAt the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by." "One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.Read Full StoryJared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo—Bloomberg (@business) June 10, 2022 Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining.""I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump."I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.Read Full StoryWhite House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney saysRep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol."They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/APFollowing the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing. Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims. Read Full StoryIvanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 electionIvanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesVideo testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect."It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full StoryLiz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in powerU.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesRep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022Read Full StoryRep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesAs a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks."Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.Read Full StoryJanuary 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'—CSPAN (@cspan) June 10, 2022 Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching."I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat."Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.Read Full StoryHouse Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection."We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger.""... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in CongressHouse Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work.""There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.Read Full StorySen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearingSenator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing. "I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats." Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them. "From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years." Read Full StoryDOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in SeptemberTrump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty ImagesA Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege."The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.Read Full StoryThe first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, PoolThe House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:How to watch the hearingsThe key witnesses who are likely to testifyWhat to expectSources say the evidence will put Trump "at the center" of the eventsMeet the lawmakers and staff leading the investigationAt least 862 people have now been arrested for their actions on January 6More than 300 people have already pleaded guiltyAn oral history of the insurrection from 34 people who were thereHow the US Capitol riot led to Trump's second impeachmentLiz Cheney's break from GOP leadership on the investigationRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJun 12th, 2022

75+ sweet gift ideas for your girlfriend that span all of her interests

We rounded up 76 thoughtful gifts to give your girlfriend, from keepsake jewelry to helpful tech and fitness accessories. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.We rounded up 76 thoughtful gifts to give your girlfriend, from keepsake jewelry to helpful tech and fitness accessories.Brightland/SonosGiving gifts as a couple can be a lot of fun. You know your partner: What they love, what rituals they enjoy, what small daily annoyances you could possibly solve with a thoughtful gift. You also know how much they'll appreciate a gift that comes from you.Odds are you want to give them something wonderful — whatever your price range is. All most of us need is a little direction and a few great options to pick from, so we put together a list of our favorite gift ideas for girlfriends of all personalities and interests to help guide you.Check out 76 great gifts for your girlfriend in 2022:Home and kitchenA small cold brew coffee makerAmazonAirtight Cold Brew Iced Coffee Maker, available at Amazon, $35.99This small cold brew maker (available in 1-liter and 1.5-liter options) makes coffee's less acidic, smoother cousin cold brew in 12 hours in the fridge, so there's a minimal hassle and always a treat ready in the morning on your girlfriend's way out the door to work. A weighted blanket for better restAmazonYnM Weighted Blanket, available at Amazon, $36.50Weighted blankets help create more restful sleep by "grounding" the body, and YnM makes some of the most popular and affordable weighted blankets on the internet. There are multiple sizes and weights for the ideal fit and width (they recommend picking whichever is about 10% of your body weight), and the segmented design allows you to move around without displacing all the weighted beads inside. A high quality scented candle she'll light all the timeNordstromKacey Musgraves and Boy Smells Slow Burn Candle, available at Nordstrom, from $46Kacey Musgrave's collaboration with Boy Smells, a popular emergent candle brand, is woody and dark, with hints of smoked papyrus and amber with ginger and black pepper. We also love Otherland if you're looking for a gift from another on-the-rise startup she may have seen ads for online. For traditional candles, we'd recommend going with Le Labo, Diptyque, and Byredo if they're within your budget. A standing desk for a home office upgradeFullyJarvis Bamboo Standing Desk, available at Fully, from $509.15If she's working from home, your girlfriend might love a home office upgrade the most. We ranked the Fully Jarvis the best standing desk; it provides the right blend of features and reliable performance. Its customizations for style, height, and accessories make it adaptable to pretty much any need. A Dutch oven to elevate their bread gameLodgeLodge Enameled Cast Iron Dutch Oven, available at Walmart, $79.90Did your girlfriend get into baking bread and, miraculously, stay committed to it? If so, a really nice Dutch oven can help elevate her experience. You can get something great for under $100, or you can splurge on a beautiful Le Creuset. Other meaningful upgrades include a cooling rack, according to the famous baker Apollonia Poilâne.A framed keepsake of a favorite memoryFramebridgeFramed photo, available at Framebridge, from $49Gift Card, available at Framebridge, from $25Framebridge makes custom framing a bit more affordable. You can print or paint something on your own and have it framed, or have them print and frame it, and you can take advantage of the team of designers for help deciding what frame to get. A one-size-fits-all lid that instantly declutters the cabinetsMade InSilicone Universal Lid Kit, available at Made In, $69This was one of the gifts that professional chefs recommended to us for avid home cooks. If your girlfriend loves to cook and has a plethora of differently sized pots and pans with all the corresponding lids, having one universal lid can declutter and streamline their space in one move. A customized map of her favorite placeGrafomapCustom Map Poster, available at Grafomap, from $49Grafomap lets you design custom maps of anywhere in the world — like the first place you met, the best trip you ever took together, or the hometown she couldn't wait to show you. It's unique, thoughtful, and pretty inexpensive.  You can find our full review here.An 8-in-1 pan that helps to declutter your homeOur PlaceAlways Pan, available at Our Place, $145If you're spending more time at home cooking together — or re-organizing the kitchen — she may appreciate a good 8-in-1 cookware hack.The Always Pan from startup Our Place is a frying pan, saute pan, steamer, skillet, saucier, saucepan, non-stick pan, spatula, and spoon rest in the space of a single pan. In other words, a clever generalist that's extremely convenient for small spaces or minimalist cooks. You can read our review here.Personalized cartoon couple mugsUncommon GoodsPersonalized Family Mugs, available at Uncommon Goods, from $30These cute mugs can be personalized for what you're like as a couple, making for a special weekend morning coffee routine or just a nice reminder in the kitchen cabinet. On the back, you can add a family name and the year the couple was established if you'd like. A large print on fine art paper of a favorite memoryartifact uprisingLarge Format Prints, available at Artifact Uprising, from $19Artifact Uprising makes luxury prints at accessible prices — and they make especially thoughtful gifts that look like they should cost much more. Get one of their favorite photos printed on archival fine art paper for $20 and up, or thoughtful cards for as little as $1 per custom card. You can also make a color series photo book for $19, a set of prints for $8, and a personalized calendar on a handcrafted wood clipboard for $26.A mug that keeps hot drinks hot for up to six hours straightHydro FlaskHydro Flask Mug, 12 oz, available at Hydro Flask, from $24.95This mug is a common desk companion for the Insider Reviews team. The 12-ounce coffee mug has the company's proprietary TempShield insulation that made its water bottles famous. This mug will keep hot drinks hot for up to six hours, and cold drinks cold up to 24 hours. Read our full review of it here.Comfy, high-end sheets at the best price on the marketBrooklinenLuxe Hardcore Sheet Bundle, available at Brooklinen, from $231.41Brooklinen is one of our favorite companies, point-blank. We think they make the best high-end sheets at the best price on the market, and most of the Insider Reviews team uses Brooklinen on their own beds.The Luxe Hardcore Sheet Bundle comes in plenty of colors and patterns, and you can mix and match them to suit your taste. Grab a gift card if you want to give her more freedom. If you opt for a sheet bundle, she'll receive a core sheet set (fitted, flat, two pillowcases), duvet cover, and two extra pillowcases in a soft, smooth 480-thread-count weave.A houseplant that arrives already potted and is easy to care forLeon & GeorgeSilver Evergreen, available at Leon & George, from $149Leon & George is a San Francisco startup that will send beautiful plants — potted in stylish, minimalist pots — to your girlfriend's door. All she has to do is to occasionally add water. Flowers are wonderful, but houseplants have a much longer shelf life, and most of Leon & George's options are very easy to care for. We'd also recommend checking out Bloomscape for small plant trios under $70.  A beautiful bouquetUrban StemsFlower Bouquets, available at Urban Stems, $55Send flowers to her doorstep. We're fans of UrbanStems; Its bouquets are one of the best things we've ever tested. If you're looking for something that won't be gone after a couple of weeks, you'll also find options for potted plants and low-maintenance, decor-friendly dried bouquets.A pasta maker you can use togetherWilliams SonomaImperia Pasta Machine, available at Williams Sonoma, $149.95Bring the pasta maker and the fixings to make a delicious meal together. It's relatively easy to get the hang of, and you can enjoy quality time with the bonus of incredible ravioli or fettuccine on the other end of it. Food and drinksDelicious sweets from a famous NYC bakeryMilk BarMilk Bar Treats, available at Milk Bar, from $27If your girlfriend has a sweet tooth, send her Milk Bar — the company delivers its iconic and decadent cakes, cookies, and truffles to her doorstep.Her favorite specialty food straight from the sourceGoldbelly/InstagramOrder her favorite specialty foods using Goldbelly, from $28Goldbelly makes it possible to satisfy your girlfriend's most specific and nostalgic cravings no matter where they live in the US — a cheesecake from Junior's, deep dish pizza from Lou Malnati, and more. Browse the iconic gifts section for inspiration. A subscription that sends her a six-month world tour of teasAtlas Tea ClubAtlas Tea Club 6 Month Subscription, available at Atlas Tea Club, $99This subscription sends your girlfriend single-origin teas from the best tea-growing regions in the world for six months. She'll get two delicious options sent to her home each month.A gift card to a popular wine subscription clubWincGift Card, available at Winc, from $50Winc is a personalized wine club — and we think it's the best one you can belong to overall. Members take a wine palate profile quiz and then choose from the personalized wine suggestions. Each bottle has extensive tasting notes and serving recommendations online, and makes it easy to discover similar bottles. Gift her a Winc gift card, and she can take a wine palate profile quiz and get started with her own customized suggestions. A gift card for delicious, healthy meals she can make in about 30 secondsDaily HarvestGift Card, available at Daily Harvest, from $50Daily Harvest is a food startup that makes it possible to eat healthy, delicious meals for less than $10 each even if you only have 30 seconds to spare for prep time. Meals are pre-portioned, delicious, and designed by both a chef and a nutritionist to make sure they're tasty and good for you. It addressed most of my healthy eating roadblocks. The internet's favorite olive oilBrightlandAwake Olive Oil, available at Brightland, $37Brightland's olive oils make great gifts for cooks and anyone else who loves to entertain. The white bottles protect the EVOO from light damage and look nice displayed on a countertop. Find a full review here. A cooking class from one of the nation's top chefsCozymeal/InstagramGift Card, available at Cozymeal, from $50With a Cozymeal class, you and your girlfriend can learn how to make anything from fresh pasta to Argentinian staple dishes from the nation's top chefs. In addition to cooking classes, Cozymeal offers food tours in various cities (when it's safe to do so). Fancy popcorn and a movie nightWilliams SonomaAmish Popcorn Gift Set, available at Williams Sonoma, from $29.95Make a reservation at a nice outdoor restaurant, stock up on your girlfriend's favorite movie candy and some fun drinks ahead of time (wrap them for an extra wow-factor), and create your own in-house cinema experience. Or, perhaps even better, order a bunch of take-out from your favorite local restaurants.A subscription to a coffee service that sends coffees specifically for her taste preferencesDriftaway Facebook3-Month Subscription, available at Driftaway Coffee, from $54If your girlfriend loves coffee, she'll probably love to try Driftaway. It's a gourmet coffee subscription that gets smarter the longer you use it, remembering your preferences and steering you towards increasingly accurate brews for your specific tastes. The first shipment will be a tasting kit with four coffee profiles, which she'll rate online or in the app to start getting personalized options.TechThe best Apple Watch we've triedAppleApple Watch Series 7, available at Amazon, from $383.97If you're looking for a great gift and not concerned about staying in an under-$200 budget, we'd recommend the Apple Watch Series 7.Currently, we think it's the best Apple Watch. The Series 7 can charge up to 80% in 45 minutes, and it's the most advanced version with features such as blood oxygen saturation measuring and an electrocardiogram scanner to detect abnormalities in the heart's rhythm. The best noise-canceling headphonesAmazonSony Noise-Canceling Wireless Headphones, available at Amazon, $348If your girlfriend is into music, the best gift is the one that improves her everyday music-listening experience. For that, we recommend our favorite noise-canceling headphones — Sony's WH-1000XM4 — that balance sound quality, noise cancellation, and comfort at a solid price.You can find more good noise-canceling headphone options here.A tracker for finding cell phones and wallets quicklyAmazonTile Pro, available at Amazon, $34.99When your girlfriend can't find her phone, all she has to do is click the Tile button to make her phone ring, even if it's on silent. We've found them especially useful lately. Apple AirPods Pro for when she's on the moveCrystal Cox/Business InsiderApple AirPods Pro, available at Amazon, $197We love Apple's AirPods Pro for Apple users. They're no-hassle, work with Apple products, have decent sound and noise cancellation, are water-resistant, have a wireless charging case, and feel more comfortable than standard AirPods. You'll find more wireless earbuds we love here.A new waterproof Kindle Paperwhite for reading anywhereAmazonKindle Paperwhite, available at Amazon, $139.99If your girlfriend is a reader, we'd suggest looking at Amazon's new Kindle Paperwhite; it's the company's thinnest and lightest yet, with double the storage. Perhaps the best features are that it's waterproof and has a built-in adjustable light for the perfect reading environment indoors or