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Ted Cruz says he will "wait and see" what Trump does before deciding on running for president in 2024

Sen. Ted Cruz told a CPAC event in Texas that he is waiting for former President Donald Trump to make up his mind about the 2024 presidential race. Sen. Ted Cruz speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Dallas, Texas, on August 5, 2022.Brandon Bell/Getty Images Ted Cruz said he will "wait and see" whether Donald Trump runs in 2024 before making any decisions on running himself. Cruz previously said that Trump deciding not to run would "significantly" clear out the field. Trump and Cruz fiercely clashed during the 2016 Republican primary campaign. Republican Sen. Ted Cruz says he will "wait and see" what former President Donald Trump does before deciding on whether to run for president again in 2024.Speaking to Fox News at a Conservative Political Action Conference event in Dallas, Texas, on Friday, Cruz said Trump is going to "decide on his own timeframe" whether he will seek the presidency for the third time.Cruz, who launched a failed bid in 2016, suggested he'd hold off until Trump announced his plans. "Everyone is going to wait and see what Donald Trump decides and make decisions from there," he said.When asked about his timeframe for deciding whether he'll put his name in the running for the Republican nominee, Cruz said his focus is now on the 2022 mid-terms."I'm spending practically every waking moment on the campaign trail, focusing on retaking the House and retaking the Senate," he told Fox News. "I think we're going to win both."In July, speaking to Fox News at the Turning Point USA conference in Tampa, Florida, Cruz said that Trump deciding not to run in 2024 would "significantly" clear out the field of potential candidates.Trump has not yet announced whether he'll run in 2024, but teasers have fueled speculation that he will.Last week, he said it would be "very hard for me not to run" against President Joe Biden in 2024. And in June, he said that he would be making an announcement about it in the "not too distant future." Cruz ran against Trump for the Republican nomination in 2016, and the two politicians clashed during the primary campaign.Trump called Cruz's wife "ugly," baselessly claimed Cruz's father was involved in a plot to assassinate President John F. Kennedy and nicknamed him "Lyin' Ted Cruz."  In turn, Cruz called Trump, a "pathological liar."They have since patched things up, according to a new book by Paul Manafort. An extract obtained by the Guardian said that Trump apologized for insulting Cruz and his family. And in recent years, Cruz has become a loyal ally to the former president.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytAug 6th, 2022

2022 election live updates: John Fetterman defeats Mehmet Oz, dealing huge blow to the GOP"s Senate hopes

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  John Fetterman defeats Mehmet Oz, dealing huge blow to the GOP's Senate hopesDemocratic Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman; Republican celebrity TV doctor Mehmet Oz.Nate Smallwood/Getty Images; Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesDemocrat John Fetterman has won Pennsylvania's Senate seat over Trump-backed TV show host Mehmet Oz, dealing a serious blow to Republicans' hopes of taking control of the US Senate."We bet on the people of Pennsylvania - and you didn't let us down," Fetterman wrote on Twitter as he declared victory. "And I won't let you down. Thank you."The win is the first Democratic pickup in the Senate.Fetterman, who had a stroke shortly before winning the Democratic primary, eeked out a victory after an uneven debate performance gave new life to Oz's campaign. Fetterman has insisted that the stroke affected only his hearing, not his cognition and that he is fit for office.Oz — who has never held office — faced accusations that he didn't really live in Pennsylvania as well as criticism of his embrace of Trump and anti-abortion rhetoric. Oz has not spoken at his election night event. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer wins re-election in MichiganMichigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.TOM BRENNERMichigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer has won re-election, fending off a challenge from Trump-backed Republican Tudor Dixon.Republicans began this cycle eager to knock out Whitmer over her management of the COVID-19 pandemic.But the targeting of Whitmer wasn't just at the ballot box.In 2020, federal law enforcement arrested 13 men suspected of engineering a terrorist plot to kidnap Whitmer and attempt to overthrow Michigan's government. The subsequent cases against them have resulted in a mixture of convictions, acquittals, and plea deals. Republican Tudor Dixon says Michigan governor's race is too close to call, despite outlets projecting her loss: 'We don't accept that Fox is calling this'Michigan Republican gubernatorial nominee Tudor Dixon.AP Photo/Paul SancyaAt a party for campaign supporters, Michigan's Republican gubernatorial candidate Tudor Dixon said she refused to accept that her race had been called for her opponent."This race is going to be too close to call, despite what Fox thinks," Dixon told attendees after Democrat Gretchen Whitmer had been declared the projected winner by some outlets, including Fox News. "We don't accept that Fox is calling this."Fox News projected that Whitmer had defeated Tudor, a Trump-backed candidate, with approximately 48% of votes tallied.Read Full Story Chuck Grassley — the oldest US senator — just won re-electionSen. Chuck Grassley, a Republican from IowaTom Williams-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Sen. Chuck Grassley, the oldest current US senator, won re-election at age 89.He is the serving president pro tempore emeritus of the Senate and represents a generation of political leaders who have held on to power despite their advanced ages.An Insider investigation into gerontocracy — the term for a government run by old people — found that young officials feel blocked by those clinging to power and that their issues are being downplayed.(Aside: Grassley was born five years before the chocolate chip cookie was invented. The beloved cookie first appeared in Ruth Wakefield's 1938 cookbook "Tried and True."Grassley was born in September 1933.)  Democrats are winning the House seats they need to winOn a night when Republicans hoped to secure toss-up districts and make headway into blue districts, Democrats have racked up wins in key toss-up races.Democratic Ohio State Rep. Emilia Sykes defeated former Donald Trump campaign staffer Madison Gesiotto Gilbert in Ohio's 13th Congressional District.The 13th district had drawn national attention and millions of dollars in spending.Chris Pappas defeated Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st District US House election, another toss-up district.Democrats also won in Ohio's 1st Congressional District, New Hampshire's 2nd District, and Kansas' 3rd District. Lindsey Graham: It's 'definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure'Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham weighed in on his party's midterms performance as election results began trickling in on Tuesday evening, declaring, it's "definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure.""I think we're gonna be at 51, 52 when it's all said in done in the Senate," the South Carolina senator said during an interview with NBC News, holding out hope for the GOP's chances.Read Full StoryThe House is too close to call. That's a great sign for Democrats and concerning for the GOPAmericans are lining up to vote in the midterm elections. All 435 House seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats are on the ballot this year.ReutersControl of the House remains too close to call, a shocking scenario that raises the possibility Democrats' could escape the midterms with little damage.As of 11:45 p.m. EST, Decision Desk HQ and Insider are unable to project which party will control either house in Congress. While the Senate was always expected to be close, few, if any, pundits foretold of a House contest that would be this narrow.—Walter Hickey (@WaltHickey) November 9, 2022 Republicans began the cycle giddy with excitement. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy even poised that his party could flip 60 seats. Instead, fury over the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade appears to have not only dampened a possible wave election but may even lead to Democratic gains.There have only been two times since World War II that a president's party has gained seats in a midterm election, one of which occurred in the months after the September 11th attacks.—Decision Desk HQ (@DecisionDeskHQ) November 9, 2022  Republicans hoped to turn New York's governor's seat red. They didn't.Joshua Bessex/AP Photo; Mary Altaffer/AP Photo; InsiderTrump-backed GOP candidate Rep. Lee Zeldin made a huge push in the final weeks of the race for New York governor, pushing concerns about crime as his opponent flagged in the polls and insisting the wedge issue would flip the Democratic stronghold red.It didn't.Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul defeated Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin after an unexpectedly strong challenge in New York's gubernatorial election. Appointed governor following the resignation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Hochul is the first woman to be governor of New York.If elected, Zeldin would have dismantled New York's Democratic trifecta, where Democrats hold the governorship and majorities in both legislative chambers.Mehmet Oz is underperforming Trump in some of Pennsylvania in early returnsDr. Mehmet Oz.AP Photo/Laurence KestersonIf Oz wants to win Pennsylvania, he'll need to outperform former President Donald Trump's results in 2020, when he lost the state by just over 80,000 votes.So far, Oz is falling short."This is Western Pennsylvania, small county ... but again Trump ran up huge numbers in Western Pennsylvania. Mehmet Oz is going to win Clarion County overwhelmingly but it's five points less than Trump got," MSNBC's Steve Kornacki said as he ticked off results across the Keystone State.Kornacki pointed out that Oz is underperforming compared to Trump elsewhere too. In Bedford County, a rural county near the Maryland border, Oz received 80.7% of the vote compared to Lt. Gov. John Fetterman's 17%. But Oz's commanding performance is still not enough to match Trump's mark of 83.5%.Read Full StoryRight-wing firebrand Lauren Boebert is in a fight for her seatRep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 8, 2022.J. Scott Applewhite/APGOP Rep. Lauren Boebert is in a tight race in her bid for reelection on the same night when Republicans appear to be poised to take control of the US House.Boebert is facing off against Democrat Adam Frisch, a businessman and former city councilman.DeSantis cruised to victory despite Trump attacking him days before the electionFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis and his wife, Florida first lady Casey DeSantis, celebrate his victory over Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rep. Charlie Crist during an election night watch party at the Tampa Convention Center on November 8, 2022 in Tampa, Florida.Octavio Jones/Getty ImagesRepublican Gov. Ron DeSantis won reelection in Florida by historic margins on Tuesday, flipping the state from purple to red and doing it all without former President Donald Trump's help.Trump has continually teased the prospect of another presidential run, and could announce soon after the midterms. DeSantis has consistently polled behind the former president as a 2024 GOP favorite, and hasn't said whether he plans to serve out all four years as governor.Trump, who is now a Florida resident, cast his vote for DeSantis on Tuesday but told reporters he didn't think the governor should run against him. "If he did run, I will tell you things about him that won't be very flattering," he told the Wall Street Journal. "I know more about him than anybody other than perhaps his wife, who is really running his campaign."Read Full StoryGOP's Karoline Leavitt loses NH race that would have made her youngest woman ever elected to CongressCharles Krupa/AP Photo; Cheryl Senter/AP PhotoDemocratic Rep. Chris Pappas defeated Republican Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District.Leavitt — a 25-year-old former White House staffer for President Donald Trump — would have been the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.J.D. Vance wins competitive Ohio Senate seatOhio Republican Senate nominee JD Vance.AP Photo/Tom E. PuskarRepublican author J.D. Vance defeated Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan in Ohio, holding a Senate seat for the GOP as they seek to flip one Democratic seat and regain control of Congress' upper chamber.The race was among the most expensive in the country, with Ryan's holding a large financial lead and forcing Republicans to spend big to win.Trump endorsed Vance ahead of the primaries despite the candidate previously comparing the former president to "America's Hitler" in private messages.Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossLM Otero/AP Photo; InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorMediaNews Group/Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandMaryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wes Moore.AP Photo/Alex BrandonDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againJessica McGowan/Paras Griffin/Getty Images; InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. DeSantis cruised to a historic victory — despite catching heat from Trump in the days before the election.. Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 9th, 2022

2022 election live updates: The House remains too close to call, a sign that the "red wave" the GOP hoped for hasn"t arrived yet

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  Republican Tudor Dixon says Michigan governor's race is too close to call, despite outlets projecting her loss: 'We don't accept that Fox is calling this'Michigan Republican gubernatorial nominee Tudor Dixon.AP Photo/Paul SancyaAt a party for campaign supporters, Michigan's Republican gubernatorial candidate Tudor Dixon said she refused to accept that her race had been called for her opponent."This race is going to be too close to call, despite what Fox thinks," Dixon told attendees after Democrat Gretchen Whitmer had been declared the projected winner by some outlets, including Fox News. "We don't accept that Fox is calling this."Fox News projected that Whitmer had defeated Tudor, a Trump-backed candidate, with approximately 48% of votes tallied.Read Full Story Chuck Grassley — the oldest US senator — just won re-electionSen. Chuck Grassley, a Republican from IowaTom Williams-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Sen. Chuck Grassley, the oldest current US senator, won re-election at age 89.He is the serving president pro tempore emeritus of the Senate and represents a generation of political leaders who have held on to power despite their advanced ages.An Insider investigation into gerontocracy — the term for a government run by old people — found that young officials feel blocked by those clinging to power and that their issues are being downplayed.(Aside: Grassley was born five years before the chocolate chip cookie was invented. The beloved cookie first appeared in Ruth Wakefield's 1938 cookbook "Tried and True."Grassley was born in September 1933.)  Democrats are winning the House seats they need to winOn a night when Republicans hoped to secure toss-up districts and make headway into blue districts, Democrats have racked up wins in key toss-up races.Democratic Ohio State Rep. Emilia Sykes defeated former Donald Trump campaign staffer Madison Gesiotto Gilbert in Ohio's 13th Congressional District.The 13th district had drawn national attention and millions of dollars in spending.Chris Pappas defeated Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st District US House election, another toss-up district.Democrats also won in Ohio's 1st Congressional District, New Hampshire's 2nd District, and Kansas' 3rd District. Lindsey Graham: It's 'definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure'Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham weighed in on his party's midterms performance as election results began trickling in on Tuesday evening, declaring, it's "definitely not a Republican wave — that's for darn sure.""I think we're gonna be at 51, 52 when it's all said in done in the Senate," the South Carolina senator said during an interview with NBC News, holding out hope for the GOP's chances.Read Full StoryThe House is too close to call. That's a great sign for Democrats and concerning for the GOPAmericans are lining up to vote in the midterm elections. All 435 House seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats are on the ballot this year.ReutersControl of the House remains too close to call, a shocking scenario that raises the possibility Democrats' could escape the midterms with little damage.As of 11:45 p.m. EST, Decision Desk HQ and Insider are unable to project which party will control either house in Congress. While the Senate was always expected to be close, few, if any, pundits foretold of a House contest that would be this narrow.—Walter Hickey (@WaltHickey) November 9, 2022 Republicans began the cycle giddy with excitement. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy even poised that his party could flip 60 seats. Instead, fury over the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade appears to have not only dampened a possible wave election but may even lead to Democratic gains.There have only been two times since World War II that a president's party has gained seats in a midterm election, one of which occurred in the months after the September 11th attacks.—Nate Cohn (@Nate_Cohn) November 9, 2022 Republicans hoped to turn New York's governor's seat red. They didn't.Joshua Bessex/AP Photo; Mary Altaffer/AP Photo; InsiderTrump-backed GOP candidate Rep. Lee Zeldin made a huge push in the final weeks of the race for New York governor, pushing concerns about crime as his opponent flagged in the polls and insisting the wedge issue would flip the Democratic stronghold red.It didn't.Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul defeated Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin after an unexpectedly strong challenge in New York's gubernatorial election. Appointed governor following the resignation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Hochul is the first woman to be governor of New York.If elected, Zeldin would have dismantled New York's Democratic trifecta, where Democrats hold the governorship and majorities in both legislative chambers.Mehmet Oz is underperforming Trump in some of Pennsylvania in early returnsDr. Mehmet Oz.AP Photo/Laurence KestersonIf Oz wants to win Pennsylvania, he'll need to outperform former President Donald Trump's results in 2020, when he lost the state by just over 80,000 votes.So far, Oz is falling short."This is Western Pennsylvania, small county ... but again Trump ran up huge numbers in Western Pennsylvania. Mehmet Oz is going to win Clarion County overwhelmingly but it's five points less than Trump got," MSNBC's Steve Kornacki said as he ticked off results across the Keystone State.Kornacki pointed out that Oz is underperforming compared to Trump elsewhere too. In Bedford County, a rural county near the Maryland border, Oz received 80.7% of the vote compared to Lt. Gov. John Fetterman's 17%. But Oz's commanding performance is still not enough to match Trump's mark of 83.5%.Read Full StoryRight-wing firebrand Lauren Boebert is in a fight for her seatRep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 8, 2022.J. Scott Applewhite/APGOP Rep. Lauren Boebert is in a tight race in her bid for reelection on the same night when Republicans appear to be poised to take control of the US House.Boebert is facing off against Democrat Adam Frisch, a businessman and former city councilman.DeSantis cruised to victory despite Trump attacking him days before the electionFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis and his wife, Florida first lady Casey DeSantis, celebrate his victory over Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rep. Charlie Crist during an election night watch party at the Tampa Convention Center on November 8, 2022 in Tampa, Florida.Octavio Jones/Getty ImagesRepublican Gov. Ron DeSantis won reelection in Florida by historic margins on Tuesday, flipping the state from purple to red and doing it all without former President Donald Trump's help.Trump has continually teased the prospect of another presidential run, and could announce soon after the midterms. DeSantis has consistently polled behind the former president as a 2024 GOP favorite, and hasn't said whether he plans to serve out all four years as governor.Trump, who is now a Florida resident, cast his vote for DeSantis on Tuesday but told reporters he didn't think the governor should run against him. "If he did run, I will tell you things about him that won't be very flattering," he told the Wall Street Journal. "I know more about him than anybody other than perhaps his wife, who is really running his campaign."Read Full StoryGOP's Karoline Leavitt loses NH race that would have made her youngest woman ever elected to CongressCharles Krupa/AP Photo; Cheryl Senter/AP PhotoDemocratic Rep. Chris Pappas defeated Republican Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District.Leavitt — a 25-year-old former White House staffer for President Donald Trump — would have been the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.J.D. Vance wins competitive Ohio Senate seatOhio Republican Senate nominee JD Vance.AP Photo/Tom E. PuskarRepublican author J.D. Vance defeated Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan in Ohio, holding a Senate seat for the GOP as they seek to flip one Democratic seat and regain control of Congress' upper chamber.The race was among the most expensive in the country, with Ryan's holding a large financial lead and forcing Republicans to spend big to win.Trump endorsed Vance ahead of the primaries despite the candidate previously comparing the former president to "America's Hitler" in private messages.Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossLM Otero/AP Photo; InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorMediaNews Group/Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandMaryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wes Moore.AP Photo/Alex BrandonDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againJessica McGowan/Paras Griffin/Getty Images; InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. DeSantis cruised to a historic victory — despite catching heat from Trump in the days before the election.. Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 9th, 2022

2022 election live updates: The House remains too close to call, a sign that the "red wave" the GOP hoped for hasn"t arrived

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  The House is too close to call. That's a great sign for Democrats and concerning for the GOPAmericans are lining up to vote in the midterm elections. All 435 House seats and 35 of 100 Senate seats are on the ballot this year.ReutersControl of the House remains too close to call, a shocking scenario that raises the possibility Democrats' could escape the midterms with little damage.As of 11:45 p.m. EST, Decision Desk HQ and Insider are unable to project which party will control either house in Congress. While the Senate was always expected to be close, few, if any, pundits foretold of a House contest that would be this narrow.Republicans began the cycle giddy with excitement. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy even poised that his party could flip 60 seats. Instead, fury over the Supreme Court's reversal of Roe v. Wade appears to have not only dampened a possible wave election but may even lead to Democratic gains.There have only been two times since World War II that a president's party has gained seats in a midterm election, one of which occurred in the months after the September 11th attacks.—Walter Hickey (@WaltHickey) November 9, 2022 Republicans hoped to turn New York's governor's seat red. They didn't.Joshua Bessex/AP Photo; Mary Altaffer/AP Photo; InsiderTrump-backed GOP candidate Rep. Lee Zeldin made a huge push in the final weeks of the race for New York governor, pushing concerns about crime as his opponent flagged in the polls and insisting the wedge issue would flip the Democratic stronghold red.It didn't.Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul defeated Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin after an unexpectedly strong challenge in New York's gubernatorial election. Appointed governor following the resignation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Hochul is the first woman to be governor of New York.If elected, Zeldin would have dismantled New York's Democratic trifecta, where Democrats hold the governorship and majorities in both legislative chambers.Mehmet Oz is underperforming Trump in some of Pennsylvania in early returnsDr. Mehmet Oz.AP Photo/Laurence KestersonIf Oz wants to win Pennsylvania, he'll need to outperform former President Donald Trump's results in 2020, when he lost the state by just over 80,000 votes.So far, Oz is falling short."This is Western Pennsylvania, small county ... but again Trump ran up huge numbers in Western Pennsylvania. Mehmet Oz is going to win Clarion County overwhelmingly but it's five points less than Trump got," MSNBC's Steve Kornacki said as he ticked off results across the Keystone State.Kornacki pointed out that Oz is underperforming compared to Trump elsewhere too. In Bedford County, a rural county near the Maryland border, Oz received 80.7% of the vote compared to Lt. Gov. John Fetterman's 17%. But Oz's commanding performance is still not enough to match Trump's mark of 83.5%.Read Full StoryDemocrat wins a major toss-up seat in OhioOn a night when Republicans hoped to secure toss-up districts and make headway into Democratic districts, Democratic Ohio State Rep. Emilia Sykes defeated former Donald Trump campaign staffer Madison Gesiotto Gilbert in Ohio's 13th Congressional District.The 13th district had drawn national attention and millions of dollars in spending.Right-wing firebrand Lauren Boebert is in a fight for her seatRep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., speaks to reporters at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 8, 2022.J. Scott Applewhite/APGOP Rep. Lauren Boebert is in a tight race in her bid for reelection on the same night when Republicans appear to be poised to take control of the US House.Boebert is facing off against Democrat Adam Frisch, a businessman and former city councilman.DeSantis cruised to victory despite Trump attacking him days before the electionFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis and his wife, Florida first lady Casey DeSantis, celebrate his victory over Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rep. Charlie Crist during an election night watch party at the Tampa Convention Center on November 8, 2022 in Tampa, Florida.Octavio Jones/Getty ImagesRepublican Gov. Ron DeSantis won reelection in Florida by historic margins on Tuesday, flipping the state from purple to red and doing it all without former President Donald Trump's help.Trump has continually teased the prospect of another presidential run, and could announce soon after the midterms. DeSantis has consistently polled behind the former president as a 2024 GOP favorite, and hasn't said whether he plans to serve out all four years as governor.Trump, who is now a Florida resident, cast his vote for DeSantis on Tuesday but told reporters he didn't think the governor should run against him. "If he did run, I will tell you things about him that won't be very flattering," he told the Wall Street Journal. "I know more about him than anybody other than perhaps his wife, who is really running his campaign."Read Full StoryGOP's Karoline Leavitt loses NH race that would have made her youngest woman ever elected to CongressCharles Krupa/AP Photo; Cheryl Senter/AP PhotoDemocratic Rep. Chris Pappas defeated Republican Karoline Leavitt in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District.Leavitt — a 25-year-old former White House staffer for President Donald Trump — would have been the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.J.D. Vance wins competitive Ohio Senate seatOhio Republican Senate nominee JD Vance.AP Photo/Tom E. PuskarRepublican author J.D. Vance defeated Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan in Ohio, holding a Senate seat for the GOP as they seek to flip one Democratic seat and regain control of Congress' upper chamber.The race was among the most expensive in the country, with Ryan's holding a large financial lead and forcing Republicans to spend big to win.Trump endorsed Vance ahead of the primaries despite the candidate previously comparing the former president to "America's Hitler" in private messages.Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossLM Otero/AP Photo; InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorMediaNews Group/Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandMaryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wes Moore.AP Photo/Alex BrandonDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againJessica McGowan/Paras Griffin/Getty Images; InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. DeSantis cruised to a historic victory — despite catching heat from Trump in the days before the election.. Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 9th, 2022

