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Student who tracks Elon Musk"s jet blasts sale of flight-tracking site he uses to keep tabs on aircraft

JetNet announced it had purchased the public flight-tracking site on Wednesday. Jack Sweeney uses the site to share celebrity flight data. Jack Sweeney has used the ADS-B Exchange site to track the private jets of Elon Musk and other celebrities.Jack Sweeney and Getty Jet-tracking student Jack Sweeney is calling for people to boycott ADS-B Exchange. JetNet announced it had purchased the public flight-tracking site on Wednesday. Sweeney uses the site to share flight data on celebrities, including Elon Musk and Donald Trump. The college student who tracks Elon Musk's jet says he's worried the tracking software he uses to keep tabs on celebrity aircraft could soon be yanked from the public after it was sold Wednesday.Aviation data company JetNet said on Wednesday that it bought ADS-B Exchange, a free website that tracked thousands of commercial aircraft around the world.Now it's unclear whether the flight information on the ADS-B exchange will remain free to the public. Jack Sweeney, the 20-year-old student behind the @ElonJetNextDay account and other Twitter accounts that track celebrity jets, said selling the company violates the spirit of the air enthusiast community that's powered the site. He's even calling for a boycott.Dan Streufert, president and founder of ADS-B Exchange, said in a statement that the deal would "meet the business needs of our users while maintaining our enthusiast roots and unfiltered data." He didn't respond to a request for comment from Insider.The plane-tracking company, which was founded in 2016, uses more than 9,000 volunteer-run radios, or "feeders," to transmit data from ADS-B-equipped aircrafts. ADS-B is a surveillance technology that broadcasts information like GPS location and altitude from one aircraft to another, and to ground stations.The software was sold for an undisclosed amount. The website has been popularized by Sweeney, who attends the University of Central Florida. Sweeney uses ADS-B to follow certain aircraft, like those owned by Musk, Donald Trump, and Taylor Swift. He then sets up bots to automatically upload their flights to Twitter.Sweeney took a jab at JetNet and Streufert for the sale, saying the move undermines the point of creating ADS-B Exchange in the first place. "The whole basis of the organization was that it's a community," he told Insider. "Everyone is choosing to give their data to make a community server, not to a private equity firm or company that is trying to make money."A spokesperson for JetNet did not respond to a request for comment ahead of publication.Meanwhile, Sweeney is calling for feeders to boycott the platform, calling it a "sad day." He said he's looking for alternatives to ADS-B Exchange, like creating his own version or using another tracking websites, like Open Sky Network and airframe.io.This is not the first challenge Sweeney has faced since he opened his jet-tracking Twitter accounts. In early 2022, Musk offered him $5,000 to stop sharing the information, but the then-teen upped the ante and asked for $50,000. Musk never followed up, Sweeney said.Later, his accounts, including @ElonJet and @ZuccJet, were suspended in December after the billionaire took over Twitter, with Musk citing the jet-tracking accounts as a "physical safety violation."Twitter has even updated its private information policy to restrict users from sharing people's live locations and Sweeney has begun posting flight data with a 24-hour waiting period to adhere to the social media site's policies.According to the FAA, sharing the public information is legal, but there are a few federal programs that can help block the tracker, however the agency acknowledges that these are not a "silver bullet" and can be skirted via ADS-B Exchange.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 25th, 2023

Elon Musk"s private jet made 134 flights in 2022 – with the shortest trip lasting just 6 minutes

Jack Sweeney, who tracks the billionaire's private jet, has tallied up the number of trips the Tesla and Twitter chief's plane made last year. Elon Musk flies a Gulfstream G550 jet.Getty Images/Jetcraft Elon Musk's private jet made 134 flights in 2022, according to figures compiled by @ElonJet. The jet's shortest flight was six minutes, which could have been the pilot repositioning the plane. The jet's operating costs came to $2.6 million and it produced 1,800 tonnes of CO2, per @ElonJet. Elon Musk's private jet made 134 flights in 2022, according to the man who runs a Twitter account tracking its movements.Jack Sweeney, the college student who started tracking the plane in 2020, compiled the figures for the billionaire's Gulfstream G650ER, whose call sign is N628TS. The data does not show whether Musk was on board, however.Musk was likely to have used his private jet to fly to Qatar to attend the soccer World Cup final in December, the data showed.The plane also made trips to Brazil, France, Italy, Greece, Norway, Germany, and the United Kingdom.Its longest flight, recorded on July 18, was from Mykonos, Greece to Austin, Texas. Musk is likely to have been on board as he was pictured in Greece two days earlier. The jet's shortest flight lasted for about six minutes, and the data shows it remained at Long Beach Airport. The movement could have been to reposition the plane. According to the statistics, the most frequent destinations included Los Angeles, and Austin and Brownsville in Texas.In December, Musk threatened to sue Sweeney for posting his location, saying it had put his two-year-old son in danger. Sweeney told Insider he wasn't concerned by Musk's threat. Sweeney uses bots to scrape and post public flight data that could otherwise be found via aircraft tracking site ADS-B Exchange.He told Insider that Musk could have avoided the public scrutiny generated by his account if Musk had paid him the $50,000 he'd asked for to shut it down – a small sum compared with the estimated $2.6 million annual bill to operate the jet. "Another $50k for privacy would've been nothing," Sweeney said.Although Sweeney's @ElonJet account was permanently banned from Twitter following a change to its doxxing policy, he created another account called @ElonJetNext that posts the same data but has a 24-hour delay. The 134 flights produced 1,895 tonnes of CO2, with the operating cost including fuel expenses of just over $1.1 million. Musk didn't respond to a request for comment from Insider. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJan 8th, 2023

Twitter took down the accounts that track Elon Musk"s and Mark Zuckerberg"s jets

@ElonJet was suspended on Wednesday. Other jet-tracking accounts, including one tracking Mark Zuckerberg's plane, were also suspended later. Associated Press Twitter suspended the @ElonJet account that tracks Elon Musk's jet on Wednesday. Other jet-tracking accounts, including one tracking Marck Zuckerberg's plane, were also suspended later on Wednesday. The man who runs the account has expressed concern in the past that Musk would ban the account. Elon Musk's Twitter suspended the account that track's the billionaire's private jet on Wednesday.Twenty-year-old Jack Sweeney had over 30 jet-tracking accounts on Twitter that track numerous public figures, including Donald Trump and Mark Zuckerberg, as well as celebrities like Taylor Swift and Kim Kardashian.On Wednesday, Sweeney's @elonjet account on Twitter had a notice on it saying it had been suspended because "Twitter suspends accounts that violate the Twitter Rules." The Twitter accounts of @elonjet, @ZuccJet, and @CelebJets have also been suspended as of 3 a.m. ET on Thursday.Sweeney, Musk, and a Twitter spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment ahead of publication. On Wednesday Musk said in a tweet any account doxxing real-time location information of anyone will be suspended, "as it is a physical safety violation."He elaborated on safety concerns, citing an incident with a stalker. Insider could not independently verify Musk's allegations. The LAPD, or Los Angeles Police Department, told Insider it can't track down the incident Musk without an address.The suspension could be a part of Musk's attempts to boot bot accounts off the platform, as Sweeney's accounts use bots to post travel data from the ADS-B Exchange, which is an independent jet-tracking website that uses publicly available data to display an aircraft's location.Musk has been very vocal on Twitter this week about his plans to eliminate bots, saying on Saturday that "bots are in for a real surprise." On Tuesday, Platformer reported that Twitter accidentally blocked dozens of real Twitter users from accessing the site while trying to eliminate spam accounts.Earlier this week, Sweeney said in a Twitter thread that he learned from an anonymous Twitter employee that his account had been shadowbanned, or partially blocked without his knowledge, which was later confirmed by Insider.Sweeney shared a screenshot of internal messages from Twitter's head of trust and safety Ella Irwin asking her team to apply heavy visibility filtering on the ElonJet account, which would limit its reach. Musk has expressed concern regarding how Jack Sweeney's jet-tracking account, @elonjet, could impact his personal safety in the past but said in November that he wouldn't remove the account."My commitment to free speech extends even to not banning the account following my plane, even though that is a direct personal safety risk," the billionaire tweeted about a week after he bought Twitter.When Musk first offered to buy Twitter, Sweeney said he thought it was likely that Musk would try to shut down the account. The 20-year-old college student turned down a $5,000 offer from Musk to take down the account last year after the billionaire called the account a "security risk" and said he didn't want to be "shot by a nutcase."Before Musk took control of the jet-tracking accounts, the Federal Aviation Administration had already implemented two free programs that could help the planes fly incognito — but they aren't foolproof.The first is Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed, also known as LADD, which allows private aircraft owners to dodge plane-tracking software that uses FAA data, like FlightAware or Flightradar24. This means when searched, those tail numbers will be blocked from public view.The second program is called the "privacy ICAO aircraft address", or PIA, which allows aircraft owners to substitute their tail number for a temporary one not used by any other plane, allowing them to fly incognito.According to the FAA, over 300 PIAs have been issued since December 2019 but told Insider they, as well as LADD, still "do not guarantee absolute privacy."This is because ADS-B Exchange does not use FAA data but instead uses data from ADS-B-equipped aircraft that broadcast information like speed and GPS location. Therefore, the website displays LADD and PIA planes, but it will not show the tail number of the latter, though it will note if the aircraft is part of either agency program.Elon Musk's private jet flight with PIA flag, tracked by Jack Sweeney.Jack Sweeney via ADS-B ExchangeMoreover, Sweeney's bot still uploads PIA flights to Twitter, with the FAA telling Insider that Freedom of Information Act requests and commonly used airports are other ways to track PIA planes."Elon Musk, for example, has a Gulfstream and there's only so many people that fly that particular plane out of Brownsville, Texas, and fly to the same airports," Sweeney told Insider.Editor's note: The story has been updated as of 3 a.m. ET on Thursday to reflect the most up to date status of the Twitter accounts. This is a developing story, please check back for updates.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytDec 15th, 2022

Twitter took down the account that tracks Elon Musk"s jet, but the ones tracking Mark Zuckerberg and other celebrities are still up and running

@ElonJet was suspended on Wednesday, but more than 30 accounts that track anyone from Mark Zuckerberg to Taylor Swift were still active. Associated Press Twitter suspended an account that tracks Elon Musk's jet, but left dozens of accounts tracking other celebrities. @ElonJet was suspended on Wednesday, but more than 30 accounts were still up and running. The man who runs the account has expressed concern in the past that Musk would ban the account. Elon Musk's Twitter suspended the account that track's the billionaire's private jet on Wednesday but failed to address other accounts that follow the travel of dozens of celebrities.Twenty-year-old Jack Sweeney has over 30 jet-tracking accounts on Twitter that track numerous public figures, including Donald Trump and Mark Zuckerberg, as well as celebrities like Taylor Swift and Kim Kardashian.On Wednesday, Sweeney's @elonjet account on Twitter had a notice on it saying it had been suspended because "Twitter suspends accounts that violate the Twitter Rules." But, as of Wednesday afternoon, @ZuccJet and @CelebJets, as well as his other jet-tracking accounts were still posting travel updates.Sweeney, Musk, and a Twitter spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment ahead of publication. The suspension could be a part of Musk's attempts to boot bot accounts off the platform, as Sweeney's accounts use bots to post travel data from the ADS-B Exchange, which is an independent jet-tracking website that uses publicly available data to display an aircraft's location.Musk has been very vocal on Twitter this week about his plans to eliminate bots, saying on Saturday that "bots are in for a real surprise." On Tuesday, Platformer reported that Twitter accidentally blocked dozens of real Twitter users from accessing the site while trying to eliminate spam accounts.Earlier this week, Sweeney said in a Twitter thread that he learned from an anonymous Twitter employee that his account had been shadowbanned, or partially blocked without his knowledge, which was later confirmed by Insider.Sweeney shared a screenshot of internal messages from Twitter's head of trust and safety Ella Irwin asking her team to apply heavy visibility filtering on the ElonJet account, which would limit its reach. Musk has expressed concern regarding how Jack Sweeney's jet-tracking account, @elonjet, could impact his personal safety in the past but said in November that he wouldn't remove the account."My commitment to free speech extends even to not banning the account following my plane, even though that is a direct personal safety risk," the billionaire tweeted about a week after he bought Twitter.When Musk first offered to buy Twitter, Sweeney said he thought it was likely that Musk would try to shut down the account. The 20-year-old college student turned down a $5,000 offer from Musk to take down the account last year after the billionaire called the account a "security risk" and said he didn't want to be "shot by a nutcase."Before Musk took control of the jet-tracking accounts, the Federal Aviation Administration had already implemented two free programs that could help the planes fly incognito — but they aren't foolproof.The first is Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed, also known as LADD, which allows private aircraft owners to dodge plane-tracking software that uses FAA data, like FlightAware or Flightradar24. This means when searched, those tail numbers will be blocked from public view.The second program is called the "privacy ICAO aircraft address", or PIA, which allows aircraft owners to substitute their tail number for a temporary one not used by any other plane, allowing them to fly incognito.According to the FAA, over 300 PIAs have been issued since December 2019 but told Insider they, as well as LADD, still "do not guarantee absolute privacy."This is because ADS-B Exchange does not use FAA data but instead uses data from ADS-B-equipped aircraft that broadcast information like speed and GPS location. Therefore, the website displays LADD and PIA planes, but it will not show the tail number of the latter, though it will note if the aircraft is part of either agency program.Elon Musk's private jet flight with PIA flag, tracked by Jack Sweeney.Jack Sweeney via ADS-B ExchangeMoreover, Sweeney's bot still uploads PIA flights to Twitter, with the FAA telling Insider that Freedom of Information Act requests and commonly used airports are other ways to track PIA planes."Elon Musk, for example, has a Gulfstream and there's only so many people that fly that particular plane out of Brownsville, Texas, and fly to the same airports," Sweeney told Insider.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 14th, 2022