outdoors, day or night. If she loves a nice, relaxing bath, pair this with a caddy, bath bombs, and a glass of wine for a relaxing night in that you've already taken care of.A small, portable projector to curl up and watch movies withAmazonNebula Projector, available at Amazon, $249.99This is one of the most portable (and affordable) projectors. It's about the size of a soda can, weighs one pound, and has crisp image quality and 360° sound. Use it at home or bring it with you on your travels. Find a full review of the Anker Nebula Capsule here. A powerful, customizable massage gunTheragunTheragun PRO, available at Therabody, $599This is the best massage gun we've tested — though it's also on the higher end of what you would expect to pay. We loved it in part due to its two-year warranty, adjustable massage arm, customizable speeds, 60 lbs of no-stall force, six different heads, an extra battery, and how easy it is to use. If you can't give your girlfriend an unlimited pass to professional massages, this is a nice in-between option. A convenient phone sanitizerPhoneSoapPhoneSoap 3 Smartphone UV Sanitizer, available at PhoneSoap, $79.95This small, easy-to-use device uses UV-C light to sanitize a phone, killing 99.9% of common household germs.The new Sonos Move portable speakerAmazonSonos Move, available at Best Buy, $399.99The Sonos Move is one of the best speakers on the market. It's powerful, can be controlled by voice or an app, and has Amazon Alexa built-in so on WiFi you can play music, check the news, set alarms, get your questions answered, and more, without much effort.Clothing and accessoriesA pair of beautiful pearl earrings she'll own for years to comeStone and StrandElliptical Pearl Huggies, available at Stone and Strand, $250Pearls are timeless, but they're also one of the jewelry trends we're keeping an eye on in 2022. This pair, from the women-led startup Stone and Strand, is made with 14K gold with freshwater pearls.A versatile exercise dressOutdoor VoicesThe Exercise Dress, available at Outdoor Voices, $100Given the popularity of the Exercise Dress, we wouldn't be surprised if this was on your girlfriend's wish list. The Exercise Dress is comfortable, versatile, and cute — which has made it a cult-favorite item. If she's a fan of dresses, Outdoor Voices, or clothes she can wear all day long, this may be a good option. A delicate, timeless diamond necklaceAurateDiamond Bezel Necklace, available at Aurate, $320This is something your girlfriend will wear and own forever. A delicate diamond necklace is an essential piece and will (probably) never go out of style. This option is from one of our favorite startups, AUrate — an ethical fine jewelry startup founded by two women from the Netherlands and Morocco, respectively. The best socks she'll ever wearBombasWomen's Performance Running Ankle Sock 3-Pack, available at Bombas, $49.50Bombas makes the best socks we've ever tried, and they're a gift we find ourselves giving every year to loved ones. They're lightweight, moisture-wicking, and built to circumvent annoyances like uncomfortable seams and heel slipping.Earrings made with her birthstoneMejuriAmethyst Flat Sphere Studs, available at Mejuri, $148If your girlfriend wears jewelry, birthstone earrings that she can keep forever are a thoughtful, personalized gift she'll wear often.  Matching underwear from one of the internet's favorite startupsMeUndiesMatching Underwear, available at MeUndies, $40Get yourself and your girlfriend festive matching underwear — which also happen to be some of the most comfortable pairs we've ever found. MeUndies gives you the options to create your own personalized set — two styles listed for women, two styles listed for men, a mix, and whichever length or cut you and your partner prefer. A monogrammed jewelry case from a minimalist fashion startupCuyanaLeather Jewelry Case, available at Cuyana, $98 (+ $15 for monogram)Keeping track of tiny and delicate jewelry is difficult — but jewelry cases are a pretty and useful solution. This is a thoughtful and personalized gift, especially if you've gotten your girlfriend jewelry in the past, or plan to in the future. It's made from premium leather, comes in many colors, and can be monogrammed with her initials. Cuyana is a cool leather bag startup she may have already heard of. A pair of blue-light-blocking glasses that look good enough to wear outside of the houseFelix GrayFaraday Glasses, available at Felix Gray, from $95If she's ever complained about strain from constant screens, you can help mitigate it with a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. They might even help with sleep.A stylish, savvy carry-on with an external battery packAwayCarry-On, available at Away, from $275Away's hyper-popular suitcases deserve their hype. Their hard shell is lightweight but durable, their 360° spinner wheels make for seamless traveling, and the external (and ejectable and TSA-compliant) battery pack included can charge a smartphone five times over so she never has to sit behind a trash can at the airport for access to an outlet again. It's also guaranteed for life by Away. Find our full review here.Silky, breathable leggingsEverlanePerform Leggings, available at Everlane, $68Everlane's Perform Leggings are some of our all-time favorites — they're breathable and silky, like a slightly less expensive version of Alo leggings. You can read a full review of the Everlane Perform Leggings and see pictures of them here.The comfiest sneakersAllbirdsWomen's Wool Runners, available at Allbirds, $110The classic Wool Runners make a great gift for the uninitiated, though we'd also highly recommend the brand's casual cup sole Wool Piper for everyday wear if that's more your partner's style. You can find our full review of the Runners here, and the Wool Pipers here.A satin-lined beanieAndrea Bossi/Business InsiderKink & Coil Satin-Lined Beanie, $36Most people with naturally curly hair avoid wearing hats to reduce frizz, but Kink and Coil's satin-lined beanie solves that issue. Just like a silk pillowcase or a bonnet, the inside of the beanie is designed to protect your hair from frizz and damage. On top of that, the pom-pom can be removed, if she'd prefer to wear the hat without it.We spoke with a trichologist to learn more about how satin- and silk-lined beanies can benefit anyone with curly or high-porosity hair. A cashmere crew from Everlane that she'll own foreverEverlaneThe Cashmere Crew, available at Everlane, $145For a closet staple she'll own for years to come, Everlane's $120 Cashmere Crew (available in various colors) is about the safest choice you can make. Everlane has plenty of great gifts (you can find the Everlane basics we wear repeatedly here), so you can't really go wrong. A stylish leather makeup pouch that's thoughtful and easy to travel withDagne DoverHunter Toiletry Bag, available at Dagne Dover, from $40Dagne Dover is quickly becoming one of the best women's handbag companies to know, and its toiletry pouches are a great and relatively affordable gift. The small size holds a handful of go-to toiletries, and the large should have enough space for all of the grooming essentials.A comfy zip-up for the months aheadPatagoniaBetter Sweater, available at Patagonia, from $139Patagonia makes our favorite athleisure options overall, and that definitely includes the Better Sweater. It works in pretty much any environment — in the office, at home, on a hike, or on a casual night out — and has zippered pockets to keep hands warm in the cold months. We're also big fans of the 1/4 Zip option.A stylish weekender to keep her organized on the goCaraa SportStudio Tote, available at Caraa, from $180Caraa Sport makes some of the most functional and best-looking gym bags on the market. This one can transition from tote to backpack by adding straps. It also has a hidden shoe compartment and a waterproof and antimicrobial lining. You can read our full review of this bag here.A pair of silky sweatsAloTailored sweatpants, available at Alo, $118These feel like sweats (in a knit jersey material) but have the sort of tailored fit that you'll find in a nice pair of trousers. So, they feel wonderful and look a bit nicer than the average pair. A new pair of comfy BirkenstocksNordstromBirkenstocks, available at Nordstrom, $134.95If your girlfriend wears the unbelievably comfortable Birkenstocks most days, she might appreciate a new, unblemished pair. They're also in style. BeautyThe best bathrobe money can buyParachuteClassic Turkish Cotton Robe, available at Parachute, $87.20We think the Parachute Classic Turkish Cotton Robe is the best robe on the market. It's soft, fluffy, and absorbent like a towel. It's also got nice deep pockets and a secure waist tie.The cult-favorite hair repair conditioner on her wish listAmazonOlaplex No. 3 Hair Repairing Treatment, available at Amazon, $28This is one gift that will have your girlfriend asking you, "how did you know about this?" If Olaplex isn't already in her shower, it might be on her wish list. The Olaplex No. 3 is good for any hair type and is meant to reduce breakage and strengthen hair from within.16 highly-rated sheet masksAmazonDermal Sheet Mask Set, available at Amazon, $22.99Grab 39 sheet masks to make it easier for your girlfriend to have a frequent and well-deserved "treat yourself" day. These are highly rated and have both vitamin E and collagen included for healthy, happy skin.   The Dyson Airwrap she's seen all over the internetBest BuyDyson Airwrap Complete Styler, available at Best Buy, $599.99The Dyson Airwrap is a minor internet celebrity — so it might already be on your girlfriend's wish list. It replaces three hair devices (blow dryer, straightener, and curling iron) and uses a technology similar to jet engines. In the end, it's a way to get a salon-grade blowout at home, and different attachments let her achieve different styles. Find a Dyson Airwrap review with photos here.But, the cost is a whopping $549, and there are some decent alternatives on the market for far less ($30-$150). If you're looking for a less splashy gift, the Dyson Hair Dryer is also excellent. A small skincare tool that removes 99.5% of dirt, oil, and makeup residueAmazonForeo Luna Play Plus 2, available at Foreo, $89In the category of things your girlfriend may love but hasn't asked for yet: Foreo facial brushes. Our team swears by these gentle yet effective cleansing devices. They have hygienic silicone bristles and come in five different models for different skin types. The Luna is small enough to bring on the go, so your partner can maintain their skincare routine while traveling. A cult-favorite hair towel that reduces damage and cuts drying time by 50%AquisAquis Rapid Dry Hair Towel, available at Anthropologie, $30Aquis' cult-favorite hair towels can cut the amount of time it takes for her hair to dry in half — a claim we're happy to report holds up. The proprietary fabric also means there's less damage to wet hair while it dries. An award-winning at-home facialSephoraDrunk Elephant T.L.C. Sukari Babyfacial, available at Sephora, $80This is an award-winning mask with a big following in the beauty and skincare community. It's $80, but it's an at-home pro-quality facial your girlfriend can use anytime — which is a fraction of the price required for regular facials.Fitness and hobbiesAn expertly designed plannerAmazonSelf Journal, available at Amazon, $31.99 The Self Journal is an undated, 13-week planner that's designed for daily use and quarterly planning. It helps its owner break projects and goals into manageable chunks. We love it.If she's working towards a big goal, this could be a really thoughtful resource — especially if it's the kind of goal you can't help her achieve otherwise.A funny card that pays homage to your girlfriend's favorite TV showEtsySuccession Cousin Greg Birthday Card, available at Etsy, from $4.66You could pick up a card from Walgreens on your way to exchange gifts, but it's so much more thoughtful if you think ahead. For that, we suggest heading to Etsy for affordable, creative, and unique gifts.As Cousin Greg said, "if it is to be said, so it is…"A 215-piece art kit for creative projectsAmazonArt 101 215-Piece Wood Art Set, available at Amazon, $43.70If your girlfriend loves to create art, this 215-Piece art kit includes everything she'll need for projects: crayons, colored pencils, oil pastels, fine line markers, watercolor cakes, and acrylic paint.Tickets to an excellent future concertStubHubConcert Tickets Gift Card, available at StubHub, starting at $25No matter when your girlfriend's favorite musicians are performing again, a gift card for concert tickets won't go to waste — and it gives both of you something to look forward to.A high-tech towel that keeps her from slipping around during yoga classesMandukaManduka Yogitoes Yoga Mat Towel, available at Amazon, from $46.72Manduka is known for making the best yoga products, and their Yogitoes towel is one of the most loved. It has tiny 100% silicone nubs on one side that grab yoga mats and keep yogis from slipping around during the exercise. Having a good towel can make a big difference. It also comes in 19 great colors and gets eco-friendly points. Each Yogitoes towel is made from eight recycled plastic water bottles, and made with dyes free of azo, lead, or heavy metal. A video message from someone she loves almost as much as youCameoCameo Video Messages, available at Cameo, from $1Whether it's your girlfriend's favorite actor, comedian, or athlete, you're likely to find someone she admires on Cameo. Cameo allows celebrities to send custom video messages to recipients for nearly any occasion, and a personalized video is a gift that she'll never forget. A disposable camera that doesn't take you out of the momentGamesgamer024 The gamer/YouTubeDisposable camera, available at Target, $15.99Interested in preserving memories without taking yourself out of them? A good disposable camera or a film camera can take the pressure away from perfection so you and your girlfriend can focus on just savoring experiences together.A planned trip for the two of you to take togetherAirbnbAirbnb Gift Card, available at Airbnb, from $25If you want to gift an experience you and your girlfriend can enjoy together, grab a card, a gift card to Airbnb, and come up with a few location ideas to choose from. You can also book a hotel in your city on Booking.com or Expedia for a sweet staycation. *This gift can be saved and used at a later date.A pass to get into a bunch of boutique fitness classesClasspassClassPass Gift Card, available at ClassPass, from $5Boutique fitness classes are expensive, which can make trying new workouts — either for variety or to figure out what we like — less appealing. ClassPass solves both issues. It's relatively affordable, and members can access a neverending catalog of great workouts with small class sizes. If your partner is getting back into fitness after over a year of at-home workouts, we'd highly recommend a gift card here for whenever they're ready to use it.A year-long MasterClass membership to learn about things she's passionate aboutMasterClassAnnual Membership, available at MasterClass, from $180/yearWe love MasterClass because it kind of feels like entertainment. Classes are short, there's no homework, and she can listen to just the audio like it's a podcast.The site hosts classes taught by well-known celebrities and industry leaders — from Neil deGrasse Tyson teaching Scientific Thinking and Communication to Malcolm Gladwell on Writing, Shonda Rhimes on Writing for Television, and Bob Iger on Business Strategy and Leadership. You can read our full review here.A sleek fitness tracker that includes heart rate monitoringFitbitFitbit Inspire 2, available at Best Buy, $99.95Fitbit's affordable Inspire 2 tracker has no shortage of useful features to keep someone informed about their physical activity — tracking calorie burn, resting heart rate, and heart rate zones.An exercise bike for staying active indoorsNordicTrackCommercial S22i Studio Cycle, available at NordicTrack, $1,899If money is of no object and your partner is trying to figure out how to exercise while staying indoors, an exercise bike is a particularly thoughtful and useful gift right now. We like the NordicTrack option the most overall, but we also like and recommend options that are under $200. A card game that's meant to deepen personal connectionsUrban OutfittersWe're Not Really Strangers Card Game, available at Urban Outfitters, $30This card game, from the popular Instagram account We're Not Really Strangers, is designed to enhance connections between people with different levels: perceptions, connection, and reflection. Not only is it a card game you haven't played before, but it's also a thoughtful activity you can enjoy with your girlfriend.A great foam rollerTB12Vibrating Pliability Roller, available at TB12, $160If your girlfriend is very physically active, a foam roller is a nice gift to aid in her workout recovery and soreness. This one is our favorite because it has four levels of vibration, a pattern that targets muscle groups, and a durable exterior. But, if your budget doesn't fit a $160 foam roller, never fear — we like some under-$50 options too. A subscription to a book club that sends her great hardcovers once per monthBook of the Month/Instagram3-Month Subscription, available at Book of the Month, $49.99If she's a bookworm, Book of the Month is an especially thoughtful and unique gift — it's a book club that has been around since 1926, and it's credited with discovering some of the most beloved books of all time ("Gone with the Wind" and "Catcher in the Rye" to name a couple). If you gift her a subscription, she'll receive a hardcover book delivered to her door once a month. Books are selected by a team of experts and celebrity guest judges.If she's really more into audiobooks or e-reading now rather than hardcovers, check out a gift subscription to Scribd (full review here).Hiking boots she'll thank you forREIForge GTX Hiking Boots, available at REI, $174.73Hiking boots are the MVP of hiking gear, and the right shoes can make all the difference thanks to their fit, ankle support, cushioning, and tread. Overall, we'd recommend getting the Tecninca Forge GTX boots – they're the best overall pair. But you can find suggestions for specific hikes — a pair for backpacking, a day hiking pair — in our buying guide to the best feminine hiking shoes here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 10th, 2022