2022 election live updates: Abbott wins governor"s race in Texas; Beto O"Rourke takes another loss

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  Abbott wins governor's race in Texas; Beto O'Rourke suffers another lossLM Otero/AP Photo; InsiderIncumbent Texas Gov. Greg Abbott fended off a challenge from Democrat Beto O'Rourke, leaning on a right-wing base energized by policies that have antagonized liberals.Abbott pushed his state into the forefront of numerous national fights, from slashing abortion rights to shipping migrants from the southern border to Democratic cities as a protest of Joe Biden's border policies.Abbott's win marked the second statewide loss for O'Rourke, who failed to unseat Ted Cruz in 2018. Democrats had hoped to flip Texas blue, but fell short again.Democrat Josh Shapiro beats election-denier Doug Mastriano for Pennsylvania governorMediaNews Group/Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images; InsiderA Trump-backed election denier has lost the race for Pennsylvania governor.Democrat Josh Shapiro has defeated Republican Doug Mastriano in the consequential open race. The election determined not just who controls the governor's house, but also who will ultimately oversee the 2024 election in a key swing state. Wes Moore wins governor's race in MarylandMaryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Wes Moore.AP Photo/Alex BrandonDemocrat Wes Moore made history, winning the Maryland gubernatorial election and becoming the first Black governor in the state's history.Moore —  a combat veteran in the US Army and a small business owner — defeated Cox, a state representative endorsed by former President Donald Trump.Polls close in Nevada, Montana and UtahThe polls have closed in key swing state Nevada, as well as Montana and Utah.Democrat wins a key Rhode Island raceDemocrat Seth Magaziner has defeated Republican Allan Fung in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District, a seat that Republicans had targeted.The victory is a key win for Democrats as the GOP worked to expand the map in House races and keep Biden's party on the defensive in the midterms.GOP Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp defeats Democrat Stacey Abrams againJessica McGowan/Paras Griffin/Getty Images; InsiderIncumbent Georgia Governor Brian Kemp has won re-election, defeating Stacey Abrams in a rematch of their race in 2018.Kemp was openly insulted by former President Donald Trump for not backing his election lies in 2020.He's held off Abrams, a Democratic star whose get-out-the-vote efforts were credited with flipping Georgia blue in 2020 but who has failed to win statewide office herself.Moderate Democratic Rep. Abigail Spanberger is in a tight race in Virginia. It's a seat Democrats need to hold.Abigail SpanbergerPhoto by Samuel Corum/Getty ImagesA consequential bellwether House race is coming down to the wire in Virginia.Both parties have targeted the seat held by Democrat Abigail Spanberger.It's the kind of district that — if the Democrats were to lose it — would bode ill for their chances for the rest of the evening and would hint that they'd have a difficult path to retain the majority in the House.(Aside: the origin of the word "bellwether" has nothing to do with rain, but comes from the Middle English word "bellewether," which refers to the bell put on a castrated ram's neck to help shepherds keep track of their flocks.)Judge denies Republicans' emergency request to keep Maricopa County polling sites open for 3 more hoursIn this Nov. 3, 2020, file photo, voters deliver their ballot to a polling station in Tempe, Ariz.AP Photo/Matt York, FileA judge on Tuesday evening rejected Republicans' request to keep polling centers in Maricopa County, Arizona, open for three more hours, until 10 p.m. local time. The ruling came after the Republican National Committee, National Republican Senatorial Committee, Blake Masters campaign, and Kari Lake campaign filed an emergency complaint asking to extend voting hours in the county amid news that dozens of vote tabulating machines had glitched and refused to accept ballots. County officials put out a press release in the afternoon saying the problem had been identified and technicians were working on it. They added that it was unclear how many ballots had been affected but that all of them would be counted. Election officials also noted that the problem wasn't that vote tabulating machines were incorrectly reading ballots but that they weren't reading them at all."Everyone is still getting to vote," Bill Gates, the chairman of the Maricopa County board of supervisors, said at a news conference in Phoenix amid reports of the voting machine issues."We do not believe that anyone has been disenfranchised because no one has been turned away," he added.But Republicans still pounced on reports of the glitch."The RNC is joining a Republican coalition to file an emergency motion to extend poll hours in Maricopa County because voting machines in over 25% of voting locations have experienced significant issues," RNC chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel said in a statement. "The widespread issues — in an election administered by Democrat Secretary of State Katie Hobbs – are completely unacceptable, especially as Republicans flock to the polls to vote in-person on Election Day."Polls close in another batch of states, including Arizona, Michigan, and TexasVoting has closed in Texas, Kansas, Michigan, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.Mississippi Secretary of State website downThe website for the Mississippi Secretary of State's Office had a "sustained outage" after hackers overloaded it with web traffic, NBC News reported.The site informs residents about voting but does not handle vote counting.NBC News reported that a Russian hacker group called for attacks on that website shortly before they began.Reporter Kevin Collier tweeted that Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency officials confirmed that Mississippi has been under a "sustained" denial of service attack all day. Other states were targeted, but there have been no sustained outages, he wrote.Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. . Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 8th, 2022

Live updates: Ohio Gov. DeWine wins re-election as 2022 election results roll in

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  Gov. Mike DeWine defeats Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial electionAaron Doster/AP Photo; Paul Vernon/AP Photo;InsiderRepublican incumbent Gov. Mike DeWine has defeated Democrat Nan Whaley in Ohio's gubernatorial election.GOP firebrand and Trump ally Matt Gaetz wins re-election in FloridaRep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., addresses attendees during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Florida.Phelan M. Ebenhack/APRepublican Rep. Matt Gaetz — a longtime Trump ally and outspoken member of the right-wing GOP House — has won re-election in Florida. Sarah Huckabee Sanders elected Arkansas governorSarah Huckabee SandersSteven Ferdman/Getty ImagesRepublican Sarah Huckabee Sanders defeated Democrat Chris Jones in Arkansas' gubernatorial race.Sanders, a former Trump administration official, is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.She will be the first woman governor of Arkansas.Democratic state Attorney General Maura Healey defeats Trump-backed Geoff Diehl in Massachusetts' gubernatorial electionSteven Senne/AP Photo; InsiderMassachusetts' Attorney General Maura Healey has won the state's gubernatorial election against Trump-backed Reublican Geoff Diehl.The current governor, Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, decided against seeking a third term.Healey has now flipped the Massachusetts governor's office. She makes history as the first openly gay person and first woman elected governor.Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. . Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 8th, 2022

Live updates: DeSantis, Rubio win in Florida as first polls in 2022 elections close

Election results and news on hundreds of campaigns, including every House, Senate, governor, and state legislative race in the US. iStock; Insider 2022 General Embeds function receiveMessage(event) { if (event.data.id && event.data.height) { document.getElementById(event.data.id).style.height = event.data.height + "px"; } } window.addEventListener("message", receiveMessage, false); America is heading to the polls Tuesday to vote in the 2022 midterm elections.  The outcome of the election will determine the balance of power in both the House and the Senate.  Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country.  Republican Laurel Lee, Florida's former secretary of state, defeats Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest 15th Congressional District electionSteve Cannon/AP photo; Alan Cohn's campaign; InsiderRepublican Laurel Lee defeated Democrat Alan Cohn in Florida's newest congressional district, which was added based on 2020 Census results. Republican Cory Mills defeats Democrat Karen Green in open seat for Florida's 7th Congressional district electionCory Mills' campaign; Karen Green's campaign; InsiderRepublican Cory Mills won an open seat in Florida's redrawn 7th Congressional District against Democrat Karen Green. The seat was open following Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy's decision to not seek re-election after serving three terms. Incumbent Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a national Republican star, wins re-electionInsiderFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising Republican star and possible 2024 challenger to Donald Trump, is projected to win re-election.DeSantis defeated Democrat Charlie Crist, who resigned his congressional seat in August after his primary victory. . Read Full StoryRepublican Sen. Marco Rubio defeats Democratic Rep. Val Demings in Florida Senate raceJoe Raedle/Getty Images;Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; InsiderSen. Marco Rubio is projected to have beaten Democratic Rep. Val Demings.Decision Desk HQ and Insider project Rubio will win his third term in the Senate as of 8 pm EST.Read Full StoryPolls close in a handful of states, including Florida and PennsylvaniaPolls have closed in Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island.Polls close in North Carolina, Ohio, and West VirginiaVoting closed in three states at 7:30 p.m. EST: North Carolina, Ohio, and West Virginia. In Ohio, Republican author J.D. Vance is facing off against Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan for a US Senate seat.These are the Donald Trump endorsements to watch on election nightArizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake embraces former President Donald Trump at a rally on October 09, 2022.Mario Tama/Getty ImagesDonald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Keep ReadingPolls close in 6 states, including pivotal swing state GeorgiaPolls have closed in six states — including Georgia where a tight Senate race between Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP candidate Herschel Walker could determine control of the US Senate.Polls closed at 7 p.m. in Kentucky, Indiana, South Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia, as well as Georgia.The US' top cybersecurity agency said there have been no credible threats to election security or integrity.The US' top cybersecurity agency warned against making the 'normal out to be nefarious' as conservatives are crying foul over election glitches on Election Day."When you have 8,800 individual election jurisdictions, you're going to see a few issues," tweeted Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency. "We have seen a few of these today as happens every Election Day."Easterly's warning comes as conservatives have raised questions about election integrity. Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday baselessly claimed that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan.Read Full Story Philadelphia Republican blames GOP for forcing election results delay: 'Republicans targeted Philadelphia'Poll workers process ballots at an elections warehouse outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 8, 2022.ED JONES/AFP via Getty ImagesPhiladelphia's last-minute decision to reinstate a policy requiring poll workers to check for double votes during — not after — the election-night tallying of ballots will further delay final results, a fact that a local Republican election official blames squarely on the GOP."I want to be very clear that when there are conversations that occur later this evening about whether or not Philadelphia has counted all of their ballots that the reason that some ballots would not be counted is that Republicans targeted Philadelphia — and only Philadelphia — to force us to conduct a procedure that no other county does," City Commissioner Seth Bluestein said Tuesday morning, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.Bluestein is the sole Republican on Philadelphia's elections commission.Keep ReadingThe first polls of the midterm elections have closedVoting has closed in the first states in a pivotal US midterm election that will determine the balance of power in the House and Senate.Polls closed in Indiana and Kentucky at 6 p.m. EST.Top federal election official: 'I have a high level of confidence in the integrity of the election'Thomas Hicks, chairman of the Election Assistance Commission.Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTens of millions of Americans are casting their ballots freely and fairly, and tens of thousands of poll workers across the nation are doing their duties "with high integrity and working truly hard to make sure votes are counted fairly and accurately," US Election Assistance Commission Chairman Thomas Hicks told Insider."If someone is eligible to cast their vote, they should be able to do so free and without any encumbrance, and those who put those encumbrances up there to harass or intimidate should be prosecuted," Hicks said.Read Full StoryVoting machines in a Pennsylvania county ran out of paper and will remain open an extra 2 hoursPolling places will remain open an additional two hours until 10 p.m. in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, a judge has ruled, after some voting machines ran out of paper.Some voters received provisional ballots until more paper could be delivered. The experience is frustrating some voters, WNEP reported."They ran out of paper. Why? I don't know," said Dominic Bechetti from Harveys Lake.Atlanta voters have their final say in the 2022 midterms, rejecting misinformation and the state of modern politicsVoters cast ballots at a precinct in DeKalb County, Georgia, on November 8, 2022.AP Photo/Ben GrayAcross the Atlanta area on Election Day, voters came out to cast ballots in the highly-consequential Georgia US Senate and gubernatorial races, with the results likely to determine the trajectory of the state for years to come.On Tuesday, citizens had their final say in the race, and whether it was a rejection of the GOP or simply pursuing a civic duty, a range of voters in Cobb and DeKalb counties told Insider that they came out to the polls not dissatisfied with the candidates themselves but the state of politics.Read Full Story A man armed with a knife at a Wisconsin polling place demanded election workers 'stop the voting,' local police saidA man armed with a knife was arrested after he showed up at a Wisconsin polling station and demanded election workers shut down the vote, local police said on Tuesday.Police said cops took a 38-year-old man into custody, and that voting was paused for 30 minutes while law enforcement officials investigated the location. No one was hurt and there isn't any other threat against the community, police added.Read Full StoryTrump says he should 'get all the credit' if Republicans win big in the 2022 elections — and 'should not be blamed at all' if they loseThreats to federal judges increased significantly during Donald Trump's administration.Evan Vucci/APFormer President Donald Trump said in a new interview on Tuesday he should "get all the credit" if the slew of GOP candidates he endorsed win big in the 2022 midterm elections — but also said he shouldn't be blamed if they don't come out on top."I think if they win, I should get all the credit, and if they lose, I should not be blamed at all," Trump told NewsNation during an interview on Tuesday when asked how much he thinks Republicans' victories or losses in the midterms will be because of him.Trump has endorsed more than 330 GOP candidates running for both state and federal office in this election cycle, including Georgia Senate hopeful Herschel Walker, Ohio Senate candidate JD Vance, and Arizona Senate hopeful Blake Masters.Keep Reading DeSantis' administration won't allow Justice Department monitors inside Florida polling placesRon DeSantis.James Gilbert/Getty ImagesThe DeSantis administration said DOJ-appointed election monitors aren't allowed inside Florida polling places.A letter from Florida Department of State General Counsel Brad McVay said the federal monitors aren't legally allowed inside.McVay said Florida's own inspectors will monitor the three locations — all Democratic strongholds. The Justice Department will still send observers to the three polling sites, but they will remain outside.Read Full Story Trump amplifies baseless claims of voter fraud in Michigan that a judge already dismissed as a 'false flag'Donald Trump arrives at a Make America Great Again rally in Cape Girardeau, Missouri on November 5, 2018.JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump claimed without evidence that a "large" amount of absentee voter fraud was underway in Detroit, Michigan on Tuesday.Trump's baseless post appeared to echo claims that Kristina Karamo, the Republican candidate running for secretary of state in Michigan, made earlier Tuesday after her lawsuit challenging absentee voting in only Democrat-heavy Detroit was thrown out of court.Judge Timothy Kenny issued a scathing opinion saying she had "raised a false flag of election law violations and corruption concerning Detroit's procedures for the November 8th election."Read MoreIn DeSantis' small Florida hometown, voters see a 'scumbag' or a 'hometown hero' as they head to the pollsDunedin, Florida, has an arch in the center of town that reads, "Defending Freedom." Dunedin is the town where Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis spent most of his youth.Kimberly Leonard/InsiderFlorida Governor Ron DeSantis is up for reelection Tuesday and could seek the White House in 2024.Insider interviewed voters from his small hometown of Dunedin, Florida. Republican voters said they were thrilled that the man who played baseball just up the street could have a shot at the White House someday. Democratic voters said it was hard for them to believe the governor spent most of his youth in this town, one they said they don't see as a red stalwart.Read Full StoryGeorgia county removes poll workers after social media posts emerge showing them at the Capitol riotIn this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo rioters supporting President Donald Trump storm the Capitol in Washington.AP PhotoTwo Georgia poll workers in Fulton County were removed from their duties on Tuesday after Facebook posts were discovered showing them at the attack on the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, the Washington Post reported.The poll workers — a mother and son — were removed shortly before voting started.One of the Facebook posts shared with the Post echoed former President Donald Trump's false claims about the 2020 election.According to the report, the Facebook post said: "I stood up for what's right today in Washington DC. This election was a sham. Mike Pence is a traitor. I was tear gassed FOUR times. I have pepper spray in my throat. I stormed the Capitol building. And my children have had the best learning experience of their lives."Keep ReadingOne prominent political force had a little less cash to spend during the Election 2022 homestretchInsider's Dave Levinthal reports that the American Hospital Association PAC told federal regulators on Monday that it lost more than $12,000 from "fraudulent activity" involving fake checks.The PAC reported the matter to police but has only been able to recoup some of the money it's lost.Read Full StoryTuesday's midterm election is playing out against the backdrop of heightened threats to lawmakers serving in CongressNancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi walk the red carpet during the 27th Annual Kennedy Center Honors at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on December 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.Kris Connor/Getty ImagesAs Insider justice correspondent C. Ryan Barber wrote: "In the five years since former President Donald Trump's election, the number of reported threats against lawmakers increased tenfold — to more than 9,625 in 2021, according to the Capitol police.""That rise has mirrored a similar increase in threats to other public figures and officials, including federal judges, who faced a surge in threats during the Trump administration," Barber added.Read Full StoryArizona's GOP Senate candidate Blake Masters says he's going to 'grind' Biden's 'agenda to a halt' if electedGOP Senate candidate Blake Masters chief operating officer of Thiel Capital and president of the Thiel Foundation.Gage Skidmore via Creative Commons/Wikimedia Commons"By taking back Congress, we're going to send Biden the message. We're going to bear hug his whole administration," Masters told Fox Business during an interview on Tuesday morning as voters across the country headed to the polls. The Republican Senate hopeful added, "I'm going to grind his agenda to a halt unless and until we get border security. Period.""I'm not going to vote for a single thing — not a single continuing resolution, not a single appointee — unless Joe Biden actually does something to secure our border," Masters said. Read Full StoryTrump said he voted to re-elect Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisSpencer Platt/Getty ImagesWhen asked whether he voted for DeSantis after he cast his vote at the Morton and Barbara Mandel Recreation Center in Palm Beach, Florida, Trump replied: "Yes, I did," according to a video shared on Twitter.Former first lady Melania Trump was alongside him. "No matter who you vote for, you have to vote," Trump told reporters gathered outside the polling site.Read Full StoryArizona's Maricopa County says it's having issues with voting tabulation machinesA sign marks the entrance to a voting precinct on the first day of early voting in the general election in Phoenix, Oct. 12, 2022.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe Wall Street Journal reported that voting tabulation machines in about 20% of Maricopa County's 223 voting centers were malfunctioning on Tuesday.Maricopa County said on Twitter that in one instance, a password was entered too many times, causing built-in security measures to lock a ballot scanner."If you're at a polling place experiencing an issue with a tabulator, you have three options & your vote will be counted in each. 1) stay where you are and wait for tabulator to come online 2) drop your ballot in the secure slot (door 3) on tabulator 3) go to a nearby vote center," Bill Gates, chairman of the county board of supervisors said on Twitter.Thomas Galvin, Maricopa County Supervisor, said on Twitter that election operations were "going well.""But I've been fielding some complaints & concerns from constituents about issues at polling booths. I'm here to listen, to get to the bottom of ALL issues," he said. "Please email me at District2@Maricopa.gov. My team & I will reach out to you ASAP."A few members of Congress up for re-election are tied to billionaire Elon MuskElon Musk.Susan Walsh/APThese are lawmakers who invest, or who've recently invested, in one of Musk's publicly traded companies — Tesla, and until recently, Twitter — either on their own or through a spouse.In all, there's a dozen of them, reports Insider's Madison Hall.One name is particularly notable: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who's husband, Paul, who earlier this year exercised 25 call options (2,500 shares) of Tesla stock at a strike price of $500, with the trade valued at between $1 million and $5 million.Read Full StoryThis week's Powerball lottery jackpot stood at a cool $1.9 billion — but that's a pittance compared to the 2022 midterm election's price tagAmerican flag over US moneySTILLFX/Getty ImagesAs Insider's Madison Hall reported, nonpartisan money-in-politics research organization OpenSecrets has estimated that all federal- and state-level contests will together be worth $16.7 billion."For perspective: the states of Iowa, Oklahoma, Nebraska North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Vermont, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Rhode Island, Maine, Delaware, Alaska, Hawaii each have annual state budgets that are around, or in some cases, much less than, $16.7 billion," Hall noted.Read Full StoryWealthy, self-funded candidates have a terrible track record of winning in politicsSure, some do just fine: Billionaire Democrat JB Pritzker will almost certainly cruise to re-election as Illinois' governor, and Republican Mehmet Oz might — maybe, possibly? — become Pennsylvania's newest US senator.But as Insider senior reporter Brent D. Griffiths explains here, the 2022 midterm election is littered with the shattered political dreams of Richie Rich candidates who flat flamed out despite pumping crazy money into their respective races.Many never emerged from their partisan primaries, no matter their millions.Others, such as Democrat Trudy Busch Valentine, who's running for US Senate in Missouri behind more than $14 million of her own fortune, are all but assured defeat tonight in their general elections.As Griffiths notes: "Despite its self-evident benefit of instant cash, self-funding a political campaign is risky. Candidates who raise gobs of money from donors, instead of their own bank account, receive the added benefit of engaging with and energizing an electorate — something that's critical to actually getting people to vote for you."Something that won't appear in black-and-white on any ballot today, but make no mistake, it's there: ageGetty; Rebecca Zisser/InsiderCongress has never been older than it is today, Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" project revealed in September.And the results of the 2022 midterms could very well keep what's been a 20-year trend toward gerontocracy very much in motion.Age and experience have factored into a number of US House and Senate races, but two stand out.First is Iowa's US Senate race, where Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is seeking another six-year term that'd keep him on Capitol Hill until he's 95 years old.Then there Ohio's 9th District race, where Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur is facing the strongest challenge of her 40-year congressional career by Republican J.R. Majewski in what's become one of the more wild House races this election cycle.Insider's Dave Levinthal and Kimberly Leonard spoke about some of the biggest votes to watch in the midterms on 'The Refresh'Listen to Insider's "The Refresh" here.Trump aides scrambled to stop him announcing his presidential candidacy on the eve of the midterms and upending the election: ReportFormer president Donald Trump at a campaign event at Sioux Gateway Airport on November 3, 2022 in Sioux City, Iowa.Stephen Maturen/Getty ImagesAides to former President Donald Trump persuaded him not to announce his 2024 presidential campaign on Monday, fearing it could upend the midterm elections, The Washington Post reported.According to three sources who spoke to the Post on condition of anonymity, Trump had touted the idea of formally announcing his bid for the 2024 presidency at a rally for GOP Senate candidate JD Vance in Ohio on Monday night. The suggestion prompted a scramble by top Republicans and Trump some aides to stop any announcement, two of the sources told the publication. Other aides, it reported, wanted Trump to go ahead.Read Full StoryWhat to watch for on Election Day 2022"I Voted" stickers are displayed at a polling place in Cheyenne, Wyo. on Aug. 16, 2022.Thomas Peipert/AP PhotoToday America will vote on the midterm elections, with the consequences of results poised to reverberate across the government for years to come.Insider will have real-time live election results on thousands of races across the country, including every House, Senate, Governor, and State Legislative election happening in the United States.The most significant story is unfolding in dozens of House races across the country, as the Democrats' tenuous control of the chamber is being challenged by the GOP. Midterms tend to be disastrous for the incumbent president's party, and this election has control of the House very much up for grabs. Insider is tracking close to 90 of the most consequential races. The Senate is currently split 50-50, and each party wants to get control of the upper chamber. Senators serve for six years, which means the impacts of this election will reverberate through at least 2028. The contest for control of the Senate might not be decided on election night, as it'll likely come down to just a few individual races and counting could continue for several days.There are also dozens of gubernatorial elections. These races are full of potential contenders for 2024, and, more consequentially, whoever wins the governor's race in a number of key swing states will have control over the levers of power around elections. Lastly, with the Dobbs decision at the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, a number of gubernatorial races will end up functionally deciding the legality and availability of abortion in any number of states.This is why this cycle has a number of critically important state legislative races. As power to regulate the right to choose has been turned over to individual states, the battles over legislative chambers are of significant importance this cycle.Lastly, many states will have ballot referenda for their citizens to consider. These run the gamut, with some potentially legalizing marijuana, others establishing or stripping citizens'  right to abortion access, and others opening up multi-billion dollar gambling markets.Insider will be closely monitoring the coverage on all of this today, tonight, and through the final calls of the races. The first polls close at 6 p.m. EST, come along and follow all the critical races of this election here.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 8th, 2022

Ted Cruz says he will "wait and see" what Trump does before deciding on running for president in 2024

Sen. Ted Cruz told a CPAC event in Texas that he is waiting for former President Donald Trump to make up his mind about the 2024 presidential race. Sen. Ted Cruz speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Dallas, Texas, on August 5, 2022.Brandon Bell/Getty Images Ted Cruz said he will "wait and see" whether Donald Trump runs in 2024 before making any decisions on running himself. Cruz previously said that Trump deciding not to run would "significantly" clear out the field. Trump and Cruz fiercely clashed during the 2016 Republican primary campaign. Republican Sen. Ted Cruz says he will "wait and see" what former President Donald Trump does before deciding on whether to run for president again in 2024.Speaking to Fox News at a Conservative Political Action Conference event in Dallas, Texas, on Friday, Cruz said Trump is going to "decide on his own timeframe" whether he will seek the presidency for the third time.Cruz, who launched a failed bid in 2016, suggested he'd hold off until Trump announced his plans. "Everyone is going to wait and see what Donald Trump decides and make decisions from there," he said.When asked about his timeframe for deciding whether he'll put his name in the running for the Republican nominee, Cruz said his focus is now on the 2022 mid-terms."I'm spending practically every waking moment on the campaign trail, focusing on retaking the House and retaking the Senate," he told Fox News. "I think we're going to win both."In July, speaking to Fox News at the Turning Point USA conference in Tampa, Florida, Cruz said that Trump deciding not to run in 2024 would "significantly" clear out the field of potential candidates.Trump has not yet announced whether he'll run in 2024, but teasers have fueled speculation that he will.Last week, he said it would be "very hard for me not to run" against President Joe Biden in 2024. And in June, he said that he would be making an announcement about it in the "not too distant future." Cruz ran against Trump for the Republican nomination in 2016, and the two politicians clashed during the primary campaign.Trump called Cruz's wife "ugly," baselessly claimed Cruz's father was involved in a plot to assassinate President John F. Kennedy and nicknamed him "Lyin' Ted Cruz."  In turn, Cruz called Trump, a "pathological liar."They have since patched things up, according to a new book by Paul Manafort. An extract obtained by the Guardian said that Trump apologized for insulting Cruz and his family. And in recent years, Cruz has become a loyal ally to the former president.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytAug 6th, 2022

Herschel Walker isn"t the only pro-footballer-turned-politician. Here are 16 others who"ve tossed the pigskin into the political arena.