It looks like Elon Musk started using a new program that blocks jet tracking after the man who follows his plane wouldn"t take his Twitter account down

Elon Musk applied for an FAA program that makes it more difficult to track his jet, according to the college student who keeps tabs on his plane. Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images, Gulfstream Elon Musk applied for a new FAA program to make it more difficult to track his plane, according to the college student who tracks his plane online. The billionaire appeared to join the program after the student recommended the tool. Musk is one of many celebrities looking for ways to dodge jet-tracking accounts on social media. Elon Musk appears to be trying to fly incognito after the college student who tracks his private jet on Twitter rejected his $5,000 offer to delete the account.The billionaire applied for a temporary aircraft registration number, according to the student, Jack Sweeney, who runs the jet-tracking account @ElonJet, after speaking with him about how to avoid being tracked. The Twitter account currently has nearly 500,000 followers. "What should I do?" Musk messaged in December, according to a screenshot from Sweeney.At the time, Sweeney said the billionaire should look into a new FAA program that would allow him to change his flight identification number, saying Musk would "definitely need the program."Direct messages between Elon Musk and Jack SweeneyCourtesy of Jack SweeneyIn 2019, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) launched a privacy ICAO aircraft address program, also known as PIA. The program allows aircraft owners to apply for a temporary aircraft registration number that is not currently attached to any other plane — meaning that celebrities like Musk can essentially fly anonymously.Up until recently, the program appears to have had few users. Though, jet-tracking accounts like Sweeney's could make the program more popular. Last week, industry executives at the National Business Aviation Association discussed ways to mitigate real-time tracking.The PIA program allows aircraft owners to switch out their registration number every 60 days. Though, Sweeney noted it can be a laborious process. Christian Renneissen, Collins Aerospace's manager for flight deck connectivity, previously told the trade publication AV Buyer that while the PIA program is essentially free, it's a hassle due to a substantial amount of paperwork.What's more, the entire process would have to start all over again if the new registration number is exposed and tied to the owner — which Sweeney said is all too easy."Elon Musk, for example, has a Gulfstream and there's only so many people that fly that particular plane out of Brownsville, Texas and fly to the same airports," Sweeney told Insider.The incognito registration number also doesn't prevent Sweeney from tracking the private jet via ADS-B Exchange, a public flight-tracking database. Jets that fly with the temporary identification number can be easily found on the ADS-B Exchange, as shown by a screenshot shared with Insider that shows the jet that Sweeney says is Musk's was flying on May 7 with no callsign, no tail number, but had "PIA" flagged.Elon Musk's private jet flight with PIA flag, tracked by Jack Sweeney.Jack Sweeney via ADS-B ExchangeMusk is also on the FAA's free "Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed" program, or LADD list. The list allows aircraft owners to avoid being tracked by sites that use FAA data. Though, the list has no impact on the ADS-B Exchange, which provides data to Sweeney's jet-tracking accounts.Musk isn't the only one to attempt to dodge flight-tracking accounts on social media. Celebrities like Taylor Swift and Oprah Winfrey are on the LADD list, while Louis Vuitton CEO Bernard Arnault recently said he's started renting private planes to avoid jet-tracking accounts.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderOct 26th, 2022

How Elon Musk, Donald Trump, Taylor Swift, and others are trying to dodge jet tracking

Some of the biggest celebrities and business names have signed up for federal programs that help them fly incognito, but it's not foolproof. Elon Musk and the Gulfstream G650ER.Patrick Pleul/picture alliance/Getty Images/Courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation On Wednesday, Twitter banned a myriad of Twitter accounts that track private jets, like Elon Musk's. 20-year-old Jack Sweeney still provides data on the private planes on other social apps. To dodge trackers like Sweeney, many celebrities are trying to fly incognito, but it's not foolproof. On Wednesday, Elon Musk's Twitter suspended over 30 jet-tracking accounts that were created by 20-year-old Jack Sweeney. The accounts showed the travel plans of celebrities like Musk, Donald Trump, and Taylor Swift.Jack Sweeney and Elon MuskJack Sweeney and GettyTwitter took down the accounts that track Elon Musk's and Mark Zuckerberg's jetsThe jet-tracking data is public information that Sweeney still shares on several other social media sites, including Instagram and Facebook.@elonmusksjet on InstagramInstagramHere's how to track the latest location of Elon Musk's private jet, after Twitter banned the @ElonJet account of a student who tracked the aircraftOver the past year, celebrities like Musk and Mark Zuckerberg have struggled to shake jet-tracking accounts that follow their private planes' every move.Mark Zuckerberg (left) and Elon Musk.Kevin Dietsch/Michael Gonzalez/Getty ImagesElon Musk says social-media accounts that track his travel movements are 'becoming a security issue'Jet-tracking wunderkind Sweeney helped ignite the trend in early 2022 when he made headlines for publicly tracking Musk's Gulfstream 650ER.Jack Sweeney at the NBAA conference in mid-October in Orlando.Jack SweeneyElon Musk now has another lavish Gulfstream private jet in his arsenalThe college student uses a public website called ADS-B Exchange, which was founded in 2016 by IT professional Dan Streufert, to track the tail number, and a bot automatically uploads the flights to his social media accounts.Floyd Mayweather's jet landing in Las Vegas on October 31.ADS-B Exchange via TwitterSource: ADS-B Exchange, TwitterThe website aggregates flight information with the help of over 7,500 volunteer-run radios around the world that receive information from ADS-B-equipped aircraft, Streufert told the Airplane Geeks podcast.The cockpit of the G280.Abby Wallace/Insider.Source: LinkedIn, Airplane GeeksAccording to the Federal Aviation Administration, ADS-B broadcasts information like GPS location, altitude, and ground speed from one plane to ground stations and other aircraft. This happens once per second.Ulrich Zillmann/Getty ImagesSource: FAAThe FAA required all operators to equip their aircraft with ADS-B technology by 2020 to fly in most controlled airspace. The agency says the move improves safety and efficiency, particularly in high-traffic airports like New York and Miami.The FAA's Air Traffic Control System Command Center (ATCSCC).Daniel Lippman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesSource: FAASweeney's tracking process is legal as ADS-B Exchange is public information, per Streufert.Pinned note on Sweeney's @ElonJet Twitter account.Jack Sweeney/TwitterThe teen famous for tracking Elon Musk's jet has a new target: Russian oligarchs' jets and yachtsIn January, Musk offered Sweeney $5,000 to take the jet-tracking account down, but Sweeney requested $50,000. Musk said he would think about it and never followed up.Chesnot/Getty ImagesElon Musk offered a 19-year-old $5,000 to take down a Twitter account that tracks his private jet, report saysBefore it was suspended, the @ElonJet Twitter account had nearly 500,000 followers.Elon Musk has a Gulfstream G650ER private jet (not the one pictured).Courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace CorporationSource: TwitterIn June, Mark Cuban even made a deal with Sweeney to give him a lifetime of business advice to stop tracking his travel on Twitter, which Sweeney agreed to.John Lamparski/Getty ImagesThe teen who tracks Elon Musk's jet agreed to stop monitoring Mark Cuban's flights on Twitter after the billionaire offered business advice: 'By ending this you have me as a friend for life'Since he made headlines, Sweeney's myriad other jet-tracking accounts have gained popularity, including @TrumpJets, which had about 10,000 followers on Twitter before it was suspended on Wednesday...Trump sitting in his Boeing 757 private jet.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSource: Twitter, Trump's beloved Boeing 757 private jet is finally flying again after a year of maintenance work and a new paint job…and @ZuccJet at about 16,000 followers…Kevin Dietsch/Getty ImagesSource: Twitter…and @CelebrityJets at nearly 125,000 followers, which tracks high-profile people like Floyd Mayweather, Blake Shelton, and Mark Wahlberg.Mark Wahlberg's Bombardier Global Express jet.HoneywellSource: TwitterWhile Sweeney says he doesn't make any money off the accounts, he said he's gotten a job offer from Stratos Jet Charters out of his work. He's currently a sophomore at the University of Central Florida studying computer science.Jack SweeneyThe 19-year-old who turned down $5,000 from Elon Musk to stop tracking his private jet has gotten a job offer out of the viral sagaWith the gaining popularity of the account, Musk expressed concern that the ElonJet account could pose a security issue.Elon Musk and a Gulfstream G550. Two G550s mostly fly for SpaceX and Tesla carrying employees, per Sweeney.Sean Zanni / Contributor/Getty Images; Courtesy of JetcraftSource: Twitter, Jack Sweeney, Teen who turned down $5,000 from Elon Musk to shut down a Twitter account tracking the billionaire's jet says he gets too much work satisfaction to settle for less than $50,000The accounts have also created PR issues for celebrities like Taylor Swift and Kylie Jenner, who have been blasted on social media for taking hundreds of flights per year and emitting thousands of tons of CO2.Taylor Swift attends the 2022 Toronto International Film Festival.Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty ImagesJokes and memes about Taylor Swift's private jet are taking over the internet as people mock her response to the carbon emissions controversySo, it's not a surprise celebrities are trying to dodge jet trackers — but it isn't easy.Taylor Swift owns a Dassault Falcon 900 (interior example pictured).Courtesy of Dassault Aviation.Elon Musk and Donald Trump are trying new ways to dodge jet-tracking Twitter accounts — but it's not a 'silver bullet'The Federal Aviation Administration has created a program called "Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed," or LADD for short. Because they use FAA data, websites like FlightAware and FlightRadar24 will not show LADD-registered planes.Celebrities are being criticized over their private jet usage.JethuynhCan/Getty ImagesSource: FAAIf, for example, someone searched for Trump's 757 tail number — N757AF — on FlightAware, the screen would say the plane "is not available for public tracking per request from the owner/operator."FlightAwareSource: FlightAwareTrump, along with Travis Scott, Drake, Steven Spielberg, and dozens of others, have signed up for the free program in an effort to dodge the tracking accounts of Sweeney and others.Drake.Kathy Hutchins/ShutterstockSource: TwitterSweeney has even created a "LADD List" that houses all of the tail numbers that he estimates have signed up.Drake's Boeing 767 private jet, dubbed "Air Drake," is on the LADD list.Laurent Thomet/AFP via Getty ImagesSource: Jack SweeneyWhile, on the surface, this seems like a reliable way to avoid being tracked, Sweeney is thwarting their plans by using ASD-B Exchange. The website does not use FAA data, so it can display any flight regardless of if it is on the LADD list or not.Puma/Jay Z's jet tracked on ADS-B Exchange with LADD indicator.ADS-B ExchangeStreufert, who runs the ADS-B Exchange website, says it's gathered from "all public information," according to an interview with the AFP. "We have not removed anything so far," he told the AFP. "And I don't want to be the arbiter of who's right and who's wrong."flyExclusiveSource: AFPSo, unfortunately for private jet owners, LADD isn't going to cut it. But, there is another free FAA program they can use that is more secure.Inside a King Air 350i.Taylor Rains/InsiderThe program is called the "privacy ICAO aircraft address program," or PIA. This allows people to substitute their tail number for a temporary one not assigned to any other aircraft, allowing them to fly incognito.Kevin Kurek/picture alliance via Getty ImagesCelebrities like Musk and Trump have enrolled in PIA. The FAA said in October that more than 300 PIAs have been issued since its launch in December 2019.New paint job on Trump's Boeing 757 private jet.MediaPost, LLC for Landlocked AviationIt looks like Elon Musk started using a new program that blocks jet tracking after the man who follows his plane wouldn't take his Twitter account downMusk actually sought advice from Sweeney on how to avoid being tracked and Sweeney suggested PIA, as shown in a Twitter DM exchange Sweeney shared with Insider.Direct message exchange between Elon Musk and Jack Sweeney.Jack SweeneyHowever, despite having PIA, the planes can still be followed: "These privacy mitigation programs are effective for real-time operations but do not guarantee absolute privacy," the FAA told Insider.ADS-B Exchange has a "PIA" filter that will show all aircraft currently flying with the program.ADS-B ExchangeFor example, Musk flew from Texas to California on May 7, and while ADS-B Exchange did not display the real tail number, it flagged the jet as PIA and it was still uploaded to @ElonJet by Sweeney’s bot.Elon Musk's private jet flight with PIA flag, tracked by Jack Sweeney.Jack Sweeney via ADS-B ExchangeSource: TwitterThe FAA also noted to Insider that a Freedom of Information Act request, LiveATC, and frequently departed airports can also be used to identify PIA planes.LiveATC allows anyone to tap into the conversations between air traffic control and aircraft.eyfoto/Getty ImagesSource: Live ATC"Elon Musk, for example, has a Gulfstream and there's only so many people that fly that particular plane out of Brownsville, Texas, and fly to the same airports," Sweeney told Insider.Inside a typical G650ER (not Elon Musk's).Taylor Rains/InsiderWith all of the loopholes to the FAA's privacy programs, the agency admits it is not a "silver bullet," prompting some celebrities and big names in business to ditch owning private jets altogether.The Bombardier Global 7500 is the largest purpose-built private jet in the world.Thomas Pallini/InsiderLVMH CEO Bernard Arnault, who oversees the Louis Vuitton brand along with other high-end names, sold his Bombardier Global 7500 in September, telling Bloomberg, "no one can see where I go because I rent planes when I use private planes."LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault on board his private jet between Beijing and Shanghai. in Shanghai, China on October 11, 2004.Marc DEVILLE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty ImagesThe world's 2nd-richest man, Louis Vuitton's CEO, sold his private jet after people started tracking it on Twitter: 'No one can see where I go'And Apple CEO Tim Cook has been renting private planes since 2017, with the company citing "security and efficiency" concerns.Cook at Code in 2022.Jerod Harris/Getty Images for Vox MediaApple's board says Tim Cook has to fly private from now on 'in the interests of security and efficiency'Meanwhile, earlier this year, Meta switched out Zuckerberg's private jet, forcing Sweeney to find the plane's new tail number all over again just months after he first started sharing the Facebook founder's travel on Twitter.Zuckerberg's new jet is a G650ER. (His exact plane isn't pictured).Taylor Rains/InsiderTeen who tracks Elon Musk's jet says he's discovered Mark Zuckerberg's new aircraftRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 18th, 2022