Check out these 41 pitch decks fintechs disrupting trading, investing, and banking used to raise millions in funding

Looking for examples of real fintech pitch decks? Check out pitch decks that Qolo, Lance, and other startups used to raise money from VCs. Check out these pitch decks for examples of fintech founders sold their vision.Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech.  Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders sold their vision. See more stories on Insider's business page. Fintech funding has been on a tear.In 2021, fintech funding hit a record $132 billion globally, according to CB Insights, more than double 2020's mark.Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech. Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders are selling their vision and nabbing big bucks in the process. You'll see new financial tech geared at freelancers, fresh twists on digital banking, and innovation aimed at streamlining customer onboarding. New twists on digital bankingZach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradleyHMBradleyConsumers are getting used to the idea of branch-less banking, a trend that startup digital-only banks like Chime, N26, and Varo have benefited from. The majority of these fintechs target those who are underbanked, and rely on usage of their debit cards to make money off interchange. But fellow startup HMBradley has a different business model. "Our thesis going in was that we don't swipe our debit cards all that often, and we don't think the customer base that we're focusing on does either," Zach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradley, told Insider. "A lot of our customer base uses credit cards on a daily basis."Instead, the startup is aiming to build clientele with stable deposits. As a result, the bank is offering interest-rate tiers depending on how much a customer saves of their direct deposit.Notably, the rate tiers are dependent on the percentage of savings, not the net amount. "We'll pay you more when you save more of what comes in," Bruhnke said. "We didn't want to segment customers by how much money they had. So it was always going to be about a percentage of income. That was really important to us."Check out the 14-page pitch deck fintech HMBradley, a neobank offering interest rates as high as 3%, used to raise an $18.25 million Series APersonal finance is only a text awayYinon Ravid, the chief executive and cofounder of Albert.AlbertThe COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the growing preference of mobile banking as customers get comfortable managing their finances online.The financial app Albert has seen a similar jump in activity. Currently counting more than six million members, deposits in Albert's savings offering doubled from the start of the pandemic in March 2020 to May of this year, from $350 million to $700 million, according to new numbers released by the company. Founded in 2015, Albert offers automated budgeting and savings tools alongside guided investment portfolios. It's looked to differentiate itself through personalized features, like the ability for customers to text human financial experts.Budgeting and saving features are free on Albert. But for more tailored financial advice, customers pay a subscription fee that's a pay-what-you-can model, between $4 and $14 a month. And Albert's now banking on a new tool to bring together its investing, savings, and budgeting tools.Fintech Albert used this 10-page pitch deck to raise a $100 million Series C from General Atlantic and CapitalG 'A bank for immigrants'Priyank Singh and Rohit Mittal are the cofounders of Stilt.StiltRohit Mittal remembers the difficulties he faced when he first arrived in the United States a decade ago as a master's student at Columbia University.As an immigrant from India, Mittal had no credit score in the US and had difficulty integrating into the financial system. Mittal even struggled to get approved to rent an apartment and couch-surfed until he found a roommate willing to offer him space in his apartment in the New York neighborhood Morningside Heights.That roommate was Priyank Singh, who would go on to become Mittal's cofounder when the two started Stilt, a financial-technology company designed to address the problems Mittal faced when he arrived in the US.Stilt, which calls itself "a bank for immigrants," does not require a social security number or credit history to access its offerings, including unsecured personal loans.Instead of relying on traditional metrics like a credit score, Stilt uses data such as education and employment to predict an individual's future income stability and cash flow before issuing a loan. Stilt has seen its loan volume grow by 500% in the past 12 months, and the startup has loaned to immigrants from 160 countries since its launch. Here are the 15 slides Stilt, which calls itself 'a bank for immigrants,' used to raise a $14 million Series AAn IRA for alternativesHenry Yoshida is the co-founder and CEO of retirement fintech startup Rocket Dollar.Rocket DollarFintech startup Rocket Dollar, which helps users invest their individual retirement account (IRA) dollars into alternative assets, just raised $8 million for its Series A round, the company announced on Thursday.Park West Asset Management led the round, with participation from investors including Hyphen Capital, which focuses on backing Asian American entrepreneurs, and crypto exchange Kraken's venture arm. Co-founded in 2018 by CEO Henry Yoshida, CTO Rick Dude, and VP of marketing Thomas Young, Rocket Dollar now has over $350 million in assets under management on its platform. Yoshida sold his first startup, a roboadvisor called Honest Dollar, to Goldman Sachs' investment management division for an estimated $20 million.Yoshida told Insider that while ultra-high net worth investors have been investing self-directed retirement account dollars into alternative assets like real estate, private equity, and cryptocurrency, average investors have not historically been able to access the same opportunities to invest IRA dollars in alternative assets through traditional platforms.Here's the 34-page pitch deck a fintech that helps users invest their retirement savings in crypto and real estate assets used to nab $8 millionA trading app for activismAntoine Argouges, CEO and founder of TulipshareTulipshareAn up-and-coming fintech is taking aim at some of the world's largest corporations by empowering retail investors to push for social and environmental change by pooling their shareholder rights.London-based Tulipshare lets individuals in the UK invest as little as one pound in publicly-traded company stocks. The upstart combines individuals' shareholder rights with other like-minded investors to advocate for environmental, social, and corporate governance change at firms like JPMorgan, Apple, and Amazon.The goal is to achieve a higher number of shares to maximize the number of votes that can be submitted at shareholder meetings. Already a regulated broker-dealer in the UK, Tulipshare recently applied for registration as a broker-dealer in the US. "If you ask your friends and family if they've ever voted on shareholder resolutions, the answer will probably be close to zero," CEO and founder Antoine Argouges told Insider. "I started Tulipshare to utilize shareholder rights to bring about positive corporate change that has an impact on people's lives and our planet — what's more powerful than money to change the system we live in?"Check out the 14-page pitch deck from Tulipshare, a trading app that lets users pool their shareholder votes for activism campaignsDigital tools for independent financial advisorsJason Wenk, founder and CEO of AltruistAltruistJason Wenk started his career at Morgan Stanley in investment research over 20 years ago. Now, he's running a company that is hoping to broaden access to financial advice for less-wealthy individuals. The startup raised $50 million in Series B funding led by Insight Partners with participation from investors Vanguard and Venrock. The round brings the Los Angeles-based startup's total funding to just under $67 million.Founded in 2018, Altruist is a digital brokerage built for independent financial advisors, intended to be an "all-in-one" platform that unites custodial functions, portfolio accounting, and a client-facing portal. It allows advisors to open accounts, invest, build models, report, trade (including fractional shares), and bill clients through an interface that can advisors time by eliminating mundane operational tasks.Altruist aims to make personalized financial advice less expensive, more efficient, and more inclusive through the platform, which is designed for registered investment advisors (RIAs), a growing segment of the wealth management industry. Here's the pitch deck for Altruist, a wealth tech challenging custodians Fidelity and Charles Schwab, that raised $50 million from Vanguard and InsightRethinking debt collection Jason Saltzman, founder and CEO of ReliefReliefFor lenders, debt collection is largely automated. But for people who owe money on their credit cards, it can be a confusing and stressful process.  Relief is looking to change that. Its app automates the credit-card debt collection process for users, negotiating with lenders and collectors to settle outstanding balances on their behalf. The fintech just launched and closed a $2 million seed round led by Collaborative Ventures. Relief's fundraising experience was a bit different to most. Its pitch deck, which it shared with one investor via Google Slides, went viral. It set out to raise a $1 million seed round, but ended up doubling that and giving some investors money back to make room for others.Check out a 15-page pitch deck that went viral and helped a credit-card debt collection startup land a $2 million seed roundHelping small banks lendTKCollateralEdgeFor large corporations with a track record of tapping the credit markets, taking out debt is a well-structured and clear process handled by the nation's biggest investment banks and teams of accountants. But smaller, middle-market companies — typically those with annual revenues ranging up to $1 billion — are typically served by regional and community banks that don't always have the capacity to adequately measure the risk of loans or price them competitively. Per the National Center for the Middle Market, 200,000 companies fall into this range, accounting for roughly 33% of US private sector GDP and employment.Dallas-based fintech CollateralEdge works with these banks — typically those with between $1 billion and $50 billion in assets — to help analyze and price slices of commercial and industrial loans that previously might have gone unserved by smaller lenders.On October 20th, CollateralEdge announced a $3.5 million seed round led by Dallas venture fund Perot Jain with participation from Kneeland Youngblood (a founder of the healthcare-focused private-equity firm Pharos Capital) and other individual investors.Here's the 10-page deck CollateralEdge, a fintech streamlining how small banks lend to businesses, used to raise a $3.5 million seed roundA new way to assess creditworthinessPinwheel founders Curtis Lee, Kurt Lin, and Anish Basu.PinwheelGrowing up, Kurt Lin never saw his father get frustrated. A "traditional, stoic figure," Lin said his father immigrated to the United States in the 1970s. Becoming part of the financial system proved even more difficult than assimilating into a new culture.Lin recalled visiting bank after bank with his father as a child, watching as his father's applications for a mortgage were denied due to his lack of credit history. "That was the first time in my life I really saw him crack," Lin told Insider. "The system doesn't work for a lot of people — including my dad," he added. Lin would find a solution to his father's problem years later while working with Anish Basu, and Curtis Lee on an automated health savings account. The trio realized the payroll data integrations they were working on could be the basis of a product that would help lenders work with consumers without strong credit histories."That's when the lightbulb hit," said Lin, Pinwheel's CEO.In 2018, Lin, Basu, and Lee founded Pinwheel, an application-programming interface that shares payroll data to help both fintechs and traditional lenders serve consumers with limited or poor credit, who have historically struggled to access financial products. Here's the 9-page deck that Pinwheel, a fintech helping lenders tap into payroll data to serve consumers with little to no credit, used to raise a $50 million Series BAn alternative auto lenderTricolorAn alternative auto lender that caters to thin- and no-credit Hispanic borrowers is planning a national expansion after scoring a $90 million investment from BlackRock-managed funds. Tricolor is a Dallas-based auto lender that is a community development financial institution. It uses a proprietary artificial-intelligence engine that decisions each customer based on more than 100 data points, such as proof of income. Half of Tricolor's customers have a FICO score, and less than 12% have scores above 650, yet the average customer has lived in the US for 15 years, according to the deck.A 2017 survey by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation found 31.5% of Hispanic households had no mainstream credit compared to 14.4% of white households. "For decades, the deck has been stacked against low income or credit invisible Hispanics in the United States when it comes to the purchase and financing of a used vehicle," Daniel Chu, founder and CEO of Tricolor, said in a statement announcing the raise.An auto lender that caters to underbanked Hispanics used this 25-page deck to raise $90 million from BlackRock investors A new way to access credit The TomoCredit teamTomoCreditKristy Kim knows first-hand the challenge of obtaining credit in the US without an established credit history. Kim, who came to the US from South Korea, couldn't initially get access to credit despite having a job in investment banking after graduating college. "I was in my early twenties, I had a good income, my job was in investment banking but I could not get approved for anything," Kim told Insider. "Many young professionals like me, we deserve an opportunity to be considered but just because we didn't have a Fico, we weren't given a chance to even apply," she added.Kim started TomoCredit in 2018 to help others like herself gain access to consumer credit. TomoCredit spent three years building an internal algorithm to underwrite customers based on cash flow, rather than a credit score.TomoCredit, a fintech that lends to thin- and no-credit borrowers, used this 17-page pitch deck to raise its $10 million Series AHelping streamline how debts are repaidMethod Financial cofounders Jose Bethancourt and Marco del Carmen.Method FinancialWhen Jose Bethancourt graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in May 2019, he faced the same question that confronts over 43 million Americans: How would he repay his student loans?The problem led Bethancourt on a nearly two-year journey that culminated in the creation of a startup aimed at making it easier for consumers to more seamlessly pay off all kinds of debt.  