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The Preakness Stakes is the next leg in horse racing"s Triple Crown — here"s how to live-stream the event on May 21

NBC and Peacock will broadcast the 2022 Preakness Stakes live from Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore starting at 4 p.m. ET on May 21. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Preakness entrant Epicenter walks back to the barn following a training session for the 147th Running of the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Course on May 18, 2022 in Baltimore, Maryland.Rob Carr/Getty Images The Preakness Stakes, the second leg of horse racing's Triple Crown, is set for May 21 at 7:01 p.m. ET. NBC, NBCSports.com, and Peacock Premium will broadcast coverage starting at 4 p.m. ET. CNBC will feature undercard coverage from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. ET. Peacock Premium (Monthly Plan)$4.99 FROM PEACOCK TVThe 2022 Preakness Stakes will be held May 21 with main event coverage set to begin at 4 p.m. ET on NBC, Peacock Premium, and NBCSports.com. Pre-event coverage and undercard races will air on CNBC starting at 2 p.m. ET.This year's race will be the 147th running of the Preakness Stakes, which is held at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore. The Preakness is the second leg of the Triple Crown, a series of America's three most prestigious horse races that also includes the Kentucky Derby and the upcoming Belmont Stakes.Nine horses will compete for a prize purse of $1.65 million at the 2022 Preakness Stakes, but Kentucky Derby winner Rich Strike won't race this weekend after his training staff expressed concerns with the short recovery period between races. NBC and Peacock are the broadcast partners for all three Triple Crown Races. The Belmont Stakes, the final race in the series, will air on on June 11.What time does the Preakness Stakes start?Undercard coverage for the Preakness Stakes begins at 2 p.m. ET on May 21, and the main event race is expected to start at 7:01 p.m. ET.How to watch the Preakness StakesYou can watch the Preakness Stakes on NBC, and you can also stream it through NBCSports.com, Peacock Premium, or via live TV streaming service like Sling TV.Peacock Premium will stream live coverage of the Preakness Stakes at 4 p.m. ET on May 21. Peacock Premium costs $5 a month for ad-supported streaming. Check out our full Peacock guide for more details about the service.Peacock Premium (Monthly Plan)$4.99 FROM PEACOCK TVNBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app will also stream Preakness Stakes coverage at 4 p.m. ET. NBCSports streaming requires an existing pay-TV subscription, so you need to have an authenticated cable or satellite service with NBC to use the platform.If you don't have cable or Peacock, you can also use a live TV streaming service with NBC to watch the Preakness Stakes. Services with NBC include Sling TV, YouTubeTV, Hulu + Live TV, and Fubo TV. Of those options, Sling's Blue plan is the most affordable at $35 a month. New subscribers can get their first month for 50% off.It should be noted, however, that Sling only offers NBC in select areas. Check the Sling website to make sure your city is supported before signing up. For more Sling TV details, check out our guide to all of Sling's channels and add-on packages.Sling TV$35.00 FROM SLINGPreakness Stakes scheduleEventDay and timeChannel or serviceBlack-Eyed Susan StakesMay 20, 5 to 6 p.m. ETUSA NetworkPreakness Stakes undercardMay 21, 2 to 4 p.m. ETCNBCPreakness StakesMay 21, 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ETNBC, Peacock Premium, NBCSports.comHorses running the Preakness StakesNumberHorse NameOdds to win1Simplification6-12Creative Minister10-13Fenwick50-14Secret Oath9-25Early Voting7-26Happy Jack30-17Armagnac12-18Epicenter6-59Skippylongstocking20-1Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 20th, 2022

The Kentucky Derby kicks off the 2022 Triple Crown season on May 7 — here"s how to live-stream the race

The annual horse race features 20 competitors vying for the top prize. NBC and Peacock will broadcast the Kentucky Derby at 2:30 p.m. ET on May 7. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Medina Spirit #8, ridden by jockey John Velazquez crosses the finish line to win the 147th running of the Kentucky Derby in 2021.Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images The Kentucky Derby, the first leg of horse racing's Triple Crown, is set for May 7 at 2:30 p.m. ET. NBC, NBCSports.com, and Peacock Premium will broadcast the Kentucky Derby live. USA Network will feature the Kentucky Oaks on May 6, and pre-Derby coverage on May 7. Peacock Premium (Monthly Plan)$4.99 FROM PEACOCK TVThe 2022 Kentucky Derby will be held May 7 with main event coverage set to begin at 2:30 p.m. ET on NBC, Peacock Premium, and NBCSports.com. Pre-event coverage and undercard races will air on USA Network starting at 12 p.m. ET.This year's race will be the 148th running of the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky. The Kentucky Derby is exclusively for 3-year-old thoroughbreds, who will race 1.25 miles. The race features 20 horses competing for the first leg of the Triple Crown and a prize purse of $3 million.Prio to the main event, USA will share coverage of the Kentucky Oaks on May 6 starting at 1 p.m. ET. The Kentucky Oaks features 3-year-old fillies, female horses, and a $1.25 million prize. The event also raises money for survivors of breast and ovarian cancer.NBC and Peacock will air the next two races in this season's Triple Crown too; the Preakness Stakes on May 21 and the Belmont Stakes on June 11. The last two Triple Crown winners were Justify in 2018 and American Pharoah in 2015. A total of 13 horses have won the Triple Crown, and American Pharoah was the first horse in 37 years to win all three races.What time does the Kentucky Derby start?Undercard coverage for the Kentucky Derby begins at 12 p.m. ET on May 7, and the main event race is expected to start at 6:57 p.m. ET.How to watch the Kentucky DerbyYou can watch the Kentucky Derby on NBC, and you can also stream it through NBCSports.com, Peacock Premium, or a live TV streaming platform like Sling TV.Peacock Premium will live-stream Kentucky Derby coverage starting at 2:30 p.m. ET on May 7. Peacock Premium costs $5 a month for ad-supported streaming. Check out our full Peacock guide for more information about the service.Peacock Premium (Monthly Plan)$4.99 FROM PEACOCK TVNBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app will also stream the Kentucky Derby starting at 2:30 p.m. ET. NBCSports coverage requires an existing pay-TV subscription, so you need to have an authenticated cable or satellite service with NBC to use the platform.If you don't have cable or Peacock, you can also use a live TV streaming service with NBC to watch the Kentucky Derby. Services with NBC include Sling TV, YouTubeTV, Hulu + Live TV, and Fubo TV. Of those options, Sling's Blue plan is the cheapest at $35 a month. New members can get their first month for 50% off.Keep in mind, however, that Sling only supports NBC in select markets. Be sure to check the Sling website to ensure your area is supported before signing up. For more Sling TV details, check out our complete guide to all of Sling's channels and add-on packages.Sling TV$35.00 FROM SLINGKentucky Derby scheduleEventDay and timeChannel or serviceKentucky OaksMay 6, 1 to 6 p.m. ETUSA NetworkKentucky Derby undercardMay 7, 12 to 2:30 p.m. ETUSA NetworkKentucky DerbyMay 7, 2:30 p.m. ET to 7:30 p.m. ETNBC, Peacock Premium, NBCSports.comHorses running the Kentucky DerbyNumberHorse nameOdds to win1Mo Donegal10-12Happy Jack30-13Epicenter7-24Summer Is Tomorrow30-15Smile Happy20-16Messier8-17Crown Pride20-18Charge It20-19Tiz the Bomb30-110Zandon3-111Pioneer of Medina30-112Taiba12-113Simplification20-114Barber Road30-115White Abarrio10-116Cyberknife20-117Classic Causeway30-118Tawny Port30-119Zozos20-120Ethereal Road30-1Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 6th, 2022

The MOST expensive homes for sale in every US state - from a $3 million house in Nebraska to a $225 million megamansion in California