Republican Herschel Walker, a former NFL star, is locked in a close battle with Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock to represent Georgia. Herschel Walker, who is a Republican running for the US Senate in Georgia, played professional football for the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1990s and was also a member of the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, and Minnesota Vikings.Photo by David Madison/Getty Images Georgia's upcoming runoff election will determine whether GOP candidate Herschel Walker will enter the US Senate. Walker was a notable college and professional football player. Here are other prominent politicians and government officials who've transitioned from a career football to politics. On December 6, Republican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker and Democratic incumbent Sen. Raphael Warnock will face-off in their highly anticipated runoff election in Georgia. This race — one of the most expensive in US history — has garnered national media attention from start to end.For voters in the Peach State, its a choice between Warnock, a senior pastor at Atlanta's historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, versus Walker, a former college football star and ex-NFL player.Walker's football career made him a celebrity not only in Georgia where he was a standout running back, but nationwide, making his campaign launch exciting for fans of America's favorite pasttime.But the pro-baller-to-politician pipeline hardly begins with Walker.Meet 16 other political and governmental figures who played or otherwise participated in pro football before entering public office:Herschel WalkerIn 1982, Herschel Walker was awarded a Heisman Trophy for being the top player in college football. He'd go on to play professional football until 1997. In 2022, Walker launched a campaign to run for US Senate in Georgia as a Republican.Bettman/Getty Images, Jessica McGowan/Getty ImagesWalker was the star running back for the University of Georgia, where he won his Heisman Trophy in 1982. He went on to play professional football for the New Jersey Generals of the US Football League, which was partially owned by Donald Trump at the time, for three years before being drafted by the Dallas Cowboys.Walker also played for the Minnesota Vikings, Philadelphia Eagles, and the New York Giants. "He had what they call straight-ahead skills, which is he was fast and he was strong. And you weren't going to bring him down on your own," author Jeff Pearlman who covered much of Walker's football career told Vox's Ben Jacobs in October. "It doesn't mean he was going to juke you but he was a great athlete.As of this year, Walker is ranked in the all-time top-12 in the NFL for all-purpose yardage, according to Pro Football reference. He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. Walker also competed on the US Olympic two-man bobsled team in 1992.Colin AllredBefore being elected to the House of Representatives, Colin Allred was a linebacker for the Tennessee Titans.Nick Laham/Getty Images, Emil Lippe/Getty ImagesBefore embarking on his political journey, Rep. Colin Allred, a Democrat from Texas, was a linebacker for the Tennessee Titans, playing from 2006 to 2010.Allred attended Baylor University on a full-ride football scholarship and was accepted to play in the NFL immediately after graduating, leading him to defer his acceptance to law school.After five seasons in the NFL, Allred sustained a career-ending injury, bringing him back to pursuing a career as a civil rights attorney, according to Allred's official House of Representatives page.Today, he represents Texas' 32nd District, having first been elected to Congress in 2018.Tommy TubervilleSen. Tommy Tuberville is ranked as one of the top 50 most winning football coaches of all time.Chris Graythen/Getty Images, Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesRepublican Sen. Tommy Tuberville was once known as Coach Tuberville when he lead Auburn University's football team from 1999 to 2008.Tuberville is the only coach in Auburn's history to defeat their in-state rival, the University of Alabama, six consecutive times.He also served stints as assistant coach and defensive coordinator for the University of Miami and Texas A&M, before being named the head coach at the University of Mississippi, according to his website.Tuberville has also coached at Arkansas State, Texas Tech, and the University of Cincinnati. While coaching the Cinncinnati Bearcats, Tuberville earned $2.2 million a year, ranking him as the second highest in the American Athletic Conference's (AAC) pay ranks at the time, according to The Enquirer. In 2004, Tuberville was named national coach of the year.He retired from coaching the sport as one of top 50 most winningest football coaches of all time.He has been serving as a US senator from Alabama since 2021.Steve LargentDuring his time as a House representative, Largent was considered highly conservative, even by other Republicans.Focus on Sport/Getty Images, LUKE FRAZZA/AFP via Getty ImagesFormer US Rep. Steve Largent was a wide receiver for the Seattle Seahawks for 14 seasons.Largent played college ball at the University of Tulsa. The Houston Oilers drafted Largent in 1976 but traded him to the Seahawks before he ever played a regular season game for the Texas team. An NFL Man of the Year winner in 1988 and Football Hall of Fame inductee in 1995, Largent only ever missed four games in his whole career because of injuries, according to the Football Hall of Fame.The Republican represented Oklahoma's 1st district from 1994 to 2002. Largent resigned from Congress to run for governor of Oklahoma in 2002 but lost in a close race.Largest later served as president of CTIA-The Wireless Association, a top Washington, D.C., trade and lobbying association, before retiring in 2014.Heath ShulerDemocratic Rep. Heath Shuler began his political career in 2006, following his retirement from the NFL.Doug Pensinger/ALLSPORT, David Howells/Corbis via Getty ImagesAfter leading his high school football team to three state championships, Joseph Heath Shuler went on to play quarterback for the University of Tennessee.Shuler's pro career began in 1994, when he was a first-round draft pick for the Washington Redskins, now known as the Washington Commanders. He received a 7-year, $19.25 million contract.But his career never really took flight.After three middling years in Washington, Shuler was traded to the New Orleans Saints. He started nine forgettable games and suffered a serious foot injury that took two surgeries to correct. He signed a contract with the Oakland Raiders, but re-injured his foot during training camp, so he was cut and later retired.In all, Shuler threw 15 touchdowns against 33 interceptions as a professional, according to Pro Football Reference.Shuler, a Democrat, was elected to represent North Carolina's 11th District in 2007. He did not seek re-election in 2012 and served in Congress until 2013.Since then, he's worked as a lobbyist and is now a senior advisor at law firm BakerHostetler.Donald TrumpIn 1983, Donald Trump bought the United States Football League's New Jersey Generals. He purchased the team for around $20 million, in today's dollars.Circa Images/GHI/Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images, Tasos Katopodis/Getty ImagesEven former President Donald Trump had a brief stint with professional football — although not with the NFL.In 1983, the then-business tycoon bought the United States Football League's (USFL) New Jersey Generals. He purchased the team for around $20 million, in today's dollars. Trump's running back for the Generals was none-other than Herschel Walker. However, Trump was widely cited for the failure of the USFL because he cared too much about merging with the NFL than he did about the team he owned."I think it was a big mistake," Dr. Ted Diethrich, one of the league's original owners, told USA Today at the time. "When that decision was made, the course for this was charted, and it was going to be a wreck."In 2014, Trump re-entered the football realm when he faced off with Jon Bon Jovi and the Pegula family to purchase the Buffalo Bills. But Trump underbid, and the Pegula family ultimately purchased the team.Less than a year later, Trump announced a bid for the presidency, ultimately winning the Republican Party nomination and defeating Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in one of the biggest political upsets in modern American history.Trump served as president from 2017 to 2021. He lost his bid for a second presidential term to current President Joe Biden. He has refused to accept the results of the 2020 election, claiming it was riddled with fraud. And in November, Trump officially announced he will run for president in 2024.Trump, who himself played football at the New York Military Academy as a youth, has long been in what Insider dubs "The Pigskin War" over players, team ownership, coaches, social injustice, Deflategate, and safety issues with the NFL.Jon RunyanRepublican Rep. Jon Runyan was elected to represent New Jersey after he retired from playing professional football.Joseph Labolito/Getty Images, Tom Williams/Roll CallRepublican Rep. Jon Runyan was elected to represent New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District in 2011, serving until 2015 after deciding not to seek a third term.Before entering politics, Runyan Sports Illustrated labeled him one of the "dirtiest players in the NFL" in its October 2006 issue.Most notably, Runyan, known as "The Enforcer," was an offensive lineman for the Philadelphia Eagles where he signed a $30 million contract, making him the highest paid offensive lineman at the time.He also had a stint with the Tennessee Titans from from 1996 to 1999. After a micro-fracture surgery on his knee and his Eagles contract expired in 2009, Runyan played five games with the San Diego Chargers before retiring later that year. Runyan's son, Jon Runyan Jr., is following in his father's footsteps and is currently a football guard for the Green Bay Packers.Jack KempThe late Jack Kemp served as a Republican on the House of Representatives from 1971 to 1989.Focus on Sport/Getty Images, Cynthia Johnson/Getty ImagesPre-politics, Jack Kemp played professional football as one of the most notable quarterbacks of his era.Kemp played from 1957 to 1969 across three pro leagues — the NFL, the Canadian Football League, and the American Football League.Kemp was captain of both the San Diego Chargers and Buffalo Bills. In 1965, he received the AFL Most Valuable Player award after leading the Bills to their second consecutive AFL championship.Kemp quickly entered politics after retiring from football.He served not only as a member of the US House of Representatives for New York from 1971 to 1989, but also as secretary of Housing and Urban Development during the George H. W. Bush Administration.In 1996, Kemp was the Republican vice presidential pick for presidential candidate Bob Dole, who lost to the Democratic ticket of Bill Clinton and Al Gore.Kemp, who died in 2009, also made an unsuccessful bid for the Republican presidential nomination in 1988.J.C. WattsRep. Julius Ceasar "J.C." Watts Jr. attended the University of Oklahoma on a football scholarship and then went on to play professional in the Canadian Football League.Mark Perlstein/Getty Images, © Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty ImagesJulius Caesar Jr. "J.C." Watts started his football career in high school where he was the star quarterback, leading him to receive a football scholarship to the University of Oklahoma. Watts was originally drafted by the NFL's New York Jets, but they weren't able to guarantee him a position as quarterback, so he opted to play professionally in the Canadian Football League during the early- and mid-1980s, mostly with the Ottawa Rough Riders.He retired from football in 1986 and became a Baptist minister. Watts served in Congress starting in 1995 and represented Okalahoma's 3rd District until 2003.Watts then became a lobbyist.Anthony GonzalezAnthony Gonzalez was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in 2007 after playing college football at Ohio State University.G. N. Lowrance/Getty Images, Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesVoters elected Republican Rep. Anthony Gonzalez to the House of Representatives in for the first time in 2018.He won re-election in 2020 but did not seek a third term in 2022 after voting to impeach Trump and otherwise running afoul of the former president. Gonzalez will exit Congress in January."While my desire to build a fuller family life is at the heart of my decision, it is also true that the current state of our politics, especially many of the toxic dynamics inside our party, is a significant factor in my decision," Gonzalez said in 2021 when announcing his decision.Before he began his political career, Gonzalez played wide receiver for the Indianapolis Colts from 2007 to 2011, catching 99 passes and seven touchdowns, according to Pro Football Reference. He also had a brief stint with the New England Patriots before retiring from the sport in 2012.Before being drafted into the NFL, Gonzalez played college ball for Ohio State University.Burgess OwensGOP Rep. Burgess Owens of Utah, played professional football for the Oakland Raiders and the New York Jets.Focus on Sport/Getty Images, Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesAfter graduating from the University of Miami, Burgess Owens was drafted by the New York Jets in 1973.He played safety for the Jets until moving to the Oakland Raiders and Los Angeles Raiders. In 1980, he played for the Raiders' Super Bowl XV championship team.During his career, he notched 30 interceptions, returning four of them for touchdowns, according to Pro Football Reference.When he played college football for the University of Miami, Owens was one of only four Black athletes recruited that year and one of three to receive a scholarship. A Republican, Owens assumed political office in 2021 to represent Utah's 4th District. Owens is a frequent contributor for Fox News and has been endorsed by Donald Trump. Tom OsborneTom Osborne won the ESPN Coach of the Decade award in 1999.John D. Hanlon/Sports Illustrated via Getty Images, Tom Williams/Roll Call/Getty ImagesIn the early 1960s, Tom Osborne played in the NFL for the Washington Redskins — now known as the Washington Commanders — after the San Francisco 49ers initially drafted him in 1959.But Osborne is most remembered for his 25 seasons coaching the University of Nebraska's Cornhuskers.During this time, Osborne's teams never won fewer than nine games in a single season, and he posted three undefeated seasons.Nebraska renamed their Memorial Stadium in 1998, calling it "Tom Osborne Field." In 1999, Osborne was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and was named ESPN's "Coach of the Decade" for the 1990s. He represented Nebraska's 3rd district as a Republican from 2001 to 2007. Osborne ran for governor of Nebraska in 2006 but lost in a Republican primary to then-incumbent Gov. Dave Heineman.Clint DidierClint Didier was elected to public office in 2018 as a Franklin County Commissioner.Focus on Sport/Getty Images, AP Photo/Gene JohnsonClint Didier is a two-time Super Bowl Champion. He played tight end for what was then the Washington Redskins (now the Washington Commanders) from 1981 to 1987. During that time, the team won Super Bowls XVII and XXII.Didier went on to play for the NFL's Green Bay Packers for one year before retiring from professional football.He unsuccessfully sought public office on four separate occasions as a Republican — including two attempts to win a US House seat — and was finally elected as a Franklin County commissioner in Washington in 2018.Alan PageIn 2018, Justice Alan Page was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Donald Trump.Bettman/Getty Images, Calla Kessler/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAssociate Justice Alan Page received national recognition as a defensive tackle in the NFL during his 15 season with the Minnesota Viking and Chicago Bears. He was the first defensive player in NFL history to win the league MVP award and is considered one of the greatest defensive lineman of all time.Following his football career, Page pursued a legal career and was elected as the first African-American to the Minnesota Supreme Court in in 1993. He served until 2015.In 2018, then-President Donald Trump awarded Page the Presidential Medal of Freedom.Byron WhiteThe late Byron "Whizzer" White served as a United States Supreme Court Justice from 1962-1993.Bettman/Getty Images, New York Times Co./Getty ImagesAn all-American halfback at the University of Colorado, Byron "Whizzer" White originally had no intention of playing pro football and was set to attend the University of Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship. But, in 1938, he was drafted to the NFL by the Pittsburgh Pirates, now Steelers.Oxford allowed him to defer his acceptance and White played for Pittsburgh for one year. White also played for the Detroit Lions from 1940 to 1941.His football career was cut short, however, when he joined the Navy to fight in World War II. After the war, he finished law school and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1954.In 1962, then-President John F. Kennedy nominated him to serve on the United States Supreme Court where he was confirmed and presided until 1993.Jay RiemersmaIn 2009, former tight end for the Buffalo Bills, Jay Riemersma launched an unsuccessful campaign for Congress.George Gojkovich/Getty ImagesIn 2009, Jay Riemersma, a former tight end for the Buffalo Bills and Pittsburgh Steelers, launched an unsuccessful campaign for Congress in Michigan.The race was decided by fewer than 700 votes and it is believed that last-minute campaign violations may have been the cause of his political failure.Riemersma's opponent at the time claimed that Riemersma illegally coordinated his campaign strategy with a political action committee that paid for attack ads against him. Riemersma, however, called it a "last minute PR trick."It was also rumored that Riemersma used false smear tactics against his opponent, Republican Bill Cooper, who later sued Riemersma over their differences.During his time with the Bills, Riemersma showed flashes of brilliance but was plagued with injuries. He underwent eight surgeries throughout the course of his NFL career. He played six seasons for the Bills and another two with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Although Riemersma had signed a three-year contract with the Steelers, he ruptured his Achilles tendon on a 26-yard touchdown play, ending his football playing career in 2004.He ended his career with 221 receptions and 23 touchdowns, according to Pro Football Reference.Gerald FordGerald Ford was the 38th president of the United States.Bettman/Getty ImagesRepublican President Gerald Ford is the only president who was never elected as president or vice president, although he served in both capacities. He was serving in the House of Representatives when then-President Richard Nixon appointed him as his vice president in 1973. When Nixon resigned the next year, Ford became president.Before his political career took off, Ford played center, linebacker, and long snapper for the University of Michigan's football team.Although Ford never played professional football, he received offers from the NFL's Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers. He turned them down to be a boxing and assistant varsity football coach at Yale University.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nyt15 hr. 42 min. ago

Trump has just a handful of vocal 2024 supporters in Congress. We asked them why they back him over Ron DeSantis and others.

Rep. Ronny Jackson, one of Trump's few 2024 backers in Congress, said Ron DeSantis shouldn't run. "I don't need to see any more," he said. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, Sen. Tommy Tuberville of Alabama, and Rep. Ronny Jackson of Texas all say they support Trump’s 2024 bid.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Anna Moneymaker, and Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images Trump has just a handful of open supporters of his 2024 presidential bid in Congress. We asked some of them why Trump was preferable to DeSantis, who's been heralded as a savvier alternative. "He's done a good job in Florida. That's one state," said Sen. Tommy Tuberville of Alabama. Less than a month out from announcing his 2024 presidential campaign, former President Donald Trump's comeback bid has just a handful of vocal supporters in Congress.Among them are some of the usual hardline Republican suspects, including Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Matt Gaetz of Florida, and Sen. Tommy Tuberville of Alabama.But two impeachments, an unprecedented assault on both the Capitol and the foundations of American democracy, and a penchant for embracing extremists have diminished the former president's stature in the eyes of many in the rest of the congressional GOP, many of which are somewhere between openly critical of Trump and in a kind of wait-and-see mode.And as other Republicans — including former Trump administration officials — look towards launching their own 2024 campaigns, one man in particular has stood out as a promising alternative for those who believe in Trump's policies but may have bemoaned his political style: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.DeSantis, who's increasingly caught the former president's ire amid speculation that the popular governor could mount his own 2024 campaign, is viewed as a savvier, less problematic alternative to the twice-impeached former president. Though much like the former president, he's pursued controversial policies while in office, including keeping his state open during the COVID-19 pandemic, using state resources to fly migrants from Texas to Martha's Vineyard in an apparent political stunt, and signing a controversial "Parents' Rights in Education" bill that advocates say has chilled the expression of LGBTQ people in the classroom. Insider asked some of the former president's few congressional supporters why they're already on the Trump train — and why they're sticking with him over the alternatives. Some spoke of Trump's "experience," as well as the "unfinished business" of his first term. "Obviously, a lot of the personality things, a lot of people didn't like," said Tuberville of Trump. "I think the leadership role experience really pays off."He added that people were "right" to point out that DeSantis doesn't bring the same "personality things" that Trump has, but suggested his experience was limited. "He's done a good job in Florida. That's one state," he said.  "We need several people to run. I think DeSantis will run, I think Trump will run, I think you'll have two or three of my friends here in the Senate will run," he added. "You might even have a couple more governors running. But we need as many as possible."By contrast, Republican Rep. Ronny Jackson of Texas — who formerly served as Trump's White House Physician — was not supportive of a competitive presidential primary process."I'd say no," said Jackson when asked if DeSantis should even run. "I don't need to see any more. I know Trump knows what needs to be done."Republican Rep. Clay Higgins of Louisiana said it was "wrong" to suggest DeSantis would be better than Trump, calling the former president the best "we've ever had in my lifetime." And he suggested that it was politicians, rather than everyday Americans, who are pining for an alternative."Before I came to this body, my colleagues were cops, and firemen, and construction workers, soldiers, bikers," he said. "Those colleagues? We're coming out to vote for Trump. Most of these other guys are just politicians."Republican Rep. Troy Nehls of Texas shrugged off questions about Trump's character versus that of DeSantis, saying he tells friends that "we're not electing the Pope" when the topic arises.Republican Rep. Jim Banks of Indiana, the leader of the Republican Study Committee and a potential Senate candidate in 2024, declined to comment on the question, despite telling the New York Times that he backed Trump shortly after this year's midterm elections."Why don't you reach out to Buckley and we'll talk another time," he said, referring to his communications director Buckley Carlson, the son of the controversial Fox News host Tucker Carlson.Others weren't keen to acknowledge the likelihood of Trump being challenged at all."DeSantis hasn't announced he's running," said Greene, who's offered praise for his performance as Florida governor. "I don't know, I can't speculate."Reached for comment, Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida's office referred Insider to an op-ed the congressman wrote shortly after the election. In it, Gaetz wrote that "Trump alone" can lead the party while criticizing GOP billionaire mega-donor Ken Griffin, who's reportedly ready to back DeSantis, as a member of the "Swamp." But Gaetz, who co-chaired DeSantis's gubernatorial transition team in 2018, avoided directly criticizing his state's governor.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytDec 3rd, 2022