Elon Musk argued with reporters on Twitter Spaces about suspending multiple high-profile journalists" accounts — hear the full exchange, including the moment he abruptly left

Several reporters, many of whom cover Musk and Twitter, had their accounts suspended, seemingly for tweeting about a site tracking Musk's private jet. Elon Musk.Carina Johansen/Getty Images On Thursday, Twitter suspended the accounts of multiple high-profile journalists who cover owner Elon Musk. Elon Musk later dropped into Twitter Spaces, where reporters asked why the accounts were suspended. He spoke a few times before abruptly leaving. Listen to the full exchange below. Twitter suspended the accounts of several high-profile journalists late Thursday, and a Twitter Spaces discussion on the matter, featuring Elon Musk himself, followed shortly after.Multiple reporters, many of whom cover tech, including Musk and Twitter, saw their Twitter accounts suspended without warning or explanation on Thursday. They include Ryan Mac of The New York Times, Donie O'Sullivan of CNN, Drew Harwell of The Washington Post, Matt Binder of Mashable, Micah Flee of The Intercept, Steve Herman of Voice of America, and independent journalists Aaron Rupar, Keith Olbermann, and Tony Webster.Several of them had recently tweeted about the @ElonJet Twitter account, which is run by college student Jack Sweeney and tracks flights by Musk's private jet using public flight data available online. Twitter suspended that account on Wednesday despite Musk, who has called himself a free-speech absolutist, tweeting in November that he wouldn't do so.Musk said on Wednesday, "Any account doxxing real-time location info of anyone will be suspended, as it is a physical safety violation. This includes posting links to sites with real-time location info."Despite the suspensions, the reporters were still able to use Twitter Spaces. Several of the reporters, along with Jack Sweeney of the @ElonJet account, gathered in a Spaces call hosted by BuzzFeed News tech reporter Katie Notopoulos to discuss the suspensions, and Musk himself briefly joined the call. When pressed for answers about the suspensions, Musk repeatedly said, "You dox, you get suspended." He abruptly left later.Twitter Spaces later stopped working, which Musk says happened to fix a "legacy bug," but several Twitter users recorded the exchange between Musk and the reporters. You can watch it here:—Bradley Eversley (@ForeverEversley) December 16, 2022      Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytDec 16th, 2022

Here"s how to track the latest location of Elon Musk"s private jet, after Twitter banned the @ElonJet account of a student who tracked the aircraft

Elon Musk this week suspended Twitter accounts using publicly available flight data showing cities where his private jet travels. Elon Musk and Jack SweeneyJack Sweeney and GettyElon Musk is trying to keep his private jet travels away from public view, despite the fact that his flight data is available online and relatively easy to track.His Gulfstream jet, registered through an LLC he owns, could be seen having landed on Wednesday evening in Austin through an online tracker, ADS-B Exchange. On Thursday, it took off again in the afternoon local time heading northwest.ADS-B makes use of flight information transmitted by federal law to show thousands of commercial and private aircraft flights all over the world. While Musk has recently begun to claim such tracking poses a security risk, ADS-B addresses that stance on its website."If aircraft do not want to be seen, (such as military aircraft on a mission) they can always turn their transponders "off," the site says. "The position data shown by ADSBexchange is available to anyone who can spend $50 on Amazon and put the parts together. It's not secret. Air Traffic Control voice comms are not encrypted either, and contain similar (or more) information." The billionaire and new Twitter owner does seem to have opted into a program offered by the Federal Aviation Association called Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed, or LADD, in an effort to limit some information about his aircraft. Another website, FlightAware, does not show any flight information for Musk's jet, saying on its website it does so at the request of the owner.A spokesperson for the FAA and ADS-B Exchange did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The cities where Musk's private jet lands have for years been openly accessible for public viewing through sites that receive and track flight data that is mandated to be transmitted by the FAA. Earlier this week, Musk suspended a Twitter account of a 20-year old student, Jack Sweeney, who created a tool that automatically posted flights the billionaire took on his jet. Musk also suspended Sweeney's personal Twitter account and is now threatening "legal action" against him. He said the cities where his jet lands being made available on Twitter threatened the safety of his family.After implementing the suspensions, Twitter changed its rules to state that the posting of a person's "live location" is now prohibited, despite a history of live posting, video and events being core to Twitter's function and appeal as a platform. Twitter also suspended more than 30 other accounts that similarly used public flight data to track private jet travel of notable billionaires and political figures, like Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Russian President Vladimir Putin.Other notable billionaires have taken pains to keep their flight data inaccessible by the public. Google co-founder Larry Page is also part of the LADD program and frequently uses rental jets to keep his travels more secret, as Insider reported. Bernard Arnault, the co-founder and CEO of luxury fashion group LVMH, earlier this year sold his private jet and began using rentals to avoid his flights being made public.In addition to private jet tracking showing where the ultra-wealthy are traveling to, accounts like Sweeney's that posted on social media about the flights noted how long they were and how much air-pollution such trips created. Private planes are known to be 14 times more pollutive per passenger than a commercial flight, creating 2 metric tons of carbon per hour. Correction: December 15, 2022 — Elon Musk's private jet is still being tracked by the website ADS-B Exchange. An earlier version of this story stated otherwise.Are you a Twitter employee or someone else with insight to share? Contact Kali Hays at khays@insider.com, on secure messaging app Signal at 949-280-0267, or through Twitter DM at @hayskali. Reach out using a non-work device.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytDec 15th, 2022

Trump has refurbished his prized $100 million Boeing 757 private jet as he announces a 2024 presidential run — see inside "Trump Force One"

The former president bought his luxury Boeing 757 private jet in 2011 and decked it out with gold-plated seatbelts and the Trump family crest. Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images After two years, Donald Trump's famous Boeing 757 private jet is flying again with a fresh paint job and new parts. The aircraft has become a symbol of Trump's wealth, complete with a bedroom and gold-plated seatbelts. The prized plane is expected to accompany Trump at his 2024 presidential campaign rallies. During his time as president, Donald Trump paraded around the world in Air Force One, a specially-modified Boeing 747 used for presidential transport.Go Nakamura/Getty ImagesSource: The White HouseThe flying Oval Office is luxurious, with several staterooms and meeting rooms.President Joe Biden meets with staff aboard Air Force One in 2021.Official White House Photo by Adam Schultz31 photos that show how Air Force One has changed through the yearsBut, as a multi-billionaire and business tycoon, Air Force One was not Trump's first time using an enormous private jet.Trump onboard his Boeing 757 private jet.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesOver the years, the former president has owned several personal aircraft, like a Cessna Citation X…Trump stepping off his Cessna Citation X.John Locher/AP ImagesHere's how the Trump family spends their billions, from a $15 million beachfront estate in St. Martin to a $32 million fleet of private helicopters and airplanes…a Boeing 727 tri-jet…Trump put the plane up for sale in 2009.Andrew Milligan - PA Images/PA Images via Getty ImagesSource: CNN…a Sikorsky S76 helicopter…Scott Halleran/Getty ImagesTrump is selling his iconic $7 million helicopter that was a frequent guest on 'The Apprentice' and the campaign trail — see inside…and his prized Boeing 757 narrowbody aircraft, which he named "Trump Force One."Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesTrump's beloved Boeing 757 private jet is finally flying again after a year of maintenance work and a new paint jobThe 757 first flew in 1991 and was previously operated by defunct carriers Sterling Airways in Denmark and TAESA Airlines in Mexico.Trump's 757 when it flew for Sterling Airlines.Flickr/Aero IcarusIt also spent time as a corporate aircraft for Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen before being sold to Trump.Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen (L).David McNew/Getty ImagesRegistered N757AF, Trump bought the 31-year-old plane in 2011 for a reported $100 million and it became an icon at his 2016 campaign rallies all over the US.Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty ImageSource: CNNAnd, it was no secret whose plane was flying overhead as it sported a giant "T" on the tail and "TRUMP" written in large letters on the fuselage.Trump eventually painted the "Trump" letters gold.Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty ImagesHowever, when Trump won the presidency in 2016, he was required to use the government transport fleet while in office.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSo, he traded in his beloved 757 for the presidential aircraft, but the plane was still used by members of the Trump Organization from 2017 to 2019.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesThe gold-plated Boeing 757 owned by former President Trump is sitting empty at a New York airport, amid reports that the plane requires costly repairsIn 2019, the plane was parked at Stewart International Airport in New York where it sat for two years before flying to Louisiana in November 2021 for refurbishment.Trump's 757 parked at Stewart International Airport in New York.Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty ImagesSource: Insider, InsiderTrump announced on his website in May 2021 that the plane, which needed a new paint job and maintenance work, would be "fully restored and updated" in Louisiana and "used at upcoming rallies."Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty ImagesSource: Donald J Trump, Trump plans to restore his 'beautiful' Boeing 757 with Rolls-Royce engines and new paint job for future ralliesAlthough Trump initially said the plane would re-enter service at the end of 2021, it is finally back as of July 2022.Trump's 757 getting a new paint job.MediaPost, LLC for Landlocked AviationEric Trump posted a time-lapse video on Twitter of the 757's new paint job, which was completed by aircraft refinishing company Landlocked Aviation.Trump's 757 getting a new paint job.MediaPost, LLC for Landlocked AviationSource: Eric Trump, 7NewsCompany president Tyson Grenzebach told local outlet 7News in July that the job took 40 people and about a month to complete.Trump's 757 getting a new paint job.MediaPost, LLC for Landlocked AviationSource:  7NewsThe fresh livery sports a black fuselage and an American flag on the tail...Trump's 757 getting a new paint job.MediaPost, LLC for Landlocked Aviation....and the signature gold "Trump" lettering.Trump's new 757 paint job.MediaPost, LLC for Landlocked Aviation"Excellence requested, excellence delivered!" Grenzebach told Insider. "The great men and women of Landlocked Aviation are proud to always deliver superior aircraft refinishing work while providing exceptional customer service."Trump's 757 going into Landlocked Aviation's paint shop.MediaPost, LLCSoon, the private aircraft is expected to return as the former head of state officially starts his 2024 presidential campaign — take a look inside Trump's luxurious ride as it looked in 2011.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesTrump announces his Boeing 757 private jet is set to return as he hints at 2024 Presidential runEntering from the back of the jet, you'll first see inside the galley complete with glassware, a sink, and coffee makers, creating a small kitchen.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSource: The Trump OrganizationThe 43-seater jet can accommodate gourmet meals, but Trump has been seen eating Big Macs and French fries onboard.Donald Trump eats a meal from McDonald's in his 757 private jet.Donald Trump for PresidentTrump reportedly loves McDonald's because he has a 'longtime fear' of being poisonedBeyond the galley are a first class cabin and a dining area with loungers and a couch...Behind the dining area through the door is the first class cabin (far left).Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images...and a table with four chairs, which Trump regularly conducted interviews from.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesAmanda Miller, the Trump Organization's SVP of marketing & corporate communications, said in a 2011 video tour that the seatbelts and other finishes are 24K gold-plated...Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSource: The Trump Organization...and the headrests and pillows have been etched with the Trump family crest.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesMoving through the jet, passengers will find the main lounge, which features seats, a couch, and the SkyTheater with a 57" TV and sound system that replicates a "Hollywood screening room," Miller said.Pictured is the main lounge's couch.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSource: The Trump OrganizationThere is also a touchscreen system that controls the theater and has a special "T" list that shows Trump's favorite movies and CDs.Donald Trump and Ivanka Trump sit in loungers in front of the dining area.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesThe plane would not be complete without a few bedrooms, including a guest room with wood finishings, a theater system, and two couches that convert into a double bed.The two couches convert into a double bed.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesMeanwhile, Trump has his own private bedroom with a custom headboard, pillows, and comforter, as well as a theater system and work desk.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesThe former president also has a master bathroom with a green countertop and gold-plated sink...Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images...as well as a toilet that doubles as a seat, which is common on many private jets.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesTowards the front of the jet is a VIP area with a couch and loungers, which is where the pilots or other important people can relax.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSource: The Trump OrganizationAlthough the plane is decked out, it's not much use without pilots. Long-time aviators, John Dunkin and Jay Galpin, head the controls in the 757's glass display cockpit in 2014.Pilots Captains John Dunkin (L) and Jay Galpin (R) after flying Trump's 757 private jet.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSince its revival, Jack Sweeney, who became famous for tracking billionaire planes like Elon Musk's on Twitter, has recorded the 757's recent flights on his Twitter account, "Trump Jets."Trump-branded water bottle on the 757.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSource: Jack Sweeney, The man who tracks Elon Musk's private jet says he would stop if the billionaire took him on a flight and gave him an interview, report saysStarting on October 15, the 757 flew several flights around Lake Charles, Louisiana before heading home to Palm Beach, Florida on October 19, per tracking website ADS-B Exchange.Looking down the hallway of Trump's 757.Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty ImagesSource: Jack Sweeney, ADS-B Exchange, From Elon Musk and Donald Trump to Taylor Swift and Tim Cook, here's how celebrities are dodging jet-tracking Twitter accounts The jet has since flown to places like Corpus Christi, Texas; Latrobe, Pennsylvania; Sioux City, Iowa; and Dayton, Ohio.Trump's 757 flight to Texas on October 22.ADS-B Exchange via Twitter/Jack SweeneySource: Twitter, Elon Musk and Donald Trump are trying new ways to dodge jet-tracking Twitter accounts — but it's not a 'silver bullet'Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 27th, 2022