Look through photos of the most expensive homes listed for sale in the US. From acres of farmland to beachfront views, the amenities are endless. Randall RealtorsReal estate is becoming increasingly more expensive - and more difficult - for the average American to comfortably afford. Each of these million-dollar homes offers unique amenities for their hefty price tags. From private islands, to a hunter's paradise, there's something for everyone. It's becoming more difficult to buy a home, and these residences show the cost of luxury. According to online real estate marketplace Point2Homes, these 51 homes are the most expensive in their respective states. The properties range from single-family houses to gated compounds on acres of land.Alabama: 2510 Kirby Bridge Road, Decatur - $12.3 millionParker Real Estate Res.LLCThis gated compound is nearly 200 acres of secluded land with a stocked pond for fishing. The house itself is a custom 3-bedroom, 2.5-bathroom that offers an abundance of privacy for outdoorsmen.Alaska: 5260 Kachemak Drive, Homer - $9 millionLarner Global GroupWith 17,000 square feet of living space, this Alaskan home offers a spa, indoor pool, and steam room. It includes eight custom suites with unique features in each room and a 270-degree conservatory with a telescope for viewing Alaska's wildlife. Arizona: 20958 N 112th Street, Scottsdale - $28 millionEngel & Voelkers ScottsdaleCalled "The Aerie," this seven-bedroom, eight-bathroom home was just built this year. It's nestled in the McDowell Mountains and boasts sweeping views of the valley below. Arkansas: 115 West Van Buren, Eureka Springs - $7 millionAll Seasons Real EstateThe Queen Anne Mansion Estate was built in 1891 with seven master suites complete with en-suite bathrooms. The 4-acre lot includes a total of 10 bedrooms and 13 bathrooms.California: 33550 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu - $225 millionWestside Estate AgencyWith 16 beds and 22 baths, this property overlooking the Pacific Ocean covers nearly five acres and features nine structures, including a beach cottages, guest houses, and more. It has an underground tunnel connecting the pool to a movie theater, and an elevator to take guests to the beach.At $225 million, it's not only the priciest home for sale in California, but also the most expensive one for sale in the US. Colorado: 1650 McLain Flats Road, Aspen - $55 millionAspen Snowmass Sotheby's International RealtyThis bucolic compound, called the "Merry Go Ranch," includes 21 acres of lawns and pastures, as well as an eight-stall barn and a 13,000-square-foot gym.Connecticut: 450 Brickyard Road, Woodstock - $60 millionRandall RealtorsEver wanted to live in a castle? Here's your chance. This distinctive property features a moat, towers rising 120 feet high, period architectural doors, and stained glass throughout the castle, which overlooks a 30-acre pond.Delaware: 21440 Bald Eagle, Rehoboth Beach - $4.85 millionJohn Rowley with CoastLine RealtyBuilt in 1993, this Delaware home offers over four acres on Rehoboth Bay with four bedrooms and three full bathrooms. If that's not enough, there's a carriage house over the 3-car garage for extra living quarters.Florida: 18 La Gorce Circle, Miami Beach - $170 millionCourtesy of 1 Oak Studios/The Jills Zeder GroupThis massive compound, built in 1936 has never been put on the market until now. It sits on a 125,000-square-foot lot. It's compromised of four gated properties, and comes with its own private park, not to mention views of Biscayne Bay and the Miami skyline. Georgia: 120 Hawkins Lane, Saint Simons Island - $17.8 millionRandy Burgess with Burnett PropertiesFor just under $18 million, Little Hawkins Island is a gated family compound surrounded by greenery and marsh. This private island includes four residential buildings: the main residence, two guest cottages, and the clubhouse for a total of 11,000 square feet.Hawaii: 9 Bay Drive, Lahaina - $59.5 millionCourtesy of Coldwell Banker Island PropertiesThis home's buyer would enjoy clear views of the sunset year-round on these 10 oceanfront acres on Hawea Point. Idaho: 105 Camas Road, Ketchum - $19.75 millionCourtesy of Sue Engelmann with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Sun Valley PropertiesThis lodge-style residence sits on nearly 300 acres of Idaho land with views of Bald Mountain. With five bedrooms and six bathrooms, the secluded home is "one of Idaho's most exclusive legacy properties," according to the listing.Illinois: 1932 N. Burling St., Chicago - $45 millionJameson Sotheby's International RealtyThis 25,000-square-foot estate in Chicago's Lincoln Park neighborhood has amenities like a reflecting pool and antique garden pavilion.Indiana: 10285 West Youth Camp Road, Columbus - $30 millionBrock Childs with The Home AestheticVisitors to this rustic home on 415 wooded acres will find a two-story waterfall and trout stream in its entryway, and an 8,700-gallon freshwater aquarium in its great room.Iowa: 16216 and 1615 IA-86, Spirit Lake - $11.9 millionEric Hoien of Hoein RealtyThis residence is more like a lakeside retreat complete with an Irish pub, movie theatre, art studio, and separate loft apartment. There are a total of eight bedrooms, 15 bathrooms, and six fireplaces, and the home is being sold completely furnished.Kansas: 1051 N Blackstone Road, Milton - $6.7 millionAdler Grey Real Estate Media CollectiveThis net-zero energy home comes fully furnished including farming equipment for the 89 acres of land that comes along with the house. According to the listing, the residence is self-sustaining with a solar power system, generators, and propane gas. On this property, there's space dedicated to horses, spring-fed ponds, and a 300-yard shooting range. Inside the nearly 7,000-square-foot main home, there are six bedrooms and seven bathrooms, and a wet bar that's more like a second kitchen.Kentucky: 30 Bass Court, Whitesville - $25 millioneXp RealtyThis western Kentucky compound comes with three homes, a large private lake, and income-producing crop land on-site.Louisiana: 11001 Highland Road, Baton Rouge - $14 millionQuita CutrerLocated in the capital city, Baton Rouge, this over-12-acre property has a Mediterranean flare. Each of the five bedrooms has its own bathroom, and access to one of the various sitting rooms. In this home, there are many places to relax: a breakfast room, coffee bar, media room, and massage room.Outside of the main house, there's a 4,800-square-foot guest house with its own 3-car garage and a fully stocked pond for fishing. For outdoor entertainment, a 1,429-square-foot cabana, saltwater pool, and outdoor kitchen.Maine: 153 Foreside Road, Falmouth - $10.5 millionDavid Jones with F.O. Bailey Real EstateThis oceanfront property underwent a full renovation in 2021 to become a one-of-a-kind estate. There are three separate dwellings for guests, staff, or rentals, and the main residence features at least four bedrooms and seven full bathrooms. Although the water is just steps away outside, there's a deepwater diving pool and whirlpool jacuzzi indoors. Maryland: 1604 Winchester Road, Annapolis - $24.9 millionTTR Sotheby's International RealtyBuilt in 1922, this property overlooking the Severn River in Maryland has changed ownership many times - at one point belonging to the Catholic Church as a friary, from which it gets its current name, Friary on the Severn. Its features include a rooftop garden, 60-foot infinity pool, and six-slip private boat dock.Massachusetts: 41 Jefferson Ave., Nantucket - $39 millionCourtesy of CompassThis Nantucket property was first developed as a private beach club in the 1930s. Today, it has a four-unit main beach house and two stand-alone cottages.Michigan: 1558 Dutton Road, Rochester - $11.5 millionVito Anthony HomesThis 22-acre residence was custom built to showcase European craftsmanship by architect Dominick Tringali. It features seven bedrooms, 10 bathrooms, a home theater, full bar, and two guest homes.Minnesota: 36463 Butternut Point Road, Pequot Lakes - $12 millionLarson Group Real Estate, Keller Williams Realty Professionals.Built on a peninsula on Whitefish Lake, this 3-acre home has 2,000 feet of shoreline, and six log guest houses. In total, there are 19 bedrooms and 22 bathrooms.Mississippi: 205 S Valley Road, Poplarville - $12.25 millionAdam Hester with Tom Smith Land & HomesThis property offers over 2,000 acres dedicated to outdoor activities. The owner can enjoy the whitetail deer enclosure, trophy bass fishing, and duck hunting without leaving home. Cross Creek Farm is custom-built 6,200-square-foot home with six bedrooms and six full bathrooms.Missouri: 2608 & 2606 Arrowhead Estates Road, Village of Four Seasons - $9.99 millionSpencer with EXP Realty, LLCThis family compound is in the heart of Lake Ozark. Inside the gates, there's a 3-story main house, two-bedroom two-bathroom guest house, two pools, a putting green, and a tennis court. The main house is complete with 130 solar panels.Montana: 405 Delrey Road, Whitefish - $40 millionGlacier Sotheby's International RealtySpring-fed mountain ponds and streams dot the 35 acres on which this lakefront log home sits in Montana.Nebraska: 17426 Island Circle, Bennington, Douglas County - $3.75 millionMichael Maley with BHHS Ambassador Real EstateThis 4-bedroom 6-bathroom home was built in 2016 on over an acre of land with 250 of