If DeSantis doesn"t get his 2024 decision timing right, he risks peaking too soon like Scott Walker or wasting his big moment like Chris Christie

Walker found himself on stage with the Republican A-team and fizzled out. Christie too had been a bright shiny object — then Trump came along. Republican Govs. Scott Walker of Wisconsin (left), Ron DeSantis of Florida, and Chris Christie of New Jersey are shown during key moments in their careers. Walker is shown ending his 2016 presidential campaign, DeSantis is shown after easily winning reelection in 2022, and Christie is depicted during a 2011 town hall, months before ruling out a 2012 presidential campaign.Insider composite of AP and Getty Images Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is seen as the top potential challenger to Trump in 2024. He'll have to decide whether he wants to run for president in 2024 or wait it out. Both approaches carry risks that could torpedo his chance at the White House, top GOP political strategists told Insider. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis often gets compared to ex-President Donald Trump. But as he faces a decision over whether to run for president in 2024, DeSantis shares far more similarities with two other ex-GOP frontrunners: Former Govs. Scott Walker of Wisconsin and Chris Christie of New Jersey. Like DeSantis, Walker and Christie once seemed like inevitable frontrunners for the White House.The two men made vastly different choices when it came to actually running for president. Walker seized the moment, while Christie let his moment pass.They both lost. Their stories provide a look into what could happen to DeSantis, too, if he decides to run in 2024 GOP nomination — or if he decides to wait until 2028."Timing is important," Mike DuHaime, CEO of MAD Global and adviser to Christie's 2016 presidential campaign, told Insider. "He's at a high point right now. Running when you're at a high point is a good thing. Timing is in many ways the most important and least controllable part of politics."Walker emerged as a darling of the right when Barack Obama was president. Like DeSantis, he skyrocketed to national prominence by picking fights with key Democratic allies.But Walker's campaign crashed so badly that he never even made it to the voting stage. He would also fail to secure a third term in Wisconsin in 2018. As for Christie, he was brash, populist, and had a big personality. It turned out that these were attributes that 2016 voters genuinely wanted in a president. But a certain reality TV star had those qualities too, just in far higher quantities.If Christie had run in 2012, when he was having a moment, maybe he would have been sitting in the Oval Office rather than Trump. Instead, he rebuffed influential Iowa Republicans who literally flew to New Jersey to beg him to run.DeSantis could trip up early in a '24 contest. A scandal could emerge during his second term that he can't come back from. Someone could steal the spotlight if he delays his run until 2028. Or, waiting might be the right move to secure an eventual White House win — he could have a strong second term in Florida with even higher approval ratings. "Those are definitely calculations and considerations that smart people in DeSantisworld would put out there," said a GOP strategist not affiliated with DeSantis, who asked not to be named in order to speak candidly. "And they would probably look at some of these past candidacies as a case study. There is a such thing as a perceptual moment and then sometimes the shine dulls a little bit."Then-President Donald Trump speaks as then-Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (L) and Foxconn CEO Terry Gou look on at the groundbreaking for the Foxconn Technology Group computer screen plant on June 28, 2018 in Mt Pleasant, Wisconsin.Andy Manis/Getty Images'We were a big deal'Walker was the one everyone was talking ahead of 2016.In 2010, he'd flipped the Wisconsin governor's mansion just two years after Obama carried the state. He then took on public sector unions to the delight of conservatives and the Koch brothers.Liberals tried to recall him. Then Democrats turned to his reelection campaign. By the end of 2014, Walker had won three times in four years. He was holding court with wealthy donors in Madison by the following summer. Neighboring Iowans clamored for his presence and a presidential campaign, as pollsters saw his fortunes rise. It all came crashing down just two months after Walker made his presidential run official. "We were a big deal, before we even had a campaign, because of what we did," Walker told Insider in an interview. "But we really didn't have the infrastructure or the experience nationally to deal with that."On top of that, the day-to-day questions a candidate faces as governor are vastly different than what can arise on the campaign trail, a top aide on Walker's Iowa team told Insider. "The national press scrutiny and the presidential issues are a completely different ballgame than being governor," said Eric Woolson, who was Walker's Iowa communications director. "It's one thing to be talking about state issues, and it's another thing to suddenly be talking about foreign policy and federal policy."Then, Walker's debate performance solidified his standing as a candidate unprepared for primetime. He was crowded out by well-known national Republican leaders on stage in heated debates. "It was almost like if they were trying out for a track team, and it was like, 'Oh, wow, everybody's a lot faster than me,'" Duhaime said. "He wasn't as good as when you put Trump and Christie and Ted Cruz, and Marco [Rubio]. They were all A-level debaters, A-level thinkers, on this stuff. Walker was just kind of the junior varsity on that stage." DeSantis may face a similar situation. He has more national and foreign policy experience because he served in the US House. But while he gets significant national coverage, he hasn't reached the national stage yet. He didn't face a serious challenge to the governorship this year, he isn't known as a gifted orator or debator, and rumors proliferate about about his lack of people skills. But DuHaime said DeSantis was "stronger than Walker ever was" and had "substantive experience" after dealing with hurricanes and the COVID-19 pandemic. "You don't have to be the best — you have to be good enough," Duhaime said about DeSantis getting on a debate stage. "And my guess is he's good enough at that point." Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis smiles as confetti falls after he is declared the victor on election night 2022.Getty ImagesDeSantis could face a pile on  DeSantis is Trump's most formidable potential rival for the 2024 nomination. A total of 33% of potential GOP primary voters said they'd vote for DeSantis today, shows a Morning Consult/Politico tracking poll released November 15. But he's still 14 percentage points behind Trump, who made his presidential run official last week.The Florida governor has so far been mum about his future plans, but he hasn't committed to serving out all four years as governor.He isn't the only one who could jump into the 2024 race. Other prospects include former Vice President Mike Pence, former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley, South Dakota Gov. Kristi L. Noem, former CIA director Mike Pompeo, Sens. Tim Scott of South Carolina and Ted Cruz of Texas, and former Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan.Should DeSantis not run, it's possible one of these other candidates could beat Trump as well as President Joe Biden, locking out the possibility for DeSantis to seek a White House run until 2032.If DeSantis does enter a large field, he would become vulnerable not just to attacks from Trump, but from all the other candidates that view him as a threat. DuHaime said presidential races were a "grind" unlike any other run for office."Millions and millions of dollars just turn on you in an instant," he said. "It happens to everybody. Only one person survives that." Hogan told reporters last weekend at a Republican Jewish Coalition event, a high-profile gathering in Las Vegas, that he knew the media was "focused" on DeSantis but warned much could change in the next six months. "I can tell you in almost every race I've ever seen, the guy that comes out the box first that everybody's talking about two years out is almost never the nominee," he said.Former Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey.AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, FileDeSantis is in a stronger position than Christie wasWhen Democratic strategist David Axelrod wrote a now-famous presidential memo to Obama, who was then a US Senator of Illinois, he stressed the importance of timing in politics. "History is replete with potential candidates for presidency who waited too long rather than examples of people who ran too soon," he wrote. Many in the donor class, GOP leadership, and media tried to impart the same lesson on Christie in 2011. But there are some key differences between Christie and DeSantis, even in terms of the timing piece, Duhaime said. When Christie was having his moment, he was early into his governorship, and Republican Mitt Romney, the former governor of Massachusetts, was getting a good deal of support from donors. "He legitimately didn't feel like he was ready — not necessarily to run but ready to do the job" of president after being governor for a short time, Duhaime said of Christie. In contrast, DeSantis would be in his fifth year as governor if he chooses to run next year. "That's a huge difference in my opinion in terms of that moment," DuHaime said.Plus, he added, Obama's reelection seemed like a surer bet whereas polling from the New York Times shows most voters don't want President Joe Biden, 80, to run again — in large part because of his age. DeSantis, in contrast, is 44.DeSantis' age gives him other options to stay relevant even if he loses the perch of the governor's mansion. He could run for Senate or — should a Republican win the White House in 2024 — serve in the administration. The GOP strategist, who concluded DeSantis should run in 2024, said "the country needs" the governor because of his competence and leadership in Florida. "There are moments," they said. "There was a moment for Christie in 2012 and there is a moment for Ron DeSantis in 2024. So so if I were advising him, I would say that it is it is less about the personal journey and more about answering the call for your country." Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 23rd, 2022

The definitive oral history of how Trump took over the GOP, as told to us by Cruz, Rubio, and 20 more insiders