20-year-old who tracks Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg"s private jets says Facebook took down his page because it violates their policy

Jack Sweeney told Insider Facebook didn't share why the account was banned and it temporarily caused his bot to crash on other sites as well. Mark Zuckerberg (left) and Elon Musk.Kevin Dietsch/Michael Gonzalez/Getty Images Jack Sweeney said Facebook shut down his page that tracks Elon Musk's jets. Sweeney made headlines earlier this year when Musk offered him $5,000 to shut down a Twitter account. The 20-year-old also shares tracking data on Mark Zuckerberg's private plane. Jack Sweeney, the 20-year-old known for tracking Elon Musk's jet, said on Thursday that Facebook had shut down his page.Sweeney shared a picture of a notice from the social media company on Twitter that said Sweeney's page for tracking Musk's jets had been "unpublished because it violates Facebook Pages terms.""Really @Facebook," Sweeney tweeted. —Jack Sweeney (@JxckSweeney) September 22, 2022A spokesperson for Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Insider ahead of publication.Sweeney told Insider the Facebook email did not share additional detail as to why the account had been banned and the shutdown temporarily caused the bot he uses to track Musk's planes to crash on other sites as well."I did an appeal, but haven't heard back," Sweeney said.The University of Central Florida student has had his jet-tracking pages reported or restricted on social media in the past. Facebook pages can be taken down for posting misleading content, promoting hate speech, or violating the site's Community Standards — which includes content that could "content that could contribute to a risk of harm to the physical security of persons."Sweeney previously told Insider he doesn't think the accounts pose a major security issue as the data is already available online via public air-traffic-tracking sites like the ADS-B Exchange. He said he merely puts the data on Twitter via bots that scrape the websites.The college student does not have any other jet-tracking accounts on Facebook. But, Instagram — which is also owned by Facebook parent company Meta — has not taken down the duplicate @elonmusksjet account. Though, the Instagram page only has about 11,000 followers as compared to the nearly 500,000 accounts that follow @ElonJet on Twitter.Sweeney has expressed concern in the past that social media sites might try to ban his accounts, especially when he first learned Musk planned to buy Twitter. At the time, he said he created backup pages on Facebook and Instagram.The college student first started @ElonJet in June 2020, but he first made headlines in January after saying Musk offered to pay him $5,000 to shut down the Twitter account that tracked his whereabouts. The billionaire told Sweeney he was concerned for his safety and didn't "love the idea of being shot by a nutcase." Sweeney previously told Insider that he countered Musk's offer, asking for $50,000 instead, but Musk declined.The Tesla CEO isn't the only person Sweeney tracks. In May, the college student said he'd re-discovered Mark Zuckerberg's aircraft after the Facebook founder appeared to switch jets shortly after Sweeney first started sharing his whereabouts on Twitter. While Sweeney initially turned down Musk's $5,000 offer to take down his account, the 20-year-old has said he isn't against deleting the tracking accounts for the right price. Earlier this year, he told Insider he stopped tracking Mark Cuban's jets on Twitter after the billionaire investor reached out and offered him business advice in exchange.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytSep 23rd, 2022

I got a free first-class upgrade on my flight from New York to London. The luxurious perks were absurd.

My free upgrade to first class got me into the exclusive Chelsea Lounge at JFK Airport, complimentary breakfast, and a pre-flight hot towel. Kiera Fields/Insider I flew with British Airways from New York to London and got a free first-class upgrade.  With the upgrade, I could access the newly renovated exclusive Chelsea Lounge in JFK's Terminal 8. I was surprised by some of the luxurious perks like a personal closet and pre-flight hot towels.  I live in London but grew up in Bermuda, where my parents still live. I'm a frequent flyer, and a Silver British Airways member to get double air miles to use toward my regular flights.After a trip home over Christmas, and from there a trip to New York in the first week of January, I was due to fly back to London with British Airways' Club World class on a return ticket. This return ticket from London to NYC usually costs £1,700, or around $2,000.But when I arrived at the check-in desk at JFK on Sunday at 5 a.m. for my 8 a.m. flight, staff told me that I was being upgraded to first class.I looked up the price-comparison site Skyscanner and found first-class single tickets from New York to London with British Airways on sale for between £4,000 and £9,000, or between around $4,874 and $10,968. Gulp.After making it through security, I found myself with an hour to spend in British Airways' new Chelsea Lounge in JFK's Terminal 8, accessible only to people traveling in first class, or American Airlines Business Premier on Flagship flights.  The lounge, which opened in December, is decorated in calming neutral tones, a pleasant balm to the airport chaos outside.Kiera Fields/InsiderThere's a large wrap-around bar fully stocked with a bartender ready to take travelers' orders upon entering the lounge.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe crystal chandelier framing the bar added to the opulence of this exclusive space.Kiera Fields/InsiderA lounge attendant asked whether I would like a complimentary breakfast in their dining area.Kiera Fields/InsiderI declined and sat in the main seating section of the lounge, near the bar.Kiera Fields/InsiderAnother attendant took my drink order and gave me a menu in case I changed my mind and wanted to order anything while I waited.Kiera Fields/InsiderI perused the snack bar and got a glass of water and a glass of fresh orange juice.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe orange juice container had the ice in a plastic tube so it wouldn't dilute the juice, which I'd never seen before.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe breakfast menu was extensive, but I wasn't very hungry at 6:30 a.m.Kiera Fields/InsiderI ordered an acai bowl as I waited for my gate to be announced to take full advantage of the lounge's amenities.Kiera Fields/InsiderStaff called my gate and I boarded the Boeing 777-200 aircraft that British Airways uses for long-haul flights.Kiera Fields/InsiderWhen I got to my seat, I was impressed with the amount of space I had to myself.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe flight attendant referred to me by name, which I thought was a nice touch, and was very friendly. She offered me pajamas and slippers to change into before the plane took off, but I declined as I didn't plan to sleep.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe seat had two pillows, one throw-sized and one full bed-sized pillow. Both were very soft and comfortable.Kiera Fields/InsiderThere was also a blanket and headphones strapped to my footstool.Kiera Fields/InsiderEach chair had a dimmable reading light in a very quaint lampshade that almost felt Parisian.Kiera Fields/Business InsiderThe seat spanned two windows with views of the sunrise.Kiera Fields/InsiderThere was a personal closet space to store my shoes and coat.Kiera Fields/InsiderI had already tossed my jacket in the overheard container, but I imagine this would be great if you're traveling for business.Kiera Fields/InsiderStaff gave me the extensive in-flight menu and took my order before we took off. This surprised me but I later realized it was so staff could serve us our first meal as soon as we reached cruising altitude.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe menu offered 3 courses for each meal, with breakfast served right after take-off and our "light meal" served before landing.Kiera Fields/InsiderI was also offered a drink before takeoff, the flight attendant suggested champagne or orange juice, but I went for water to stay hydrated. The drink came on a linen coaster, another weirdly luxurious quirk.Kiera Fields/InsiderI was also given a toiletry bag decorated in a fun floral print, which felt well-made.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe bag contained a large selection of items including beauty products from Elemis, a high-end cosmetic brand, a pen, an eye mask, socks, a compact mirror, and earplugs.Kiera Fields/InsiderClassical music played overhead before takeoff. I wasn't sure if British Airways pipes music through the whole plane, or just in first class.Kiera Fields/InsiderBefore takeoff, staff offered me a hot scented towel on a little glass plate. Some of the perks, like a towel on a plate, felt a little absurd.Kiera Fields/InsiderFor all my seat's amenities, I couldn't find anywhere easily accessible to put my phone and book during take off. I ended up stashing them in the magazine holder for safekeeping.Kiera Fields/InsiderOnce we were at cruising altitude, I was able to adjust my seat to a more comfortable position. However, I didn't find the dial that controlled the seat very user-friendly.Kiera Fields/InsiderI settled in to watch some of the in-flight entertainment. The TV screen that extends from the inner wall of the seat was large and completely touch-screen.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe complimentary headphones they provided were incredibly good quality, which struck me as bizarre as they are single-use and can only be used in the airplane’s double-pronged headphone jack.Kiera Fields/InsiderWithin half an hour of reaching cruising altitude, the flight attendant came to set my place for breakfast.Kiera Fields/InsiderI was extremely impressed with the restaurant quality of the place setting. My "table" was set with a white linen tablecloth, multiple sets of silverware, and individual salt and pepper grinders.Kiera Fields/InsiderMy coffee came with a milk jug and a sugar dish. I felt like I was in a fancy café.Kiera Fields/InsiderI had the ricotta-and-truffle omelet for breakfast and chose a slice of toast from the bakery basket — croissants and danishes were also available.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe omelet came with mushrooms and tomatoes — a welcome healthy addition. The entire dish required a lot of additional seasoning with salt and pepper, which made me think that, even in first class, airplane food can be bland.Kiera Fields/InsiderI continued watching films for the remainder of my flight. The window blind can also be adjusted to prevent glare on the screen or if you felt like sleeping.Kiera Fields/InsiderTwo and a half hours after breakfast was served, the flight attendant came around with a basket of snacks. I chose some popcorn and a chocolate truffle.Kiera Fields/InsiderFour and a half hours and an entire season of "Derry Girls" later, the "light-meal" service began.Kiera Fields/InsiderI ordered a bulgur-wheat, tomato, and cucumber salad to start and a small loaf of bread from the bread basket.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe flight attendant cleared my salad plate and replaced it with my second course, a "mezze rigatoni" with asparagus sauce and tomatoes.Kiera Fields/InsiderThe sauce was quite soupy, which made it difficult to eat without a spoon, which didn't make it into the array of cutlery my place was set with.Kiera Fields/InsiderI'm glad I had the opportunity to travel first class. I can definitely see the appeal of a seat that becomes a bed, with a turndown service and a large TV screen for an overnight flight or a longer journey. But I can't see myself paying thousands to cross the Atlantic like this again.Kiera Fields/InsiderRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJan 22nd, 2023