open water frontage.Nevada: 1730 Hwy 50, Glenbrook - $100 million1730 Us Highway 50, Glenbrook, NVGoogle/US Geological SurveyThe Wall Street Journal and Robb Report have published photos of this lakefront home, complete with features like a wine room with capacity for 2,500 bottles, a greenhouse, and a whopping 700 evergreen trees on the property.New Hampshire: 144 Springfield Point Road, Wolfeboro - $19.5 millionJamieson Duston Of Duston Leddy Real EstateNamed "Lakeside Manor" for its location along 841 feet of Lake Winnipesaukee's shore, this home has four levels and 37 rooms total. The amenities offered inside include a 900-bottle wine room, 15-seat theater, and a 30-foot natural stone fireplace.New Jersey: 48 Rio Vista Drive, Alpine - $25 millionChristie's International Real Estate Northern New JerseyThis chateau-style manor has its own movie theater, pub, and great room with a 37-foot-high arched cathedral ceiling.At $25 million, it ties with another estate for the title of most expensive home for sale in New Jersey...New Jersey: 275 Indian Trail Drive, Franklin Lakes - $25 millionCourtesy of Christie's International Real Estate Northern New JerseyThis 14,700-square-foot estate comes with indoor and outdoor pools, a wine tasting room, and a basketball court.New Mexico: Zorro Ranch, Stanley - $27.5 millionUS Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New YorkRoughly half an hour from Santa Fe, this ranch has a three-story, four-bedroom main house; a lodge and log cabin; and even a yurt. The sprawling property was formerly owned by the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, who purchased it in 1993 and killed himself in jail in 2019. It has been on the market for about a year.New York: 700 Meadow Lane, Southampton - $175 millionBespoke Real EstateThis modern Tudor-style mansion in the Hamptons comes with 11 bedrooms, 12 full and four  half bathrooms, and a private boardwalk to the beach. North Carolina: 1 Auditorium Circle, Wrightsville Beach - $13 millionLandmark Sotheby's International RealtyThis modern home features four bedrooms, five bathrooms, a pool, spa, and a boathouse. According to the listing, its design was inspired by the tropical modernism of mid-century Hawaii.North Dakota: 14388 45th St. NW, Williston - $4.99 millionDarin Milbrath with Dakota Plains Realty, LLCThe River Ranch uniquely features two master suites — one on each level. It's situated on 1,879 acres of land with the possibility of farming available.Ohio: 2779 Som Center Road, Hunting Valley - $6.95 millionTerry Young with Keller Williams Greater MetropolitanThe home itself is over 17,000 square feet of castle-like design. Situated on over five acres, it includes five bedrooms, eight bathrooms, a 12-seat theater, and a rooftop outlook to take in the views.Oklahoma: 3105 S Peoria Ave., Tulsa - $15 millionRob Allen with Sage Sotheby's RealtyThis 1925 mansion is in the heart of Tulsa on seven acres of heavily wooded land. The Patterson Estate consists of a main house, a guest house, and a tennis court. Oregon: 27280 NE Old Wolf Creek Road, Prineville - $65 millionCascade Hasson Sotheby's International RealtyThis ranch has a three-bedroom home, multiple cabins, and a six-stall horse barn. It's located in the foothills of central Oregon's Ochoco Mountains and borders 850,000 acres of national forest.Pennsylvania: 500-6 Walnut St., Unit 2500-2600, Philadelphia - $27 millionKurfiss Sotheby’s International RealtyThis 8,400-square-foot penthouse boasts floor-to-ceiling windows and is configured to allow for three large bedrooms, four full baths, and three half baths.Rhode Island: 2 Kidds Way, Westerly - $18.5 millionCourtesy of Lila Delman CompassThis open concept residence has been named Treasure Hill as it's situated at the second highest elevation on the Watch Hill peninsula. It features a heated saltwater pool, in-house fitness area with a sauna, and a wine tasting room.South Carolina: 133 Flyway Drive, Kiawah Island - $20 millionCelia Dunn Sotheby's International RealtyThis seaside estate comes with a private 400-foot driveway and a bridged walkway from the backyard to the beach.South Dakota: 13911 Cobb Road, Hermosa - $6.9 millionCourtesy of Jeff Garrett with Hayden Outdoors Real EstateThe Rafter R Ranch is nearly 500 acres. The 4,125-square-foot home was built in 2000 with three bedrooms and three bathrooms.Tennessee: 1304 Chickering Road, Nashville - $50 millionFridrich & Clark RealtyThe main home on this 59-acre estate has colonnaded porches at its front and back. The property also comes with a separate nine-acre building site.Texas: 12400 Cedar St., Lake Travis - $45 millionAustin Luxury GroupOne of the first things visitors will be greeted by at this waterfront estate/event space, called Villa Del Lago, is a grotto with multiple cascading waterfalls carved into the adjacent canyon hillside. Elsewhere on the property, they'll find a mudroom, private custom boathouse, and fenced pastures.Utah: 533 N Left Fork Hobble Creek Road, Springville - $48 millionCourtesy of Summit Sotheby's International RealtySeveral ponds dot Hobble Creek Ranch, which is well-suited for cattle and horses, and varies in elevation from 5,700 feet to over 9,100 feet.Vermont: 506 North Hill Road, Stowe - $16 millionPall Spera Company Realtors-StoweThis 68-acre estate has a helicopter landing site, a zipline, sunken hot tub, and a total of 11 bedrooms.Virginia: 700 Bulls Neck Road, McLean - $39 millionCourtesy of Townsend Visuals / TTR Sotheby's International RealtyThis estate overlooking the Potomac River has two garages, one of which can fit up to 22 cars, as well as a central lawn area designed to fit a large tent to accommodate more than 200 guests.Washington: 3858 Hunts Point Road, Hunts Point - $85 millionCourtesy of Windermere Real EstateBuilt in 1995, this compound on Lake Washington consists of four structures totaling more than 17,000 square feet of living space.West Virginia: 4428 Irish Heights Drive, Summersville - $19.5 millionColdwell Banker RealtyThe main residence overlooks over 100 acres of forest for an especially secluded experience. The wine cellar holds 3,000 bottles, and the primary suite has private access to an outdoor hot tub.Wisconsin: 9095 Cottage Row Rd, Fish Creek - $11.9 millionDiane Taillon with Arbor Crowne PropertiesThis 7-acre property is made up of a main house, guest house, and boathouse with rooftop entertainment deck. It offers 805 feet of shorefront in Fish Creek. Wyoming: 6160 W Lazy H Road, Wilson - $19.5 millionCompass Real EstateThis residence offers three separate living spaces and 50 acres with access to miles of National Forest. It comes with access to amenities like private fly fishing and trails for hiking and running.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJun 25th, 2022

DEFCON 2... Or Cutting Off The Nose To Spite The Face

DEFCON 2... Or Cutting Off The Nose To Spite The Face By Peter Tchir of Academy Securities I had difficulty choosing a title for today. DEFCON 2 made a lot of sense as I’m increasingly worried about the economy and the market – for this summer. On the one hand I’m so perplexed by the messaging that the Fed is prepared to trigger a recession in its fight with inflation that I can’t help but think about cutting off your nose to spite the face. I could almost see Powell starting the press conference with “this is going to hurt me more than it is going to hurt you,” which based on my experience, is rarely true. Inflation - Food To expect monetary policy to reduce food prices seems like a stretch. We all must consume some basic level of food regardless of our income level. Sure, maybe the rich eat more Kraft dinners with fancy ketchup [apologies to the Barenaked Ladies], but food consumption seems relatively inelastic. Maybe lowering the cost of fuel will help reduce the cost of food [shipping, the farmer's use of diesel, etc.], but I'm not sure that will happen quickly enough [or be impactful enough] to help the average consumer in the meantime. Many of those consumers are now facing higher costs of funding - anything from credit cards to ARMs, or any new loan that they are looking at. The supply chain disruption in primarily wheat [and other basic groins due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine] is real and is likely to lost into next year. The longer that lasts, the more stockpiles will be eroded. That is a problem not impacted much one way or the other by interest rates. The shortage of fertilizer [a topic of conversation] will admittedly be helped by reduced energy prices [if the Fed achieves that], but again, I'm not sure this provides much near-term relief, Food, which may or may not be accurately reflected in official inflation measures [when I write may or may not I mean definitely not, but don't