Initially, Bethancourt and fellow UT grad Marco del Carmen built GradJoy, an app that helped users better understand how to manage student loan repayment and other financial habits. GradJoy was accepted into Y Combinator in the summer of 2019. But the duo quickly realized the real benefit to users would be helping them move money to make payments instead of simply offering recommendations."When we started GradJoy, we thought, 'Oh, we'll just give advice — we don't think people are comfortable with us touching their student loans,' and then we realized that people were saying, 'Hey, just move the money — if you think I should pay extra, then I'll pay extra.' So that's kind of the movement that we've seen, just, everybody's more comfortable with fintechs doing what's best for them," Bethancourt told Insider. Here is the 11-slide pitch deck Method Financial, a Y Combinator-backed fintech making debt repayment easier, used to raise $2.5 million in pre-seed fundingQuantum computing made easyQC Ware CEO Matt Johnson.QC WareEven though banks and hedge funds are still several years out from adding quantum computing to their tech arsenals, that hasn't stopped Wall Street giants from investing time and money into the emerging technology class. And momentum for QC Ware, a startup looking to cut the time and resources it takes to use quantum computing, is accelerating. The fintech secured a $25 million Series B on September 29 co-led by Koch Disruptive Technologies and Covestro with participation from D.E. Shaw, Citi, and Samsung Ventures.QC Ware, founded in 2014, builds quantum algorithms for the likes of Goldman Sachs (which led the fintech's Series A), Airbus, and BMW Group. The algorithms, which are effectively code bases that include quantum processing elements, can run on any of the four main public-cloud providers.Quantum computing allows companies to do complex calculations faster than traditional computers by using a form of physics that runs on quantum bits as opposed to the traditional 1s and 0s that computers use. This is especially helpful in banking for risk analytics or algorithmic trading, where executing calculations milliseconds faster than the competition can give firms a leg up. Here's the 20-page deck QC Ware, a fintech making quantum computing more accessible, used to raised its $25 million Series BSimplifying quant modelsKirat Singh and Mark Higgins, Beacon's cofounders.BeaconA fintech that helps financial institutions use quantitative models to streamline their businesses and improve risk management is catching the attention, and capital, of some of the country's biggest investment managers.Beacon Platform, founded in 2014, is a fintech that builds applications and tools to help banks, asset managers, and trading firms quickly integrate quantitative models that can help with analyzing risk, ensuring compliance, and improving operational efficiency. The company raised its Series C on Wednesday, scoring a $56 million investment led by Warburg Pincus with support from Blackstone Innovations Investments, PIMCO, and Global Atlantic. Blackstone, PIMCO, and Global Atlantic are also users of Beacon's tech, as are the Commonwealth Bank of Australia and Shell New Energies, a division of Royal Dutch Shell, among others.The fintech provides a shortcut for firms looking to use quantitative modelling and data science across various aspects of their businesses, a process that can often take considerable resources if done solo.Here's the 20-page pitch deck Beacon, a fintech helping Wall Street better analyze risk and data, used to raise $56 million from Warburg Pincus, Blackstone, and PIMCOA new data feed for bond tradingMark Lennihan/APFor years, the only way investors could figure out the going price of a corporate bond was calling up a dealer on the phone. The rise of electronic trading has streamlined that process, but data can still be hard to come by sometimes. A startup founded by a former Goldman Sachs exec has big plans to change that. BondCliQ is a fintech that provides a data feed of pre-trade pricing quotes for the corporate bond market. Founded by Chris White, the creator of Goldman Sachs' defunct corporate-bond-trading system, BondCliQ strives to bring transparency to a market that has traditionally kept such data close to the vest. Banks, which typically serve as the dealers of corporate bonds, have historically kept pre-trade quotes hidden from other dealers to maintain a competitive advantage.But tech advancements and the rise of electronic marketplaces have shifted power dynamics into the hands of buy-side firms, like hedge funds and asset managers. The investors are now able to get a fuller picture of the market by aggregating price quotes directly from dealers or via vendors.Here's the 9-page pitch deck that BondCliQ, a fintech looking to bring more data and transparency to bond trading, used to raise its Series AFraud prevention for lenders and insurersFiordaliso/Getty ImagesOnboarding new customers with ease is key for any financial institution or retailer. The more friction you add, the more likely consumers are to abandon the entire process.But preventing fraud is also a priority, and that's where Neuro-ID comes in. The startup analyzes what it calls "digital body language," or, the way users scroll, type, and tap. Using that data, Neuro-ID can identify fraudulent users before they create an account. It's built for banks, lenders, insurers, and e-commerce players."The train has left the station for digital transformation, but there's a massive opportunity to try to replicate all those communications that we used to have when we did business in-person, all those tells that we would get verbally and non-verbally on whether or not someone was trustworthy," Neuro-ID CEO Jack Alton told Insider.Founded in 2014, the startup's pitch is twofold: Neuro-ID can save companies money by identifying fraud early, and help increase user conversion by making the onboarding process more seamless. In December Neuro-ID closed a $7 million Series A, co-led by Fin VC and TTV Capital, with participation from Canapi Ventures. With 30 employees, Neuro-ID is using the fresh funding to grow its team and create additional tools to be more self-serving for customers.Here's the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that analyzes consumers' digital behavior to fight fraud used to raise a $7 million Series AAI-powered tools to spot phony online reviews FakespotMarketplaces like Amazon and eBay host millions of third-party sellers, and their algorithms will often boost items in search based on consumer sentiment, which is largely based on reviews. But many third-party sellers use fake reviews often bought from click farms to boost their items, some of which are counterfeit or misrepresented to consumers.That's where Fakespot comes in. With its Chrome extension, it warns users of sellers using potentially fake reviews to boost sales and can identify fraudulent sellers. Fakespot is currently compatible with Amazon, BestBuy, eBay, Sephora, Steam, and Walmart."There are promotional reviews written by humans and bot-generated reviews written by robots or review farms," Fakespot founder and CEO Saoud Khalifah told Insider. "Our AI system has been built to detect both categories with very high accuracy."Fakespot's AI learns via reviews data available on marketplace websites, and uses natural-language processing to identify if reviews are genuine. Fakespot also looks at things like whether the number of positive reviews are plausible given how long a seller has been active.Fakespot, a startup that helps shoppers detect robot-generated reviews and phony sellers on Amazon and Shopify, used this pitch deck to nab a $4 million Series AE-commerce focused business bankingMichael Rangel, cofounder and CEO, and Tyler McIntyre, cofounder and CTO of Novo.Kristelle Boulos PhotographyBusiness banking is a hot market in fintech. And it seems investors can't get enough.Novo, the digital banking fintech aimed at small e-commerce businesses, raised a $40.7 million Series A led by Valar Ventures in June. Since its launch in 2018, Novo has signed up 100,000 small businesses. Beyond bank accounts, it offers expense management, a corporate card, and integrates with e-commerce infrastructure players like Shopify, Stripe, and Wise.Founded in 2018, Novo was based in New York City, but has since moved its headquarters to Miami. Here's the 12-page pitch deck e-commerce banking startup Novo used to raise its $40 million Series AShopify for embedded financeProductfy CEO and founder, Duy VoProductfyProductfy is looking to break into embedded finance by becoming the Shopify of back-end banking services.Embedded finance — integrating banking services in non-financial settings — has taken hold in the e-commerce world. But Productfy is going after a different kind of customer in churches, universities, and nonprofits.The San Jose, Calif.-based upstart aims to help non-finance companies offer their own banking products. Productfy can help customers launch finance features in as little as a week and without additional engineering resources or background knowledge of banking compliance or legal requirements, Productfy founder and CEO Duy Vo told Insider. "You don't need an engineer to stand up Shopify, right? You can be someone who's just creating art and you can use Shopify to build your own online store," Vo said, adding that Productfy is looking to take that user experience and replicate it for banking services.Here's the 15-page pitch deck Productfy, a fintech looking to be the Shopify of embedded finance, used to nab a $16 million Series ADeploying algorithms and automation to small-business financingJustin Straight and Bernard Worthy, LoanWell co-foundersLoanWellBernard Worthy and Justin Straight, the founders of LoanWell, want to break down barriers to financing for small and medium-size businesses — and they've got algorithms and automation in their tech arsenals that they hope will do it.Worthy, the company's CEO, and Straight, its chief operating and financial officer, are powering community-focused lenders to fill a gap in the SMB financing world by boosting access to loans under $100,000. And the upstart is known for catching the attention, and dollars, of mission-driven investors. LoanWell closed a $3 million seed financing round in December led by Impact America Fund with participation from SoftBank's SB Opportunity Fund and Collab Capital.LoanWell automates the financing process — from underwriting and origination, to money movement and servicing — which shaves down an up-to-90-day process to 30 days or even same-day with some LoanWell lenders, Worthy said. SMBs rely on these loans to process quickly after two years of financial uncertainty. But the pandemic illustrated how time-consuming and expensive SMB financing can be, highlighted by efforts like the federal government's Paycheck Protection Program.Community banks, once the lifeline to capital for many local businesses, continue to shutter. And demands for smaller loan amounts remain largely unmet. More than half of business-loan applicants sought $100,000 or less, according to 2018 data from the Federal Reserve. But the average small-business bank loan was closer to six times that amount, according to the latest data from a now discontinued Federal Reserve survey.Here's the 14-page pitch deck LoanWell used to raise $3 million from investors like SoftBank.Catering to 'micro businesses'Stefanie Sample is the founder and CEO of FundidFundidStartups aiming to simplify the often-complex world of corporate cards have boomed in recent years.Business-finance management startup Brex was last valued at $12.3 billion after raising $300 million last year. Startup card provider Ramp announced an $8.1 billion valuation in March after growing its revenue nearly 10x in 2021. Divvy, a small business card provider, was acquired by Bill.com in May 2021 for approximately $2.5 billion.But despite how hot the market has gotten, Stefanie Sample said she ended up working in the space by accident. Sample is the founder and CEO of Fundid, a new fintech that provides credit and lending products to small businesses.This May, Fundid announced a $3.25 million seed round led by Nevcaut Ventures. Additional investors include the Artemis Fund and Builders and Backers. The funding announcement capped off the company's first year: Sample introduced the Fundid concept in April 2021, launched its website in May, and began raising capital in August."I never meant to do Fundid," Sample told Insider. "I never meant to do something that was venture-backed."Read the 12-page deck used by Fundid, a fintech offering credit and lending tools for 'micro businesses'Embedded payments for SMBsThe Highnote teamHighnoteBranded cards have long been a way for merchants with the appropriate bank relationships to create additional revenue and build customer loyalty. The rise of embedded payments, or the ability to shop and pay in a seamless experience within a single app, has broadened the number of companies looking to launch branded cards.Highnote is a startup that helps small to mid-sized merchants roll out their own debit and pre-paid digital cards. The fintech emerged from stealth on Tuesday to announce it raised $54 million in seed and Series A funding.Here's the 12-page deck Highnote, a startup helping SMBs embed payments, used to raise $54 million in seed and Series A fundingHelping small businesses manage their taxesComplYant's founder Shiloh Jackson wants to help people be present in their bookkeeping.ComplYantAfter 14 years in tax accounting, Shiloh Johnson had formed a core philosophy around corporate accounting: everyone deserves to understand their business's money and business owners need to be present in their bookkeeping process.She wanted to help small businesses understand "this is why you need to do what you're doing and why you have to change the way you think about tax and be present in your bookkeeping process," she told Insider. The Los Angeles native wanted small businesses to not only understand business tax no matter their size but also to find the tools they needed to prepare their taxes in one spot. So Johnson developed a software platform that provides just that.The 13-page pitch deck ComplYant used to nab $4 million that details the tax startup's plan to be Turbotax, Quickbooks, and Xero rolled into one for small business ownersInvoice financing for SMBsStacey Abrams and Lara Hodgson, Now co-foundersNowAbout a decade ago, politician Stacey Abrams and entrepreneur Lara Hodgson were forced to fold their startup because of a kink in the supply chain — but not in the traditional sense.Nourish, which made spill-proof bottled water for children, had grown quickly from selling to small retailers to national ones. And while that may sound like a feather in the small business' cap, there was a hang-up."It was taking longer and longer to get paid, and as you can imagine, you deliver the product and then you wait and you wait, but meanwhile you have to pay your employees and you have to pay your vendors," Hodgson told Insider. "Waiting to get paid was constraining our ability to grow."While it's not unusual for small businesses to grapple with working capital issues, the dust was still settling from the Great Recession. Abrams and Hodgson couldn't secure a line of credit or use financing tools like factoring to solve their problem. The two entrepreneurs were forced to close Nourish in 2012, but along the way they recognized a disconnect in the system.  "Why are we the ones borrowing money, when in fact we're the lender here because every time you send an invoice to a customer, you've essentially extended a free loan to that customer by letting them pay later," Hodgson said. "And the only reason why we were going to need to possibly borrow money was because we had just given ours away for free to Whole Foods," she added.Check out the 7-page deck that Now, Stacey Abrams' fintech that wants to help small businesses 'grow fearlessly', used to raise $29 millionCheckout made easyRyan Breslow.Ryan BreslowAmazon has long dominated e-commerce with its one-click checkout flows, offering easier ways for consumers to shop online than its small-business competitors.Bolt gives small merchants tools to offer the same easy checkouts so they can compete with the likes of Amazon.The startup raised its $393 million Series D to continue adding its one-click checkout feature to merchants' own websites in October.Bolt markets to merchants themselves. But a big part of Bolt's pitch is its growing network of consumers — currently over 5.6 million — that use its features across multiple Bolt merchant customers. Roughly 5% of Bolt's transactions were network-driven in May, meaning users that signed up for a Bolt account on another retailer's website used it elsewhere. The network effects were even more pronounced in verticals like furniture, where 49% of transactions were driven by the Bolt network."The network effect is now unleashed with Bolt in full fury, and that triggered the raise," Bolt's founder and CEO Ryan Breslow told Insider.Here's the 12-page deck that one-click checkout Bolt used to outline its network of 5.6 million consumers and raise its Series DPayments infrastructure for fintechsQolo CEO and co-founder Patricia MontesiQoloThree years ago, Patricia Montesi realized there was a disconnect in the payments world. "A lot of new economy companies or fintech companies were looking to mesh up a lot of payment modalities that they weren't able to," Montesi, CEO and co-founder of Qolo, told Insider.Integrating various payment capabilities often meant tapping several different providers that had specializations in one product or service, she added, like debit card issuance or cross-border payments. "The way people were getting around that was that they were creating this spider web of fintech," she said, adding that "at the end of it all, they had this mess of suppliers and integrations and bank accounts."The 20-year payments veteran rounded up a group of three other co-founders — who together had more than a century of combined industry experience — to start Qolo, a business-to-business fintech that sought out to bundle back-end payment rails for other fintechs.Here's the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that provides payments infrastructure for other fintechs used to raise a $15 million Series ABetter use of payroll dataAtomic's Head of Markets, Lindsay DavisAtomicEmployees at companies large and small know the importance — and limitations — of how firms manage their payrolls. A new crop of startups are building the API pipes that connect companies and their employees to offer a greater level of visibility and flexibility when it comes to payroll data and employee verification. On Thursday, one of those names, Atomic, announced a $40 million Series B fundraising round co-led by Mercato Partners and Greylock, alongside Core Innovation Capital, Portage, and ATX Capital. The round follows Atomic's Series A round announced in October, when the startup raised a $22 million Series A from investors including Core Innovation Capital, Portage, and Greylock.Payroll startup Atomic just raised a $40 million Series B. Here's an internal deck detailing the fintech's approach to the red-hot payments space.Saving on vendor invoicesHoward Katzenberg, Glean's CEO and cofounderGleanWhen it comes to high-flying tech startups, headlines and investors typically tend to focus on industry "disruption" and the total addressable market a company is hoping to reach. Expense cutting as a way to boost growth typically isn't part of the conversation early on, and finance teams are viewed as cost centers relative to sales teams. But one fast-growing area of business payments has turned its focus to managing those costs. Startups like Ramp and established names like Bill.com have made their name offering automated expense-management systems. Now, one new fintech competitor, Glean, is looking to take that further by offering both automated payment services and tailored line-item accounts-payable insights driven by machine-learning models. Glean's CFO and founder, Howard Katzenberg, told Insider that the genesis of Glean was driven by his own personal experience managing the finance teams of startups, including mortgage lender Better.com, which Katzenberg left in 2019, and online small-business lender OnDeck. "As a CFO of high-growth companies, I spent a lot of time focused on revenue and I had amazing dashboards in real time where I could see what is going on top of the funnel, what's going on with conversion rates, what's going on in terms of pricing and attrition," Katzenberg told Insider. See the 15-slide pitch deck Glean, a startup using machine learning to find savings in vendor invoices, used to raise $10.8 million in seed fundingReal-estate management made easyAgora founders Noam Kahan, CTO, Bar Mor, CEO, and Lior Dolinski, CPOAgoraFor alternative asset managers of any type, the operations underpinning sales and investor communications are a crucial but often overlooked part of the business. Fund managers love to make bets on markets, not coordinate hundreds of wire transfers to clients each quarter or organize customer-relationship-management databases.Within the $10.6 trillion global market for professionally managed real-estate investing, that's where Tel Aviv and New York-based startup Agora hopes to make its mark.Founded in 2019, Agora offers a set of back-office, investor relations, and sales software tools that real-estate investment managers can plug into their workflows. On Wednesday, Agora announced a $9 million seed round, led by Israel-based venture firm Aleph, with participation from River Park Ventures and Maccabee Ventures. The funding comes on the heels of an October 2020 pre-seed fund raise worth $890,000, in which Maccabee also participated.Here's the 15-slide pitch deck that Agora, a startup helping real-estate investors manage communications and sales with their clients, used to raise a $9 million seed roundAccess to commercial real-estate investing LEX Markets cofounders and co-CEOs Drew Sterrett and Jesse Daugherty.LEX MarketsDrew Sterrett was structuring real-estate deals while working in private equity when he realized the inefficiencies that existed in the market. Only high-net worth individuals or accredited investors could participate in commercial real-estate deals. If they ever wanted to leave a partnership or sell their stake in a property, it was difficult to find another investor to replace them. Owners also struggled to sell minority stakes in their properties and didn't have many good options to recapitalize an asset if necessary.In short, the market had a high barrier to entry despite the fact it didn't always have enough participants to get deals done quickly. "Most investors don't have access to high-quality commercial real-estate investments. How do we have the oldest and largest asset class in the world and one of the largest wealth creators with no public and liquid market?" Sterrett told Insider. "It sort of seems like a no-brainer, and that this should have existed 50 or 60 years ago."This 15-page pitch deck helped LEX Markets, a startup making investing in commercial real estate more accessible, raise $15 millionInsurance goes digitalJamie Hale, CEO and cofounder of LadderLadderFintechs looking to transform how insurance policies are underwritten, issued, and experienced by customers have grown as new technology driven by digital trends and artificial intelligence shape the market. And while verticals like auto, homeowner's, and renter's insurance have seen their fair share of innovation from forward-thinking fintechs, one company has taken on the massive life-insurance market. Founded in 2017, Ladder uses a tech-driven approach to offer life insurance with a digital, end-to-end service that it says is more flexible, faster, and cost-effective than incumbent players.Life, annuity, and accident and health insurance within the US comprise a big chunk of the broader market. In 2020, premiums written on those policies totaled some $767 billion, compared to $144 billion for auto policies and $97 billion for homeowner's insurance.Here's the 12-page deck that Ladder, a startup disrupting the 'crown jewel' of the insurance market, used to nab $100 millionData science for commercial insuranceTanner Hackett, founder and CEO of CounterpartCounterpartThere's been no shortage of funds flowing into insurance-technology companies over the past few years. Private-market funding to insurtechs soared to $15.4 billion in 2021, a 90% increase compared to 2020. Some of the most well-known consumer insurtech names — from Oscar (which focuses on health insurance) to Metromile (which focuses on auto) — launched on the public markets last year, only to fall over time or be acquired as investors questioned the sustainability of their business models. In the commercial arena, however, the head of one insurtech company thinks there is still room to grow — especially for those catering to small businesses operating in an entirely new, pandemic-defined environment. "The bigger opportunity is in commercial lines," Tanner Hackett, the CEO of management liability insurer Counterpart, told Insider."Everywhere I poke, I'm like, 'Oh my goodness, we're still in 1.0, and all the other businesses I've built were on version three.' Insurance is still in 1.0, still managing from spreadsheets and PDFs," added Hackett, who also previously co-founded Button, which focuses on mobile marketing. See the 8-page pitch deck Counterpart, a startup disrupting commercial insurance with data science, used to raise a $30 million Series BSmarter insurance for multifamily propertiesItai Ben-Zaken, cofounder and CEO of Honeycomb.HoneycombA veteran of the online-insurance world is looking to revolutionize the way the industry prices risk for commercial properties with the help of artificial intelligence.Insurance companies typically send inspectors to properties before issuing policies to better understand how the building is maintained and identify potential risks or issues with it. It's a process that can be time-consuming, expensive, and inefficient, making it hard to justify for smaller commercial properties, like apartment and condo buildings.Insurtech Honeycomb is looking to fix that by using AI to analyze a combination of third-party data and photos submitted by customers through the startup's app to quickly identify any potential risks at a property and more accurately price policies."That whole physical inspection thing had really good things in it, but it wasn't really something that is scalable and, it's also expensive," Itai Ben-Zaken, Honeycomb's cofounder and CEO, told Insider. "The best way to see a property right now is Google street view. Google street view is usually two years old."Here's the 10-page Series A pitch deck used by Honeycomb, a startup that wants to revolutionize the $26 billion market for multifamily property insuranceHelping freelancers with their taxesJaideep Singh is the CEO and co-founder of FlyFin, an AI-driven tax preparation software program for freelancers.FlyFinSome people, particularly those with families or freelancing businesses, spend days searching for receipts for tax season, making tax preparation a time consuming and, at times, taxing experience. That's why in 2020 Jaideep Singh founded FlyFin, an artificial-intelligence tax preparation program for freelancers that helps people, as he puts it, "fly through their finances." FlyFin is set up to connect to a person's bank accounts, allowing the AI program to help users monitor for certain expenses that can be claimed on their taxes like business expenditures, the interest on mortgages, property taxes, or whatever else that might apply. "For most individuals, people have expenses distributed over multiple financial institutions. So we built an AI platform that is able to look at expenses, understand the individual, understand your profession, understand the freelance population at large, and start the categorization," Singh told Insider.Check out the 7-page pitch deck a startup helping freelancers manage their taxes used to nab $8 million in fundingDigital banking for freelancersJGalione/Getty ImagesLance is a new digital bank hoping to simplify the life of those workers by offering what it calls an "active" approach to business banking. "We found that every time we sat down with the existing tools and resources of our accountants and QuickBooks and spreadsheets, we just ended up getting tangled up in the whole experience of it," Lance cofounder and CEO Oona Rokyta told Insider. Lance offers subaccounts for personal salaries, withholdings, and savings to which freelancers can automatically allocate funds according to custom preset levels. It also offers an expense balance that's connected to automated tax withholdings.In May, Lance announced the closing of a $2.8 million seed round that saw participation from Barclays, BDMI, Great Oaks Capital, Imagination Capital, Techstars, DFJ Frontier, and others.Here's the 21-page pitch deck Lance, a digital bank for freelancers, used to raise a $2.8 million seed round from investors including BarclaysSoftware for managing freelancersWorksome cofounder and CEO Morten Petersen.WorksomeThe way people work has fundamentally changed over the past year, with more flexibility and many workers opting to freelance to maintain their work-from-home lifestyles.But managing a freelance or contractor workforce is often an administrative headache for employers. Worksome is a startup looking to eliminate all the extra work required for employers to adapt to more flexible working norms.Worksome started as a freelancer marketplace automating the process of matching qualified workers with the right jobs. But the team ultimately pivoted to a full suite of workforce management software, automating administrative burdens required to hire, pay, and account for contract workers.In May, Worksome closed a $13 million Series A backed by European angel investor Tommy Ahlers and Danish firm Lind & Risør.Here's the 21-slide pitch deck used by a startup that helps firms like Carlsberg and Deloitte manage freelancersPayments and operations support HoneyBook cofounders Dror Shimoni, Oz Alon, and Naama Alon.HoneyBookWhile countless small businesses have been harmed by the pandemic, self-employment and entrepreneurship have found ways to blossom as Americans started new ventures.Half of the US population may be freelance by 2027, according to a study commissioned by remote-work hiring platform Upwork. HoneyBook, a fintech startup that provides payment and operations support for freelancers, in May raised $155 million in funding and achieved unicorn status with its $1 billion-plus valuation.Durable Capital Partners led the Series D funding with other new investors including renowned hedge fund Tiger Global, Battery Ventures, Zeev Ventures, and 01 Advisors. Citi Ventures, Citigroup's startup investment arm that also backs fintech robo-advisor Betterment, participated as an existing investor in the round alongside Norwest Venture partners. The latest round brings the company's fundraising total to $227 million to date.Here's the 21-page pitch deck a Citi-backed fintech for freelancers used to raise $155 million from investors like hedge fund Tiger GlobalPay-as-you-go compliance for banks, fintechs, and crypto startupsNeepa Patel, Themis' founder and CEOThemisWhen Themis founder and CEO Neepa Patel set out to build a new compliance tool for banks, fintech startups, and crypto companies, she tapped into her own experience managing risk at some of the nation's biggest financial firms. Having worked as a bank regulator at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and in compliance at Morgan Stanley, Deutsche Bank, and the enterprise blockchain company R3, Patel was well-placed to assess the shortcomings in financial compliance software. But Patel, who left the corporate world to begin work on Themis in 2020, drew on more than just her own experience and frustrations to build the startup."It's not just me building a tool based on my personal pain points. I reached out to regulators. I reached out to bank compliance officers and members in the fintech community just to make sure that we're building it exactly how they do their work," Patel told Insider. "That was the biggest problem: No one built a tool that was reflective of how people do their work."Check out the 9-page pitch deck Themis, which offers pay-as-you-go compliance for banks, fintechs, and crypto startups, used to raise $9 million in seed fundingConnecting startups and investorsHum Capital cofounder and CEO Blair SilverbergHum CapitalBlair Silverberg is no stranger to fundraising.For six years, Silverberg was a venture capitalist at Draper Fisher Jurvetson and Private Credit Investments making bets on startups."I was meeting with thousands of founders in person each year, watching them one at a time go through this friction where they're meeting a ton of investors, and the investors are all asking the same questions," Silverberg told Insider. He switched gears about three years ago, moving to the opposite side of the metaphorical table, to start Hum Capital, which uses artificial intelligence to match investors with startups looking to fundraise.On August 31, the New York-based fintech announced its $9 million Series A. The round was led by Future Ventures with participation from Webb Investment Network, Wavemaker Partners, and Partech. This 11-page pitch deck helped Hum Capital, a fintech using AI to match investors with startups, raise a $9 million Series A.Helping LatAm startups get up to speedKamino cofounders Gut Fragoso, Rodrigo Perenha, Benjamin Gleason, and Gonzalo ParejoKaminoThere's more venture capital flowing into Latin America than ever before, but getting the funds in founders' hands is not exactly a simple process.In 2021, investors funneled $15.3 billion into Latin American companies, more than tripling the previous record of $4.9 billion in 2019. Fintech and e-commerce sectors drove funding, accounting for 39% and 25% of total funding, respectively.  However, for many startup founders in the region who have successfully sold their ideas and gotten investors on board, there's a patchwork of corporate structuring that's needed to access the funds, according to Benjamin Gleason, who was the chief financial officer at Groupon LatAm prior to cofounding Brazil-based fintech Kamino.It's a process Gleason and his three fellow Kamino cofounders have been through before as entrepreneurs and startup execs themselves. Most often, startups have to set up offshore financial accounts outside of Brazil, which "entails creating a Cayman [Islands] holding company, a Delaware LLC, and then connecting it to a local entity here and also opening US bank accounts for the Cayman entity, which is not trivial from a KYC perspective," said Gleason, who founded open-banking fintech Guiabolso in Sao Paulo. His partner, Gonzalo Parejo, experienced the same toils when he founded insurtech Bidu."Pretty much any international investor will usually ask for that," Gleason said, adding that investors typically cite liability issues."It's just a massive amount of bureaucracy, complexity, a lot of time from the founders. All of this just to get the money from the investor that wants to give them the money," he added.Here's the 8-page pitch deck Kamino, a fintech helping LatAm startups with everything from financing to corporate credit cards, used to raise a $6.1M pre-seed roundThe back-end tech for beautyDanielle Cohen-Shohet, CEO and founder of GlossGeniusGlossGeniusDanielle Cohen-Shohet might have started as a Goldman Sachs investment analyst, but at her core she was always a coder.After about three years at Goldman Sachs, Cohen-Shohet left the world of traditional finance to code her way into starting her own company in 2016. "There was a period of time where I did nothing, but eat, sleep, and code for a few weeks," Cohen-Shohet told Insider. Her technical edge and knowledge of the point-of-sale payment space led her to launch a software company focused on providing behind-the-scenes tech for beauty and wellness small businesses.Cohen-Shohet launched GlossGenius in 2017 to provide payments tech for hair stylists, nail technicians, blow-out bars, and other small businesses in the space.Here's the 11-page deck GlossGenius, a startup that provides back-end tech for the beauty industry, used to raise $16 millionRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 6th, 2022