Aircastle Announces Third Quarter 2022 Results, Strong Gains on Sales

Highlights for the Three Months Ended November 30, 2022 Total revenues of $258 million Adjusted EBITDA(1) of $240 million Net income of $50 million Acquired seven narrow-body aircraft for $298 million, six of which were new technology aircraft Sold eight aircraft and other flight equipment, including two 747 Freighters and one 777, for proceeds of $163 million and a gain on sale of $53 million $24 million of Russia-related letters of credit received 27% increase in year-to-date cash flows from operations Liquidity Entered into a new $450 million secured aircraft financing facility. Total liquidity as of January 6, 2023 of $2.3 billion includes $1.7 billion of undrawn facilities, $0.4 billion of projected adjusted operating cash flows through January 1, 2024, $0.1 billion of contracted asset sales, and $0.1 billion of unrestricted cash 209 unencumbered aircraft with a net book value of $5.5 billion STAMFORD, Conn., Jan. 12, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Mike Inglese, Aircastle's Chief Executive Officer, commented, "Sustained demand for travel has been progressing into 2023 with a generally profitable outlook as airlines deftly manage through economic disruptions. In the third quarter, Aircastle continued our trading momentum with seven narrow-body acquisitions, six of which further grow our fleet of in-demand, new technology aircraft. On the financing front, we bolstered our conservative debt profile with a $450 million secured aircraft financing facility." Mr. Inglese concluded, "Our strategic new acquisitions and profitable sales this quarter are strong indications that aircraft leasing remains resilient and robust. While funding challenges are felt across the sector, we remain optimistic because of our favorable credit rating, along with the opportunities afforded by our unique ownership arrangement with the Marubeni Corporation and Mizuho Leasing. With Aircastle's deep team of solutions-focused aviation experts, we look forward to disciplined future growth." (1)  Refer to the selected financial information accompanying this press release for a reconciliation of GAAP to Non-GAAP numbers. Aviation Assets As of November 30, 2022, Aircastle owned 241 aircraft and other flight equipment having a net book value of $6.6 billion.  We also manage nine aircraft with a net book value of $289 million on behalf of our joint venture with Mizuho Leasing. Owned Aircraft As of November 30,  2022(1)   As of November 30,  2021 Net Book Value of Flight Equipment ($ mils.) $           6,571 $           6,734 Net Book Value of Unencumbered Flight Equipment ($ mils.) $           5,480 $           5,619 Number of Aircraft(1) 241 255 Number of Unencumbered Aircraft 209 223 Number of Lessees 76 79 Number of Countries 46 43 Weighted Average Fleet Age (Years)(2) 10.0 10.6 Weighted Average Remaining Lease Term (Years)(2) 5.1 4.8 Weighted Average Fleet Utilization for the three months ended(3) 94.4 % 94.0 % Weighted Average Fleet Utilization for the nine months ended(3) 94.6 % 93.7 % Managed Aircraft on behalf of Joint Ventures Net Book Value of Flight Equipment ($ mils.) $              289 $              302 Number of Aircraft 9 9 _______________ (1) Excludes nine aircraft that remain in Russia with zero net book value – see Note 3 in the Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements. (2) Weighted by net book value (flight equipment held for lease and net investment in direct financing and sales-type leases, or "Net Book Value"). (3) Aircraft on-lease days as a percent of total days in period weighted by Net Book Value. Conference Call In connection with this press release, management will host a conference call on Thursday, January 12, 2023, at 9:00 A.M. Eastern Time.  All interested parties are welcome to participate on the live call.  The conference call can be accessed by dialing (877) 870-4263 (from within the U.S. and Canada) or (412) 317-0790 (outside the U.S. and Canada) ten minutes prior to the scheduled start. Please reference our company name "Aircastle" when prompted by the operator. A simultaneous webcast of the conference call will be available to the public on a listen-only basis at www.aircastle.com.  Please allow extra time prior to the call to visit the site and download the necessary software required to listen to the internet broadcast.  For those who are not available to listen to the live call, a replay will be available on Aircastle's website shortly after the live call. About Aircastle Limited Aircastle Limited acquires, leases and sells commercial jet aircraft to airlines throughout the world.  As of November 30, 2022, Aircastle owned and managed on behalf of its joint ventures 250 aircraft leased to 76 customers located in 46 countries. Safe Harbor All statements in this press release, other than characterizations of historical fact, are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws, including the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.  Examples of forward-looking statements include, but are not necessarily limited to, statements relating to our proposed public offering of notes and our ability to acquire, sell, lease or finance aircraft, raise capital, pay dividends, and increase revenues, earnings, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA and the global aviation industry and aircraft leasing sector. Words such as "anticipates," "expects," "intends," "plans," "projects," "believes," "may," "will," "would," "could," "should," "seeks," "estimates" and variations on these words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements.  These statements are based on our historical performance and that of our subsidiaries and on our current plans, estimates and expectations and are subject to a number of factors that could lead to actual results materially different from those described in the forward-looking statements; Aircastle can give no assurance that its expectations will be attained.  Accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements which are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated as of the date of this press release.  These risks or uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those described from time to time in Aircastle's filings with the SEC and previously disclosed under "Risk Factors" in Item 1A of Aircastle's most recent Form 10-K and any subsequent filings with the SEC.  In addition, new risks and uncertainties emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for Aircastle to predict or assess the impact of every factor that may cause its actual results to differ from those contained in any forward-looking statements.  Such forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this press release.  Aircastle expressly disclaims any obligation to revise or update publicly any forward-looking statement to reflect future events or circumstances.   Aircastle Limited and SubsidiariesConsolidated Balance Sheets(Dollars in thousands, except share data) November 30,2022 February 28,2022 (Unaudited) ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents $        208,208 $        167,891 Restricted cash and cash equivalents — 2,791 Accounts receivable 39,087 63,666 Flight equipment held for lease, net 6,445,141 6,313,950 Net investment in leases, net 125,504 150,325 Unconsolidated equity method investment 40,097 38,317 Other assets 328,978 356,326 Total assets $     7,187,015 $     7,093,266 LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY LIABILITIES Borrowings from secured financings, net $        656,032 $        684,039 Borrowings from unsecured financings, net 3,842,816 3,835,841 Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities 208,273 177,424 Lease rentals received in advance 52,688 37,361 Security deposits 64,856 69,189 Maintenance payments 494,058 459,713 Total liabilities 5,318,723.....»»

Category: earningsSource: benzingaJan 12th, 2023

Elon Musk"s private jet hasn"t flown to SpaceX"s main launch site since he bought Twitter, jet-tracker claims

The last recorded flight to Brownsville, Texas on Elon Musk's private jet was about two weeks before he bought Twitter, said Jack Sweeney. Elon Musk stands in front of the undeveloped SpaceX site in Boca Chica in 2014.Robert Daemmrich Photography Inc./Getty Images Elon Musk's private jet hasn't flown to Starbase in almost three months, per jet-tracking data. He has flown to airports near SpaceX HQ in LA, however, and could have used its planes to fly to Starbase. Last month, the billionaire said staff at SpaceX and Tesla "are so good that often little is needed from me." Elon Musk's private jet hasn't traveled to the airport near SpaceX's main launch site in nearly three months, according to Jack Sweeney, a college student who has made a name for himself publicly tracking flight data.On Friday, Sweeney tweeted that the private plane hadn't visited the airport near Brownsville, Texas since October 14 — almost two weeks before Musk bought Twitter. Prior to Musk's Twitter acquisition, Brownsville, Texas was one of the private jet's most frequent destinations, per Sweeney's flight data. Sweeney uses bots to scrape and post public flight data that can be found on the ADS-B Exchange.Of course, Musk could've traveled there using other means of transportation. The 20-year-old said on Twitter that it was possible that Musk could have used one of SpaceX's designated planes for a trip to the launch site in Starbase, Texas, but deemed it "unlikely" based on previous observations of his flight data."Most often the jet is in San Francisco before the Twitter takeover it was rarely there," Sweeney tweeted via his new Twitter account @ElonJetNextDay. "This would suggest Twitter is a significant distraction to Tesla & SpaceX."SpaceX's Starbase hub is over 2,000 miles away from Twitter's headquarters in San Francisco, where Musk has been known to sleep at the office since acquiring the company in October. Meanwhile, Tesla's Fremont Factory is just over an hours drive from the social media company's headquarters.However, Musk's private jet has flown to airports near SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, California since the Twitter acquisition, including Los Angeles International Airport, Sweeney's data shows. The SpaceX headquarters is about a 6-hour drive from Twitter's office, but much of SpaceX's testing and production takes place in Starbase, near Brownsville, Texas. Starbase serves as the hub for Starship and Musk has been pushing for SpaceX employees to move to Starbase for years. On average, SpaceX launched a rocket every six days in 2022.Musk and spokespeople from SpaceX and Tesla did not respond to a request for comment from Insider ahead of publication. It is unclear whether Musk has resorted to more virtual meetings at SpaceX as a result of his time in San Francisco.Last month, NASA chief Bill Nelson reportedly expressed concern over Musk's preoccupation with Twitter, but was reassured by SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell that the agency has "nothing to worry about." Shotwell has served as SpaceX's President and COO for 21 years and in November, Musk reportedly moved a top Tesla lieutenant, Omead Afshar, into a lead role on Starship production at SpaceX. Tesla investors have also expressed concern over Musk's focus on Twitter. Last month, a top Tesla shareholder said he believes the billionaire "abandoned" the company."I continue to oversee both Tesla & SpaceX, but the teams there are so good that often little is needed from me," Musk said on Twitter in December.After buying the social media company, Musk admitted in November: "I have too much work on my plate" and has said he plans to eventually find someone to serve as CEO of Twitter.From SpaceX, Twitter, and Tesla to Neuralink and Boring Company, Musk is involved in a lot of companies. In 2021, he said that he divides his time based on the "crisis of the moment" and that SpaceX's Starship project "absorbs more of my mental energy than probably any other single thing."Historically, the CEO has said he has worked up to 20 hours a day and has been known to sleep on Tesla's factory floor. After purchasing Twitter, Musk said his workload jumped from "70 to 80 hours a week to probably 120." And at Twitter's headquarters, Musk has said he's slept at the office and even had bedrooms set up at the site.Ultimately, Musk has said he believes his focus on Twitter will be temporary."In the grand scheme of things, the amount of cognitive load that Twitter represents is low," Musk said in a Twitter Spaces meeting in December. "It is a much simpler problem than Tesla or SpaceX obviously by a country mile."Do you work for SpaceX, Tesla, or Twitter? Reach out to the reporter from a non-work email at gkay@insider.comRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 9th, 2023

Southwest, still reeling from last week"s meltdown, just suffered another system glitch that grounded flights

Southwest pilots announced the weather system outage to passengers, per tweets. It comes a day after the airline said it had made "solid progress." Many passengers have been impacted by Southwest Airlines' travel chaos this holiday season.Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images Southwest experienced a weather system outage, which disrupted flight schedules again. Pilots made announcements while passengers were waiting for the flight, some people tweeted. The outage came on the same day that Southwest said it had made "solid progress." Southwest Airlines was on Tuesday hit by a weather system outage, which grounded flights and caused disruption again for passengers.Several people posted on Twitter about their flight delays, saying the pilot announced the weather system was down and the plane was unable to take off.One person tweeted that they were sitting on the aircraft for an hour and a half and waiting to depart because of the issue. Southwest apologized in response.Around 140 Southwest flights were canceled on Tuesday, while more than 1,500 were delayed, according to flight-tracking site FlightAware.The airline told NBC News in a statement on Tuesday that its third-party vendor IBM had a "brief outage in their service that provides weather data to Southwest dispatching flights."Southwest added that it expected minor delays for the remainder of the night, per the report. In the statement, the company also apologized to passengers for the inconvenience.Pilots are required to be aware of weather reports and forecasts before a flight commences, according to federal regulations.Southwest didn't immediately respond to Insider's request for comment made outside normal US working hours.The weather system outage came the same day Southwest said it had made "solid progress" to resolve passengers' problems with luggage, reduce flight cancellations, and process refund requests.Following a bitter winter storm that swept across parts of the US over the holiday period, Southwest's flight schedule was heavily impacted for several days. Passengers faced flight cancellations and delays, while airports were flooded with missing baggage.Southwest said on December 30 it planned to resume normal operation "with minimal disruptions." Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 4th, 2023

The legendary SR-71 spy plane first flew 58 years ago, and enemy jets and missiles could never catch up

When you're 85,000 feet up and moving at 36.55 miles per minute, it's going to be hard to keep up with you. DVIDS The SR-71 made its first flight in December 1964. The spy plane set a number of flight speed records. The Blackbird could outrun anything enemy forces could throw at it. Speed can do many things for an aircraft. It can allow an airplane to get to its target quickly and complete its bombing run. Speed can help outmaneuver enemy fighters and shoot them down. It enables survivability to outfox air-defense systems.Spy planes such as the SR-71 Blackbird could really boogey. The Blackbird had MACH 3 speed that allowed the bird to outrun surface-to-air missiles. That's 36.55 miles per minute or 3,216.4 feet per second.In fact, when the SR-71 streaked by, SAMs could barely lock on to target, and if they did the Blackbird was already out of range. This allowed it to outrun and evade over 4,000 enemy missiles that were fired at it over the years.Sometimes enemy radar worked; sometimes it didn'tThe SR-71 BlackbirdJudson Brohmer/USAFAnother thing that helped the SR-71 was its reduced radar cross section. The airplane also featured an early type of radar-absorbent iron-ferrite paint.This helped, but the airplane was hardly completely stealthy as its engines put out a large heat exhaust plume. A radar could lock onto this. It was a cat-and-mouse game as the SR-71 could also deploy its electronic countermeasures to jam SAM systems.The high-altitude flight also helped; we are talking 85,000 feet after all. No SR-71 was ever shot down.The Swedes came closeAn underside view of an SR-71 Blackbird strategic reconnaissance aircraft in flight at an undisclosed location.US Air ForceIn fact, the only airplane that got close enough to an SR-71 was not a Soviet fighter but a Swedish SAAB J37 Viggen that attained missile lock and a visual on the American spy plane in 1986.On another occasion, Viggen pilots even took handheld photos of the Blackbird when an SR-71 lost an engine in 1987, and the Swedish pilots guided it to safety.The North Vietnamese came closerThere was one harrowing occurrence when the SR-71 almost got shot down during the Vietnam War.Aviation Geek Club's Dario Leone uncovered the fascinating anecdote. Reconnaissance Systems Officer Jerry Crew spoke to Air and Space Magazine, in 2014, about the first time the SR-71 was shot at by an anti-aircraft missile.In 1968, Crew was preparing for a Blackbird mission from Okinawa that would collect intelligence over North Vietnam to snoop around Hanoi and Haiphong. The flight quickly became dangerous when the airplane hit North Vietnamese air space.Oh no, the worst lights turned onCrew recounted, "Turning inbound on our first sensor run, I noticed the "R" light on my electronic countermeasures (ECM) panel was illuminated. A North Vietnamese SAM site was tracking us on its radar.What we didn't expect was the illumination of the "M" light, followed closely by the "L" light! This meant that the North Vietnamese had actually fired one or more SAMs at us. (The "R" light meant they were searching for you, the "M" light meant they were tracking you, and the "L" light meant they were launching at you,)" Crew said.Countdown to destructionUS Air ForceThe incoming missile was already in the air for about five seconds. Flight time of many enemy SAMs was around 58 seconds. The SR-71 had less than a minute before impact and since it was too late for defensive maneuvers, speed would have to win the battle.The ECM jammer was not going to be completely effective. The missile was homing in on that frequency. Crew struggled to turn the ECM off. Precious seconds elapsed while he accomplished that task. The pilot kept asking, "how much time do I have?" Crew watched the clock and reported back every ten seconds.Finally, the SR-71 did its job and outran the enemy bogeys. Later, the flight camera recording showed there were actually two incoming SAMs that could have shot down the Blackbird, so this was a close call.The SR-71 was just a blessed airplane. Pilots and RSOs were highly skilled. The maintenance crews worked hard to ensure safety. And intelligence gathered by the recon flights saved countless lives and was a factor in giving the United States the edge during the Cold War. The Blackbird's speed won.Expert Biography: Serving as 1945's defense and national security editor, Dr. Brent M. Eastwood is the author of "Humans, Machines, and Data: Future Trends in Warfare." He is an emerging-threats expert and former US Army infantry officer. You can follow him on Twitter @BMEastwood. He holds a Ph.D. in political science and foreign policy/ international relations.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytDec 23rd, 2022