want to sound too aggressive] is unlikely to see price declines to the point where the consumer is helped materially. While the official data may or may not be accurate, the consumers know the "real world'' costs and that is affecting their behavior, their sentiment, their outlook, and ultimately their spending, I remain extremely worried about food inflation. Inflation - Energy I'm not sure that even the "after school" specials that used to air on broadcast TV [that always had a morality message] could come up with a plot where the "hero" beats up on the "villain" for most of the show, only to realize that the "villain" has something they need, Then the "hero" reaches out to the "villain" to strike a "mutually" beneficial deal and the "villain," which is so overjoyed to become part of the "good team," immediately acquiesces to that and ignores all the previous messaging, Weirdly, it is a plot too unbelievable for a children's special, but one that "we" (collectively] seem to think will work with Iron, Venezuela, and the Saudis. I won't even touch on the "side plot" of the long-overlooked friend, eagerly waiting for o word of encouragement from the "hero" and ready to step up and deliver, finding itself being treated worse than the "villain" at a time of need. If you missed the Academv Podcast that was "dropped" (I think that's the cool term for it] on Friday, I highly recommend listening to it, General Kearney [ret,] leads the conversation, along with Rachel Washburn, Michael Rodriguez [from an ESG perspective], and me, on nuclear proliferation, the nuclear geopolitical landscape, and also, crucially important, thoughts on the future of nuclear energy, But I've digressed, as those energy issues are really more issues related to D.C. and policy rather than anything controlled by interest rates and Fed policy, But maybe after all I didn't digress that much because I don't see how Fed policy helps reduce energy prices, other than if they are "successful” in derailing the economy. Again, much like food, individuals can only tinker with their need for energy. All of this has a limited impact on overall consumption: keeping the house warmer in the summer, colder in the carpooling a winter, carpooling a bit more, being more organized on errands, convincing the bosses that WFH is good for the environment, etc. Higher energy costs are already causing the demand shrinkage from consumers and I don't see any direct way that higher rates will help reduce gas demand or prices, unless, again, the Fed is "successful" in making the economy worse by a significant margin. On the other side of the coin, higher interest rates seem likely to increase the cost of new production and storage. Any company tying up working capital or expanding production is now experiencing higher interest costs and logic dictates that they will try and pass some of those costs on or not embark on some projects due to the higher cost of funds, So, the rate hikes’ direct impact on energy prices is to probably push them higher as the production and distribution systems face higher costs. Reducing Energy Prices, aka, Hitting the Economy Hard If interest rates are going to reduce energy prices it is going to come from cratering demand for anything and everything that uses energy that can be affected by interest rates! Housing/Real Estate/Construction. I have no idea how much energy goes into building a new home, but I assume a non-trivial amount, The materials that go into constructing a building can be energy intensive [copper piping, etc,], The transportation of these materials to the building site is also expensive, We are already seeing negative data in the housing sector [new home permits are down, expectations for new home sales are declining, the Fannie Mae Home Purchase Sentiment Index is at its lowest level in a decade [except very briefly in March 2020 during the Covid lockdowns], I'm sure I could find more dato pointing to housing slowing, but maybe highlighting that the Bankrate.com 5/1 ARM national average is at 4.1% versus 2.75% at the start of the year, is sufficient, We could look at 30-year mortgages and really shock you, but I think that the 5/1 is as interesting as the rate environment because it demonstrates that there is little relief anywhere along the curve for those needing new mortgages. Autos. Annualized total U.S, auto sales [published by WARD'S automotive] have fallen recently. This measure has been "choppy" to say the least as auto sales have clearly been hit by supply issues. For many makes and models, I'm hearing the wait time is 6 months for a car where you pick the features and it is built to your specifications [which had become the "normal" way of buying cars]. So, maybe, just maybe, the sales here are still being impacted by that, but I’d have to guess that rising auto loan costs are playing a role as well. The Manheim used vehicle value index is still very high, but has stabilized of late. If that stabilization is related to higher loan costs, then it is bad for the auto industry. If it is related to new cars and trucks being more readily available, it isn't a great sign, since that means the new auto sales indications cannot be entirely explained away by supply constraints. My understanding, given the steel and other components, is a lot of energy goes into producing a new automobile. So, I guess it is "good" news that slowing auto sales [and presumably production] will curb energy demand? Consumer Purchases and Delivery, Everywhere you turn there are stories and anecdotes about consumer purchasing slowing down, CONsumer CONfidence [as discussed last weekend] is atrocious! Not only does energy go into the production of the goods that the consumer was purchasing, but with home delivery being such a feature of today's purchasing behavior, energy consumption should go down as delivery services slow down [and as they continue to become more efficient - a process spurred on by higher gas prices]. I’m not sure whether to laugh or cry. Higher interest rates will "help" reduce demand for autos, housing, and general consumer consumption, Apparently, that is good, because it reduces demand for energy and energy inflation [as well as inflation for those products]. I can see that, but I cannot help but think that we need to Be Careful What You Wish For! A Special Place in Hell for Inventories I fear that inventories were a big part of the rise in inflation and would contribute to stabilizing prices [all else being equal] and that recent rate hikes are going to turn a "normal" normalization into something far more dangerous, Manufacturing and Trade Inventories grew from 2014 until COVID at a steady pace, This seemed to correlate nicely with the growing U.S. and global economy. They dropped with supply chain issues, but were back to pre-COVID levels by last summer. Then, from late last summer until the end of April [most recent data point for this series], these inventories grew rapidly! Companies worried about supply chain issues overstocked. This could lead to much lower future orders. Companies shifting to "just in case" from "just in time" need higher inventories, so that part would be stable, but costs of carrying inventory have increased, Maybe companies used straight line extrapolation to accumulate inventory to meet expected consumer demand. That is bad for inventories if the demand isn't materializing! It is extra bad if consumers pulled forward demand in response to their supply chain concerns, meaning that any simplistic estimate of future demand [always problematic, though easy] is even further off the mark as the extrapolation was based on a faulty premise [which is not thinking consumers responded to supply chain issues]. We may have an inventory overhang in the economy. While inventories are significantly higher than pre-COVID levels, the number of people working has still not returned to pre-COVID levels, Yeah, I get that it is far easier to "spend now, pay later" than it used to be through a variety of fintech solutions [ignoring rising interest costs] and that the "wealth effect" and "gambling" culture allows for more spending per job [or maybe it did a few months ago, but not now?] Maybe I'm just a stick in the mud, but... When I look at this chart, I see the correlation between total number of people working and inventory has been completely dislocated! [It also makes me question some of the supply chain issues we allegedly have]. Again, this potential inventory overhang is "amazing" if you want to slow orders and "fix" inflation by having to work off excess inventory rather than adding more. Apologies, if you're tired of reading my snarky comments about things being "good" for inflation fighting. I'm tired of writing them, but cannot think of what else to do. But the Economy