Trump announced that he's running for president in 2024. Insider previously spoke with Cruz, Rubio, and others who had front-row seats to his rise. Donald Trump defeated 16 Republicans en route to winning the 2016 GOP presidential nomination. History books would be written very differently had that not happened.Marianne Ayala/InsiderThe most famous escalator ride in American political history was almost an elevator ride. Donald Trump's operatives couldn't decide whether to send him down the escalator to announce his presidential candidacy or have him take the elevator instead. They landed on the escalator, and that moment would set in motion a 13-month ride that would ultimately ensconce him atop the GOP as its 2016 standard-bearer.On Tuesday, Trump officially announced his 2024 presidential bid, marking the start of yet another race in his storied political career. Seventeen Republicans aspired to be president of the United States during the 2016 election cycle, one of the most unorthodox and unconventional the country had ever seen. Only one emerged from the pileup — Trump — who would learn he was the nominee on the Trump Tower elevator he almost descended on back on announcement day.During those tumultuous months from June 2015 to July 2016, the Republican Party establishment's reluctant journey to accepting a reality-TV celebrity as their presidential nominee laid bare deep ideological and cultural divisions within their ranks. Traditional Republicans found themselves outflanked by an insurgent former lifelong Democrat whose impulses and approach conflicted with their own. But by the time of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland five years ago this week, running from July 18 through the 21st, Republicans who did not support Trump fell in line.In interviews with nearly two dozen people — including several 2016 Republican candidates, party officials, and both GOP and Democratic campaign operatives — Insider collected never-before-reported recollections from Trump's hostile takeover of the GOP. The story that follows covers the Trump Tower escalator ride that was mocked from all directions and yet started everything; the Trump official behind renting a crowd for the big campaign announcement speech; and Melania Trump's plagiarism of Michelle Obama's Democratic National Convention speech eight years earlier.These 2016 insiders also described how the Trump team prepared for the first GOP debate in Cleveland by hanging with a member of Aerosmith and how his campaign polled Ivanka Trump as a vice-presidential candidate amid the RNC's last-minute gambit to dump Trump.The human drama of the Republican primary campaign has been all but forgotten, replaced by what came after: Trump versus Hillary, Russian hackings, WikiLeaks, and the infamous "Access Hollywood" tape — and the four ensuing wild years that roiled the nation and the world.But for any of that to happen, Trump must first become the leader of the GOP. What you are about to read is the oral history of that story.Chapter 1: The escalatorFor 29 years before his fateful escalator ride, Trump toyed with the idea of running for president. This time he was serious. Aides carefully planned and scripted the event and his remarks; Trump improvised.Corey Lewandowski, Trump campaign manager: We had a number of variables which we had to factor in, which was either come down the elevators in the back of the room and have him walk out through a blue curtain and onto the stage, or come down into the lobby, come down that now famous escalator ride, and then go up onto the stage. But what our goal was, was making him look as presidential from the very onset, which means the American flag behind him, the stage was exactly how we wanted it, with a podium, with the same type of microphone that presidents traditionally use.The most famous escalator ride in US political history.Christopher Gregory/Getty ImagesDonald McGahn, Trump campaign counsel: I was at the top. He went down. And I remember seeing the crowd go nuts.Adrienne Elrod, Hillary for America director of strategic communications: We all kind of stopped what we were doing and chuckled at the fact that this is happening. And we all kind of said, "Yeah, he's going to be in the race for about six weeks. He'll use this to make some more money and grow the Trump brand and try to launch a new television show."Sarah Isgur, deputy campaign manager for Carly Fiorina: What a weird thing for the advance team to think was OK — like him standing on this escalator.Tim Miller, communications director for Jeb Bush: I thought it was a ridiculous show.Corey Lewandowski: We had people who were on the periphery of the campaign and thought they were campaign strategists who wanted to have elephants and monkeys and donkeys running through Trump Tower.Donald McGahn: There was a lot of building security checking each other's credentials, because we had different levels of credentials. It took them a while to realize there was a hierarchy of credentials. There were security guards telling other security guards to move.Corey Lewandowski: There were five different sets of credentials and all-access to media and volunteers. They all had the wrong date printed on it. They all said June 16, 2016. So we had to send this poor woman by the name of Joy out to Brooklyn at, like, 3 o'clock in the morning to get these reprinted, because we knew that if it wasn't perfect we'd be chastised.Josh Schwerin, Hillary for America national spokesman: He was not a serious person at that point. There had been debate of will-he-won't-he for a really long time. It didn't seem like a serious thing.Sarah Isgur: I remember thinking: "Man, I'm surprised he couldn't even get people there. That seems insane."Amanda Carpenter, communications director for Ted Cruz: It seemed strange. I was watching the coverage of "Oh, did they pay people to show up? Who were these people?"Corey Lewandowski: That's a Michael Cohen special. Michael Cohen decided that he was going to go hire one of his buddies and pay his buddy without getting any campaign approval. You know, $50 for every person to come in, to stand in Trump Tower.I literally spent the entire day of Trump's announcement screaming at TV executives. Tim MillerMichael Cohen, Trump personal attorney: Trump hired David Schwartz to coordinate the campaign launch, which he did professionally. Any allegation of payments to actors is an absolute lie that was promoted by Corey Lewandowski.David Schwartz, partner at Gotham Government Relations: We were hired to put that entire event together. That event was really our brainchild: The most famous escalator ride in the history of politics was that one. Bottom line is, we had thousands of people there, and then the press accused us of hiring thousands of actors. Based on the fee that I got, that would not have been a good business decision on anyone's part. The reality is we hired 50 people, some of whom were part-time actors I found out later on. But we hired 50 people to help coordinate an event that brought in thousands of people. There were people at the door that couldn't get in. That night, all of the sudden, I got accused of hiring thousands of actors.Tim Miller: So Trump is going to speak, and Sean Hannity was going to give Trump Jeb's slot that night, because they announced the same day. So I'm standing outside Bed Bath & Beyond in Miami, shouting at Hannity, like, "What the F is your problem?" F this and F that. "How can you give this guy our slot?" Then I remember going in to shop and coming out and yelling at some other anchors. I literally spent the entire day of Trump's announcement screaming at TV executives.Corey Lewandowski: He did not deliver one word of the speech as it was written. We provided the speech to every media outlet and said, "Remarks as prepared by Donald Trump for his announcement speech." There were some media outlets that actually just printed them verbatim. Probably had egg on their face afterward. Because as we know, Donald Trump went on to speak extemporaneously for 45 minutes and talk about some of the individuals coming across the border that were never in the original speech. And I assume some are good people.Trump promised to make America great again and vowed to take on the growing might of China in a speech launching his run for the presidency in 2016. He made his way to the stage as Neil Young's "Rockin' in the Free World" played.Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty ImagesAmanda Carpenter: I was, like, "OK, well, at least he's talking about mostly our type of issues. People will realize he's a clown. And then this whole thing will melt like cotton candy. And we'll be back to maybe a Jeb, Rubio, Cruz race."Lindsey Graham, GOP senator and 2016 presidential candidate: I thought his announcement was pretty extreme. I thought the rhetoric around his announcement and some of his policy positions would make it almost disqualifying.Chapter 2: Early disastersA month after his campaign announcement, at the Family Leadership Summit in Ames, Iowa, Trump attacked Sen. John McCain. The Arizona senator and 2008 Republican presidential nominee had been a prisoner of war in Vietnam. "He's not a war hero," Trump told the moderator Frank Luntz. "He's a war hero because he was captured. I like people who weren't captured." It proved to be the first of a series of moments early on when it looked like Trump's campaign was over before it had even really begun.Marco Rubio, GOP senator and 2016 presidential candidate: Look, everybody — every traditional observer of politics — thought his campaign was dead when he said the things he said about John McCain.GOP Sen. John McCain of Arizona in the US Capitol in July 2015, days after Trump said the Vietnam POW was "not a war hero."Andrew Harnik/AP PhotoCorey Lewandowski: We had a whole day planned in Iowa that day. I remember it very vividly. I waited for Mr. Trump to walk off the stage, and I said, "I'd like to speak to you." He said, "I was pretty good, right?" I said, "Sir, could I speak to you over here for a second, please?" We went into a locker room, which is where the referees or umpires, depending on the sport, would get dressed in that gymnasium. And I said: "Sir, by all accounts, John McCain is a war hero. You need to apologize." He said, "Yeah, no apologies."Marco Rubio: That was a pretty early sign that the dynamics of American politics have changed. Part of it is just the way the public now consumes political news. It's very different than 20 years ago. It's covered more like entertainment or sports, and less like public policy. It was a perfect forum for a candidate with a message and the experience that he had.I called my wife just as we were getting onto the plane. I said, 'Hey, baby, I'm coming home.' She said, 'Oh, the day is over?' I said, 'No, no — the campaign is over.' She said, 'What do you mean?' I said: 'It's over. We're done.' Corey Lewandowski, Trump campaign managerCorey Lewandowski: I called my wife just as we were getting onto the plane. I said, "Hey, baby, I'm coming home." She said, "Oh, the day is over?" I said, "No, no — the campaign is over." She said, "What do you mean?" I said: "It's over. We're done."We flew from Iowa back to New Jersey, and this guy Dave picked us up in the car and we drove over to Mr. Trump's home. As we walked in the door, Mrs. Trump was waiting for us. She said: "You're right. John McCain isn't a war hero. What he has done for the veterans has been shameful." In the meantime, I'd been getting phone calls from every major political pundit and conservative talk-show host except Rush Limbaugh. They were all telling me that Donald Trump had to apologize — that his race was over if he didn't apologize immediately.Michael Cohen: Melania played a very limited role during the campaign not believing Donald would actually win. However, when directly asked for her opinion on a matter by Donald, she offered it readily.Chapter 3: The DebatesOn August 6, inside Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, 10 Republican presidential candidates took part in the first debate. Trump was a neophyte to debates, and his team was more interested in hanging out with the Aerosmith lead guitarist Joe Perry than prepping, auguring the alchemy of entertainment and politics that would define the Trump era. If Trump was a made-for-television candidate, he benefited from the unconventional nature of that cycle's nearly dozen debates, spanning from August 2015 to March 2016.Corey Lewandowski: We had a little bit of downtime before we went over to the arena. We landed the plane in Cleveland, and we got a phone call from Don McGahn, who was then our general counsel. "Hey, Aerosmith is close by. Do you mind if they bring their tour bus over and party with us for a little while?" We said, "100% — bring Aerosmith over!"Donald McGahn: Close, but that's a little off.Corey Lewandowski: So we sat there with Aerosmith about an hour before the debate, swapping stories of Aerosmith as opposed to doing debate prep.Steven Tyler of Aerosmith listens from the audience during the first official 2016 Republican presidential debate in Cleveland.Brian Snyder/ReutersDonald McGahn: It wasn't the whole band. It was Joe Perry. He was intrigued by the emerging Trump phenomenon. Remember, this was before there were any primary debates, and it was all new to everyone. Stuff that would be from Mars on any other campaign was perfectly normal for the Trump campaign.By this point, Trump was getting ready for the debate, so Joe had to wait a little bit. On the way out the door, Trump says something about "rock stars have all the ladies," which apparently Perry got mad at, because he's been married for decades and takes all that stuff pretty seriously. After the debate, if you watch the film, Joe goes up on stage and finds Trump and proceeds to tell him that he's married and he doesn't sleep around.The subtext is that Steven Tyler already had tickets to the debate through some other wing of Trump Org. Joe didn't want to be upstaged — wanted to meet with Trump rather than just go to the debate. Apparently, there's a whole internal Aerosmith thing among the political persuasion of the band.After the first debate, the prime-time contests took on a familiar pattern, with Trump becoming their draw and center of gravity.Marco Rubio: The first time I got on the debate stage, there were, like, 100 people on stage. So it was a very unique race, because you had so many different people running.Rand Paul, GOP senator and 2016 presidential candidate: I blame as much as anything the media. The media organizes the debates.Sarah Isgur: It wasn't a debate. You were debating yourself. How could you use your time as effectively, and where can you jump in on a question that wasn't to you?The top-polling 2016 Republican presidential candidates in August 2015 at their first official debate in Cleveland. From left: Chris Christie, Marco Rubio, Ben Carson, Scott Walker, Trump, Jeb Bush, Mike Huckabee, Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, and John Kasich.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesCorey Lewandowski: Let me just remind you, Trump had never been on the debate stage. And he was going up against a Princeton-educated debate champion in Ted Cruz, and career politicians and executives who've done this their entire life. So we spent time talking to Mr. Trump about some of the possible questions that would come up. We wrote one-liners on every candidate, just so he would have a quick retort if he wanted that.Rand Paul: It's hard to have much exchange when you don't get much time. It's unfair the way the debates are set up. They really make it impossible for the underdog to have much of a chance.Lindsey Graham: I never got on the big stage. That's frustrating. I was never able to poll well enough.Sean Spicer, chief strategist and communications director for the Republican National Committee: You're sitting there and watching Trump say, "Yeah, I don't know." And you think, "OK, that would have been a death knell for anybody else. It would have been, like, 'Boom — you're out.'"Josh Hawley, GOP candidate for Missouri attorney general: The one debate I remember, he starts by attacking Rand Paul. "I don't know why Rand Paul is even on the stage." I remember thinking, "I can't believe he's saying this stuff out loud." You can understand why people are watching the debates. Because you wonder, "Well, what's gonna happen next?"Rick Gates, deputy Trump campaign chairman: Donald Trump had this amazing ability to size people up — a "Little Marco" — in literally a one- or two-word phrase that so encapsulated who they were that people said: "This guy is absolutely right. He's telling us the truth." So it was almost impossible to compete with Donald Trump in that regard.Corey Lewandowski: Everyone has a plan until you get punched in the face. And we just kept punching people in the face.Tim Miller: If you're designing a candidate to do a poor job of being the one to go head-to-head with Trump, it would be Jeb. He was an easy punching bag because of his family. He's not an alpha type on a debate stage.—NTA by Mic (@NavigatingTrump) March 4, 2016Josh Schwerin: The most memorable debate experience? I was on the road, and it was the one where Trump and Rubio got into an argument about hand size, which I then had to brief President Clinton on. Which was one of the more awkward moments in my life, I would say. We were in Louisiana. He didn't at first believe me that this was the topic of a debate. I had to show him the CNN headline. I tried to not add any commentary and just let him read it for himself. Because it was not the most comfortable conversation to have with the former president of the United States. He was amused, but also really aghast that this is what they had devolved to.The evening after the Cleveland debate, with exhaustion setting in, Trump ignited another controversy when he phoned into "CNN Tonight" with Don Lemon and said that the Fox debate moderator Megyn Kelly had "blood coming out of her eyes, blood coming out of her wherever." Kelly had aggressively questioned Trump about his past comments about women, and his post-debate commentary would only further solidify the narrative that Trump had a problem with sexism.Sean Spicer: I think she thought that was going to be the gotcha moment.Corey Lewandowski: I remember getting a phone call that Friday night. I was in my apartment in New York at, like, 9 o'clock — we were supposed to be traveling to South Carolina the next day — from a guy by the name of Erick Erickson. And he says, "I just listened to the interview, and I've got teenage daughters and a wife, and Donald Trump is no longer invited to my event, because it was such an egregious thing to do."I didn't even know what the hell he was talking about. I said, "What happened?" I call Mr. Trump, and he says: "Yeah, I don't know. Maybe I said something." I again tell him it was one of these things where his campaign was over. And he just doubled down on it. He powered through it. And once again, 48 hours later, we were into a new news cycle.At the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California, the candidates faced off in another marathon debate, during which Trump attacked Rand Paul's height and Carly Fiorina blasted Trump for mocking her appearance in an interview with Rolling Stone a few days before the debate. ("Look at that face! Would anyone vote for that? Can you imagine that, the face of our next president?!") "I think women all over this country heard very clearly what Mr. Trump said," Fiorina would say that night to raucous applause.Sarah Isgur: We were landing — this was back when not every airplane had WiFi. And so I was landing and getting WiFi back, and that's when I saw it. And, I mean, she knew immediately that was the best opportunity we'd ever had. Like the thing sucking up all the oxygen just gave us an oxygen mask.Tim Miller: Carly did a good job.Sarah Isgur: Trump realized the mistake he had made. That's why he never touched her again.Chapter 4: Republicans cannibalize themselvesIn the months-long lead-up to February's Iowa caucuses, the massive Republican field continued to jockey for position, and Trump continued to suck most of the oxygen out of the room and vacuum up earned media. By the end of 2015, the oxygen deprivation had winnowed the field by five candidates. The candidates who remained were trapped in something like a prisoner's dilemma in which they turned fire on everyone else but Trump. Meanwhile, the former celebrated neurosurgeon Ben Carson began to gain traction among social conservatives nationwide, particularly in Iowa. During a rally in Fort Dodge, Trump went after his future Cabinet appointee, reenacting Carson's teenage tribulations — ridiculous mock knife fight, anyone? — purely for laughs. Trump's team planned it on the plane, and it led to an awkward exchange in the motorcade afterward.—Vaughn Hillyard (@VaughnHillyard) November 13, 2015Corey Lewandowski: Mr. Trump says to Mark, the head of the Secret Service detail: "Hey, Mark. How did we do?" And Mark says, "Very good, sir!" And Mr. Trump says, "Do you have any advice?" And Mark says, "Just one, sir."I'm like, "You gotta be shitting me. This guy has been on the job a hot second and he's already giving the candidate advice? He's the fucking Secret Service guy!" And Mark, who's a great guy and I have enormous respect for, says: "Sir, please don't have anybody come up on the stage and stab you. We have to shoot them!"Then Trump goes, "Oh, Mark — the guy was 80."And Mark goes: "No, don't. Please. Here is my only advice. Please don't ask anyone to come up on the stage." And I said: "OK, like, I agree with you, head of Secret Service detail protection, let's not have anyone come up on the stage."February 2016 opened with Ted Cruz mounting a surprise win in Iowa and Trump complaining that the election was rigged.Newt Gingrich, former House speaker and 2012 GOP presidential candidate: Trump could never perform a classic Iowa campaign. First of all, it's not who he is. It's inconceivable he was going to go to small towns three times. But how could you create a replacement campaign? I called him one afternoon and said: "What you have to do is get on Facebook every day. People have to feel that you're in their living room or their kitchen every day. Then the familiarity will lead them to decide." I must have said that to him in October. And at Christmas, we were at my wife's sister-in-law's. He calls and says: "This is Donald. We just finished taping 58 Facebook videos."Sean Spicer: I had breakfast one morning with Corey. He was very clear that the expectations were that Trump needed to win Iowa. He was going all in, doing anything he could.Corey Lewandowski: Cruz's campaign was so focused, they put all their eggs in the Iowa basket. Then at the very end of the night of the Iowa caucus, they sent out a mass distribution that said, "Ben Carson is getting out of the race — vote for Ted Cruz." We believe that those votes went from Dr. Carson to Ted Cruz, and that is ultimately what led Donald Trump to finish second in the Iowa caucus.Marco Rubio: It was obvious he was doing it differently than everybody else was.Corey Lewandowski: There was a brief period of time where Marco Rubio started to go after Donald Trump and attack him. And you actually saw a movement in the polls, but what did Marco's team do? They started hearing from their donors, and their donors said: "This is beneath you. You should not be talking about the size of Mr. Trump's hands. This is not becoming of a presidential candidate."Marco Rubio: He has a real understanding of the media ecosystem and what feeds it—what it is the media wants to report on and getting narratives across. And that was probably underappreciated when everybody was kind of running traditional political campaigns and he was running a 21st-century, modern version of what we have. And it worked.The ensuing four weeks — starting with the Iowa caucuses at the beginning of February 2016 — saw the remaining Republican challengers cannibalize each other instead of Trump. Taking out the top guy after the Iowa caucuses, Ted Cruz, was too lofty a goal for Chris Christie in early 2016. So the straggling two-term governor of New Jersey settled on taking out the first-term senator from Florida, portraying Rubio as too green to be president. Meanwhile, Trump aides worried their candidate's obsession over not coming in first in Iowa could spell the end of his campaign.Mike DuHaime, senior strategist to Chris Christie: So it was on the plane ride back from Iowa to New Hampshire, it was really the governor himself and basically said: "This is what we have to do. Now is the time to take on Marco."Corey Lewandowski: I called the grown children — Don, Eric, and Ivanka — told them what was happening, brought Mr. Trump in, and, over a meal of McDonald's in the back room of our Manchester office, told him that if he wants to continue to bitch about the results in Iowa and not lay out his vision for what he wanted to achieve for America to the people in New Hampshire, this race was over. It was a very candid conversation; it was just he and I in the room. He listened intently. You walked out of that room. He went to a town-hall meeting with CNN that afternoon and Manchester. He came and ran a positive message.Then he went to a shift change at the Manchester police department, where he talked about supporting the men and women in law enforcement. And we campaigned in New Hampshire on Thursday and Friday, on Saturday, on Sunday, and on Monday. And on Tuesday, Donald Trump won the state of New Hampshire by 17 points, with 35%, in the 17-way primary. It was a complete blowout, the biggest blowout in the primary's history.With the field on the verge of collapsing, the GOP establishment's favorite son, Jeb Bush, sensed opportunity — albeit briefly. They pinned their hopes on the candidate's mother, the former first lady.Tim Miller: There was a small window where we felt, like, "Mrs. Bush is coming up, somebody is going to take some momentum here out of New Hampshire." That's not Cruz or Trump. It'll either be us or a Kasich or Rubio. We thought maybe we can kind of channel this and have a McCain-like 2008 sort of bump.Our internal numbers were going up a little bit right around the time when Mrs. Bush came to visit us. And it was just lovely, and she's just so charming and wonderful and aligned and blunt. And I remember briefing her for — she was interviewing with Norah O'Donnell. I was pretty clear, and I asked her what she was going to say if she was asked about them. I asked her her thoughts about Cruz and Trump, and she gave her very candid negative assessments of both of them. After each sort of rant she went on, she then looked at me and said, "But I'm not going to say that."Former first lady Barbara Bush introduces her son Jeb Bush at a town-hall meeting in Derry, New Hampshire, in February 2016.Charles Ommanney/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesCorey Lewandowski: We could attack Jeb for being a fake rich guy. Because he wasn't as rich as Trump. And then we could attack him for being a career politician. And then we can attack him for being low energy. He became an easy target for us because he had never had a tough battle.Christie dropped out after Trump won New Hampshire. Meanwhile, Bush's campaign never got going. He suffered perhaps most from a viral video after he told a New Hampshire audience on February 4, 2016, to "please clap."Tim Miller: The "please clap" thing is Ashley Parker's fault. I never will forgive her for that. She was the one who tweeted it out first and made everybody go back and find it and make it seem cringe.It was like a totally normal human response to an awkward audience moment that he was trying to let it go ahead. And then it got turned around on the internet to seem like he's begging people to clap for him. Like: 'Please clap for me, please clap for me. I'm so sad. I'm in last place.' Such is life. Tim MillerAshley Parker, reporter at The New York Times: I made it the kicker of my story. Once I tweeted it out, it just took on a totally unexpected life of its own.Tim Miller: It was like a totally normal human response to an awkward audience moment that he was trying to let it go ahead. And then it got turned around on the internet to seem like he's begging people to clap for him. Like: "Please clap for me, please clap for me. I'm so sad. I'm in last place." Such is life.Ashley Parker: It was sort of a poignant moment and a telling moment, in certain ways, but I think some of this got lost in the meme. It was also a lighthearted moment.All told, 12 Republican candidates started out in February. By the time Super Tuesday rolled around, on March 1, 2016, the field stood at five. Amid the South Carolina primary, holed up at a Hilton Garden Inn, the Bush campaign compiled speeches for dropping out and forging deeper into other states' nominating contests. Surrounded by the Bush family, the New York Jets owner Woody Johnson, and staffers, the son and brother of two former presidents dropped out of the race. He was the 2016 campaign's original front-runner with a nearly $100 million war chest.Rob Portman, GOP senator from Ohio: The Republican primary was a surprise for people because most of us thought Jeb Bush came into it with the most mainstream Republican support.Tim Miller: There were a couple of folks around Jeb who wanted him to keep going, and he called us back in and said: "You know, this is, I can't, can't do it. I can't move forward. So we have to, you know, we have to do this." He was all business. And he looked at me and says, "I've got it." And we went over the speech, you know, just like we would have with any other speech. He was wistful, obviously, and a little sad, but very businesslike. Like, this happened, he gave it his all, and he recognized staying in was only going to make things more likely at that point for Trump.Discarded lawn signs for Jeb Bush and Ben Carson lie on the ground outside a polling station in Columbia, South Carolina, on February 20, 2016.Joshua Roberts/ReutersMarco Rubio: Generally I was happy when people dropped out, because that meant, you know, one less candidate out there and a pool of voters that were now available to go after. Unfortunately for me, they didn't drop out soon enough.Chapter 5: Trump takes control: Super Tuesday, Indiana's decisive primaryIn March, as the contest narrowed, Trump went on a tear on Super Tuesday, winning Virginia, Vermont, Georgia, Tennessee, Arkansas, Massachusetts, and Alabama, setting up a battle royal between Trump, Cruz, and Kasich in Indiana's May primary.Rick Gates: By March, clearly he was the front-runner, and he was gaining delegates. But at the same time, you could see the party apparatus starting to work against him.Lindsey Graham: I endorsed Ted Cruz. I ran out of people to endorse. I was sort of the Dr. Kevorkian of endorsing. Everybody I endorsed politically died.Amanda Carpenter: It was essentially coming down to a Cruz-Trump race, and Kasich was refusing to get out. People like John Boehner and others were signaling that they weren't going to help Cruz and consolidate the field. They were just saying, "Well, we'll just nominate Trump and let him lose."Tim Miller: Jeb endorsed Cruz pretty quickly after he dropped out. Gave Marco Florida all to himself. I went to work for a super PAC that spent millions of dollars attacking Trump in Florida. Like, what more did you want from us?Mike DuHaime: Mitt Romney was potentially the most influential endorsement during that cycle. He was the previous nominee, and he had this massive fundraising network. So the thought was that if Mitt endorsed somebody, that person could become the one who could coalesce people. He never did.Mitt Romney, 2012 Republican presidential nominee: There's really no reason for me to add to that story.Tim Miller: There's an alternate history where Trump gets treated like a joke from the start. There's another alternate history where all of the campaigns attack him and treat him seriously from the start and he never really takes off. We'll never know. I do think that in both of those alternative histories, he could've gotten killed in the crib.A London pub set up cardboard cutouts of the faces of Ted Cruz, Trump, and Marco Rubio in March 2016 as part of an informal survey for customers to log which they disliked the most.Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty ImagesIn the early spring of 2016, the Trump campaign began to make some changes atop its organizational chart, hiring Paul Manafort, the veteran delegate wrangler of RNC conventions who'd turned into a jet-setting shadowy political operative for foreign autocrats.Rick Gates: Paul Manafort was brought in at the end of March. Trump had been advised to meet with Paul because Paul knew how to deal with conventions. The media had been reporting that the Republican convention was going to be contested. So you needed somebody to understand the nuances of how a contested convention works.The first call he made was to Jim Baker, the broker of the last contested convention. We had a secret meeting with Baker at the Jones Day law firm, our lawyer at the time. He and Trump had a fantastic meeting. Baker was as smooth as he typically is, and Trump was very interested in Baker's experience.The second call, which I thought was interesting, was to Dick Cheney. Cheney had agreed to support Trump, but he wanted to do it from behind the scenes. He wanted to be helpful for the party and support the nominee, but clearly he was not comfortable yet to move all into Trump's camp, given his relationship with the Bush family.Another interesting call was to Marco Rubio. Paul got Marco on the phone, and Rubio said he would look at how Trump was going to run his campaign, and, at the appropriate time, he might be willing to support him. Paul hung up and started smirking. I said, "What's going on?" He goes, "Marco used to be my driver at the 1996 Republican convention."At a hastily arranged event in Indianapolis, in a last-stand effort ahead of Indiana's decisive primary and following Trump's big wins in five East Coast states, Ted Cruz announced that Carly Fiorina would be his running mate if he emerged from the GOP primary with his party's nomination. It was an odd, awkward event that featured a botched handshake between the two.Sarah Isgur: The most important thought was, who can actually beat Trump at this point? He was underperforming with women. Cruz wasn't women's favorite candidate either. So if women in the middle of the Republican Party were up for grabs, maybe Carly could help with that.Jeff Roe, campaign manager for Ted Cruz: They had a really good rapport, and it was a man-bites-dog publicity event. So we thought it would be newsworthy, and that's how it came together.Adrienne Elrod: By that point, we realized it was over, and we started planning for the general election.Amanda Carpenter: I like Carly and respect her a lot, but it was just a play. You just tried to signal that we would be serious about things: "Look, we would bring a woman onto the ticket." I mean, it was kind of a last-ditch attempt.Nothing fancy to explain there: We fumbled for a moment, and it makes for an amusing video after the fact. Ted CruzJeff Roe: What's funny is we practiced the handshake.Sarah Isgur: Oh, my God. My memory is that not only did they practice the handshake, we made them practice the handshake. They balked at us and said that we were idiots for making them practice. They did it in a way teenagers will do something, like rolling their eyes. And then to have them do the most awkward, whatever that was, in the world.Jeff Roe: It's always awkward when candidates do the victory wave. We freaking practiced it, and they still screwed it up.Ted Cruz: Nothing fancy to explain there: We fumbled for a moment, and it makes for an amusing video after the fact.Jeff Roe: They really liked each other, legitimately liked each other. So it was what it was, a guy running for president who announced his VP before he got the nomination. It's going to be a little funky. If we could get conservatives to unite against Trump, then this could be a thing. It wasn't, "Oh, isn't this kind of funny?" We did not treat it as being funny.Lindsey Graham: I think it had slipped away by then.Days later, during an event on May 2, Fiorina fell through the stage while campaigning with Cruz.Sarah Isgur: I was doing something on my phone. They were, like, "Carly just fell!"Jeff Roe: I think she stepped off the thing. It's better from the camera angle than it was in real life. But the camera angle looks bad.Sarah Isgur: I was, like, "Oh, my God."One of the most pivotal endorsements during the final days of the GOP nominating contest was still up for grabs. On April 29, 2016, in a radio interview in Indianapolis, Gov. Mike Pence, himself running for reelection, endorsed Cruz to appease his socially conservative base. But Pence also threaded the needle with kind words about Trump. "I'm not against anybody, but I will be voting for Ted Cruz in the Republican primary," Pence said in an interview with WIBC's Greg Garrison. Trump won despite Pence's endorsement.Rick Gates: That night we set up a rally inside Trump Tower for Trump to kind of do his victory party. But we didn't say anything about being the presumptive nominee. We didn't take any liberties. We just stayed in our lane, and we knew at some point Cruz is going to have to drop out. We didn't know he was going to drop out that night.Jeff Roe: We stayed in a hotel. I cannot remember the name of the hotel, and, unbelievably, there was a dog show there. So we stayed up there the whole weekend, and we made our decision with these dogs barking next to us the whole damn time.Ted Cruz: When I was giving my speech and I said the words "We're suspending the campaign," a woman in the crowd let out a wail. It was piercing. I almost broke down. I finished the speech, and one of the things I'm still frustrated to this day is that I wanted to stay out there and thank the hundreds of volunteers who were there that night who were grieving. And I couldn't. I couldn't hold back the tears. There was an army of TV cameras there, and I'll be damned if I was going to let the media turn Lyin' Ted into Cryin' Ted. I had to leave the room because I simply couldn't hold back. I'm grateful that Heidi spent probably an hour just hugging everyone and saying thank you. I wish I had the strength to do that. I didn't. But Heidi did it for us. That piercing cry from the woman in the crowd. I'll never forget.Rick Gates: We found out that Cruz had dropped out after Trump had gone through the hallway to the elevator. It was Melania and Trump and myself and Paul in the elevator. And it was just utter silence. Paul turned to Trump and said, "Do you now know that you're one of two people who is going to be the next president of the United States?"Sarah Isgur: I was listening to the "Hamilton" soundtrack just over and over and over on the bus with my headphones on with the senior Cruz team and Cruz and Heidi and Carly. I wish I had had a better mood, attitude, whatever you want to call it. But you just worked your heart out and lost, and now you don't have time off. You're just back doing it for someone else. I say all that because when he lost, I was in sort of a historical, pensive mood. I remember wondering who had run against Hitler in Germany and thinking those people deserve more credit in history. Because you can know what the threat is and you can give everything you've got and still lose.Mike DuHaime: There were too many people who wanted to beat Trump but didn't have the courage to get behind any one person, because they didn't want to offend either us or Jeb or Marco or Cruz. So it was just too little too late.Ultimately, Pence, despite not endorsing Trump, became Trump's pick for the vice-presidential nomination — because of "divine intervention."Trump walks with Mike Pence on stage during a July 2016 campaign event in New York to announce Pence as Trump's running mate.Evan Vucci/AP photoRick Gates: Unbeknownst to Trump, we polled Ivanka to understand where she was. We didn't think that he was necessarily seriously going to move forward with it. But Paul thought we got to at least test it, because you never know, everything else about this race has been different. So why not? Let's look at this, you know, in totality. She had pretty good name recognition for that part. But at the end of the day, even she knew that she was not wanting to be the candidate. And so we moved on very quickly.Trump wanted to bring on somebody that was his friend, that he could work with as vice president, that he was able to communicate with very easily. And so this idea of Chris Christie and Newt Gingrich kind of being among the front-runners was absolutely accurate. But in the background we were looking at people like Mike Pence, Joni Ernst, and Bob Corker who might bring some significant role or resource to the campaign in order to help Trump win.So they came up with a short list very early on, and we reached out to the candidates individually. One of the first candidates was Mike Pence. He was the first VP candidate we met with at Bedminster. I was put in charge of vetting for Pence along with the lawyer A.B. Culvahouse. I staffed that meeting. This is the first time that Trump was physically meeting Mike Pence. And I think it's humorous in the sense that up to this point, Trump thought that Pence was not doing well in his governor's race. Trump felt like if he wasn't winning the governorship of Indiana, how in the world would he be able to help Trump as a vice-presidential candidate?And I say to this day, it was just divine intervention on how everything worked out for the first time they had met. Pence was ultimately selected. And we had a scenario where we met at Bedminster for the first time, Pence and his wife, Karen, and daughter Charlotte were there. And it was Trump and myself in the room. And Trump immediately started the meeting looking at Pence's daughter, Charlotte, and saying, "Charlotte, you know, your dad supported Ted Cruz in Indiana, not me." And it broke the ice and it was great. And to Mike's credit, he said, "Yes, Mr. Trump — uh — that was my fault." And it immediately just kind of got them into a position of really getting to know each other. And the visit was not without its challenges, because they are two very different people.Chapter 6: The RNC, July 2016Their presidential dreams crushed, a handful of Trump's 2016 rivals had by this point quit fighting and pledged allegiance to the seemingly inevitable nominee. But there were holdouts, like Rubio, Cruz, and Graham, who were still refusing to bend the knee. The climax came in Cleveland.Marco Rubio: I didn't go to the convention because I was running for reelection. I had announced late, so I needed every day I could spare in Florida.Tim Miller: I ended up not going to Cleveland. I drove to Richmond and got blackout drunk with my friend.Melania Trump at the end of her speech on the opening day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016.Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty ImagesRick Gates: On the first night of the convention, Melania did a fantastic job in the speech. And then about an hour and a half later, we start getting calls about the speech and about how it may have had information in it from a speech that Michelle Obama gave. And then, obviously, people started digging into the two speeches, and then they started comparing it.My wife calls me about an hour later, I think just a little after midnight, and says, "You're being blamed for it." And I was in a complete state of shock, because none of us had seen the speech until just before she gave the speech. And the way that the process worked, it was fed into a system run by the RNC where they would typically check for grammatical mistakes, but they never checked for content — obviously a correction that was made after that night. But at that point, nobody had thought to check Melania's speech because she had taken the team of speechwriters and done it. And what we found out after the fact was that there was an individual who had been guided by the speech firm that had given ideas and previous examples of speeches, and the speechwriter that helped him a lot, he was not political in nature and so, from what we now know, taken some of those aspects of the speech and included it, unbeknownst to Melania. And I don't think it was a deliberate intent, but obviously it created such a stir.Entering the convention, candidates who vociferously opposed Trump during the primary had to decide how to handle the convention optics. Former candidates such as Fiorina took a different tack than former candidates such as Cruz.Sarah Isgur: Carly couldn't endorse Trump and she couldn't not endorse him. I think that the phrase that was used was "You don't show up to someone's birthday party and talk about what a son of a bitch they are."Amanda Carpenter: I was working for CNN, and I had an inkling that Cruz was going to do something. I thought, another good, last-ditch attempt to try to at least signal opposition to what was going to happen.Rick Gates: We had negotiated with Cruz that he would be able to speak but that he would need to come out and say he was endorsing Donald Trump, which up until that moment he hadn't committed to. We asked for a copy of the speech in advance, but he didn't give it to us. We felt Cruz was going to renege on his commitment, which you naturally would assume.There was a lot of jockeying at the last minute. Jared and I were at the hotel with Trump in his suite. We're on the phone with Paul, who was over at the convention center. Nobody wanted Cruz to speak except for Paul, who thought it would be a disaster if he didn't, since we had committed to it. But Trump refused to allow him to speak, and so we were working out how we were going to tell Cruz this.Ted Cruz: The purpose of the speech was to lay out a path that I hoped then-candidate Trump would follow. A path to unifying conservatives. A path to honoring the promises that we had been making to the American people. What I said in the speech is vote for candidates who you trust to defend freedom and to defend the Constitution. And that is very much what I hoped Donald Trump would do. At the time I didn't know if he would or not. There were reasons to have concerns. I did have concerns.Amanda Carpenter: It was all pretty high-level, high-stakes theatrics going on — on everyone's part.Rick Gates: So we go over to the convention center in the motorcade. We have Trump in a holding room, and he's watching the proceedings on TV. He asked me where the rest of the family is. We had a family box, which we called the VIP box, in the corner of the convention center, looking directly onto the stage. Trump said: "'We'll check it out. Let's go."So we walk through the halls, and everybody's shouting "Trump! Trump! Trump!" He's building momentum. I'm thinking, this is way early for him to come down into this area, before Pence comes out to speak. And then he just kind of moseys out of the room right around the corner, because the stairs lead down into the box. He gets into the stairwell, and he turns to me and says, "Watch this."Ted Cruz: I didn't know it was coming. I had no idea. It didn't occur to me that that would be the campaign's reaction. Given that, for any nominee, the objective typically is to unify the party and win in November.Amanda Carpenter: I just remember how loud the boos were. And how I was worried for Heidi, watching her just kind of whisked out.Ted Cruz: If you look at what I said in the speech, the words were virtually identical to what Ted Kennedy said about Jimmy Carter and to what Ronald Reagan said about Gerald Ford. Neither one of them, at their respective conventions, endorsed the nominee. And the reason I know it was identical is I had both of those speeches in front of me when I was writing it and very deliberately used the same language.Amanda Carpenter: I didn't think anybody was in real danger, but just watching everything that happened at Trump rallies and the violence outside the convention, it was uncomfortable.Sean Spicer: Trump owned the moment. He gets stuff in a way that I don't think people appreciate in terms of — what's the right word? — pageantry. It's like showbiz, in the sense that he knows how to make a presentation.Trump's takeover of the GOP would culminate in a dark, authoritarian speech that would presage much of his reign over the country and, years later still, his party. "I alone can fix it," he infamously claimed.Rick Gates: Trump was very involved in writing the speech. We had created a framework for it. But as with every speech, he put his words to it, he put his rhythm, his content, to a large extent. It was a speech that I think resonated with a lot of people at that time. It was one that showed the issues with America, the problems that we were having, based on, in his view, failed leadership, across not just Democratic administrations but Republicans too. He felt very particular about immigration, about China, about making sure that America could be the best country it could be. And he had a different idea of how to do that. And so in laying that out in the speech — and it was a long speech, longer than we had anticipated, but it needed to show Americans — not just Republicans, but all Americans — what was wrong and how we could potentially fix it. And so it kind of codified both those dark moments of where you feel like there's no hope or optimism to feeling very optimistic by the end. And you could sense that he poured everything he had into that speech.The balloon drop after Trump formally accepted the GOP's 2016 presidential nomination in Cleveland. He'd go on to defeat the Democratic nominee, Hillary Clinton, that November and serve a single term as president of the United States.Jeff J Mitchell/Getty ImagesLindsey Graham: I thought it was a pretty good speech. But I never thought he could win. I really didn't. I thought we would lose big. So what the hell do I know?Rick Gates: I'll never forget it, because he was also involved in the actual walk out and how he was going to do it. And just the way that the optics were very important for him. And it was going to either create a momentum booster, which is exactly what you want out of a convention, because at the end of the day, a convention is an event where you get to control the entire script, you don't have a bunch of people criticizing you or weighing down on it, you can certainly try, but at the end of the day, the majority of Americans are seeing exactly what you put on prime time. That 7-to-10-p.m. slot is the most important time of any convention, Republican or Democrat. And so with Trump that night, giving that speech, if he did it, it ultimately gave us a 10-point boost.Donald McGahn: The thing I remember the most are the number of people who still opposed Trump at that point and who were not at all enthusiastic about him. But then after he won, they were the first people in line saying, "I was with you the whole time, and I should get a job." That's the biggest thing I remember about the convention: the lack of honest support Trump was getting, even then.Rick Gates: When we first started planning the convention, it turns out that the RNC had hired a production team, that part of their team had been involved in "The Apprentice." So Trump, he has a style of getting to know everybody who works under him. At the convention, during the walk-through, Trump saw a director he knew, and they connected right away. This individual had a sense of what Trump would like, and he presented an overall plan. Trump loved it. We had to change a few things along the way at Trump's request, but this idea that you create the optic of somebody coming out in this kind of silhouette way through the middle doors — it was almost like a rock concert more than a convention, and people reacted that way. I'll never forget people texting me and emailing me, like, "I've never seen a walk out like that, not ever."Sarah Isgur: By that point, not only has Trump taken over the Republican Party, but the Democratic Party has responded to him as well. So he has had a huge effect on the Democratic Party. Think of it like evolution. There's this thing called Red Queen theory, where parasites actually affect the evolution of their hosts. The two will keep evolving to get advantage over one another. So it really matters what advantage the parasite gets next time, because that's how the host is going to evolve next time.John Cornyn, GOP senator from Texas: Every day was a surprise. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 15th, 2022