The 16 best planners for staying organized in 2023

Planners are designed to keep you organized and help you map out your days. There are a few things to consider when picking the best planner for you. When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Planners are designed to keep you organized and help you map out your days. There are a few things to consider when picking the best planner for you.The Happy PlannerPaper planners are calendars that help you keep track of tasks, appointments, ideas, and so on. They let you see the week or month all at once, in a clear and legible way. No planner is one-size-fits-all. Picking one comes down to personal preference, whether you like to schedule things down to the minute or just jot a few weekly notes. Some people want a balance of enough space for their jottings but in a book that can easily fit in their bag. Planner styles get even more detailed, and we break down the ways to choose what's right for you at the end of this guide. We talked to two stationery store owners and a productivity expert to get their advice on how to pick a planner."There are lots of different, great planners, and it just kind of depends on thinking about how you want to plan your week and how you want to visualize your week," said Jeremy Crown, who co-owns Little Otsu, a paper store in Portland, Oregon. Whatever style of planner you prefer, you'll be able to find something in the list below.Best all-in-one planner if you're on a budget: Day Designer Daily Planner for Blue SkyAmazonA thorough planner with lots of room for notes, the Day Designer Daily Planner for Blue Sky is great for people with busy days or lengthy to-do lists.Best for: Those who love splashy, detailed planners but without the high priceLength: One yearLayout: DailyFormat: DatedSize: 8 by 10 inchesUsually, Day Designer planners are $68, but the Blue Sky collaboration version is $40.The day has a 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. schedule, along with room for to-do lists. At the top and bottom are boxes for gratitude, your "top three" important items, and notes for the night. Best planner for tracking everyday goals: BestSelf Co. the Self JournalBestSelf CoThe Self Journal from BestSelf is geared toward quarterly planning, with daily, intensive options for tracking your goals.Best for: Dedicated daily usersLength: 13 weeksLayout: DailyFormat: UndatedSize: 5.75 by 8.5 inchesIf you're looking for a lot of structure and prompts, the Self Journal might be right for you. It has pages of tasks and templates to guide your goal-setting. While undated, it's only meant to last 13 weeks, so you won't have a full year at your fingertips.The idea is to break the year  — or just daunting projects — down into manageable chunks. There are spaces to fill out what you're grateful for, as well as your goals and targets. With 240 pages, the size is fairly portable and has a hardcover. The paper is also fountain-pen friendly.Best planner for writing a lot: Clever Fox Non-Dated Daily PlannerClever Fox PlannerWith a full page for each day, the Clever Fox Non-Dated Daily Planner gives you space for your packed schedule or brainstorming sessions.Best for: People who like to do daily entries and love stickersLength: 6 monthsLayout: DailyFormat: UndatedSize: 5.8 by 8.3 inchesClever Fox's daily planner has scads of room for those with busy days — or anyone who likes to doodle and brainstorm in their calendars. Each day of the week has its own page, with space to schedule from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. There are also prompts for weekly goals (both work and personal priorities) and productivity tracking.The planner also comes with stickers to help you personalize your pages. With a sturdy cover in colors from black to rose gold to royal blue, it should be easy enough to find one that matches your style. In addition to the daily version — which is only for six months — there are weekly options that have space for a full year. If you want a larger planner, the pro version measures 8.5 by 11 inches. Best daily planner: Day Designer Daily PlannerDay DesignerBeautiful and very detailed, Day Designer's planners are made for busy people who like to stay on top of it all.Best for: Those who like plenty of space to write and a hardcover plannerLength: One yearLayout: DailyFormat: DatedSize: 9 by 9.75 inchesEach page of the Day Designer Daily Planner is split into two columns, with one half for scheduling and the other with a to-do list. There are extra spots for priorities, budgeting, dinner planning, and gratitude. While it's a fairly structured format, there is flexibility for adding your own times. There's a front pocket for extra papers, which comes holding two sheets of stickers. The cover is durable, with protective metal corners. While the covers trend toward the floral, there are some plain options, too. All the detailed pages, hardcover, and spiral binding make it a hefty, large book. It's not the best option if you're looking for something compact. If you love the page layout, Day Designer does have a flexible-cover version that's 8-by-10 inches.Best planner for flexibility: Field Notes 56-Week PlannerField NotesRobust yet portable, the Field Notes 56-Week Planner is a great low-priced choice that still lasts a full year.Best for: Fans of utilitarian plannersLength: 13 monthsLayout: WeeklyFormat: UndatedSize: 4.75 by 7.5 inchesCompact yet rugged enough to toss in a backpack, Field Notes' 56-week planner is no-frills but fully functional. Each week gets two pages, with Saturday and Sunday sharing space. They're undated, so you can start anytime, miss a couple weeks, and pick back up without wasting pages. As the name suggests, you get space for over a year, with 112 pages total. At less than $20, it's one of the more affordable planners on the list, though we wish there were a few options for the covers. Best themed planners: Bloom Daily PlannersBloom Daily PlannersBloom's Daily Planners come in many versions to suit many styles, all with plenty of supplemental sheets for tracking progress.Best for: Anyone looking for a specific layoutLength: One yearLayout: DailyFormat: DatedSize: 6 by 8.25 inchesBloom's planners are full of lists and charts for you to fill out and help you figure out how to schedule the year ahead. There are vision boards and habit-tracking options included. You can also sign up for additional, downloadable sheets for bill tracking, meal planning, and so on. The nice thing about Bloom is that it has almost countless options for getting exactly what you want. The planners come in both softcover and hardcover options, and there are several planner layouts to choose from. For teachers, there are undated versions, as well as ones that start in July. If you have a wedding or new baby on the horizon, there are planners for that, too.Best short-term planner: Panda PlannerPanda PlannerThe Panda Planner is meant to be hyper-focused on a three-month period, with daily tracking.Best for: Short-term projects, starting new habits or routinesLength: Three monthsLayout: DailyFormat: UndatedSize: 5.25 by 8.25 inchesThe classic version of the Panda Planner is undated, with room for three months of daily tracking. There are also weekly and monthly sections, and the planner is designed for those who need lots of on-page support, with boxes for morning and end-of-day reviews, habit tracking, and priorities. Each day gets an undated two-page spread, so you can skip weekends if you want something more work-focused. Panda Planners also come in undated, six-month, and dated, full-year versions.Best mindfulness planner: UrBestSelf 6-Minute DiaryAmazonThe 6-Minute Diary from UrBestSelf leaves space for daily gratitude journaling and goal-setting. Best for: More detailed daily promptsLength: 220 pagesLayout: DailyFormat: UndatedSize: 8.66 by 5.59 inchesFor anyone interested in gratitude journaling, this planner is made for daily reflections, including short sections on things you're grateful for, goals you want to accomplish, and good deeds you did that day. It also has inspirational quotes and a habit tracker for more ambitious goal-setting.Best planner for creative projects: Passion PlannerPassion PlannerDesigned with motivation in mind, the Passion Planner has a few layouts to help you follow through with your goals.Best for: Creative projects, people who want goals and promptsLength: One yearLayout: WeeklyFormat: DatedSize: 8.3 by 11.7 inchesThe Passion Planner is focused on motivation and helping you achieve your yearly goals. The weekly version has places for you to note what you're focusing on and the good things that happened in your life.There are a few styles to choose from, including undated, daily, and weekly layouts. On the website, you can also choose whether you want your planner's week to begin on Sunday or Monday. Small, medium, and large sizes are available, with the biggest being a bit larger than a standard sheet of paper. If buying a Passion Planner doesn't fit into your budget, the site also offers downloadable content that you can print and fit into a regular, three-ring binder. There are also digital versions available. Best planner for strictly scheduling: Quo Vadis Weekly Business PlannerQua VadisGood quality yet affordable, the Quo Vadis Weekly Business Planner is a no-nonsense way to keep tabs on your weekly to-dos.Best for: Those who want a particular layout, without quotes and promptsLength: One yearLayout: WeeklyFormat: DatedSize: 4 by 6 inchesThis well-designed, pocket-sized planner from Quo Vadis has a textured, faux leather cover. It's helpful to go on the Quo Vadis website because it lays out all the options available for its planners: Academic or calendar year; daily, weekly, or monthly format; and small, medium, or large size.The planner's weekly layout is vertical, with scheduling space from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. There are large squares on the right page for extra notes. The cover comes in several colors, and you can also find the planner in faux suede or smooth faux leather options. Though there isn't a lot of extra space for habit tracking, the back of the planner does have some space for personal notes and a map of the world's time zones. Best pocket-sized planner: Lemome Pocket PlannerAmazonLemome's pocket-sized planner (which also comes in a spiral-bound version) is ideal for carrying around with you on the go.Best for: TravelLength: One yearLayout: DailyFormat: DatedSize: 6.4 by 3.9 inchesThe planner features a simple calendar grid each month for jotting down quick reminders or plans, and has a section on the side for extra notes. Still, considering the small size, this notebook is best if you anticipate using it for bare-bones planning (such as dinner reservations or birthdays). It also has a separate section for writing down contact information and has a list of the year's holidays as a quick reference.Best customizable planner: Happy PlannerThe Happy PlannerHappy Planner has lots of customization options, including layout and length.Best for: Disney fans, people looking for a planner with removable pagesLength: One yearLayout: DailyFormat: DatedSize: 7 by 9.25 inchesHappy Planner is all about making its products work for you, so there are quite a few ways to customize your planner. It offers vertical and dashboard layouts, as well as a few different sizes and undated options. You can also buy plenty of stickers to add more flair, and we also like the planner's disc-bound binding, which is like a three-ring binder you don't have to open and close.Happy Planner is a popular brand with teachers, and it offers 18-month versions that start in July. Best academic planner: Blue Sky Academic PlannerAmazonThe Blue Sky Academic Weekly & Monthly Planner is an affordable option for students that still offers plenty of room for notes and organization. Best for: StudentsLength: One year (June to July)Layout: WeeklyFormat: Dated Size: 8.5 by 11 inches or 5 by 8 inchesSlim yet sturdy, Blue Sky's academic planner gives students weekly planning layouts for June through July of next year. Some layouts give equal space to Saturday and Sunday as the rest of the week, which is perfect for people whose study and work schedules don't end on Friday. There are also two sizes so you can decide whether you prefer more room to write or something a bit more portable. (A few more sizes are available, though the design choices are much more limited.)The front has a section dedicated to chronicling yearly goals. There's also space for contacts and notes. The covers tend to lean toward the pastel and floral, but there are some more understated options. For between $10 and $20, it's hard to beat the style and functionality you get with this academic planner. Best teacher planner: 4theloveofpi Teacher Planner4theloveofpi4theloveofpi planners are made for teachers who have a lot to keep track of, from multiple subjects to conferences and field trips. Best for: Teachers (and some students)Length: One year (July to June)Layout: WeeklyFormat: Dated Size: 8.5 by 11 inchesFor many teachers, the new year really starts in the summer as they start to plan for back to school. The 4theloveofpi planners begin in July and run through June of the next year. You can opt for layouts based on the number of subjects you teach, from one to eight. Each planner comes with pages dedicated to checklists and student notes. Unlike some teacher planners, this one has space for weekend plans, too. The covers come in a range of styles, including subject-specific options for science, math, special education, and more. Add-ons for seating charts, students' health information, professional development, and expense tracking are also available. This isn't the most budget-friendly teacher planner out there, but the thoughtful design and customizability are ideal for teachers with hectic schedules. Editor's note: Orders for 2023 planners will begin in the spring.Best big planner: Wit & Delight Stay on Track Desktop NotepadWit & DelightPortable planners aren't for everyone, so the Wit & Delight Stay on Track Desktop Notepad is a great (big) way to jot down notes, appointments, and the like.Best for: People who want a desk-sized plannerLength: 180 weeksLayout: WeeklyFormat: UndatedSize: 8.9 by 10 inchesIf you want a planner that you can't accidentally lose, this desk version from Wit & Delight is a good option.It's undated, comes with 180 sheets, and each page has vertical space for Monday through Friday. There aren't Saturday and Sunday spots, but there's a "home life" box that could work for weekend activities. There are also places for notes, projects, and big picture items. How to choose a plannerJenny McGrath/InsiderThere are an overwhelming number of planner types. Chandra Greer, who owns Greer, a stationery store in Chicago, Illinois, prioritizes stocking her store with functional, quality options, knowing they might not be the right fit for everyone. "I'm more interested in the function," she said. "Is the layout useful? Is it something that is going to withstand being your daily friend for 365 days?" To find out what will work for you, you can start by considering what qualities are most important to you. "I think if you sort of start with, 'What is it that I want to use this for?' that gives you a good starting point," said Alexandra Cavoulacos, founder of The Muse and author of "The New Rules of Work."Daily, weekly, or monthlyFor some people, a planner is merely a portable calendar, Cavoulacos said. Other people want to track projects and create to-do lists. The amount of detail per day will start to dictate how much space you need.Dated or undatedThere are many reasons you might decide to buy an undated calendar. "People might decide on March 28th, they want a planner," said Greer. "But if a planner is dated, they're already three months through the year." Plus, with an undated planner, you can always pick up where you left off without wasting days' worth of paper. Horizontal or verticalWhen someone comes into Little Otsu looking for a planner, co-owner Jeremy Crown first asks, "Are you more of a task-oriented planner?" He thinks people with detailed schedules or long to-do lists may prefer the column format of vertical layouts, while those who like making notes or doodling might prefer the horizontal layout.Some planners also use a "dashboard" view, with a week or day on one page and the other dedicated to habit trackers, gratitude prompts, and other fill-in-the-blanks. SizeDoctors, nurses, and chefs always want pocket-sized notebooks and planners, said Crown. You might want something big enough to hold your sprawling handwriting but small enough to carry around in your purse or messenger bag. Minimalist or full of prompts Planner aesthetic ranges from very bare-bones to packed with extras like quotes, charts, and check-ins. "You want your planner to inspire you," Cavoulacos said. "I do think the sort of aesthetic piece, the inspiration piece, is also something that shouldn't be forgotten," she said.  Both Greer and Cavoulacos point out that you can add your own quotes and personalizations to even the most minimalist planner, as long as there's space. "It could become more of a person's little command center," said Greer. Paper qualityIf paper quality is high on your list of importance, Greer suggests taking a close look at who makes a planner. "I definitely gravitate towards manufacturers who have a background in paper," she said, recommending notebook or paper companies that have planners such as Midori, Paperways, High Tide, and Kokuyo Jibun Techo.CoverEven if you're not into paper, you'll want to pay attention to the cover's material. Hardcovers will stand up to more wear and tear than softcovers. "Sometimes people will trade that durability for something that doesn't cost very much, but definitely people are expecting [their planner] to get through the whole year and not look like it was run over by a truck," Greer said. Binding It's important that planners lie flat since you're writing in them. Many are spiral bound, but others are stitch bound. Either will let you write on them, but you can flip one side of the book behind the other with a spiral binding. "A lot of people are kind of indifferent between spiral and stitch bound now, as long as it lies flat because that's really what they're looking for," Greer said. Another concern with the binding is whether it will keep the planner together for the whole year. Some glued-in pages might not hold out as well. "If you have something that's stitch-bound or spiral, it's very sturdy for the long haul," Greer said.Why not just use your phone as a digital planner?"I don't necessarily think a planner is for everybody, just like any particular productivity hack or tool," Cavoulacos said. There are plenty of people who prefer to keep their calendars and notes strictly digital, and getting a paper planner might not make sense for them. If you're on the fence, she suggests asking yourself what's attractive about a paper planner. "I think for a lot of people it's slowing down, right?" Cavoulacos said. "It's like the lack of distraction. It's the moments to think, to cross things off — the satisfaction of crossing things off." For Crown, it's more personal than a phone calendar. "It's your life in a book," he said. "[By] the end of the year, you have this book that was like, this is what I did. That's something that the phone doesn't do that well." Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 22nd, 2022