New York Times Op-Ed Applauds Inflation As Means To Enforce Green Diet

New York Times Op-Ed Applauds Inflation As Means To Enforce Green Diet Following a general trend of excitement among extreme leftists in media, The New York Times has recently posted an Op-Ed which argues in favor of the inflationary crisis facing the US and much of the world because it forces the public to go vegan and give up meat “for the greater good.” Just as late night propagandist Steven Colbert cheered for higher gas prices and suggested people buy a Tesla (a vehicle far outside the affordability of the majority of Americans) if they want to avoid paying $15 a gallon for gas, the NYT Op-Ed has a familiar stench of elitism. The UN and many globalist foundations have been engaged in a war on the average person's diet for many years now. A main pillar if the UN's climate change agenda calls for the end of large scale farming and meat production in the name of reducing our “carbon footprint.” Keep in mind that even the NOAA admits in their own data that worldwide temperatures have only risen 1 Degree C in the past century (with a margin of error of 0.23C). That's right, 1 degree, and this is after climate scientists have made numerous “adjustments” to how temperatures are recorded for the official record. Also note that the temperature record started in the 1880s. Whenever NASA or the NOAA says that a particular day was the “hottest day on record,” they are referring to a tiny sliver of the history of the Earth in which data has been “officially” collected. In reality, the history of the planet is replete with long term global warming events (far hotter than we are witnessing today), and long before man-made carbon was ever a thing. Today's temperatures are low to moderate in comparison, but if you only look at the records that climate groups want you to see rather than the bigger picture then it might seem like the world is getting hotter than it should. The Earth's weather history is vast, and changes occur without the input of human activity. There is zero concrete evidence to support the claim that man-made carbon has any significant bearing on the current and historically minor temperature increase of today; only assumptions, once again based on correlation rather than proof of causation. This fact won't stop the climate cult from singing the praises of economic decline, though. If they can't force Green New Deal-type legislation on the masses, then perhaps an inflationary collapse will do the job for them? Even more disturbing is the insinuation by the Times that a reintroduction of the Lever Act might be in order. For those unfamiliar with this starkly unconstitutional legislation, the Lever Act, also known as the Food And Fuel Act, was passed in 1917 and used wartime conditions and price inflation as an excuse for the government to take control of agricultural production, specifically reducing meat availability. It also gave the government the power to confiscate agricultural resources and “prevent hoarding.” As the Op-Ed notes in a quote: “There was huge cultural buy-in to the idea that collectively, we could make small sacrifices — which is how people saw giving up meat — and we’d make the sacrifices in the name of a greater good and get something done...” In other words, the argument is that climate ideologues and militant vegans should support government actions that violate private property and business rights because this has already been done before. A precedent was set in 1917, and they think this makes it okay to do it again. It's also funny how the “greater good” always seems to coincide with whatever establishment elites want to happen rather than what public freedom demands. The globalist organization known as the Club Of Rome openly admitted the agenda in 1992 in their treatise titled 'The First Global Revolution': “In searching for a common enemy against whom we can unite, we came up with the idea that pollution, the threat of global warming, water shortages, famine and the like, would fit the bill. In their totality and their interactions these phenomena do constitute a common threat which must be confronted by everyone together. But in designating these dangers as the enemy, we fall into the trap, which we have already warned readers about, namely mistaking symptoms for causes. All these dangers are caused by human intervention in natural processes, and it is only through changed attitudes and behaviour that they can be overcome. The real enemy then is humanity itself.” The statement comes from Chapter 5 – The Vacuum, which covers their position on how to convince the public on the need for global government. Why does the UN and other globalist institutions want to remove meat in particular from our diet? It's hard to say, but it's certainly not climate related. There is some scientific evidence including multiple studies which suggest that a plant based diet can lead to stunted brain development and cognitive decline, especially in children and adolescents. Is removing meat availability from our society a bid to make the peasants dumber and less dangerous? There are also multiple studies which link veganism to higher rates of depression and a higher chance of irritability and anger. This would help explain the bizarre zealotry we see among some vegans these days, but the overall problem is one of cultism. Connecting dietary habits with moral responsibility is nothing new – Many religions have done this in the past. However, the NEW global religion is one of environmental faith and climate doomsday fears that never seem to materialize. At the very least, the anti-meat campaign serves to provide a sense of moral superiority that adherents desperately need in order to feel justified in their militancy. It is also something that any individual can do to feel as though they are making a difference on the planet, even if they are really achieving nothing at all. Tyler Durden Sun, 06/05/2022 - 17:00.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 5th, 2022

Progressive prosecutor Larry Krasner is taking on gun violence and ‘dirty cops’ in Philadelphia

In an interview, Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner defended his handling of the city's gun-violence crisis amid attacks from Republicans. Larry Krasner during a news conference in Philadelphia on May 17, 2017.AP Photo/Matt Rourke Philadelphia's district attorney, Larry Krasner, sat down for an interview with Insider. The recently reelected prosecutor addressed criticism he's faced from Republicans and police. Krasner also defended his approach to Philadelphia's gun-violence crisis. Sixteen people a day were shot in Philadelphia last year. By the end of 2021, more than 560 residents of the city had been killed.It's a national trend: a spike in gun violence that began with the pandemic and has ravaged cities in red, blue, and battleground states. As society locked down, Americans lost jobs and access to community supports and healthy diversions. Personal conflicts leaped from social media to brawls on the street, and record gun sales meant the participants were more likely to be armed — encouraging yet more people to go out and get a firearm.The reasons behind the spike in violence across the US are complex. In conservative media, though, one villain is obvious and comfortably partisan: the progressive prosecutor. And in Pennsylvania, that means Larry Krasner. Krasner is an outsider. The former criminal-defense attorney did not come up through the city's Democratic machine, having held no previous elected office, unlike his predecessors over the past several decades. He's also a committed reformer. Since taking office as district attorney in 2018, he's slashed probation sentences, ended the prosecution of sex work and cannabis offenses, and aggressively pursued cases against police officers accused of misconduct. His Conviction Integrity Unit has exonerated about two dozen people his predecessors convicted.He has, at times, been his own worst enemy. In December, Krasner insisted that the City of Brotherly Love was not experiencing a "crisis of lawlessness," citing the fact that many nonviolent crimes had indeed decreased. It was a gift not only to the likes of Fox News — which ran the chyron "Philly DA Downplays Crime Despite Record Killings" — but also Krasner's critics within the local Democratic Party. The former mayor, Michael Nutter, took to the pages of The Philadelphia Inquirer to decry the top prosecutor's "white wokeness."Republicans, meanwhile, have been in a competition to see who can be more anti-Krasner. In January, the head of the state Senate, Jake Corman, called for the legislature to remove Krasner from office. One failed candidate in the recent GOP gubernatorial primary proposed holding a statewide referendum that would allow the governor to appoint a replacement district attorney."It is nothing more than a new version of the Southern strategy," Krasner said during an interview earlier this year at his office over a lunch of soup, potato chips, and a Diet Coke, referring to President Richard Nixon's appeal to a white majority frightened by scenes of civil unrest in the nation's cities. "It worked before. They've read their Republican history. They're saying 'big cities, lawless,' except all the big cities they're talking about are very Democratic and have huge Black and brown populations."In his view, the coded language of today is more subtle than that of the late 1960s. Instead of directly singling out minorities, his critics go after progressive prosecution, Krasner said."I think politically, in many ways, it represents a good strategy," Krasner said. But, he added, it's "really about Black people. It's not about me."A controversial plea deal feeds attacksPolice tape at a crime scene in Philadelphia on July 19.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhile Krasner might be an accomplished attorney, he was never much of an administrator, which has, at times, provided ammunition to his critics. After taking office, he was eager to replace experienced prosecutors with young lawyers who may not have had much trial experience. And in one episode, the DA's office itself acknowledged that an error by a new prosecutor had created a public-relations disaster.In 2018, just months into Krasner's tenure, his office reached a plea deal with Jovaun Patterson — who was accused of shooting and nearly killing a Cambodian immigrant with an AK-47 during a botched robbery of a corner store — that would have allowed him to serve a minimum of 3 ½ years in state prison and a maximum of 10 years. The victim was not informed of the relatively lenient sentence.Facing backlash, the DA's office soon announced that the plea agreement had not been approved by a supervisor. It also tried, without success, to have it thrown out. To Krasner's opponents, it had all the markings of a bleeding-heart liberal coddling violent felons.Then-US Attorney William McSwain, a Trump appointee, stepped in to pursue federal charges, accusing the DA's office of having "sent a message that violent crime has little consequences." Patterson was ultimately sentenced to 14 years in federal prison for assault and attempted-robbery convictions.At the very least, the Patterson incident suggested that Krasner led a DA's office that was not functioning as a smooth, cohesive unit.Nearly four years later, Krasner insisted that while his office is younger, it's also more ethical. Carlos Vega, one of the prosecutors he fired, was involved in the prosecution of Anthony Wright — a man who was wrongfully convicted of rape and murder. In 2013, DNA evidence was presented linking another man to the crime. Instead of freeing him, Philadelphia's previous DA, Seth Williams, who claimed to be a reformer, decided to try Wright again, a case that Vega assisted with in court. Wright was found not guilty and freed, with jurors wondering why he was even being prosecuted.Krasner cast that as emblematic of justice in the city before he came along. "If the point is you should keep people around who lie, cheat, and steal because the only thing that matters is winning, even if the person is innocent, well, maybe they got a point," Krasner said of prosecutors like Vega. "But that's not justice. And that's not my obligation. My obligation was to actually bring in people who had a moral compass."But it's not just people like Vega who have left the DA's office in recent years. In December, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that more than 70 lawyers who Krasner himself hired had quit. Some who spoke with the paper cited burnout from an unsustainable workload and worsening morale in the office. Overall, more than 260 attorneys left during his first four-year term.Clashes with policeA police officer in Philadelphia.Mark Makela/Getty ImagesAny successful district attorney requires not just a team of competent trial attorneys but also a working — if not necessarily "warm" — relationship with the police. At the leadership level, at least, that exists in Philadelphia. But there's also a fundamental disagreement between police and prosecutors, as exposed by a recent city report examining gun violence in the city. The police department, led by Commissioner Danielle Outlaw, insists there ought to be an "equal focus" on shootings and illegal gun possession, while the DA is adamant that there is not a correlation between the two. "If illegal gun possession was a good predictor of that, then I would probably agree with the commissioner," Krasner said. "It's actually a terrible predictor of that."In a recent report, Krasner's office said the focus on illegal gun possession, at least in cases involving nonviolent offenders with no felony convictions, was about singling out people of color."Our legislature's primary interest is incarcerating Philadelphians," the report said, "most of them Black and brown."The shootings themselves deserve the most attention, Krasner said. And there are plenty of them to solve: As of May 22, more than 830 people had been shot in Philadelphia this year, 166 of them fatally."At the point where you take a gun, point it at another person to pull the trigger, whether you kill them or not, there is an accounting — there is a reckoning; that is a heinous and terrible act," Krasner said. "That's exactly the kind of really serious crime that we should focus upon."John Pfaff, a professor at Fordham Law School, believes Krasner is on to something. While some who are arrested on a charge of illegal gun possession intend to use that weapon in a violent crime, the strategy of focusing on illegal possession will pull many who have no such intention into the criminal-justice system, derailing lives and perpetuating distrust in police, he argued in a recent article for Slate."Ultimately, these flawed models encourage police to