is So Resilient? More on this later,,. The "Disruptive Portfolio" Wealth Destruction We have examined the concept of Disruptive Portfolio Construction and continue to think that this is playing a major role in how markets are trading, but increasingly this creates a potential shock to the economy, Let's start with crypto, Bitcoin briefly dropped below $19,000 Saturday morning. I have no idea where it will be by the time you are reading this, but I am targeting $10,000 or less for bitcoin within a month or so. First the "altcoins" [some of which are derisively referred to as "sh*t-coins"] are a complete mess. Solana is down 88% from its November 2021 highs and is roughly back to where it "debuted" in June 2012. Dogecoin, which I think was originally created as a joke, but rose to 70 cents [I think the weekend of Elon Musk's Saturday Night Live appearance] is back to 5 cents, which I guess is still good for something that was originally created as a joke. Ethereum, a "smart contract" that has some use cases very different than bitcoin and was often talked about as a superior product, is down 80% from its November 2021 highs. Under the Bloomberg CRYP page there are 25 things listed as "Crypto Assets". Maybe if I looked at each one I'd find some with a different story, but somehow, I doubt it. Okay, I lied, I couldn't resist, I had never heard of Polkadot, but it looks like it was launched in April 2021 at $40, declined to $11, rallied to $54 in November 2021, and is now down to $7 [at least the name is still cute]. But bitcoin is the story I’m looking at because it is the biggest and the one that seems to have the most direct ties to the broader market. Crypto, to me, is often about adoption. It was why I got bullish a couple of years ago and caught at least part of the wave. Back then, every day some new, easier, better way to own crypto was being announced. Companies and famous billionaires were putting it on their corporate balance sheets. FOMO was everywhere with people racing to put ever higher targets on its future price and those who didn't have anyone to jump on to the bandwagon with were hiring people who could put on an ever-higher price target with a straight face. That ended a while ago and we are in the "disadoption" phase [spellcheck says disadoption isn't a word, but I'm sticking with it]. Or as I wrote the other day, which the FT picked up on, we have moved from FOMO [Fear Of Missing Out] to FOHO [Fear of Holding On]. Even more concerning is a world where HODLING [originally either a mistype of HOLDING that gained traction or short for Holding On for Dear Life] is more prevalent and many people are now unable to exit their positions even if they wanted to. There are some serious "plumbing" issues right now in the crypto space. Maybe the decentralized nature of crypto will work and be extremely resilient [I cannot fully discount that possibility] but maybe, just maybe, there is a reason banks and exchanges have regulators who enforce rules to protect everyone [yes, I can already see the flame mail accusing me of FUD and not understanding how self-regulating is better, etc, but then all I do is spend about 10 minutes looking at some of the shills out there and fall back to thinking "adult supervision" might be wise]. Stablecoins. Stablecoins are what I would call a "thunk" layer in programming language, It is an intermediate layer between two things, in this case, cryptocurrencies and fiat, Terra/LUNA got wiped out, but it was an "algo" based stablecoin which many, in hindsight, say was a flawed design [clearly it was], but that didn't stop it from growing to $20 billion with some big-name investors engaged. Tether is the one garnering a lot of attention now. It is still the largest stablecoin and it did survive on "attack" of sorts after the Terra/LUNA fiasco. The issue with Tether is that it purports to be fully backed by "safe" assets, yet will not produce audited financials. The disarray in stablecoins should at the very least slow adoption. Freezing Accounts. Celsius blocked withdrawals 5 days ago and as of the time I'm typing this, it was still frozen. Babel Finance announced Friday that it would stop withdrawals. I found this one particularly interesting, as in May, according to news reports, it raised $80 million in a Series B financing, valuing it at $2 billion. Maybe needing to suspend withdrawals isn't a big issue, or maybe it is a sign of how rapidly things can change in the space? Right now, I’d be more worried about extracting value from the system rather than adding to the system. Yes, these are isolated cases [so far] and there are some big players in the space which presumably are not at risk of such an event, but having lived through WorldCom and Enron, and then the mortgage fiasco of 2008, I'm heavily skewed to believing that the piping issues will spread and get worse before they get better. Industry Layoffs. In a rapidly evolving industry, one with so much potential, it makes me nervous how quickly we are seeing layoffs announced publicly or finding out about them privately. Maybe I'm cynical, but to me that signals that the insiders aren't seeing adoption increase, which for anything as momentum dependent as crypto has been, seems like a signal for more pain. The big question is how many of the "whales" and big "hodlers" will buy here to stabilize their existing holdings or whether some level of risk management is deemed prudent. You cannot go more than two minutes talking to a true believer without "generational wealth" being mentioned [trust me, I've tried]. At what point does wanting to stay really rich become the goal rather than trying for generational wealth, even if it means converting back ("cringe") to something as miserable as fiat? I expect more wealth destruction in crypto and that will hurt the economy! The wealth itself is gone, curbing spending [I'm already noticing how much I miss the Lambo photos all over social media]. The jobs are now disappearing, curbing spending. The advertising will likely slow down [though not having to watch Matt Damon or LeBron wax on about crypto might be a good thing for our sanity]. But seriously, ad dollars from this lucrative source [I'm assuming it's lucrative given how often ads appear in my social stream, during major sporting events, and even in an arena [or two] could be drying up just as retailers are also struggling. It seems that every week there is a conference somewhere dedicated to crypto [with Miami and Austin seemingly becoming a non-stop crypto conference/party]. This could turn out to hurt many companies and even some cities, Semiconductor purchases could decline. Mining rigs have been a big user of semiconductors, All you have to do is pull up a chart of bitcoin versus some select semi-conductor manufacturers and the correlation is obvious, Energy usage could decline. If mining slows [as a function of lower prices and less activity] then we might see less energy used by the crypto mining industry [the public miners are in some cases down almost 90% from their November 2021 highs, presumably because the industry is less profitable]. Ultimately this could reduce energy prices and semiconductor prices/backlogs, which would generally be good for the broader economy and would help the Fed on their inflation fight, but could hurt some individual firms that rely on this industry. My outlook for crypto is that we have more downside in sight and that will hurt broader markets and might do far more damage to the economy than many of the crypto haters realize. It is fine to dislike crypto, but it is naïve not to realize how much wealth was there helping spending and how impactful a slowdown on this industry could be! Which brings me briefly to "disruptive" stocks. The wealth created by these companies was simply astounding, Whether remaining in the hands of private equity or coming public through IPOs or via a SPAC, there was incredible wealth generated, Investors were rewarded, but so were the founders, sponsors, and employees! There was great wealth created as these innovators and disruptors [along with a mix of more traditional companies] were rewarded. I am extremely concerned about the employee wealth lost. I cannot imagine the personal wealth destruction that has occurred for many, especially mid-level to mildly senior employees. Just enough of a taste of the equity exposure to do well.  