Shadowy US Spy Firm Promises To Surveil Crypto Users For The Highest Bidder

Shadowy US Spy Firm Promises To Surveil Crypto Users For The Highest Bidder Authored by Kit Klatenberg via MintPressNews.com, Leaked files reviewed by MintPress expose how intelligence services the world over can track cryptocurrency transactions to their source and therefore identify users by monitoring the movements of smartphone and Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices, such as Amazon Echo. The contents comprehensively detonate the myth of crypto anonymity, and have grave implications for individuals and states seeking to shield their financial activity from the prying eyes of hostile governments and authorities. The documents are among a trove related to the secret operations of Anomaly 6, a shadowy private spying firm founded by a pair of U.S. military intelligence veterans. The company covertly embeds software development kits, or SDKs, in hundreds of popular apps, then slices through layers of “anonymized” data in order to uncover sensitive information about any individual it chooses anywhere on Earth, at any time. In all, Anomaly 6 can simultaneously monitor roughly three billion smartphone devices – equivalent to a fifth of the world’s total population – in real-time. Having previously hawked its wares to U.S. Special Operations Command, as this journalist revealed on December 6, Anomaly 6 is now using British private military company Prevail Partners – heavily involved in the West’s proxy war in Ukraine – to market and sell its product to a variety of Western military, security, and intelligence agencies the world over. This is despite the company’s own founders fearing its global dragnet could be completely illegal under national and international data protection regimes. The company’s international surveillance reach could be more sweeping – and invasive – than even that of the C.I.A. and N.S.A. MintPress can reveal individuals, organizations, and states seeking to bypass traditional financial structures and systems loom prominently in Anomaly 6’s mephitic crosshairs, and spying on their transactions is a pivotal component of its sales pitch to government and private clients. This Orwellian technology leaves cryptocurrency users the world over nowhere to hide. WHO WATCHES THE WATCHERS? Ever since Bitcoin’s launch in 2009, anonymity has been an absolutely fundamental tenet of cryptocurrency. The ability to make and receive payments incognito through a secure, decentralized platform without needing to register a named bank account, or even interact with established financial gatekeepers at any stage, was and remains a unique selling point for the asset. The principle of anonymity is taken so seriously by crypto practitioners and aficionados alike that industry platforms are graded according to their levels of privacy. Many crypto entrepreneurs, some of whom manage hundreds of millions of dollars for clients, conduct business without ever disclosing their names, or any identifying information at all. Venture capital firms have even invested vast sums in crypto ventures with wholly pseudonymous founders, an unprecedented sectoral development. Anomaly Six’s website features no other data but the company name, contact and location In recent years, however, there have been several clear indications that cryptocurrency anonymity is under significant threat, and indeed could already have been mortally compromised by the U.S. intelligence apparatus. In June 2021, it was revealed that the F.B.I. had successfully traced and recovered $2.3 million in Bitcoin extorted by hackers from Colonial Pipeline in a ransomware attack, which had shut down the company’s computer systems, causing fuel shortages and a spike in gas prices. U.S. officials declined to reveal how they tracked where the ill-gotten funds had ended up, and identified the ultimate owners of 23 separate cryptocurrency accounts belonging to DarkSide, the hacking collective responsible for the cyberattack, although public statements by C.I.A. director William Burns in December that year may provide a clue. Speaking at a Wall Street Journal summit, he acknowledged that his Agency was engaged in “a number of different projects focused on cryptocurrency.” “This is something I inherited. My predecessor had started this,” he said. “Trying to look at second- and third-order consequences as well and helping with our colleagues in other parts of the U.S. government to provide solid intelligence on what we’re seeing as well.” While it’s certainly true that cryptocurrency’s anonymity is attractive to criminal elements and terrorist groups, there are a wide variety of entirely legitimate reasons for seeking privacy in financial transactions, and preventing regulators, big banks, and governments from keeping an eye on what one is doing. For example, political and social movements of every stripe in all corners of the globe have embraced the asset, as they can be financially supported from overseas without any paper trail being left at either end. In turn, activists can send money to each other and make purchases in secret, and organize events and construct local and international support networks, leaving authorities none the wiser. In Venezuela, cryptocurrency has provided vital respite to an entire country, as crippling U.S.-led sanctions have in recent years deprived both its government and citizens of access to, and the ability to buy, even basic necessities, including food and medicine. The national currency’s value reduced to almost zero, crypto transactions offer a literal lifeline by which goods and services can be accessed, and import and export restrictions imposed by Washington circumvented. ‘PATTERNS OF LIFE’ AND ‘BED DOWN LOCATIONS’ A February 2021 U.N. special rapporteur report on the impact of American sanctions on Venezuela ruled they were “collective punishment,” and Caracas lived on just 1% of its pre-sanctions income. The previous March, Alfred de Zayas, formerly an independent expert for the United Nations Human Rights Council, calculated that over 100,000 Venezuelans had died as a result of the restrictions. Despite this monstrous human toll, and countless calls from prominent rights groups and international institutions to end the suffering, Washington rigidly enforces the sanctions regime, and seeks to harshly punish any individual or organization helping Caracas skirt restrictions. While measures have eased slightly following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the Stateside prosecution of Colombian businessman Alex Saab, abducted from Cape Verde in October 2020, for selling food to the Venezuelan government is ongoing. Saab could be soon joined in the dock, if Anomaly 6 has anything to do with it. One of the company’s leaked sales presentations provides several case studies showing how its spying technology can be used by security and intelligence services to “derive understanding of the actions of individuals associated with sanctions violations.” By homing in on the location of the Venezuelan government’s sanctioned cryptocurrency exchange, the National Superintendence of Cryptoactives and Related Activities (Sunacrip), which manages all crypto activities in the country, Anomaly 6 identified two specific IoT devices “which show the value of the A6 dataset in this endeavor.” Scouring data generated at the site back to January 1, 2020, Anomaly 6 found thousands of signals emitted by IoT devices and smartphones. From there, it “built out the pattern of life for the devices in that search” – in other words, the locations device owners traveled to and from, when, and where they lived. In all, these devices produced “over 593,374 geographic points of reference”, in Argentina, Colombia, and Venezuela. From this amorphous corpus, Anomaly 6 identified one device with “a unique travel pattern which makes it worth further investigation.” In particular, its movements indicated a “very well-defined pattern of life in and around Caracas” – although the company professed to be “much more interested in its travel to the Colombian border in the Cúcuta/San Antonio del Táchira border area.” That Anomaly 6 was able to track this device while in flight was said to highlight a “unique aspect” of its dataset. The device “took a less than seven hour trip from Caracas to San Antonio del Táchira (Juan Vicente Gómez International Airport) which landed (or was on final approach at 0923 on 23 Feb).” “With less than 10 flights a day on average to this airport (pre-Covid 19), it would not be difficult to ascertain a short list of personalities of interest with access to Venezuelan passenger name records,” Anomaly 6 bragged. “Additionally, we can see that this device transits to the border crossing locations in the short time it was located in the area.” This border area was of note for Anomaly 6 as, “according to open source reporting, historically, Venezuelans have used border areas for cash pickup/drops to skirt sanctions put in place by the international community.” Such activities “provide access to hard currency to actors and governments which have been cut off from U.S. dollar trading platforms.” A “second device of interest” was found to have traveled to Medellín, Colombia, and its “pattern of life” indicated its owner had “connections to the financial/banking environment.” “Both of these devices exhibit [patterns of life] that warrant further exploration, especially when combined with fact [sic] they have been located at the Sunacrip HQ,” Anomaly 6 concluded. “Further investigation can find bed down locations as well as other insights for business locations, international travel, and other device co-location.” THE DEVIL TURNS AROUND Due to a highly successful mainstream media campaign over many years to demonize the government of Venezuela, and by extension its people, it is likely some American citizens will be entirely unsympathetic to Caracas’ plight, and approve of efforts to prevent the state bypassing sanctions. However, the ease with which Anomaly 6’s tools of mass surveillance could be domestically deployed, and the likelihood they already have, should give them pause. As I revealed in my initial report, Anomaly 6 can identify U.S. smartphone users by name, address and travel history. Another leaked sales presentation details how by linking a single anonymous individual’s smartphone signal recorded in North Korea to a network of hotels, schools, and other sites, the company determined with pinpoint accuracy their identity, marital status, where they worked and lived, the names of their children and the schools and universities at which they study, and more. Such capabilities would no doubt be of much interest to the C.I.A. and N.S.A. – both of which are in theory prohibited from spying on U.S. citizens, but have been recurrently embroiled in controversy for engaging in such activity. Concerningly, it has been revealed that the C.I.A. for many years sought to bulk collect international financial data in service of tracking the Islamic State’s funding sources, and incidentally vacuumed up voluminous quantities of sensitive information on U.S. citizens in the process. Heavily redacted records related to the connivance were unearthed due to pressure from senators Ron Wyden and Martin Heinrich of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. Upon reviewing the material, they wrote to U.S. Director of Intelligence Avril Haines, righteously admonishing the C.I.A. for brazenly ignoring longstanding constitutional checks and balances on the Agency’s domestic activities. “[The C.I.A.] has done so entirely outside the statutory framework that Congress and the public believe govern this collection, and without any of the judicial, congressional or even executive branch oversight that comes with FISA collection,” they fulminated. Anomaly 6’s services, of course, mean the C.I.A. and N.S.A. can dodge restrictions at home, without fear of landing in hot water. Other agencies permitted to monitor Americans can likewise now do so without a warrant too. And there is no reason to believe that its spying would be restricted to financial transactions, either “Anomaly 6 data can be used in multiple use cases to support cyber intelligence and operational use end states,” the leaked crypto sales deck declares. “By utilizing multiple targeting methodologies, this data can support the building of a far superior intelligence picture that enables clients to move towards actionable end states. Fusing A6 data with other classified and unclassified data sets places the client at the forefront of the cyber mission space.” Other leaked Anomaly 6 files openly discuss how its technology is ripe for both “counterintelligence” and “source development” purposes, and it’s not merely U.S. citizens in the firing line. The firm boasts of having spied on the movements of “devices from other friendly countries,” including members of the Five Eyes global spying network, and France and Germany. In other words, Anomaly 6 turns every citizen on Earth into a potential “person of interest” to intelligence agencies, and thus a target for recruitment, surveillance, harassment, and much, much worse, the most intimate details of their private lives easily accessible by shady actors with a few clicks of a button, and without their knowledge or consent. While the mainstream media is yet to acknowledge the leak of the company’s sensitive internal papers, this has all the makings of an Edward Snowden-level international scandal of historic proportions. If Anomaly 6 is to be successfully stopped in its tracks, and Western intelligence agencies prevented from egregiously violating the privacy of innumerable individuals without compunction or oversight, it will require concerted collective action from concerned citizens worldwide. Tyler Durden Sat, 12/17/2022 - 19:30.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytDec 17th, 2022