cast broad nets that will end up locking up thousands of people just to prevent dozens of future shootings, imposing significant human and social — and moral — costs that could overwhelm the benefits of such detention," Pfaff wrote.Krasner insists the fight over guns is all about politics."The same thing is happening in basically all the major cities where there are progressive prosecutors," he said. "We're not talking too much about the actual gun violence. We're going to talk all day long about the guns. And there's a lot of reasons for that. You can control the number of gun arrests you get."Krasner added: "Stop car after car after car after car. In a city where there are more guns than people, you're going to find some guns. You can gin up a ton of gun arrests, sometimes with all kinds of illegal searches that will invalidate prosecution."You can harvest guns. I mean, that's not hard to do. What's hard to do is to solve shootings — and to solve fatal shootings. It's a more difficult task."Christopher Herrmann, a former crime analyst at the New York City Police Department who is now an assistant professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, tends to agree.Like in Philadelphia, "there's so much pressure right now here in New York City to take illegal guns off the street," Herrmann said. And they should be taken off the street, he added."But I think a lot of people just equate — you know, if we have a 30% increase in guns off the street that equals a 30% decrease in the number of shootings and stuff like that," he said. "And that's just not how it happens."'Legit cops hate dirty cops'Krasner announcing he was pursuing charges against Inspector Joseph Bologna.AP Photo/Matt RourkePolice officers are generally less likely to engage in overtly illegal behavior to secure an arrest than in the past. That, at least, is Krasner's read on declining clearance rates — the number of homicides committed in a year compared to the number of homicides that have resulted in an arrest. In the 1980s, the clearance rate was over 80%; now it's less than 50%.A 2021 report from his office said that in the past police sometimes engaged in "egregious misconduct" to ostensibly solve a case, such as intimidating or bribing supposed witnesses to give testimony the police wanted. Krasner said there are still holdovers from "the Frank Rizzo era" of the 1970s, a reference to the mayor and former police chief who oversaw a department that, at one point, shot one civilian each week, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported in 2020. Some of these officers are themselves criminals in the eyes of the DA. Take Joseph Bologna. In 2020, Krasner's office pursued charges against the former police commander — who was fired by the department — after video emerged of him striking a Temple University student during a racial-justice protest.While prosecutors and outraged members of the public saw an assault, Bologna's defenders characterized it as an attack on police."This is another attempt by DA Krasner to railroad a highly decorated and well-respected member of the Philadelphia Police Department," John McNesby, the president of the local chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police, said at the time.The war of words between McNesby and Krasner has been constant — and, in some ways, advantageous for a district attorney eager to cast his opponents as relics of a with-us-or-against-us era of abusive policing.That said, McNesby doesn't speak for all or even most police officers, Krasner said. Associations for Black and Latino officers, for example, endorsed the DA's reelection campaign."Legit cops hate dirty cops — that's been my experience, over and over," Krasner said.Last year, police arrested suspects in only about one-third of homicide cases in Philadelphia, according to the DA's office. It took an average of 35 minutes for an officer to respond to a 911 call, according to an analysis by The Inquirer, four minutes longer than in the prior year. And the number of police claiming to be too injured to work has more than doubled since Krasner was elected, with 14% of the city's law-enforcement officers collecting a tax-free salary while at home on disability — or, The Inquirer found, working second jobs.Forty years ago, Philadelphia police engaged in a "work slowdown" to protest budget cuts. The police have not been defunded — its $729 million slice of the city's budget is second only to pensions — but morale, here as elsewhere, is down in the wake of the 2020 protests against killings by law enforcement.Could history be repeating, this time with police protesting Krasner's prosecution of their fellow officers?Krasner on June 25, 2019, in New York City.Scott Heins/Getty ImagesHerrmann, the former NYPD analyst, told Insider the 2020 social-justice protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing, and the increased distrust of police since, has influenced morale in departments across the country and, consequently, their ability to solve crimes. When there's a shooting, for example, eyewitnesses may be less willing to cooperate with the police investigation. Police, in turn, could blame the community. When the crime isn't solved, they may blame each other.But, Herrmann said, work slowdowns or stoppages ("the infamous 'blue flu,' we call it") tend to "last a couple weeks or maybe a couple months, at most." Those who haven't left the force, he added, may well be deciding not to give it their all, worn out by the pandemic, the ensuing rise in violent crime, and increased criticism of law enforcement as an institution."That's happening in a lot of cities now, which is: the distrust and the lack of faith — and the lack of cooperation, maybe we'll even call it — between the police department and the prosecutor's office," Herrmann said.Each side accuses the other of having the wrong priorities, with the department wanting to focus more on gun-possession cases and Krasner saying the department has underinvested in modern forensic technology that could help solve more cold cases."There seems to be a lot more riffs," Krasner said. Krasner said he didn't believe that such riffs could have led to police in his city to consciously do their jobs poorly as a means of expressing displeasure with his office."That is one of the most awful and cynical things I've ever heard, actually, because that would be criminal conduct," Krasner said when asked about the possibility. "Wouldn't it?"He continued: "If that is true — and I'm not saying it is true — but if that is true, then what you are suggesting is a lot worse than disinterest in highly effective modern methods," he said. "What you're suggesting is that they want crime to win so that they can go back to no accountability — and maybe more compensation.""And," he said, "that's what criminal organizations do."Have a news tip? Email this reporter: cdavis@insider.com.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 5th, 2022

America Needs to End Its Love Affair With Single-Family Homes. One Town Is Discovering It’s a Tough Sell

The housing development Brown Ranch aims to provide affordable housing to a community that desperately needs it. Its road ahead is filled with challenges. The question came, as it always did, just as Jason Peasley finished making his case for Brown Ranch, a development that would grow the size of his city by one-third and finally provide some affordable housing for the hundreds of people doubled up in trailer parks and hotel rooms in the ski town. The development, as Peasley pitched it to the room of residents gathered under thick wooden beams in the local community center, would use density to solve the housing problem—mainly by building apartments and attached homes. “What about single family homes?” a woman standing in the back of the meeting room asked. “Because I would like to buy one someday.” [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] Steamboat Springs, Colo.—where Peasley serves as the head of the Yampa Valley Housing Authority, providing affordable housing to all of Routt County—is a mountain town that draws people for its wide open vistas and outdoor space. The idea of living in an apartment on what is now green rolling hills jarred people with visions of their own porches and yards, who had seen their neighbors amass hundreds of thousands of dollars in equity just by owning a single family home during the pandemic. “Personally, I would take a very, very small house,” another resident said. “So would I,” the woman in the back said quickly, so as not to be left out. Peasley sighed. Nine months ago, he’d been given an opportunity that most urban planners dream of—an anonymous donation of 536 acres of land to build long-term affordable housing for people who live and work in Steamboat Springs. But it’s difficult to get buy-in to use hundreds of acres to build multifamily homes in Steamboat, which currently has 1,400 fewer housing units than are currently needed. Residents might support density in theory, but what they really want is a single-family home to call their own. How Steamboat solves this conundrum could have implications for communities across the country that are struggling with affordability as their populations grow. Home prices have soared in the past two years in cities like Austin and Phoenix as well as in ski towns like Truckee and Sun Valley. Adding more dense housing units would help keep prices affordable, because many of these places have natural boundaries like mountains or oceans that prevent developers from sprawling out. But proposals like Peasley’s are usually thwarted by neighbors who complain about their views being blocked or their parking becoming limited or their beloved town—which they themselves moved to years or decades before—getting too crowded. David Williams for TIMEJason Peasley, Exectutive Director of the Yampa Valley Housing Authority, stands on Brown Ranch just west of the city of Steamboat Springs, Colorado on May 16, 2022. Many communities like Steamboat are reaching a breaking point. Here, the need for more housing had been abundantly clear even before the pandemic, as investors turned condos and apartments that had once provided workforce housing into cash cows on Airbnb. Then, in 2020, remote workers flocked to Steamboat. For all the urban planners proclaiming density to be the solution to America’s housing needs, the majority of Americans still dreamed of a single-family home, with a yard, a tree, and room to grow, and the pandemic only whetted that appetite as families spent more time at home and looked for private outdoor space and extra rooms to double as offices. The median listing price of a single family home in Steamboat is now $829,000, up from $529,000 in 2019. Rents for a one-bedroom apartment are hovering around $2,100, about one-third higher than the national average. By July of 2021, 60 percent of Americans said they’d prefer to live in a place where the homes are large and farther apart, even if schools, stores, and restaurants were a few miles away, up from 53 percent before the pandemic, according to a Pew Research Center survey. In contrast, 39 percent preferred a community where homes are small and close to each other but where schools, stores, and restaurants were in walking distance, down from 47 percent in 2019. That’s even though half of Americans say that affordable housing is a major problem in their community. As Peasley has tried to explain time and again, affordability and density go hand in hand. Single family homes are much more expensive to build than attached homes or apartments, and they take up more room, and need more resources to maintain. Steamboat could build seven attached homes for the amount it would cost to build one single-family detached home, according to projections by Mithun, a consulting group helping with the project. Read More: Return to the Office? Not in This Housing Market “We have an opportunity that maybe no other community has to really thoughtfully address our housing issues in one massive development,” Peasley, a tall redheaded urban planning guru who could be mistaken for an Olympic skateboarder, told me recently. “This could really be a template for our 21st century live, work, and play.” Peasley is uniquely suited to helping convert Steamboat to pro-density. He was a city planner for Steamboat Springs for five years before taking over the Yampa Valley Housing Authority a decade ago; his tenure has created hundreds of units of affordable housing. His success in getting tax credits to build some affordable housing in Steamboat is what motivated anonymous donors to give him the money to buy Brown Ranch and build even more. Peasley hopes to build 2,300 units at Brown Ranch, which would meet the demand projected for the next two decades. But no matter how many times Peasley explains this all to the community, even the most self-aware residents of Steamboat are having a hard time letting go of their vision of a home and yard to call their own. “The disconnect we’re having is that everyone wants the American dream—a single-family home—and economists tell us it’s not possible,” Peasley says. The surest way to wealth in America has long been to stake claim to a plot of land and a home, but places like Steamboat are discovering that if they are dedicated to welcoming everyone who wants to live there, they’re going to have to pioneer another way. The problem with seeking more space In 1890, the U.S. Census Bureau declared the American frontier closed, meaning there was no land that settlers hadn’t claimed, nowhere further west to expand. Yet people have continued to move west, seeking better weather, more land, a different life, the growing population all competing for a limited set of homes, roads, and water. Since the turn of the 20th century, the American West—which is roughly the states from Colorado west, defined by the Census Bureau—has added 73 million people. Today, nearly one-quarter of the nation’s population lives in the 13 western states, up from just 7% in 1900. If new residents lived in the west the same way they lived in cities like New York and Philadelphia—in tall buildings with apartments stacked on top of one another—there might not be a housing affordability problem today. But in the westward expansion, Americans grabbed as much space as they could, sometimes given it for free by the federal government if they were willing to farm it. The West grew out rather than up. “There’s a certain independence that Westerners have, where folks don’t want to be regulated, they value independence and wide open spaces, and that manifests itself in the housing choices people make,” says Robert Parker, director of strategy at the University of Oregon’s Institute for Policy Research & Engagement, where he studies housing density. David Williams for TIMEBrown Ranch, a 536-acre property on the west side of Steamboat Springs, Colorado, which was gifted to the Yampa Valley Housing Authority in mid-August 2021 by an anonymous donor. Worried about sprawl, some cities started establishing urban growth boundaries in the 1950s, limiting development outside a certain area. The boundaries preserved the open space that drew people west, but also limited housing production. Today, in Steamboat Springs, development outside the urban growth boundary is restricted to one unit every 35 acres—or less. That puts even more pressure on building density where it is allowed; Brown Ranch is the largest plot of undeveloped land inside Steamboat’s urban growth boundary. When land seemed endless and cheap, the federal government encouraged families to spread out. It subsidized highways so that wealthier families could easily get between city centers and the suburbs, and provided tax incentives for home ownership. But Americans’ preference for single-family homes has also contributed to the housing undersupply that has sent prices soaring over the last two years. Between 1970 and 2020, 52 million single-family homes were built in America, accounting for three-quarters of all the housing built over that time, according to Census data. Over the same time, the population grew by 128 million. As a result, the median price of a home in the U.S. more than doubled over that time, even when adjusted for inflation. This is playing out across states in the American West. Colorado’s population doubled between 1980 and 2020, adding 2.8 million people, but the state only built 1.4 million units over the same period, 70% of them single-family homes. The median price for a single family home in 2020 was $434,000. Today, it’s around $600,000. The families committed to staying are crowding into housing as they wait for a solution. About one-quarter of all children now live in “doubled-up” households, where a nuclear family lives with additional family members. In places like Steamboat, doubled-up households are often in the smallest homes, which are trailers in the town’s handful of trailer parks. In doubled-up households, the use of drugs and alcohol rises, as does domestic violence, because