Donald Trump announces he"s running for president in 2024

Donald Trump, who faces escalating federal and state criminal probes, is widely seen as the frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination. Former President Donald Trump announced his third presidential run at the Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, on November 15, 2022.ALON SKUY/AFP via Getty Images Donald Trump announced on Tuesday that he's running for president again in 2024. It's Trump's third presidential run; he won his first race against Hillary Clinton in 2016 and lost to Joe Biden in 2020. Trump's 2024 campaign comes as he faces escalating federal and state criminal investigations. Donald Trump formally announced on Tuesday evening that he is running again for president, portraying a dark picture of President Joe Biden's America in what quickly became a meandering speech to kick off his comeback campaign.Trump cast himself as the lone panacea to a long list of ills on a "quest to save our country." He was short on new policy pronouncements, reiterating past ideas of imposing the death penalty for drug dealers, promising full back-pay for any American servicemember who was kicked out due to vaccine mandates, support for term limits for members of Congress, and a lifetime ban on former lawmakers becoming lobbyists. "So from now until Election Day in 2024 ... I will fight like no one who has ever fought before," Trump said during his speech, adding: "America's comeback starts right now."What was notable in Trump's just over an hour speech is what he did not say. The former president did not attack Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis or any of his potential future GOP primary foes by name. The closest he came to any criticism of any non-Democratic politician is when he warned that the task ahead is so great that only Trump himself fits the bill."Together, we will be taking on the most corrupt forces and entrenched interests imaginable," Trump said. "Our country is in a horrible state. We're in grave trouble. This is not a task for a politician or a conventional candidate this is a task for a great movement that embodies the courage, confidence, and spirit of the American people."Trump described a nation of "blood-soaked" streets, an "erased" Southern border, and a "destroyed" economy. Of the upcoming holiday, Trump wished Americans "good luck getting a turkey during Thanksgiving."Trump blames Biden for 'decline of America'"America is mocked, derided, and brought to its knees, perhaps, like never before," he said, also describing the US as "failing" and "in decline." The former president promised to "immediately tackle inflation" and restore the US economy to its pre-pandemic state, but he was short on specifics on how a renewed Trump administration would accomplish these tasks. Trump repeatedly mocked Biden, suggesting that the commander-in-chief is feeble and unfit. The former president has never officially conceded his 2020 election defeat, continuing to tout a debunked denial of the results."The decline of America is being forced upon us by Biden and the radical left lunatics that are running our government right into the ground," Trump said.Former President Donald Trump arrives with his wife, former first lady Melania Trump, to announce that he will once again run for president in the 2024 presidential election during an event at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, FloridaJonathan Ernst/ReutersTrump appeared to try to stay on script on Tuesday evening, saying at one point that his announcement was "an elegant night and this is an elegant place." As time went on, though, Trump's speech became virtually inseparable from his long stem-winding political rally speeches that can go on for hours.As the speech neared the one-hour mark, Trump began to abruptly jump topics from old grievances over the so-called "Steele dossier" to wanting to impose a federal limit on early voting. He then called for his son Eric to stand up, arguing that he has a "Ph.D. in subpoenas" due to the many prosecutors who have probed the Trump administration.Multiple networks, including Fox News, began to give up on Trump's announcement and resumed regular programming before he was done speaking.The twice-impeached former president won his first term in 2016 against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Now-President Joe Biden defeated Trump in 2020. Trump has repeatedly and falsely claimed that the 2020 election was rigged and stolen from him due to widespread voter fraud, claims that failed repeatedly in courts but that nonetheless helped incite the violent storming of the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Trump's announcement comes two years before Election Day, and he is the first Republican to throw his hat into the ring. Just before his expected announcement, Trump filed his official paperwork with the Federal Elections Commission — such a step would meet the legal requirements of his comeback campaign.Trump now enters the field as the presumptive frontrunner for the Republican nomination, with greater name recognition and a larger war chest than any of his potential rivals.He also goes into the 2024 race facing more federal and state criminal investigations than his potential opponents, with prosecutors scrutinizing everything from his handling of highly sensitive government records to his role in the deadly January 6, 2021, insurrection. Unlike most former presidents, who cede the spotlight to a new generation of successors after leaving the White House, Trump has sought to maintain control of his party apparatus while out of office and held rallies around the country, fueling expectations that the 76-year-old would run again. The 'red wave' that wasn'tTrump's lavish Mar-a-Lago club in Florida became a mandatory campaign stop for Republican candidates seeking donations and support from the former president ahead of the 2022 midterms. He also handed out dozens of endorsements during the 2022 midterm cycle, playing kingmaker in key races like the battles for the Arizona, Ohio, and Pennsylvania US Senate seats.Supporters wait for the arrival of former President Donald Trump during an event at his Mar-a-Lago resort on November 15, 2022 in Palm Beach, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesRepublicans saw the 2022 midterm elections as a prime opportunity to regain power in Washington, DC, especially as Biden's approval ratings remained underwater in most public polling this year. Conservatives sought to rally voters around issues including inflation and the record number of migrant apprehensions at the US-Mexico border. Most political observers had long predicted that a GOP-fueled "red wave" would elect dozens of new members of Congress — flipping the House and potentially the Senate — based on the precedent of a new president's first midterm election cycle being one where voters reject the commander-in-chief's political party and opt for the opposing party.However, the wave never materialized, as Democrats retained their Senate majority and control of the House currently remains up in the air, a development that has stunned Republicans — who had hoped to use the midterms as a clarion call for reclaiming the White House in 2024. If Republicans eventually regain a House majority, it will be a slim one, which will present challenges for Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California, a Trump ally who is poised make a bid to lead the chamber if the party claims at least 218 seats.Many of Trump's endorsed candidates lost their general election races, including GOP secretary of state nominees Mark Finchem of Arizona, Kristina Karamo of Michigan, and Jim Marchant of Nevada, all of whom backed the former president's debunked claims about the 2020 election.Trump-backed candidates Adam Laxalt of Nevada, Blake Masters of Arizona, and Mehmet Oz of Pennsylvania all lost their respective Senate races, dashing any hope of a Republican Senate majority in 2023. Republican author JD Vance defeated Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan in the Ohio Senate race, but not before the GOP was forced to pour millions of dollars into the contest, diverting resources that could have been used for other races.And the Georgia Senate race is headed to a December 6 runoff election, with Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock edging out the Trump-backed GOP nominee, former NFL player Herschel Walker, on Election Day but falling just short of the 50% threshold required for victory. It is unclear what role, if any, Trump will play in the runoff, given that many Republicans still blame his involvement in last year's runoff races, featuring then-Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, for the party losing both seats.Outgoing Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan — a potential 2024 GOP presidential contender — on Sunday criticized Trump's influence in the 2022 races, stating that the former president had become a drag on the party's efforts to elect more Republicans."I think it's basically the third election in a row that Donald Trump has cost us the race, and it's like three strikes, you're out," Hogan said during a CNN interview. "I'm tired of losing. I mean, that's all he's done."Trump's candidacy would be highly uniqueTrump's will-he-won't-he dynamic has shaped the Republican 2024 field, as allies and potential rising stars in the party waited to see what he would do.Trump's presidency ended in a cacophony of partisan violence and a historic second impeachment, stemming from the attack on the US Capitol during which his supporters attempted to stop the verification of the 2020 election results.Trump administration senior advisor Stephen Miller speaks with fellow supporters as they gather in the ballroom at former U.S. President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate where he says he will make a “special" announcement.Jonathan Ernst/ReutersAfter months of Trump's insistence that Biden and the Democratic Party had stolen the election from him, thousands of pro-Trump rioters besieged Congress as it formally certified the Electoral College tally that named Biden the winner. At least seven people died in connection with the attack, including one pro-Trump demonstrator who was shot by a Capitol Police officer. In the days after the attack, five Capitol Police officers died, including one who sustained injuries while fighting off the mob, and two who died by suicide.Trump was impeached for the first time in 2019 by the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives over allegations he sought to withhold aid to Ukraine unless its leaders opened investigations into Biden's family. The Senate later acquitted Trump of these charges.There is only one other precedent in US history for what Trump is seeking to accomplish.Grover Cleveland, of the National Democratic Party, was the only president to serve two non-consecutive terms in the White House. He held office from 1885-1889, and again from 1893-1897. Cleveland was ousted after his first term by Benjamin Harrison, a Republican, but made a political comeback four years later.Former staff writer Kayla Epstein contributed to this report.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 15th, 2022

Trump expected to make a "special announcement" at Mar-a-Lago on Tuesday after months of 2024 rumors

Trump has not confirmed that he will run for president in 2024, but has alluded to it repeatedly during rallies and events this year. Former President Donald Trump greets supporters before a rally at the Dayton International Airport on November 7, 2022 in Vandalia, Ohio where he campaigned for Ohio Republican candidates including Republican candidate for U.S. Senate JD Vance, who won his election.Drew Angerer/Getty Images Donald Trump is expected to announce a 2024 presidential run at an event at Mar-a-Lago on Tuesday. The former president has repeatedly teased another bid at the White House. Some of Trump's advisers have reportedly advised against him announcing his intent to run so early. Former President Donald Trump has promised a "special announcement" on Tuesday at Mar-a-Lago, in Palm Beach, Florida, where he is widely expected to kick off his 2024 presidential run.The event, scheduled for 9 p.m. local time, comes exactly a week after the midterm elections that failed to result in a much-anticipated "red wave." A number of Trump-endorsed candidates like Mehmet Oz, Blake Masters, Dan Bolduc, and Joe O'Dea lost their respective races, and while control of the House remains up in the air, Democrats retained their Senate majority. Jason Miller, a former senior adviser to Trump, confirmed to Steven Bannon on Friday that Trump, the presumptive Republican frontrunner, is "ready to go" when it comes to revealing his intent for a third White House run."President Trump is going to announce on Tuesday that he's running for president, and it's going to be a very professional, very buttoned-up announcement," Miller said on Bannon's podcast, the "War Room."However, despite Trump's eagerness to get back in the ring, many of his GOP allies and advisers have reportedly been suggesting that he should wait until after Georgia's December 6 runoff election. In Georgia, Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock and GOP challenger Herschel Walker, a Trump endorsee, both failed to win 50% of the vote in the US Senate race. So, despite Trump's eagerness to get back in the ring, many of his GOP allies and advisers have reportedly been suggesting that he should wait until after the December 6 runoff election. "I'll be advising him that he move his announcement until after the Georgia runoff," Miller told the Associated Press. "Georgia needs to be the focus of every Republican in the country right now."Some Republicans are publicly blaming Trump for the party's failures in the 2022 midterm. "There's only one person to blame for that and that's Donald Trump … The only animating factor in determining an endorsement is, 'Do you believe the 2020 election was stolen or don't you?'" Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey, told the Associated Press.Outgoing Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan echoed the sentiment on Sunday, telling CNN: "I think it's basically the third election in a row that Donald Trump has cost us the race, and it's like three strikes, you're out. I'm tired of losing. I mean, that's all he's done."Trump, for his part, is not backing down. The former president has not confirmed that he plans to announce his candidacy for the 2024 race, but has alluded to it many times during rallies and events this year."Hopefully, tomorrow will turn out to be one of the most important days in the history of our Country!" Trump posted on his social media platform Truth Social on Monday.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderNov 14th, 2022

George Conway says he doesn"t think Ron DeSantis will run for president because there"s no "upside" to wading into a "mud fest to end all mud fests"

Conway said that DeSantis, at 44, is young enough to wait for an opportune moment, rather than go into an all-out slugfest against Trump now. Then-President Donald Trump campaigns with Ron DeSantis at a rally in Pensacola, Fla., on November 3, 2018.AP Photo/Butch Dill, FileGeorge Conway doesn't think Ron DeSantis will run for president.Conway said he did not see any upside for DeSantis to wade into a "mud fest" with Trump.He said it's more likely that DeSantis, who is 44, could run in 2028.Lawyer and political pundit George Conway said he does not think Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis will run for president against Donald Trump in 2024.In an appearance on MSNBC on Sunday, Conway said he thought DeSantis would reconsider a 2024 run since any fight with the former president would be "brutal.""The way you take on Trump is to go after him hammer and tong, and Trump is going to go right back," said Conway, a political commentator married to Trump aide Kellyanne Conway. "It's going to be the mud fest to end all mud fests. And for DeSantis, I don't see what the upside is for him to do that."“I actually don’t think Ron DeSantis is going to run.” @gtconway3d says he doesn’t see what the upside would be for DeSantis to challenge Trump when he is still young and has the chance of losing. pic.twitter.com/JVaffom19f— The Katie Phang Show (@katiephangshow) November 13, 2022 "Even if DeSantis does succeed in knocking off Trump, he will end up with some significant percentage of the Republican base angry at him," he said.Conway said that DeSantis, at 44, is young enough to wait for an opportune moment, rather than go into an all-out slugfest against Trump during the 2024 election cycle."He's rational, unlike Trump," Conway said.Conway added that he thought the newly re-elected Florida governor would continue to raise money and build a "massive war chest." He speculated that DeSantis will leave open the possibility of running, then wait until the 2028 race to become the "leading candidate" for the GOP.Trump and DeSantis are currently the leading contenders for the 2024 Republican presidential ticket, though neither has announced a run for the presidency.Even so, Trump has already started attacking DeSantis, drawing potential battle lines for the 2024 GOP nomination.Last week, Trump unleashed a tirade on DeSantis, calling him an "average Republican governor." He also accused DeSantis of being disloyal and referred to him by a new nickname, "Ron DeSanctimonious."Trump advisor Kellyanne Conway said in September that the former president is eager to announce his 2024 run soon. At a rally on November 5, Trump teased that an announcement would be coming in a "very, very, very short period of time."As for DeSantis, in a debate in October, he did not commit to serving four full years as Florida's governor. A DeSantis representative told Insider in July that the governor is "focused on Florida and running for reelection as governor this year."Representatives for DeSantis and aides at Trump's post-presidential press office did not immediately respond to Insider's requests for comment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytNov 14th, 2022