Many have restrictions so have not exited and many had options, not all of which were struck at zero, so they may be back to zero, That wealth lost has to translate into lower economic activity, especially as the losses seem more persistent than they might have been a few months ago! But investors have also been hit hard, and possibly harder than most people factor in. I will use ARKK here to illustrate an important point and why a subset of investors is in far more financial difficulty than might be apparent [assuming "traditional" portfolio construction]. ARKK, not accounting for dividends, is back to where it traded in the aftermath of the COVID shutdowns in March 2020. The number of shares outstanding have almost tripled since then. Yes, the number of shares traded daily is large and they frequently change hands, but on average, this shows that some large number of shares were issued as the fund price rallied. Many of those investors [on average] were originally reworded, but now, on average, those shares are somewhere between small losses and serious carnage. ARKK is down to $7.7 billion in AUM as of Friday from a peak of $28 billion in March 2021. The bulk of that change in market cap can be attributed to performance as shares outstanding are still near their peak. I highlight ARKK because I don't feel like talking about individual companies, the portfolio has changed so much, the performance is more generic than company specific, and ETFs are often just the observable "tip of the iceberg" of major trends that are more difficult to observe, but are still happening, TQQQ, the triple leveraged QQQ, exhibits a similar pattern and all the gambling stocks are doing poorly, which I attribute to incredible wealth destruction for a subset of investors, The three groups that I believe were most hurt are: Relatively young people, who took a very aggressive approach to trading/gambling [with relatively small amounts of money] that they can make back via their job earnings over time [or they might now need a job if they were living off of the trading/gambling money]. I don't see a material economic impact from this group, It may even encourage workforce participation, Aggressive disruptive investors. Many people went all-in on some version of a disruptive portfolio [I didn't even bring up those who treated mega-tech stocks as a bank account with dividends and upside], There could be some serious wealth lost here that will affect the economy [and is likely already affecting the economy], Employees, some of whom also adopted disruptive portfolios. As the likelihood of a near-term rebound recedes, there will be wealth preservation as a focus. The number of IPOs and SPACs that are not just below their all-time highs, but below their launch prices, is scary, and that really hurts the employees, or at least those who couldn't sell, didn't sell, or sold, but diversified into a disruptive portfolio. This is all deflationary (which I’m told is a good thing] but I cannot see how this is a good thing for the economy or broader markets! But the Economy is So Resilient? I challenge this. If we have an inventory overhang, the economy may grind to a halt far quicker than many are expecting. If banks start tightening lending practices [clear evidence this is occurring and will likely get worse than better] we will see credit contraction and that will feed into the economy, rapidly. We have NEVER gone from low rates and QE to higher rates and QT successfully [we haven't had many attempts, but I remain convinced that QE is very different than rate cuts and that it affects asset prices quite directly - see Stop Trying to Translate Balance Sheet to BPS. The wealth effect must be bad overall and devastating to some segments. My view is that: Things definitely hit faster than people realized. Often the inflection point has already occurred while many are still applying straight line extrapolation to what they perceive to be the still “existing" trend. "Gumming" up the piping often leads to more problems, rather than a quick solution [and I completely believe the current high levels of volatility in markets and lack of depth in liquidity is a form of gumming up the pipes]. If the problem hits the financial sector it is too late (unless immediate/strong support from central banks is provided). So far, the banking sector is looking good, though Europe is lagging the U.S, in that respect. The ECB came up with half-hearted efforts to reduce Italian bond yields relative to others. The JGB stuck to their yield curve targeting, but markets will soon just expect that to get reversed at their next meeting. Finally, the Fed, unlike in March 2020, will have difficulty reversing course and helping. The good news is so far this isn’t hitting the banking system, but I am watching this sector closely, especially in Europe. Risk happens fast! It's a phrase often said, but often ignored. I'm not ignoring it right now. Commodity Wars? This is a bigger question, and one that is coming up more frequently, but have we entered into a global "war" to secure natural resources? I think that, increasingly, this is the reality we live in and that will be inflationary, just like reshoring, onshoring, securing supply chains, and “transforming“ energy production/ distribution, etc., will all be inflationary longer-term as well, But I've taken up too much space already today and that isn’t a question that needs to be answered to drive my current thinking, Bottom Line I am including what I wrote last week because it largely worked and my views haven't materially changed, I added some color and exactness on the views while definitely shifting from DEFCON 3 to DEFC0N2. I want to own Treasuries here at the wide end of the range, but for the first time, I'm scared that we could break out of this range (big problem]. The 10-year finished almost unchanged on the week, going from 3.16% last Friday to close at 3.23% (it did gap to 3.48% on Tuesday]. The swings in the 2-year were even more "insane" given the level and maturity. So, as recession talk heats up, yields should go down, but I’d spend a bit of option premium protecting against a rapid gap to higher yields. Credit spreads should outperform equities here, though both may be weak, (Verbatim from last week]. Equities could be hit by the double whammy of earnings concerns and multiple reduction. I am told there is a lot of support, but I think that we see new lows this week unless central banks change their tune, which seems incredibly unlikely). I still find it mind boggling that we prefer recession to inflation. Crypto should remain under pressure. I think bitcoin will be sub $20k< before it reaches $35k. Now I think it will be $12,000 before $24,000. Have a great Father's Day and enjoy the Juneteenth long weekend! (Though, I have to admit, I kind of wish markets were open on Monday because this is the trading environment that deep down, I have to admit, I enjoy!] Tyler Durden Tue, 06/21/2022 - 07:20.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 21st, 2022

Saudi Arabia Faces Accusations of ‘Sportswashing.’ For Young Saudis, It’s a Chance to Enjoy New Freedoms

Standing in a luxury spectator stand on Saturday night, Abdullah Sarhan stared down at the newest track on the Formula 1 series, as the world’s top race-car drivers roared past in a blur, during this past weekend’s Grand Prix event. His amazement was not the race itself. It was where it was happening: His home… Standing in a luxury spectator stand on Saturday night, Abdullah Sarhan stared down at the newest track on the Formula 1 series, as the world’s top race-car drivers roared past in a blur, during this past weekend’s Grand Prix event. His amazement was not the race itself. It was where it was happening: His home town of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. “For years, if we wanted to see something like this, we had to travel,” said Sarhan, a 29-year-old with long curly hair, wearing jeans and T-shirt, who works for his family’s hotel company in the Red Sea coastal city. “Now it’s happening five minutes from my house.” [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] The sense of the world opening up has—at least for many Saudis—injected a palpable excitement and a giddy sense of newness. In numerous interviews with TIME in the kingdom over the past week, young Saudis—nearly 70% of Saudi Arabia’s 34.8 million is younger than 35—said that their lives had markedly changed during the past three years, and that they were thrilled they could finally cut loose, after decades of cultural isolation and suffocating religiosity. To anyone visiting Saudi Arabia after a long absence, as TIME’s correspondent did last week after four years, the change is evident. Rules forbidding women to travel without a male relative’s permission, to work in public-facing jobs, to leave their heads uncovered—and most famously, to drive—have been scrapped in the past three years. Religious police, who until 2018 detained women for violating dress codes, have vanished from the streets. Now, women with long flowing hair, some tinted pink or blue, fill the crowds at mass events like last weekend’s Formula 1 on Jeddah’s