Chamath Palihapitiya says he"s faced privacy concerns over jet-tracking like Elon Musk, and would consider ditching flying private for something "more anonymous"

On the "All-In" podcast, Chamath Palihapitiya said he's experienced privacy concerns like Elon Musk's, and it "feels pretty terrorizing." Elon Musk (left) and Chamath Palihapitiya (right).Getty Chamath Palihapitiya said he's dealt with privacy concerns similar to Elon Musk's jet-tracking. Experiencing it "feels pretty terrorizing," Palihapitiya said on the "All-In" podcast. Palihapitiya said the question for him was whether or not to switch to "more anonymous" transportation. Chamath Palihapitiya said he's dealt with privacy concerns similar to Elon Musk's jet-tracking issue "multiple times" in the past.For Palihapitiya, the question on how he'd deal with it if it became too much boils down to a simple question: Do you ditch flying private and find a more anonymous form of travel instead?"I'm not nearly as important as Elon is, but it feels the same when you're in the middle of it," Palihapitiya said on the "All-In" podcast. "It feels pretty terrorizing. That being said, I think the real decision for somebody like me is that if it's too much, is frankly just to get rid of it and to find a different mode of transportation that's a little bit more anonymous."Palihapitiya, the CEO and founder of venture capital company Social Capital, said the reason he would consider opting for different transportation is because the other option would be going to the government to change the law surrounding flight information, "which they're not going to do." Thousands of commercial and private flights around the world are public and can be found on online tracker ADS-B Exchange. The tracker uses flight information transmitted by federal law, to show flights. Palihapitiya was discussing the @ElonJet account from Twitter, which tracks Musk's private jet and was suspended from the platform Thursday, on the "All-In" podcast that he co-hosts with Jason Calacanis, David Sacks, and David Friedberg. Palihapitiya did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment ahead of publication seeking additional information on his past experiences with publicly tracked flight information.Friedberg, an angel investor and entrepreneur, said he thought banning the @ElonJet account, "was a bad decision.""The least generous statement would be that it represents deep hypocrisy," Friedberg said. "Not just a few weeks ago did he say he would never delete that account, but he also said he was buying Twitter to enable freedom of speech and freedom of expression and that he wouldn't come in and do the same sort of content moderation that was done by the old regime."Friedberg said Musk took over and did the same thing as "the old regime," by taking the rules and moderation policies and finding "a way to use them to make some editorialized decisions that he thought was appropriate."Friedberg said a "more generous" view would be that that Musk is "trying to protect people where there's some loophole or some law that doesn't seem right morally, but it is the law, and it is what it is."Jack Sweeney, the college student who runs @ElonJet, was also banned from Twitter, and Musk has threatened legal action against him and others on Twitter "who supported harm to my family.""I'm not really concerned because a tweet is just a tweet, you know?" Sweeney told Insider on Thursday. "From what I see, there isn't much ground for him to stand on and that's the opinion of a lot of people." In a Twitter Space Thursday night with suspended journalists and Sweeney, Musk reiterated his point that accounts who "dox" people will be suspended. The journalists pushed back on the characterization that they had participated in any doxing, and Musk eventually left the conversation.You can watch the full debate in the episode below.  Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 17th, 2022

College student who tracks Elon Musk"s private jet said he started doing it years ago because he was a fan. Now the billionaire is threatening to sue him.

"If he was the same age, I could see him doing something similar too," said 20-year-old Jack Sweeney, who began tracking Elon Musk's jet in 2020. Jack Sweeney and Elon MuskJack Sweeney and Getty Jack Sweeney said he started tracking Elon Musk's jet because he was a fan of the Tesla CEO. On Wednesday, Musk threatened to take legal action against the college student who runs @ElonJet. Sweeney has expressed admiration for Musk in the past. Jack Sweeney said he started tracking Elon Musk's private jet in 2020 because he was a fan. Over two years later, the billionaire is threatening to sue him after suspending his Twitter accounts.Since its launch, Sweeney's account that tracks Musk's plane, @ElonJet, has garnered nearly 500,000 followers and spawned over 30 jet-tracking accounts that follow numerous celebrities — from Mark Zuckerberg and Donald Trump to Taylor Swift and Kim Kardashian. The 20-year-old has made headlines and even gotten job offers as a result of his jet-tracking accounts."I don't mean any harm and that's never the intended purpose of the accounts," Jack Sweeney told Insider on Thursday. "I'm literally just sharing public information and the whole intended purpose of the account was originally because I was a fan of him."The 20-year-old has expressed his admiration for Musk in the past and even said when the billionaire bought Twitter that it would be "probably good" for the platform — though perhaps not for his jet-tracking accounts. Now, Sweeney said he's disappointed that the relationship has turned sour and had initially hoped when Musk first reached out to him about @ElonJet earlier this year that the billionaire would understand."If he was the same age, I could see him doing something similar too," Sweeney said on Wednesday.On Wednesday, Twitter suspended Sweeney's account that track's Musk's private plane as well as his personal account, and over 30 other jet-tracking accounts. Later that day, @ElonJet was temporarily reinstated and Sweeney received an email saying the account had been suspended to "prevent real time location sharing" and telling the 20-year-old to "please refer to our updated policy regarding location sharing to prevent further account restrictions." Only a few hours later, the account was once again suspended after @ElonJet tweeted asking how long he would need to delay the location data to avoid violating the policy.Twitter updated its private information policy to prohibit users from sharing people's live locations on Wednesday.The same night, Musk tweeted that a "crazy stalker" followed the car in which his two-year-old son, X Æ A-Xii, reportedly was. He then said that legal actions against Sweeney and "organizations who supported harm to my family" were being taken.Musk and a Twitter spokesperson didn't immediately respond to a request for comment by Insider.—Elon Musk (@elonmusk) December 15, 2022 Sweeney told Insider he'd never call for people to stalk or hurt Musk."I've never supported harm," he said. "I ran an account that posts public information and I wasn't saying 'go follow this person' or stuff like that."Sweeney uses bots to scrape and post publicly available flight data that people would otherwise be able to find on their own via ADS-B Exchange. The college student also shares the tracking data on accounts on Instagram, Facebook, and Mastodon.Sweeney added he was "not really concerned" for the moment about the legal action threat because he believes there "isn't much ground for him [Musk] to stand on." Erik Gordon, a business law professor at the University of Michigan, told Insider that while Musk doesn't have a good legal case, a lawsuit could be costly for Sweeney.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytDec 16th, 2022

Elon Musk hasn"t filed a police report about the "crazy stalker" incident which sparked journalists" Twitter suspensions, LAPD says

Several journalists were suspended from Twitter after sharing the account tracking Elon Musk's private jet, which he is taking legal action against. Elon Musk at the Met Gala in May 2022.Getty Images The LAPD says Elon Musk hasn't filed a police report about the "crazy stalker" who followed his son. Musk tweeted that the man had followed a car containing his son X Æ A-Xii, believing Musk was inside. Musk says he is taking legal action against the student behind an account that tracks his private jet. Elon Musk hasn't filed a police report about the stalking incident which sparked the suspensions of journalists' Twitter accounts, the Los Angeles Times reported.The billionaire said that a car carrying his two-year-old son, X Æ A-Xii Musk, was followed by a "crazy stalker" who thought it was Elon in the vehicle. He added that they blocked the car from moving and climbed onto its hood.On Thursday, the Los Angeles Police Department said "LAPD's Threat Management Unit is aware of the situation and Tweet by Elon Musk and is in contact with his representatives and security team.""No crime reports have been filed yet," it added.In the same tweet, Musk had said that he would be taking legal action against Jack Sweeney, the college student behind the banned @ElonJet account, which shared flight data from his private jet.The Twitter CEO said "Any account doxxing real-time location info of anyone will be suspended, as it is a physical safety violation. This includes posting links to sites with real-time location info."—Elon Musk (@elonmusk) December 15, 2022Musk then shared a video of the masked person who he said followed his son, and the car's license plate.Twitter changed its rules around the same time, citing "an increased risk of physical harm."Journalists from the likes of CNN, The Washington Post, and New York Times were all suspended from Twitter on Thursday evening, after sharing links to ElonJet's Instagram or Mastodon accounts.However, some of the reporters say they never shared such links, like independent journalist Aaron Rupar. He told Insider's Erin Snodgrass: "That leaves me inferring I guess it was something critical I posted of Elon."The official Twitter account for Mastodon was also suspended. Micah Lee, a tech reporter at The Intercept, told Snodgrass he believes he was suspended for tweeting about this.Twitter and Musk's attorney, Alex Spiro, did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment, sent outside US working hours. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytDec 16th, 2022

Elon Musk"s private jet is no longer appearing on a widely used public tracking system

Elon Musk this week suspended Twitter accounts using publicly available flight data showing cities where his private jet travels. Elon Musk and Jack SweeneyJack Sweeney and Getty Musk earlier this week suspended Twitter accounts showing his private jet travel. Now, the billionaire seems to have blocked his private plane from public view altogether. Data for Musk's flights has for years been available due to a federal mandate covering aircrafts.  Elon Musk may have taken an additional step to keep his private jet travels away from public view.His Gulfstream jet, registered through an LLC he owns, could be seen having landed on Wednesday evening in Austin through an online tracker, ADS-B Exchange. On Thursday the jet was not available for view.The billionaire and new Twitter owner has likely opted in to a program offered by the Federal Aviation Association called Limiting Aircraft Data Displayed, or LADD, that prevents much of his previously available flight paths from being tracked.On Thursday, Musk's jet showed up on a widely used public tracking system with a note that it is part of the LADD program.The program is part of a privacy bill that allows the FAA to "upon request of a private aircraft owner or operator, block the registration number of the aircraft from any public dissemination or display, except in data made available to a Government agency, for the noncommercial flights of the owner or operator." So, Musk's flight information will now only be available to the government as necessary.A spokesperson for the FAA and ADS-B Exchange did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The cities where Musk's private jet lands has for years been openly accessible for public viewing through sites that receive and track flight data that is mandated to be transmitted by the FAA. Earlier this week, Musk suspended a Twitter account of a 20-year old student, Jack Sweeney, who created a tool that automatically posted flights the billionaire took on his jet. Musk also suspended Sweeney's personal Twitter account and is now threatening "legal action" against him. He said the cities where his jet lands being made available on Twitter threatened the safety of his family.After implementing the suspensions, Twitter changed its rules to state that the posting of a person's "live location" is now prohibited, despite a history of live posting, video and events being core to Twitter's function and appeal as a platform. Twitter also suspended more than 30 other accounts that similarly used public flight data to track private jet travel of notable billionaires and political figures, like Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Russian President Vladimir Putin.Other notable billionaires have taken pains to keep their flight data inaccessible by the public. Google co-founder Larry Page is also part of the LADD program and frequently uses rental jets in order to keep his travels more secret, as Insider reported. Bernard Arnault, the co-founder and CEO of luxury fashion group LVMH, earlier this year sold his private jet and began using rentals to avoid his flights being made public.In addition to private jet tracking showing where the ultra-wealthy are travelling to, accounts like Sweeney's that posted about the flights noted how long they were and how much air-pollution such trips created. Private planes are known to be 14 times more pollutive per passenger than a commercial flight, creating 2 metric tons of carbon per hour. Musk's plane in august took a 9-minute flight from San Jose to San Francisco. Are you a Twitter employee or someone else with insight to share? Contact Kali Hays at khays@insider.com, on secure messaging app Signal at 949-280-0267, or through Twitter DM at @hayskali. Reach out using a non-work device.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytDec 15th, 2022