Donald Trump’s top endorsements to watch on election night

Many of the former president's endorsees share have repeated his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him. Pennsylvania Republican Senate nominee Mehmet Oz speaks during a rally with former President Donald Trump.Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post via Getty Images Trump has made his endorsements a cornerstone of his post-presidential life. Tonight, his hand-picked candidates are running in some of the most closely-contested races. Mehmet Oz, Herschel Walker, Kari Lake, and John Gibbs are some of the hopefuls to watch. Donald Trump ensured he was on the ballot Tuesday night even if all he could do was wait for the election results like everyone else.The legally challenged, twice-impeached former president has put great effort into continuing to rebrand the Republican Party while in his Mar-a-Lago home. He made more than 250 general election endorsements, according to Ballotpedia. Many of his endorsees have echoed his lies that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.Top Trump endorsees, former reality TV star Mehmet Oz and author JD Vance,  could help Republicans hang onto two Senate seats in Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. Trump also weakened nominees in key races like Colorado's Joe O'Dea, one of the few candidates in a significant Senate contest to win without the former president's blessing. His ire also reportedly chased away sitting governors from challenging Democratic Sens. Mark Kelly of Arizona and Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire.Trump's picks could become eager allies for a man seeking to join Grover Cleveland as the only former president to reclaim the White House. He is expected to formally announce his candidacy soon after the election.Here are some of his most high-profile endorsees in alphabetical order.Don Bolduc, New Hampshire Senate: Projected to have lostRepublican senate nominee Don Bolduc speaks during a campaign event on October 15, 2022 in Derry, New Hampshire.Photo by Scott Eisen/Getty ImagesMcConnell and other Republicans hoped that the popular Gov. Chris Sununu would run. Instead, Sununu backed state Sen. Chuck Morse before Trump swopped in to support Bolduc. The former president touted Bolduc's election denialism. Bolduc, a retired Army brigadier general, has been gaining ground in the race's final days, leading some forecasters to deem the race a "toss-up."Mark Finchem, Arizona's Secretary of State: Race remains too close to callMark Finchem, a Republican candidate for Arizona Secretary of State, waves to the crowd as he arrives to speak at a Save America rally Friday, July 22, 2022, in Prescott, Ariz.AP Photo/Ross D. FranklinThe GOP state representative caught Trump's attention as a leader in Arizona's "Stop the Steal" movement. In his endorsement last year, Trump baselessly lauded Finchem's "powerful stance on the massive Voter Fraud that took place in the 2020 Presidential Election Scam."As secretary of state, Finchem would run Arizona's elections in 2024, when Trump is expected to run for president.He has a history of sharing far-right extremist posts on social media, including a post about stockpiling ammunition, CNN's KFile team found. On January 6, 2021, Finchem was at the pro-Trump rally at the Ellipse and then outside the US Capitol, and he faced ethics complaints about his attendance. He told Insider last year that the people where he was standing, on the edge of the Capitol plaza near the Supreme Court, were "orderly."John Gibbs, Michigan's 3rd Congressional District: Projected to have lostRepublican congressional candidate John GibbsEvan Cobb for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesTrump endorsed Gibbs, a far-right election denier, last year shortly after he announced his GOP primary bid against Rep. Peter Meijer.Meijer was among 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump over the January 6, 2021 Capitol siege and Gibbs is known as a conspiracy theorist who has also suggested women should not have the right to vote.The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee was criticized for spending hundreds of thousands of dollars boosting Gibbs, a Trump administration Housing and Urban Development official, during the primary as a pro-Trump conservative. But Democrat Hillary Scholten, a former Department of Justice attorney, now has a shot in this race after redistricting turned the seat Democratic-leaning. The Cook Political Report shifted its race rating from "toss up" to "lean Democratic" after Meijer lost the GOP primary.Joe Kent, Washington's 3rd Congressional District: Projected to have lostRepublican congressional candidate Joe KentNathan Howard/Getty ImagesThis former Green Beret is an election denier who has called those charged in the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol "political prisoners." He was one of just two congressional candidates to speak last year at a "Justice for J6" rally in Washington, DC, according to the Seattle Times. He wants Congress to investigate the FBI.He is running for Congress in Washington against Democrat Marie Gluesenkamp Perez, a small business owner, and the race leans in his favor, according to Cook Political Report and Inside Elections.Trump met Kent at Dover Air Force Base in 2019 when the remains of Kent's wife Shannon, a Navy cryptologist, were returned from Syria where she was killed by a suicide bomber while on a mission to fight ISIS. The seat is currently held by Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, who lost a nonpartisan primary in August. She was one of 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump in the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol, and Trump cited her vote in his endorsement of Kent.Sarah Palin, Alaska's at-large Congressional District: Race is too close to callFormer vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin speaks while campaigning for U.S. Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore at the Historic Union Station Train Shed in Montgomery, Alabama, U.S., September 21, 2017.REUTERS/Tami Chappell/File PhotoTrump called the former Alaska governor and 2008 vice presidential candidate a "wonderful patriot" when he endorsed her in April ahead of the state's special election to complete the late Rep. Don. Young's congressional term. He held a campaign rally for her and Senate candidate Kelly Tshibaka in July. He also dialed into a tele-rally for Palin hours after the FBI carried out a search warrant at his Mar-a-Lago home, calling it then "a strange day."Palin lost that race in August — in a state Trump carried in 2020 by 10 percentage points — to Democrat Mary Peltola, the first Alaskan Native to be elected to the House. Republicans blamed her loss on Alaska's ranked-choice voting, a system Palin described as "cockamamie" and "very, very potentially fraught with fraud."Kari Lake, Arizona gubernatorial: Race is too close to callKari Lake is running for Arizona Governor.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesThe national focus might be on Congress, but Lake could emerge as the largest pro-Trump ally. Trump was even caught on camera joking to Masters that when Lake is asked about her family, the former newscaster immediately pivots to debunked claims about the 2020 election.There's even been talk of Lake becoming a vice presidential candidate. First, Lake will have to get through Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, who burst onto the national stage in the aftermath of the 2020 election. But Democrats have fretted about Hobbs for months. While Lake's unconventional campaign may well prove to be successful.JR Majewski, Ohio's 9th Congressional District: Projected to have lossJR Majewski, Kaptur’s Republican opponent, at a Trump rally in Youngstown, OH on September 17, 2022.AP Photo/Tom E. PuskarTrump endorsed Majewski in his congressional bid, saying he "bravely served in the U.S. Air Force." But his military record became a source of controversy in September when the Associated Press reported that he misrepresented aspects of his service. Though he said a "brawl" disqualified him from re-enlisting, the AP also found a drunk driving stop may have been a contributing factor.He also reportedly embraced QAnon theories and was a January 6, 2021 pro-Trump rally participant, according to CNN.Majewski faces Democratic Rep. Marcy Kaptur, the longest-serving woman in the House. Redistricting helped give her a competitive race, but election experts say the race still leans Democratic.Blake Masters, Arizona Senate: Race is too close to callBlake Masters speaks at a campaign event on August 1, 2022 in Phoenix, Arizona.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesA long-time ally of venture capitalist, Peter Thiel, Masters candidacy should be compared to Gov. Doug Ducey, a two-term incumbent that Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell repeatedly tried to woo. Trump rejected Ducey's candidacy.Instead of a proven politician, Masters, like Oz and author JD Vance, is a first-time candidate who has repeatedly shown his inexperience. Masters' team even had to scrub his campaign website to make his abortion position seem more centrist following the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade.Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly was long viewed as the most embattled Senate Democrat heading into this cycle. If Kelly wins, he will do so having a more liberal voting record than Sen. Kyrsten Sinema. Mehmet Oz, Pennsylvania Senate: Projected to have lostDr. Mehmet Oz.Matt Rourke/Associated PressTrump is to Oz's aspiring political career as Oprah was to the doctor's reality TV stardom.Oz barely beat former Trump administration official Dave McCormick in the primary after McCormick lobbied unsuccessfully to secure the former president's backing. To say Oz has struggled would be an understatement. He's been lampooned for everything from his longstanding ties to New Jersey to his love of crudité. During the race's only debate, Oz also included "local politicians" in an answer about who should have a say over a woman's abortion, something his opponent Lt. Gov. John Fetterman's campaign immediately seized on. But Oz has surged in the closing months following Fetterman's stroke.Just like in Ohio, a win would hand Trump another ally in the Senate. While a loss could doom the party's chances of retaking the chamber.JD Vance, Ohio Senate: Projected to have wonOhio Republican Senate nominee JD VanceAP Photo/Tom E. Puskar Of all of his endorsements this cycle, Trump is arguably the most responsible for Vance's success thus far. Polls showed the "Hillbilly Elegy" author struggling before the former president weighed in on the primary race.Like other first-time candidates, Vance has also struggled. Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan has also ran an effective campaign that has impressed even some Republicans. Trump-accelerated changes have made it much harder for Democrats to win there. In the end, a Vance loss would be a major embarrassment for Trump. Republicans have also spent more than $30 million to hang onto this seat funds not being spent elsewhere.Herschel Walker, Georgia Senate: He is headed to a runoffRepublican Senate candidate Herschel Walker speaks at a rally featuring former President Donald Trump on September 25, 2021 in Perry, Georgia.Sean Rayford/Getty ImagesTrump pushed the former Heisman Trophy winner to run long before Walker's announcement, the latest chapter in a decade-long friendship. Unlike other candidates, the more establishment wing of the party quickly embraced Walker after initial concern about his past violent outbursts toward women. Walker then stormed through his primary like a running back in his prime.The general election has not been as easy. Walker will end the campaign by having to publicly admit to fathering three more children. Two different women have also accused Walker of pressuring them to get an abortion, which Walker has denied knowing about. Walker's own son Christian lashed out at him. Things were so bad that Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan wrote an op-ed bemoaning that the GOP bet on the football star in such a crucial race.Despite all the drama, the race has tightened and Walker still remains within striking distance of ousting incumbent Sen. Raphael Warnock.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 9th, 2022

Marty Walsh On The Labor Market, Minimum Wage And More

Following is the unofficial transcript of a CNBC interview with U.S. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh at CNBC Work Summit, which took place today, Tuesday, October 25th. Video from the interview will be available at cnbc.com/work-events/. Interview With U.S. Secretary Of Labor Marty Walsh KAYLA TAUSCHE: Thank you, Tyler. I’m honored to be here today […] Following is the unofficial transcript of a CNBC interview with U.S. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh at CNBC Work Summit, which took place today, Tuesday, October 25th. Video from the interview will be available at cnbc.com/work-events/. Interview With U.S. Secretary Of Labor Marty Walsh KAYLA TAUSCHE: Thank you, Tyler. I’m honored to be here today with the Secretary of Labor, Secretary Marty Walsh. Thank you for joining us. SECRETARY MARTY WALSH: Thanks for having me today. if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Henry Singleton Series in PDF Get the entire 4-part series on Henry Singleton in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q3 2022 hedge fund letters, conferences and more   Find A Qualified Financial Advisor Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn't have to be hard. SmartAsset's free tool matches you with up to 3 fiduciary financial advisors in your area in 5 minutes. Each advisor has been vetted by SmartAsset and is held to a fiduciary standard to act in your best interests. If you're ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now. TAUSCHE: So the labor market’s a little bit confusing. You just heard Tyler say that we're back at pre-pandemic unemployment levels, but job openings are starting to shrink and now more than half of large companies say they're looking at layoffs. So how certain is the strength in the economy? WALSH: I still think that we're gonna have job gain as we move into the end of this year, early next year. A lot of people are still looking at different jobs. We saw a lot of moving around over this last course of the year. People leaving jobs, getting better jobs, and I, you know, I'm not convinced yet that we're headed towards that. TAUSCHE: But the Federal Reserve has said that there needs to be some more pain felt in the employment space in order to get inflation under control and even the Biden administration has said that the economy needs to move toward a place of more steady stable growth. So from a jobs picture, what does that look like to you? WALSH: It's hard to say that I mean, we definitely have to go towards more steady growth, we definitely have to bring down inflationary pressures. People still feeling them at the kitchen table every day. We need to do that. But I also think there's a way to do that with by creating good opportunities for people so they have opportunities to get into the middle class and not enough people in America are working in those jobs, quite honestly, if they can get them into the middle class. TAUSCHE: What is the middle class right now? How much does someone need to make to be able to make ends meet because a lot of the companies who are watching this broadcast this morning are wondering, what do I need to pay people to get them hired and get them to stay? WALSH: Well certainly more than minimum wage. I think that we have to get people into better paying jobs. We need to get people into better stability when it comes to benefits and when, you know, the 401k, a pension plan, potentially if they have them. I think there's a lot of Americans out there right now that have gone through the last two years a lot of concern in the pandemic, they were working in a job maybe making minimum wage, maybe they had two or three jobs. Really I think the best way to describe what is what is a middle class job is a job you can work one job, get a good pay, so you don’t have to work two and three jobs to support your family. TAUSCHE: The federal minimum wage is still $7.25. Several states are still using that as their minimum wage. Does the administration see any path going forward to raise that? You've tried in the past and it hasn't worked. WALSH: It shocks me that there are members of in the building behind me, if you can't see the building behind me it's the Capitol Hill, that people think that families can raise their family on $7, $7 plus on the minimum wage in this country. It's really amazing to me that people think that families can get by on minimum wage in this country. We can't. We're working, we passed legislation, the House voted it, it's in the Senate and it hasn’t moved there. We’ll have to see after the elections what happens as far as moving that minimum wage forward. The President did file, sign the executive order raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour, but in fairness to a lot of companies, companies have already raised it far beyond the minimum wage in the country. They've gone to $15, $16, $17, $18 an hour to attract people into their businesses to work. TAUSCHE: Your agency in recent weeks has moved to change a rule and reclassify gig workers for companies like Uber and Lyft and DoorDash as employees rather than contractors. You're soliciting comments right now. What's the feedback that you've gotten about whether that's a good move? WALSH: Well, we haven't necessarily said what companies are affected by it, and what business are affected by it. What we're looking at is people that are employees that are working for companies that are being taken advantage of as independent contractors. We want to end that. We have plenty of businesses in this country, like dishwashers and delivery drivers in areas like that, where people are working for a business that other employees in that business are employees, and they're labeling them as independent contractors. So we're going to look at this. We're in the rulemaking process now. We're taking in the comments now, and we'll see when the comments come in what the final rule looks like. TAUSCHE: But there are pros and cons I mean on one hand, yes, it would afford those workers benefits. On the other hand, it might deny them some flexibility in setting their schedule if the company then says, you’re an employee, you have to work a minimum of this many hours per week. WALSH: Well, let's see what the final rule looks like number one, but again, the flexibility is not an excuse to pay somebody as an employee, you can't use that as an excuse. But we'll see what the final rule is and then, when that's done, you and I will have a conversation about it.   TAUSCHE: The infrastructure law that was passed last year, there have been some estimates about how many jobs that would create. I believe Moody said it would be about 800,000 jobs. Do you have an accounting of how many jobs that's created and where they are? WALSH: I don’t have what they what they've said today, but they said the infrastructure investment will create 800,000 jobs and then the spin off in the private sector industry will create much, many more jobs. Some of these construction jobs so folks that are working on these construction projects will be able to go to these other private sector jobs when they're done. I don't have an exact number of how many jobs are on the street today. I know there are 1,000s of projects that predominantly out of Transportation Secretary Buttigieg has put the put them out there and we're starting to see them in cities and towns all across America. TAUSCHE: Are you confident that those jobs would still go forward even if the economy starts to slow that a private sector company might say you know what, we want to participate in that program, but let's wait a couple years to see how the economy looks before we commit to it. WALSH: Oh no, I think the project from the infrastructure investment act will go forward. Those that those monies are there. As a matter of fact, if we did have a downturn in the economy, those jobs will keep people working through a difficult time if we came to that point in our country. The private investment that I'm talking about is in cities and towns that will spin off of these investments of new new new rails, new streets, new bridges, new broadband internet, charging stations, all of these different investments will help our economy moving forward with new development down the road. TAUSCHE: I believe that same Moody's estimates said that about 12% of those 800,000 jobs would be union jobs. And I'm wondering if you could just provide a commentary a snapshot on union membership in America right now because if you look at the most recent survey available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics that showed that labor jobs decreased by more than 240,000 in 2021. We don't know what that looks like in 2022 so I'm wondering if you do. WALSH: Yeah, I don't know, I don’t have the number of 2022 but 2021 was unique year the numbers went down in a lot of ways because companies unions weren’t organizing number one and number two, we had a pandemic and a lot of people retired, left their business or they retired. Those jobs weren’t back filled by companies. I think that, you know, I don't think the unions will see all this interest in unionization right now in the country that we're seeing, you know, polling, I think it's like 65%, 70% of Americans still looking favorably upon unions as in the past the highest in 50 years. I don't think you'll see the benefit of that organizing until probably 2023, 2024. TAUSCHE: And what are the forces that will drive that? WALSH: I think people that are looking for better opportunities for themselves,. I think that you know, you have a lot of workers that are the pandemic you know, when I think about the pandemic, I think it's done a few things for the workplace. Number one, it's changed the workplace. We have a lot of hybrid situations going on. It's changed what people want out of their careers. It's also changed people's perception of not wanting to be taken advantage of thinking that unions can help them grow. TAUSCHE: Because they can't argue, the worker, it won't be successful arguing or bargaining on their own behalf? They need a collective organization? WALSH: Well I think, yeah when there’s a collective power, there’s more, more support although I'd tell you, companies have done a good job of working through people keeping trying to keep people retaining people and recruiting people to their companies. They've realized in this last couple of years that they have to do more to retain and recruit people. TAUSCHE: So what do you think the Biden administration's reputation among organized labor is right now. I know that the President when he was on the campaign trail said that there was no one that would be a bigger proponent for labor than he would be. He made a splash in the early days by canceling the Keystone pipeline, and a lot of those union jobs went away. So where are we halfway through the term right now. WALSH: If you're, if you're a union member, you should be looking favorably upon this administration for a whole host of reasons is that you know, one of which the Labor Secretary of the United States has union book in his pocket. I think that that's something that's important. But the President is also focused on working people in America. He talks about unions a lot. He mentions the word union, but he talks about people and talks about creating a pathway into the middle class both for union workers and nonunion workers. And you know, the President wants to see from the very beginning when he started to run for president, he talked about creating an economy from the bottom up in the middle out meaning creating pathways into the middle class. Now, whether that's unionization or whether that's a good job and good opportunities. TAUSCHE: But he didn't talk about inflation being as high as it has been and I'm wondering— WALSH: We didn’t know it was going to be that high. TAUSCHE: But I’m wondering at what point does that eclipse— WALSH: Well, let's be honest— TAUSCHE: Any positive feelings that a worker would have? WALSH: Sorry I didn’t mean to cut you off there. No, there's no question about it. Inflation is an issue that we're dealing with. We're not running away from it. You know, inflation was not caused by President Biden, was not caused by President Biden's policies. Inflation is in large part is due to a global pandemic, a worldwide recession that's going on, inflation that’s in double digits in other countries. Oil, oil prices going up, the war in Ukraine, there's a lot of components to that and, you know, the President is very serious talking to us, the cabinet, to make sure we're doing everything we can to bring those inflationary pressures down. You know, we've seen some of the gas prices come down, we've seen a little bit of inflation come down, but not enough and none of us are satisfied, the President's not satisfied until we bring those costs down at the kitchen table. American people are concerned about a lot of things right now in this world and inflation is one of them. TAUSCHE: There are two major policy pillars from the President's campaign that have ended up on the cutting room floor and that is immigration reform and childcare. I'm wondering what impact do you think each of those would have on the the economy and on the labor market if you were to be able to advance either one of those? WALSH: I mean, I think we should we have to advance both and I’ll start with childcare. Childcare is is a basic necessity to get millions of women back into the workforce in a full-time basis. Childcare has not been addressed by this country or by most states in this country for the last 50 years. The cost is too high for the average family and we can't retain the workers in those industries. We lost a lot of workers in the childcare industry because they’re paying them minimum wage or a little bit above minimum wage. TAUSCHE: I saw a stat that 100,000 workers from the— WALSH: They’ve left. TAUSCHE: Childcare industry have left since the pandemic but how do you get them back? WALSH: We have to we have to respect them and pay pay them better wages. Anyone watching today that has kids in childcare, you know, you're paying 30%, 40%, 50%, 60% of your salary for childcare, a lot of families have made the decision we don't want to have two people working, one person will maybe stay home, work part time and make up those costs so that that issue has to be resolved number one. It's not just an economic issue. It's it's a it's a human human rights issue in our country to get good childcare in this country. The second part immigration. Right now, we're talking about worker shortages and what's happening is the political parties are getting immigration all tied up. One party is saying showing pictures of the border and meanwhile if you talk to businesses that support those, those those congressional folks, they're saying we need immigration reform. Every place I've gone in the country and talked to every major business, every small business, every single one of them is saying we need immigration reform. We need comprehensive immigration reform. They want to create a pathway for citizenship into our country, and they want to create better pathways for visas in our country. TAUSCHE: Parties have very different ideas about what that would look like but even just from— WALSH: They’re not offering, I haven't I haven't heard any of the parties off -- well, the Democrats have put through a plan but I haven't seen the other side offer offer a solution yet. Yet, we need a bipartisan fix here. TAUSCHE: On inflation, do you believe that immigration reform would actually solve price pressures if you were able to get more immigrant workers into the economy? WALSH: Well, I’ll tell you right know if we don't if we don't solve immigration, we're going to have economic, we’re talking about worrying about recessions, we're talking about inflation. I think we’re going to have a bigger catastrophe if we don't get more workers into our society and we do that by immigration. TAUSCHE: What does the supply chain look like going into the holiday season? WALSH: I feel good where we are. I mean, obviously we talked off air a minute ago about we have two big negotiations going on. We have the ports and the shipping companies that are going on right now. That's moving steady. Right now, I stayed in very close contact with both the companies and the unions. TAUSCHE: So you don't see a rail strike on November— WALSH: No, that’s the ports. TAUSCHE: The ports. WALSH: And on the rail stuff, you know, we had 12, 12 unions came up with an agreement. Six have voted to ratify their contract. Five are still up for ratification, one union voted it down and they're at the table right now working with the companies hopefully coming up with a new proposal to put in front of the members. So right now we're just moving along here. We'll know in the next couple of weeks here but I feel good where we are today. TAUSCHE: The cost of shipping containers has gone down. I know that you've been personally involved in training commercial truck drivers. Do you feel like each part of this system that you've solved the variables that were leading to all of the pain last year? WALSH: Yeah, I mean, the pain last year, but but you got to think now the infrastructure investment bill is going to invest in the rails. We're going to be, you know, we're going to be needing more supplies on our rails moving goods and service goods around the country. You see the ports in LA, Long Beach, you see the ports around the country, they're adding capacity there. So we're looking at more opportunities there. Solve it, you know, we've solved the problem of the pandemic and bringing goods and services into the country. Now, there's still some issues in other parts of the globe that, you know, had to shut the factories down. So as they got their factories up and running, we'll see more of those services, those goods coming into the country. And I think the President's emphasis on buy and build in America and more manufacturing in America is going to be key for the future of our supply chain. TAUSCHE: You remarked recently on the low turnover among cabinet officials in this administration before the midterms. Does that mean that you see a lot of turnover after the midterms? WALSH: No, I think, you know, I think we have a good strong team and we're working very well together. I mean, obviously, this is my first venture into federal government. So I don't know what the average lifespan or service of a cabinet person is. But as of right now, I'm just focused on my job and I think a lot of people are focused on their job. We have a lot lot going on, the implementation of the chips bill, implementation of the inflation reduction act, implementation of the the infrastructure bill, we're working on job training, workforce development, apprenticeship. So there's a lot of good things happening in this administration. TAUSCHE: For officials who may or may not be considering what their next step is, do you think that the US edging closer to a recession would make that decision easier or harder for them? WALSH: As far as the cabinet? TAUSCHE: Yes. WALSH: I think it's harder for all of us. I think if you know, what you don't want to do you want to just continue to work for the administration. We've made great progress in a lot of different areas and we have challenges in front of us. And I think that, you know, some of our work is not done. I mean, we've done a lot here at the Department of Labor to revamp the way we do job training, working very closely with trying to work closely with businesses. You know, when I go on the road, I talk to business groups all the time. I was in West Palm Beach last week, I spoke to a Chamber of Commerce down there. I think it's really important for us to continue this conversation. So the reason why I say that to you is that we get ideas from them about workforce development, job training, what are they looking for out of their employees. TAUSCHE: Yeah, you mentioned the midterms earlier and we've talked now about immigration, childcare, minimum wage, all of those are policy priorities for your party. But how much of what you're able to do will be shaped by the midterms and how much of the agenda is in flux until you know what Congress looks like? WALSH: I think at the end of the day, no matter what happens in a couple of weeks here, elected officials, Congress, whether you are a Democrat or Republican, you need to work on behalf of the American people, and we need to put the American American public first. You have to put them back at the top of the pedestal. It's not about parties, it's about delivering for people. And you know, depending on what part of the country you're in, people feel differently about where their own situation is, whether it's inflation is their top issue, or what the Supreme Court did with with with a woman's right. A lot of people will see after the election which direction Congress is gonna go but I think the President is going to stay focused on on his agenda. TAUSCHE: We have a lot of dates circled on the calendar in November. WALSH: We certainly are. TAUSCHE: Talk to you again soon. Mr. Secretary, we really appreciate your time. WALSH: Thank you. TAUSCHE: Labor Secretary Marty Walsh. Tyler, back to you......»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkOct 25th, 2022

Paul Ryan says Donald Trump won"t be the GOP presidential nominee in 2024: "We all know that he will lose"

"We all know that he's so much more likely to lose the White House than anybody else running for president on our side of the aisle," Ryan said of Trump. Then-House Speaker Paul Ryan listens to then-President Donald Trump during a meeting with Republican lawmakers in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on September 5, 2018.AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File Former House Speaker Paul Ryan predicted Donald Trump will not be the 2024 GOP presidential nominee. Trump is "so much more likely to lose" than any other GOP presidential contender, Ryan said. "So why would we want to go with that?" he asked. Former House Speaker Paul Ryan said former President Donald Trump will not be the GOP presidential nominee in 2024.By then, Trump's "unelectability will be palpable," the former Republican lawmaker said in a Teneo Insights Series conversation."We all know that he will lose," Ryan said. "Or, let me put it this way: We all know that he's so much more likely to lose the White House than anybody else running for president on our side of the aisle. So why would we want to go with that?"Ryan, the GOP's former 2012 vice presidential nominee, said the only reason he stays relevant is because "everybody's afraid of him" going after them."The fact that he polls so much poorer than anybody else running for president, as a Republican against the Democrat, is enough right there. He's gonna know this. And so whether he runs or not, I don't really know if it matters. He's not going to be the nominee," Ryan went on. Ryan, who had a rocky relationship with Trump, left Congress in January 2019 and is now vice chairman of Teneo, which advises CEOs and executives. —Jason Calvi (@JasonCalvi) October 14, 2022He said Trump will "try and intimidate people out of the race as long as he can." Republican contenders will delay their decisions and wait for someone else to jump in first and "take the ire of Trump." "It's sort of a prisoner's dilemma," he said.But he said the person who gets in the race first can also get a jump on signing up donors and supporters and establishing a campaign organization. A handful of people will run because it's the only cycle when they can do it and they can't wait until 2028, he said."The one inexhaustible power in politics is ambition. You can count on that," he said.The only outstanding question, he said, is whether there will be so many "non-Trump" Republicans running that they divide up that vote so that Trump gets the nomination. "But I think you'll see enough of a consolidation in the primary that that's probably not the case," he said. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytOct 14th, 2022

Gen X is late to the leadership table in US politics, prompting the question: Will it ever produce a president?