seafront. Even the women’s bathroom sign at the race featured a silhouette of a long-haired woman with bright lipstick. At its first-ever Grand Prix, the kingdom celebrated with fireworks and crowds including top royals and government officials filling the venue to capacity.The race marked a milestone for Saudi Arabia, aligning the kingdom with top-level international competition and, by implication, cementing its perceived acceptability on the world stage. It is that second prospect that has drawn fire from human rights groups in recent weeks, in the run-up to the Grand Prix. They accuse the titular Saudi ruler, Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, or MBS as he is universally known, of “sportswashing,” using Saudi Arabia’s vast oil wealth to buy its way into the biggest sporting events, and so gloss over mounting human-rights violations. The country reportedly spent about $900 million to secure 10-year hosting rights for Formula 1 and in November, its Olympic Committee announced it would spend $694 million creating about 90 sports federations, training athletes from scratch to be world champions, much as China did decades ago. Lars Baron/Getty ImagesJEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA – DECEMBER 05: Fans show their support from the stands during the F1 Grand Prix of Saudi Arabia at Jeddah Corniche Circuit on December 05, 2021 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. All this is part of a carefully crafted strategy, micromanaged by MBS, who was given effective power by his father, King Salman, in 2017, when he was just 31. Named “Vision 2030,” MBS’s plan is geared toward ending almost 90 years of near-total dependence on vast oil reserves. By diversifying the economy and opening up to foreign investment and tourism with attractions such as big sporting events, the goal is to provide jobs for the new, wired generation. But human rights activists and others detect another, unstated goal too: Keeping that generation compliant, and even content, under an autocratic monarchy, despite little prospect of Western-style democracy. Few areas crystallize that social contract quite so starkly as professional sports. The vast sums that the Saudis are investing are fueling an unstoppable momentum, on which efforts to raise awareness of sportswashing or force boycotts have had little impact. In October, the government’s Public Investment Fund, of which MBS is chairman, snapped up Newcastle United soccer club for $409 million, giving it a toehold into the U.K.’s powerful Premier League. Even before then, Saudi Arabia had spent about $1.5 billion in recent years on investments in a wide range of professional sports, from boxing to chess, according to a March report by the British human rights group Grant Liberty. Earlier this month, Human Rights Watch called the Saudi government’s giant sports investments, including in golf and soccer, “well-funded efforts to whitewash its image, despite a significant increase in repression over the last few years.” The claim of sportswashing has little resonance among many Saudis, who believe that they finally have opportunities long enjoyed by the rest of the world. “The country was closed off from the world,” Reema Juffali, 29, Saudi Arabia’s first female professional race-car driver, told TIME on Sunday, on the side of the race track. “Now it is changing, and they should support us wanting to.” Human-rights observers strongly disagree, seeing in events like Formula 1 the endorsement of a repressive regime. They point to the country’s arrest of critics, the execution of nonviolent offenders, the heavy air bombardment of Houthi rebels in Yemen, and the use of flogging as punishment for homosexuality, which remains a crime in Saudi Arabia. Most shocking of all was the horrific killing and dismemberment in October, 2018 of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, of which MBS has denied he had prior knowledge. A CIA report last February concluded that MBS, with his “absolute control” over Saudi intelligence services, very likely approved the operation. Yet three years on, foreign investors—many flying into Jeddah to attend the Formula 1 event—are back in force. On Saturday, as the qualifying races got underway, French President Emmanuel Macron wrapped up a tour of the Gulf region with a visit toJeddah accompanied by a large contingent of French businesses. While Macron met with MBS, the French companies including BNP Paribas, Sanofi and EDF Renewables, signed 27 deals with Saudi companies. Macron was one of the first Western leaders to meet the Crown Prince since Khashoggi’s killing. U.S. President Joe Biden has refused to do so. All that made last weekend’s Formula 1 race an important moment in Saudi Arabia’s rehabilitation, in spite of criticism by observers like Human Rights Watch. “Everyone is entitled to their opinion,” says Juffali, the female racing driver. ”But I think people have to come here and see it for themselves.” While countless Saudis have embraced the flashy sporting events with huge enthusiasm, there is little sign that they are considering the moral questions or whether sports are being used as a political tool. “I’ve spent a lot of time in the [Persian] Gulf, and I’ve never once heard anyone talk about sportswashing,” says Simon Chadwick, director of the Center for Eurasian Sport at the Emlyon Business School in Paris. “If you sit in Qatar, you sit in Saudi Arabia, it is nation building, it is soft power,” he says. “Sportswashing is in the eye of the beholder.” Saudi Arabia is not the only rich authoritarian state to spend lavishly on sports, or to face accusations of sportswashing because of it. The mammoth multibillion-dollar global sports industry, which has benefited from the perception of being an apolitical crowd-pleaser, is increasingly becoming entangled in issues of human rights, corruption, and personal agency. On Monday, U.S. officials announced they would not send a diplomatic delegation to the Beijing winter Olympic Games in February. That is in response to China’s brutal repression of the Uighur Muslims in the western province of Xinjiang, and its crackdown on protesters in Hong Kong. Great Britain, Canada and Australia also announced diplomatic boycotts of the Beijing Olympics. There are calls to boycott the 2022 FIFA World Cup soccer tournament next November in Qatar in protest against the wealthy Gulf state’s human rights record, following the deaths of dozens of migrant construction workers. Qatar, like Saudi Arabia, also outlaws homosexuality. The country has spent about $200 billion creating a vast infrastructure for the tournament, and it is reportedly paying about $500 million for the Premier League’s broadcast rights in the Middle East and North Africa—again drawing fury from human-rights observers. As the controversy raged over the Jeddah car races, the world’s top race-car driver Lewis Hamilton wore a rainbow Pride crash helmet in Jeddah to support gay rights, which he first donned the previous week at the Qatar Formula 1 race; Hamilton won the Saudi Grand Prix in a chaotic final race on Sunday night, putting him one step closer to winning a record eight Formula 1 titles. Cristiano Barni/ATPImages—Getty ImagesJEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA – DECEMBER 05: Lewis Hamilton (GBR) Mercedes AMG F1 Team, Mercedes-AMG F1 W12 E Performance in the final stage of the race during the Grand Prix Formula One of Saudi Arabia on December 05, 2021 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Yet even as more countries face accusations of sportswashing it is clear that for many citizens, the issue is often complex. In Saudi Arabia, for example MBS has maintained an authoritarian regime while allowing Saudis a markedly more relaxed personal lifestyle than they have enjoyed for decades—a two-pronged strategy that has helped toto consolidate his power. The explosion of professional sports is closely interwoven with aspects of youth culture, giving Saudis the sense that, although they cannot elect their leaders or march in protests like their contemporaries in the U.S. or Europe, they can now enjoy the same culture as them. In a country where live music had been banned for decades until 2018, thousands of young Saudis partied until 2.30 a.m. at Formula 1 on Saturday and Sunday at blowout post-race concerts by Justin Bieber, and DJ megastars David Guetta and Tiësto. During breaks between races, giant monitors along the track screened other music, with women gyrating behind DJs in skintight, hot-pink sequined bodysuits. Until 2018, movie theaters were also banned in Saudi Arabia, deemed to violate Islamic strictures. Now, there are multiplexes across Riyadh and Jeddah packing theaters with movies like The House of Gucci. In the capital