the situation is so stressful, says Irene Avitia, who works with families at Integrated Communities, a Steamboat nonprofit that works with the Latino community. Read More: Marcia Fudge Is Trying to Decide Which Fire to Put Out First The housing troubles are also bad for the local economy. Banks are reducing their hours, and restaurants are closing a few days a week because they can’t find enough workers, because staff can’t afford to live nearby in Steamboat. The ski area cut off night service because it was so short-staffed. The local medical center struggles to recruit doctors and nurses because candidates hear about how hard it will be to find housing if they move there. One bartender, David Hughes, told me his rent for one room in a four bedroom house was going up to $1,500 per person, from $900, and he was probably going to have to leave town. “We can’t continue to exist here if employees don’t have secure housing,” says Andrew Beckler, the founder and CEO of Grass Sticks, a company that makes bamboo paddles and ski poles. That population growth outpaced the supply of single-family homes has been very good for the pocketbooks of people who have bought them in the last few decades. Homeowners collectively have $29 billion in real estate equity, three times what they did 20 years ago, according to the Federal Reserve. Investing in a home and making a big sum to retire on has become such an American rite of passage that it’s hard to ask Steamboat residents like Avitia, who lives in a trailer park with her husband and two daughters, to give up on the same dream. “I would love to own a single-family home in Steamboat, and Brown Ranch has created that hope for my family,” she says. Even people who live in apartments in Steamboat now say they’d prefer a single-family home. Lizzy Konen, 33, grew up in a single-family home in San Diego that she says her parents would never be able to afford today. She moved to Steamboat 12 years ago and wants to stay there, but the lease on the one-bedroom she rents is up in July, and the owner wants to demolish the building and construct a multimillion dollar home that he can sell for profit. Konen knows she’ll probably have to move to Oak Creek or Hayden, smaller towns that are 30-45 minutes away, because she can’t afford to buy a house or pay $2,100/month for an apartment. But when asked what her vision for Brown Ranch, she says: “I would love to own a single family home and have pets and children running around. I would rather not be in an apartment building. It doesn’t feel as homey.” David Williams for TIMETraffic passes through the downtown area of Steamboat Springs, Colorado on May 16, 2022. Selling people on apartments The big challenge for Peasley is balancing the wants of people like Avitia and Konen with the larger community’s need for affordable housing. He’s trying to learn from past missteps, like in 2010 when developers committed to building thousands of condos, the city council approved it, and then enraged voters worried about overcrowding put the project on the ballot and it was soundly defeated. This time around, Peasley is trying to get residents as involved as possible before any major decisions are made. The housing authority has held 200 community meetings where residents have spoken about what they want from Brown Ranch, and their suggestions include roof gardens, hiking trails, community composting, greenhouses, a school, a grocery store, a coffee shop, a walkable commercial area, and, of course, single-family homes. Peasley says more community engagement is what’s going to get people closer to accepting that how Brown Ranch will look will be different than their ideal vision. For example, attendees of Brown Ranch meetings often mention that they want the development to be Net Zero, which provides an opportunity for YVHA staff to explain that density is very sustainable—apartments or attached units require fewer resources to build and maintain than single-family homes. “By doing this transparent process, and having the community discuss it, we hope that while they might not agree, they at least understand,” says Cole Hewitt, the president of the board of the Yampa Valley Housing Authority. “Maybe there aren’t as many people that show up and say, ‘Well, I didn’t know this was going on.’ They can stand up and say, ‘I’m a part of it. I understand it. I get where you’re coming from. I still disagree with it.’ But that’s a lot better discussion than, ‘No, don’t do it.’” The community meetings have served to jump start a discussion about how Steamboat’s hopes and dreams match up with reality. “Everyone wants to live in a single family 5000 square foot mansion next to an ocean with a view of the mountains and is across the street from a school and within walking distance from the bar. That doesn’t exist,” Michael Fitz, a 29-year old local who owns a 600-square foot home in a trailer park, told Steamboat residents gathered to talk about the urban design of Brown Ranch. Read More: Millions of Tenants Behind on Rent, Small Landlords Struggling, Eviction Moratoriums Expiring Soon: Inside the Next Housing Crisis The people who led the opposition to the past development seem to be getting on board. Tim Rowse, who led the campaign that stopped development on Brown Ranch in 2009, told me recently that he thinks the housing authority is planning the development in the best possible way, and he supports it wholeheartedly. (He told me this from his mansion perched on acres of virgin land outside Steamboat.) Sheila Henderson, the Brown Ranch project manager who headed a local nonprofit for nearly a decade, says she recently had a good talk with a woman who wanted her own “cute little cottage” on Brown Ranch. When Henderson explained that such a home might take away space from families who were living in unsafe conditions, though, the woman relented and said she would be open to living in a multifamily home. Whether or not Brown Ranch gets built will likely depend on the persuasion powers of Peasley, an unabashed optimist who sometimes takes on the role of city coach. He says he wants to change people’s vision of what a vibrant American community can look like—it doesn’t have to have driveways and parking lots, for instance. “The only way we fail is to stop trying,” he said at a recent meeting. Besides, he says, for more than a century, people have given up creature comforts to move to Steamboat for the access to mountains and a life of beauty. That might have meant giving up plumbing or getting used to snow in May in the past; now, it might mean being OK living in a house that shares a wall with a neighbor. The reality of population growth Even if he does convince Steamboat to embrace density, Peasley still has a long road ahead to make Brown Ranch a reality. Consultants have estimated that infrastructure on the site will cost around $400 million, which includes improvements to the local highway, water treatment plant, and sewer system, and roads, and trails in the development. Once that’s complete, the housing authority can start building homes. The city isn’t even sure how it will affordably house all the workers who are going to be flocking to Steamboat to build this affordable housing. One idea is to have construction workers live in an old barn. Steamboat’s infrastructure is already straining under the weight of population growth. There’s only one main road through town, Highway 40, and at rush hour, long lines of pickup trucks get stuck at traffic lights as they make their way across town. After wildfire damage and rains created landslide dangers on Interstate 70, Colorado’s major east-west highway, traffic was rerouted onto Highway 40, causing more headaches for Steamboat residents. The electricity cooperative can only serve 15 homes at Brown Ranch before it runs out of capacity, and water is in short supply, as it is just about everywhere in the American West. Brown Ranch will, of course, add further strain. Peasley estimated that by the time Brown Ranch is finished, it will have almost 1,000 rental apartments and 400 to own, 218 single family-attached homes for rent and 266 to purchase, and 98 single-family detached homes for rent and 300 to purchase. The development will also include a K-8 school, a childcare center, office space, retail, and a grocery store. It’s enough to make old-timers argue against population growth in Steamboat. “Everybody’s moving here—I have to tell you, it would be nice if they wouldn’t,” Cindy Clark, a resident since 1988, told me, outside the crowded grocery store parking lot. But as the many doubled-up residents of Steamboat can attest, America has never been able to prevent people from moving west. Steamboat and popular communities across the country can convince the people who got there first to agree to accommodate the new residents by building more housing. Or residents can declare their cities and towns closed to new construction, new ways to live, and the new people who are seeking a place to live as they did months, years, or decades before......»»

Category: topSource: timeJun 2nd, 2022

Prosecutors Say California Policy Reforms Favor Criminal Suspects Over Victims

Prosecutors Say California Policy Reforms Favor Criminal Suspects Over Victims Authored by Cynthia Cai via The Epoch Times, As stories of smash-and-grab robberies, thieves targeting media crews, and fatal shootings have filled headlines in recent months, two criminal prosecutors say some of this criminal activity may be the result of policy changes in California shifting the law from protecting victims to shielding suspects. Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert (L) and Sacramento Police Department Chief Katherine Lester at the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office in Sacramento, Calif., on May 3, 2022. (Paul Kitagaki Jr./The Sacramento Bee/TNS) Over the past decade, California has implemented a number of criminal law reforms to reduce its prison population. “We’ve got this bad combination of kind of flooding our communities with releases. You’ve got inadequate supervision; you’ve got inadequate plans for them [and] inadequate rehabilitation,” said Anne Marie Schubert, district attorney for Sacramento County. In May 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that “the medical and mental health care provided by California’s prisons has fallen short of minimum constitutional requirements and has failed to meet prisoners’ basic health needs,” with overcrowding highlighted as the main cause. A California Department of Corrections officer speaks to inmates at Chino State Prison in Chino, Calif., on Dec. 10, 2010. (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) Following this ruling, lawmakers and voters passed a series of measures that reduced sentences for certain crimes and diverted offenders from state prisons to county jails. Starting with Assembly Bill 109, state lawmakers proposed and voters passed a measure that allows non-violent, non-serious, and non-sex offenders to be supervised at the local county level after being released from California state prisons. The legislation established the California Public Safety Realignment Act of 2011 and aimed to meet the Supreme Court order to reduce the prison population in the state’s 33 prisons (now 34 prisons, according to a February 2022 report). In 2014, California voters passed Proposition 47, which classifies stealing up to $950 as a misdemeanor crime (up from $400). The law also reclassified some drug possession offenses from felonies to misdemeanors, punishable by up to one year in county jail. Proposition 47 has become more controversial in recent months, as some residents and officials have attributed the law to the recent rise in theft. California’s string of smash-and-grab retail thefts, which began near the end of 2021, prompted state legislators to introduce measures that would either repeal or amend Proposition 47 in an effort to address the rising crime. A series of smash-and-grab robberies left stores with boarded-up windows on Nov. 22, 2021. (Lear Zhou/The Epoch Times) However, lawmakers remain divided on the issue and none of the measures have passed the state legislature. “You’ve got good legislators, like Assemblymember Jim Cooper, who are trying to pass a bill that would just put a GPS device on a high-risk parolee and our legislature is saying ‘No,'” Schubert said. “That is just illogical and it’s not good for public safety.” In 2016, voters passed Proposition 57, which allows felons to earn credits through sustained good behavior and by participating in educational or training assignments, among other programs, while in jail to reduce their sentences and expedite their release. “Many of us in this profession of prosecutors and law enforcement have been kind of ‘sounding the alarm’ before Prop. 57 had passed,” Schubert said. “We said, ‘If you just start handing out credits to dangerous people or you let them just easily let violent people out of prison early without adequate rehabilitation, then we’re failing.’” In January, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) enacted an emergency regulation to create an accelerated credit system. This means that nonviolent offenders can cut two-thirds of the time off their prison sentences, while violent offenders can cut theirs in half. Prisoners wait in line for breakfast at the California Men’s Colony prison in San Luis Obispo, Calif., on Dec. 19, 2013. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images) The CDCR cited the need to reduce the spread of COVID-19 within jail facilities as part of its push for reduced sentencing and reduced inmate population. As of May 16, there have been 50 reported deaths among prison staff and 254 deaths among inmates since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. In April, the CDCR then proposed making the accelerated credit system permanent. Proponents at an April 16 public hearing said the change promotes participation in rehabilitation and educational services. “If you take away these rehabilitative credits from people who strongly want to change their lives and want to earn these credits, you’ll be doing a disservice to them and to the humanity of who we are as a nation,” Reda Chaple, from the Anti-Recidivism Coalition, said during the hearing. However, opponents and a handful of district attorneys said the idea would harm public safety if criminals are released before finishing their sentences. “People that go to prison now in California, it took a lot of effort to get there,” Schubert said. “Either they are repeat offenders, over and over again, or they committed a very particularly violent crime, such as murder or sexual assault. So the population in our prison system now are the most dangerous of the most dangerous.” Critics were quick to point to Proposition 57 and the reduced sentencing system following a shooting on April 3 near the state capitol. An unspecified gang dispute led to a shootout in downtown Sacramento, killing six people and injuring 12. An investigation found that some of the suspects were repeat felons who had been released from prison just weeks before the incident. Police officers work the scene on the corner of 10th and L street of a shooting that occurred in Sacramento, Calif., in the early morning hours on April 3, 2022. (David Odisho/Getty Images) In addition to criminal laws, California prosecution and sentencing laws have also changed. In 2017, Senate Bill 620 removed a prohibition on firearm charges. Under this law, a court may now strike charges involving gun use in a criminal case “in the interest of justice,” the legislation’s text states. Daniel Chung, a career prosecutor and former deputy prosecutor for Santa Clara District Attorney Jeff Rosen, said criminal justice reforms have become “imbalanced.” According to data from the California Department of Justice, prosecution rejections in criminal cases are at their highest rates since the 1980s. “I think that DAs [district attorneys] these days in certain jurisdictions are trying to become very progressive and less about punishment and more just about services,” Chung said. “They’re losing their focus on their main responsibility, which is to enforce laws.” He referred to an attempted murder case that the district attorney had asked him to dismiss. Chung said the case involved a young man who allegedly robbed three stores with a gun and shot at a bystander in the third store. The bystander wasn’t struck and fled the scene. “DA Rosen wanted me to consider dismissal,” Chung said, suggesting influence by special interest groups. “That’s how much we’ve gotten soft on crime.” The Epoch Times reached out to District Attorney Jeff Rosen for comment, but didn’t hear back by press time. Both Chung and Schubert said the ​​state legislature needs to strengthen criminal laws, allow prosecutors to prosecute criminal offenders, and roll back policy reforms that are leading to early releases. Tyler Durden Wed, 06/01/2022 - 23:25.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 2nd, 2022