Boomers have been in charge of the country for most of the past 30 years. Now Gen Xers fret millennials may beat them to the White House. Tyler Le/Insider By historical standards, Gen X should be in charge of the US by now.  Boomers (and the Silent Generation) still hold prime positions of power, including the presidency.  Gen X has yet to secure a majority of seats in Congress and the Supreme Court. Read more from Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" series. Generation X's tardiness on the biggest of political stages explains a good deal about why the United States is mired in gerontocracy.By historical standards, today's middle-agers should be right there, right now, in the most important positions of power — like the presidency.But the best they have to show so far are a handful of consolation prizes: Paul Ryan's tumultuous three-year run as House speaker, four seats on a divisive US Supreme Court, and a spirited debate over whether Barack Obama even is a Gen Xer (he's not, but we'll get to that later).A big part of Gen X's leadership impediment: finding the winning message in a country that for most of the past 30 years has been led by baby boomers. President Joe Biden represents an even earlier cohort — he's a member of the Silent Generation, born less than a year after the country he now leads entered World War II under President Franklin D. Roosevelt."I thought that the country wanted, you know, a generational candidate," Rep. Eric Swalwell, the 41-year old California Democrat who barely made it onto the 2020 presidential-primary debate stage because of low polling numbers, told me earlier this summer."But what I found when I actually talked to people in Iowa, and New Hampshire, and South Carolina, was that the voters, especially with Trump as president, were so risk-averse to a younger candidate that they saw in Biden a seasoned hand, someone who kind of just, could like, restore sanity in governing," Swalwell said. Moving aside any blame toward Donald Trump and Biden, Gen Xers are making some inroads. Should things break their way in November's 2022 midterms, the group born between the start of 1965 and the end of 1980 could finally make up the majority of members in the US House.It's taken way longer than many thought, with nearly a decade of prognostications that this important torch-passing moment in history was just about to happen with each coming election cycle. If Republicans score a majority in 2023, Rep. Kevin McCarthy is also next in line to be the country's second Gen X speaker following Ryan's brief tenure that got consumed in the chaos of the Trump presidency.And should Biden and Trump opt against running again in 2024, the presidential field for both parties is expected to be packed with Gen X governors and members of Congress.They won't be shoo-ins. But Gov. Ron DeSantis of Florida, as just one example, would be the fourth-youngest president in US history, at age 46, behind Bill Clinton, John F. Kennedy, and Theodore Roosevelt, were he to run for and win the White House.Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, shown here in April 2021 at a press conference for a UFC event in Jacksonville, Florida, would be 46 years old upon his inauguration should he run and win the White House in 2024.Josh Hedges/Zuffa LLCAs they make their calculations about seeking the most powerful job on the planet, some Gen Xers are eager to shed their reputation as the "Slacker Generation." They say the US needs a new approach to politics and policy."Look, we've seen a whole series of presidential leaders who were baby boomers, and they had a particular set of policies and a style of governing," said Sen. Ted Cruz, the 51-year old Texas Republican, during a chat this summer while walking through the US Capitol.Echoing a line I heard often from Republicans about the septuagenarian president who was in office when many Gen Xers came of age, Cruz continued, "I do think the country would benefit from leadership that embodies what I described as the children of Reagan, that embodies a commitment to being happy warriors and to appealing to our better angels."But the Gen Xers also know they are late.The oldest members of their group could have first been running for president back in 2000, when the dot-com bubble had yet to burst and September 11 was just a date on the calendar. The boomers George W. Bush and Al Gore had something to say about that, and there's hardly been much of a serious peep from Gen X in the five ensuing presidential races. The nation isn't in the final two years of the Martin O'Malley administration. President Beto O'Rourke isn't about to launch his White House reelection campaign.But "it's inevitable that it's going to happen," Sen. Cory Booker, a 53-year old who made his own ill-fated 2020 presidential bid, told me in a conversation about when he thought a fellow Gen Xer might finally make it to the White House."Unless, of course," the New Jersey Democrat added, with a reference to the 40-year-old transportation secretary, Pete Buttigieg, "we get a millennial president."Democratic Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey ran for president in 2020. He told Insider it's "inevitable" a fellow Gen Xer like him will make it to the White House, but added a millennial could make it their first.Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty ImagesBiden made generational history — very lateInsider's "Red, White, and Gray" series explores the costs, benefits, and dangers of life in a democracy helmed by those of advanced age, where issues of profound importance to the nation's youth and future — technology, civil rights, energy, the environment — are largely in the hands of those whose primes have passed.Gen Xers — now roughly 41 to 57 years old — are ripe to be president considering the ages of those who have held the job.Of the 45 people who have served as US president, almost three in four fit smack in that age range upon taking office, including George Washington (57), Abraham Lincoln (52), and John F. Kennedy (43). Of course, no generation can automatically stake a claim to the presidency. But the presidential historian Douglas Brinkley argues it is also uncommon and unhealthy for the country's growth if one age group does get skipped."Each generation deserves to have a president from their ranks," he said. "It shows the maturation of life in America. There's a semblance of one generation passing it on to the next. That's the seamless quality of the United States."A missing generation in the White House is nearly what happened before Biden finally won in 2020 — after unsuccessful bids in 1988 and 2008.By the time he did make it, at age 78, Biden was the oldest president in US history to be sworn into office and the first member of the Silent Generation to get there. His senior citizenry is apparent not just in the ever-present question of whether he'll run for a second term, but also in the number of funerals he's attended as president where he grieves and often eulogizes friends and political contemporaries who helped shape his career.Then-President Barack Obama in May 2009 wearing his famous dad jeans while on the sidelines at his daughter Sasha's soccer game.Mandel Ngan/AFPObama, 'Generation Jones'One important thing we are going to dispense with: Obama doesn't really count as a Gen Xer.We know this is subject to intense debate. And yes, his personal background has some common characteristics with Generation X, like being the mixed-race son of divorced parents who embraced technology to win the presidency. He was also born in 1961, the same year as Douglas Coupland, the author of the book responsible for coining the phrase "Generation X."But have we all seen the future president in those dad jeans?The social commentator Jonathan Pontell said Obama told him back in 2007 that he identified with what's known as "Generation Jones," a micro generation consisting of people born between 1954 and 1965 who don't quite fit as the archetypal boomer or Gen Xer. Think of them as the godparents of the "Xennials" — those born in the late 1970s or early 1980s who aren't fully Gen X or millennial."I remember reading his original autobiography, 'Dreams from My Father,' and thinking this guy is Generation Jones through and through," Pontell, who invented the term, told me in recounting his brief conversation with Obama during a Los Angeles fundraiser emceed by Cedric the Entertainer.Please just don't call me Gen XGenerational boundaries are also anything but an exact science or official. There's plenty of debate and competing visions about when one cohort ends and another begins.Swalwell, for instance, wants nothing to do with Gen Xers even though he was born on November 16, 1980 — six weeks away from what many demographic experts say is the dawn of millennials."I'll humor you with your questions. I want it reflected in the story that I don't accept your premise," he told me in an interview in which he described himself as "a pioneer of the millennials."No matter whether you deny the 61-year-old Obama is a boomer, Gen X is starting to get up there in age.Sen. Tim Scott, as just one example, is the Senate's oldest Gen Xer and someone who's been mentioned as a possible 2024 White House candidate. He'd be the country's 13th-oldest president if he were to win the next election and get sworn in — at age 59 — in January 2025.South Carolina GOP Sen. Tim Scott, shown here in February 2020 with then-President Donald Trump, is the oldest member of Gen X in the Senate. He's been mentioned as a possible future White House candidate.Saul Loeb/ AFP via Getty ImagesWhether Scott or any other Gen Xer gets to make a serious run in 2024 will depend largely on the decisions of a late-vintage Silent and early-blooming boomer. Both Biden and Trump are sending strong signals they intend to run for their respective parties' nominations and force a 2020 rematch. And even if they forgo runs, Gen Xers will be competing with boomers such as Mike Pence, Mike Pompeo, and Vice President Kamala Harris — and perhaps millennials such as Buttigieg and even Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.It's a crowded-enough field that some political operatives say Gen Xers should brace for an even longer wait to take their most serious shot winning the White House. "I think the '28 cycle would be very much more likely," one longtime Gen X GOP aide from Trumpworld predicted, noting the challenge long-shot candidates will face in finding donors willing to shift horses at this early stage of the 2024 race. "That's where the window opens up."In 2016, Gen X Sens. Marco Rubio (left) and Ted Cruz (right) challenged Donald Trump for the Republican presidential nomination.Michael Ciaglo-Pool/Getty ImagesWhat's the US missing without a Gen X president?Several of the US's closest allies — the United Kingdom, France, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden — are led by Gen Xers.Gen Xers in politics and people who study the issue told me the US was missing out on plenty by not following suit in electing a president and other government leaders who were born in the mid- to late 1960s and through the 1970s. Generally speaking, Gen Xers bring a sense of individualism and pragmatism to politics that comes with growing up in an era when divorce rates spiked and parents seemed to care less about maintaining more traditional families, as evidenced by the popular culture hits from their childhood such as "Rosemary's Baby" and "Home Alone." As adults, many of the older members of Gen X carry an independent, bordering-on-libertarian streak that's distrustful of politics and institutions — some of the same traits that Trump relied on to win the White House in 2016."When you think about what populism draws upon, if there was ever a generation that thought of itself as 'the deplorables,' it's the 'We're not worthy!' generation," said Neil Howe, a demographics expert who helped come up with the term "millennial."Gen Xers also came of age during a time that straddled extraordinary changes in geopolitics, including the end of the Cold War and the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Most also made it through the bulk of their schooling without worrying about their high-school pictures spreading via Facebook or Instagram, their online experiences formed largely on now-archaic platforms such as AOL, Hotmail, and Ask Jeeves."It's the one generation that has sort of had formative experiences in both the Old World and the new one," said Sen. Marco Rubio, a Gen Xer who first won a seat in the Florida House in 2000 at age 28 and, by age 34, became speaker of the state chamber. Spencer Cox, the 47-year-old first-term Republican governor of Utah, told me in a recent interview that he hoped the next president would come from Gen X.Utah Gov. Spencer Xox, shown here in May 2021 with his wife, Abby, greeting First Lady Jill Biden. He told Insider he hopes the next president comes from Gen X.Carlos Barria/pool/AFP"I'm biased because I am one, but I do believe that that's really what the nation is searching for but hasn't been able to find yet," he said. Asked what Americans would get should they elect one of his peers, Cox mentioned the World Wide Web."I think what we're missing out is someone who kind of has a leg in both the pre-internet era, and the post-internet era," he said. "I think there's value in understanding what it was like before knowing how to use it, what it's like after, and how to bridge those gaps and in healthy ways."Thanks to their boomer parents' low birth rates, Gen Xers have always been a smaller group than boomers or millennials."Which I always think is interesting," Booker said. "It's like we're this relatively tiny group of public servants."But that will soon change as boomers — the oldest are pushing 80 — die. Gen Xers are finally projected to outnumber their parents' generation by 2028, according to Pew. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (right) was the only Gen Xer on the stage competing against Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton during the 2016 Democratic presidential primary debatesJoe Raedle/Getty ImagesDunking on Ted Cruz, even if he's a Gen XerGore set the standard for youthful presidential campaigns. In 1988, he ran for the Democratic nomination at 39 years old. Had he won, he'd have been the youngest president in US history. That didn't happen, though Gore four years later did win the vice presidency as part of the first all-boomer ticket with Bill Clinton. He also nearly won the White House in 2000 against Bush.But in subsequent presidential races, Gen Xers failed to follow Gore's youthful path to the campaign trail. Not in 2000, and not in 2004. Even the 2008 presidential election was bereft of Gen Xers: Yes, the eventual Republican nominee John McCain's comparatively youthful running mate, Sarah Palin, falls within the boomer bracket.And while Ryan did make history in 2012 as the first Gen Xer on a major-party ticket, that happened only when the GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney opted for a fresh face that would contrast with then-Vice President Biden.Paul Ryan, shown here with 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney, made history that election cycle as the first Gen X vice presidential nominee. In 2015, Ryan became the first Gen X speaker of the House.Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesNot until the 2016 and 2020 campaigns did the presidential field take on the veneer of a race driven by Generation X.But even then, candidates such as O'Malley, O'Rourke, Booker, Rubio, and Cruz were competing on debate stages packed with boomers and Silents — Trump, Biden, Hillary Clinton, and Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders.For one reason or another, all the Gen Xers flamed out."For me, this is about who the people are," Warren, the 73-year-old Massachusetts Democrat who also came up short against Biden in 2020, said in an interview while speed-walking through the underground Senate tunnels. "I'm not a big fan of Ted Cruz just because he's 30 years younger than somebody else. He's still Ted Cruz."Gen Xers on boomers: Necessary, or necessary evil?Gen Xers aren't just behind in winning the White House. It's a similar phenomenon in other parts of government, too.Entering the 2022 midterm elections, only 14 of 50 governor slots are in the hands of Gen Xers. And while the four most recent Supreme Court appointees are children of the mid-'60s and '70s, they still remain a seat shy of being their own majority bloc. On Capitol Hill, Gen Xers' numbers have been slowly building but are still nowhere near the size of their elders. The 435-member US House opened the current session with 144 Gen Xers compared with 230 boomers and 27 Silent Generation members (the numbers have since changed slightly because of six deaths since January 2021, as well as nine resignations).The breakdown is much starker in the US Senate, which opened the current session with 11 members of the Silent Generation and 68 boomers, compared with just 20 Gen Xers.While those numbers are in flux even now as senators retire or resign from office early, historical trends suggest the Senate won't reach a plurality of Gen Xers until somewhere in the 2030s, if not later. By then, millennials will be entering their political primes, with Gen Zers not far behind."Yeah, I won't be here at that point," said GOP Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma, an early-era Gen Xer at 54.Many Gen Xers insist that it's a-OK to still have so many Silent Generation and boomer senators hanging around, even if it means they need to wait for their own opportunities.Kirsten Gillibrand, a New York Democrat, became the first Gen X senator in January 2009.Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images"I respect a lot of the people in our leadership. I've learned a lot from them. And I think they continue to make a huge difference," said Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who in 2009 became the nation's first Gen X senator.Donna Brazile, the longtime party operative who served as Gore's 2000 presidential campaign manager, said she'd recently been trying to think up ways to get Generation X politicians to step up "without asking anyone to step aside.""Remember, there is no such thing as entitlement in politics or public service. You have to get in the game and follow a path or wait for a lucky break," she said in an email. "There's too much at stake and much more to be done. What are they waiting for?"When we talked again a few days later, Brazile, who in 2016 chaired the Democratic National Committee, quickly rattled off the names of several Gen X leaders who did currently hold office in Congress, as governors and in state and local government.Anyone from Gen X who wants to contribute at the top, she said, needs to get off their duffs and stop fretting so much about the boomers and any others who will step aside when they're darn good and ready."No generation can replace another generation," she said. "I can't replace my parents' generation. But I can be an extension of the vision they had for my generation and future generations."With America in a gerontocracy, she acknowledged "there's a vacuum" for future leaders that shouldn't prevent them from getting involved now."It's like seeing a ghost that doesn't appear," she said of any expectation the presidency would just suddenly open up for Gen X. "There's nothing stopping them from leading."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytSep 28th, 2022

"Red, White, and Gray": Key findings from Insider"s investigation into the US gerontocracy

What it means for a nation when young Americans are governed by old leaders. Rachel Mendelson/Insider Congress and the president are the oldest in US history. There's a growing age gap between the people leading the government and Americans being led. Some young officials say they feel blocked by those clinging to power, their issues downplayed. The United States' elected leaders are the oldest they've ever been.The age gap between the government and the governed is wider than ever before.And the notion that the nation is now a gerontocracy — which the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary defines as "a state, society, or group governed by old people" — is decidedly real.Insider journalists have spent four months interviewing hundreds of sources and analyzing gigabytes of data to understand how the United States arrived at this moment.In "Red, White, and Gray," Insider endeavors to explain what it means for a nation that, on balance, is decades younger than its representatives in Washington, DC.Launched September 13, here are highlights and key findings from this ongoing series:Nearly one in four members of Congress are in their 70s or 80s — a level never before seen in US history.Almost 50% of Americans are under 40, but only about 5% of members of Congress are.Before running for the White House in 2020, Joe Biden confided in a friend and quoted a death-defying line from the poet Dylan Thomas: "Do not go gentle into that good night." The friend described it to Nicole Gaudiano as "a window into how he views his role."One of the most powerful legislators in modern US history acknowledged to Kimberly Leonard that President Ronald Reagan, while conducting a meeting at the White House, once seemingly forgot who he was.Current and former congressional staffers explained to Warren Rojas the lengths to which they'd gone to keep older lawmakers focused, engaged, and, sometimes, upright.Old age has been a theme in presidential races. Often it's a liability. But as Leonard and Darren Samuelsohn write, sometimes it's not at all.Six former members of Congress dished to Jake Lahut about why they quit Capitol Hill in the prime of their political careers.Sen. Jon Ossoff and Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Lauren Boebert, among several other young lawmakers, told Oma Seddiq why youth is an advantage in Congress despite the high-profile flameouts of some peers, including Rep. Madison Cawthorn.Senator Biden of 1977 has some rather different thoughts on key political issues than, say, President Biden of 2022.Most Americans want term limits and age ceilings for members of Congress, per an Insider/Morning Consult poll.Special elections are often chaotic messes that could be avoided if lawmakers stepped aside earlier, writes Grace Panetta.The 2024 presidential campaign, at this earliest of stages, is becoming an epic game of 3-way geriatric chicken. Retirees are becoming one of the most powerful political financial forces in the nation, writes Madison Hall.Tech policy can confuse and confound members of Congress, which doesn't bode well for the public, write Hanna Kang and Kayla Gallagher.The climate crisis affects young people most, but older generations are deciding the planet's future, Eliza Relman explains.These young candidates could have been the next AOC, John L. Dorman writes. But they ran headlong into the political establishment.Redistricting? Gerrymandering? They have significant ramifications for youthful representation.Old leaders helped lead to the Soviet Union's demise. There are lessons to learn for the United States, writes John Haltiwanger.Americans love the idea of age caps for lawmakers. Here's why that won't happen, per Bryan Metzger and Brent D. Griffiths.New installments of "Red, White, and Gray" will be published here through early October as voters across the country prepare for the midterm elections.Have a tip for Insider's "Red, White, and Gray" reporting team? Confidentially email us at insider-dc@insider.com.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 26th, 2022

Biden Says Will Make "Firm Decision" On 2024 Run After Midterms, Blames Pandemic For Dwindling Support

Biden Says Will Make "Firm Decision" On 2024 Run After Midterms, Blames Pandemic For Dwindling Support Authored by Katabella Roberts via The Epoch Times, President Joe Biden said in an interview on Thursday that it is “much too early” to decide whether or not to run for re-election in 2024 and that he will wait until after the midterm elections in November to come to a final conclusion on the matter. “Look, if I were to say to you, I’m running again, all of a sudden, a whole range of things come into play that I have, requirements I have to change and move and do in terms of election laws,” Biden, 79, said in an interview with CBS’ “60 Minutes” that aired on Sunday. “And it’s much too early to make that kind of decision. I’m a great respecter of fate. And so, what I’m doing is I’m doing my job. I’m gonna do that job. And within the timeframe that makes sense after this next election cycle here, going into next year, make a judgment on what to do.” Biden reiterated that he still has not made a decision on the move, adding: “Look, my intention as I said to begin with, is that I would run again but it’s just an intention. But is it a firm decision that I run again? That remains to be seen.” 60 Min: "Are you committed to running again?" Biden: "My intention, as I said to begin with, is that I would run again. But it’s just an intention. But is it a firm decision that I run again? That remains to be seen,” pic.twitter.com/3R3W3I8e9Z — Greg Price (@greg_price11) September 19, 2022 Biden’s comments come after White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre in August insisted that he would embark on another presidential reelection campaign. That is despite concerns over his physical health, mental acuity, and age. Biden is the oldest person to have become president and will celebrate his 80th birthday in November. Support for Biden has also dwindled; with multiple polls indicating that his ratings have plummeted amid soaring inflation, which came in at 8.3 percent in August, and is hampering American households. Pandemic Has Been Profound When asked why he believes his support has declined, Biden on Thursday cited the COVID-19 pandemic, which he declared to be over, but said has had a big “impact on the psyche of the American people.” People shop at a supermarket in Montebello, Calif., on Aug. 23, 2022. U.S. shoppers are facing increasingly high prices on everyday goods and services as inflation continues to surge with high prices for groceries, gasoline, and housing. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images) “This is a really difficult time. We’re at an inflection point in the history of this country,” Biden said. “We’re gonna make decisions, and we’re making decisions now, that are gonna determine what we’re gonna look like the next ten years from now. I think you’d agree that the impact on the psyche of the American people as a consequence of the pandemic is profound. Think of how that has changed everything.” “You know, people’s attitudes about themselves, their families, about the state of the nation, about the state of their communities. And so there’s a lot of uncertainty out there, a great deal of uncertainty. And we lost a million people—a million people to COVID,” Biden continued. When asked whether he believed he was fit and healthy enough to embark on another re-election bid, Biden replied: “Watch me. And honest to God, that’s all I think. Watch me.”   “If you think I don’t have the energy level or the mental acuity, then, you know, that’s one thing. It’s another thing, you just watch and, you know, keep my schedule, do what I’m doing. I think that, you know—when I sit down with our NATO allies and keep them together, I don’t have them saying, ‘Wait a minute, how old are you?'”   “I respect the fact that people would say, you know, ‘You’re old,'” Biden continued, “But I think it relates to how much energy you have and whether or not the job you’re doing is one consistent with what any person of any age would be able to do.” Read more here... Tyler Durden Mon, 09/19/2022 - 10:05.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytSep 19th, 2022