Riyadh, more than two million people have visited a giant entertainment zone called Riyadh Season over its six-week run, where they can catch nightly music or dance performances, go rock-climbing, or whizz down the world’s longest slide. Wang Haizhou/Xinhua—Getty ImagesPhoto taken on Nov. 6, 2021 shows a view of the winter wonderland in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Riyadh winter wonderland is one of the entertainment zones of Riyadh Season 2021, which will continue until March 2022, with the aim of attracting a diverse audience with more than 7,000 events. “Everything is different,” says Salma Sultan, 37, describing her life over the past three years. A Riyadh mother of a six-year-old, separated from her husband, she learned to drive after the ban on women driving was lifted in 2018, and now supplements her civil-service pay by driving for a ride-share company on her off-hours. “I am finally independent,” she says. While the revamped regime has enabled Sultan to make a modest living for herself, at the much higher end of the economic spectrum, it has also allowed the generously-funded new Saudi sports industry to flourish. Outside Riyadh, a permanent Formula 1 racetrack is being built within the sprawling Qiddiya entertainment and sports city, which is being built by the amusement-park giant Six Flags. There is a separate Formula E track for electric race cars, in Riyadh’s restored historic area of Diriyah, with a race scheduled for February. Sports organizations play a role in the dynamics that are playing out in countries like Saudi Arabia, say some observers who have tracked the industry for years. Bidding wars for sports clubs and hosting deals for events like the Olympics, Formula 1, and the FIFA soccer World Cup have increasingly attracted—and been won by—rich, state-dominated countries, like Russia, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Paris Saint-Germain, one of Europe’s wealthiest soccer clubs, is able to pay its superstar players Lionel Messi, Kylian Mbappé and Neymar small fortunes partly because it is owned by Qatar’s sovereign wealth fund. Formula 1, often associated with glamor and celebrity-studded crowds, attracts dizzying sums and its Paris-based international federation, known as the FIA, has signed increasingly large hosting contracts. “The sport faces some huge challenges if it wants to preserve its reputation and not be known as a money-grabbing plutocracy,” wrote a Formula 1 analyst last year, when Saudi Arabia negotiated its hosting contract. From the stands high above the race track in Jeddah last weekend, racing fan Sarhan did not see a plutocracy. What he saw was young Saudis like himself being able to enjoy themselves in a way they weren’t able to before 2018. Looking around the Formula 1 luxury stand, at young people laughing and sipping sodas, he dismissed the idea of sportswashing and embraced what he sees as new freedoms. “You would never see this before,” he said. The crown prince’s ambitious plans for the kingdom indicate that young Saudis like Sarhan will see more evenings like it. —With reporting by Sean Gregory.....»»

Category: topSource: timeDec 12th, 2021

UFC 276 features 2 of the world"s top pound-for-pound fighters &mdash; here"s how to watch the main event on July 2

UFC 276 prelims will air live on ABC and ESPN before the main card with Israel Adesanya and Jared Cannonier starts at 10 p.m. ET on ESPN+. When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Israel Adesanya celebrates one of his wins.Photo by Getty Images UFC 276 will stream live on July 2, with the main card starting at 10 p.m. ET on ESPN+. Middleweight champ Israel Adesanya will fight Jared Cannonier in the co-main event. The main card is a pay-per-view fight that costs $75 in addition to an ESPN+ subscription ($7/month). UFC 276 features two of UFC's top three pound-for-pound fighters, with Israel Adesanya and Alexander Volkanovski set to defend their titles in a co-main event on July 2. Adesanya will face Jared Cannonier, while Volkanovski is going up against Max Holloway. Adesanya has successfully defended the middleweight title four times, including a decision victory over Robert Whittaker in February. Cannonier has earned his first UFC title fight after wins against Derek Brunson and Kelvin Gastelum. Volkanovski has won 11 straight matches since his UFC debut in 2016, including back-to-back decision wins over UFC 276 challenger Max Holloway.How to watch UFC 276You can watch the main event of UFC 276 on ESPN+ at 10 p.m. ET on July 2. The main card requires an ESPN+ subscription ($7/month) and an extra PPV fee of $75. Before the main event, UFC Fight Pass subscribers can watch the early prelims at 6 p.m. ET. The prelims will then start at 8 p.m. ET on the ESPN cable channel, ABC network, and ESPN+ service.You can access the ESPN+ app on all major mobile and streaming devices, including Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Android and iOS smartphones, Chromecast, PS4, Xbox One, Roku, Samsung smart TVs, and more.Ways to save on the UFC 276 pay-per-view priceIf you plan on signing up for ESPN+ to stream UFC 276, you can take advantage of a special discounted package.New subscribers can purchase a year-long ESPN+ membership with access to UFC 276 included for a total of $99.98. That's more than 30% off the regular combined price of an annual plan and a PPV match.Following your first year of service, ESPN+ will renew for the regular annual price of $70.Here's the fight card for UFC 276: Adesanya vs. CannonierESPNEarly Prelims — 6 p.m. ET,  3 p.m. PT on UFC Fight PassJessica-Rose Clark versus Julija Stoliarenko [Women's bantamweight]Jessica Eye versus Maycee Barber [Women's flyweight]Uriah Hall versus Andre Muniz [Middleweight]Prelims — 8 p.m. ET, 5 p.m. PT on ESPN+, ESPN, and ABCBrad Tavares versus Dricus Du Plessis [Middleweight]Jim Miller versus Donald Cerrone [Welterweight]Ian Garry versus Gabriel Green [Welterweight]Brad Riddell versus Jalin Turner [Lightweight]Main Card — 10 p.m. ET, 7 p.m. PT on ESPN+Pedro Munhoz versus Sean O'Malley [Bantamweight]Robbie Lawler versus Bryan Barberena [Welterweight]Sean Strickland versus Alex Pereira [Middleweight]Alexander Volkanovski versus Max Holloway [Featherweight title fight]Israel Adesanya versus Jared Cannonier [Middleweight title fight]Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJul 1st, 2022

These 46 pitch decks helped fintechs disrupting trading, investing, and banking raise millions in funding

Looking for examples of real fintech pitch decks? Check out pitch decks that Qolo, Lance, and other startups used to raise money from VCs. Check out these pitch decks for examples of fintech founders sold their vision.Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech.  Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders sold their vision. See more stories on Insider's business page. Fintech funding has been on a tear.In 2021, fintech funding hit a record $132 billion globally, according to CB Insights, more than double 2020's mark.Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech. Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders are selling their vision and nabbing big bucks in the process. You'll see new financial tech geared at freelancers, fresh twists on digital banking, and innovation aimed at streamlining customer onboarding. New twists on digital bankingZach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradleyHMBradleyConsumers are getting used to the idea of branch-less banking, a trend that startup digital-only banks like Chime, N26, and Varo have benefited from. The majority of these fintechs target those who are underbanked, and rely on usage of their debit cards to make money off interchange. But fellow startup HMBradley has a different business model. "Our thesis going in was that we don't swipe our debit cards all that often, and we don't think the customer base that we're focusing on does either," Zach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradley, told Insider. "A lot of our customer base uses credit cards on a daily basis."Instead, the startup is aiming to build clientele with stable deposits. As a result, the bank is offering interest-rate tiers depending on how much a customer saves of their direct deposit.Notably, the rate tiers are dependent on the percentage of savings, not the net amount. "We'll pay you more when you save more of what comes in," Bruhnke said. "We didn't want to segment customers by how much money they had. So it was always going to be about a percentage of income. That was really important to us."Check out the 14-page pitch deck fintech HMBradley, a neobank offering interest rates as high as 3%, used to raise an $18.25 million Series APersonal finance is only a text awayYinon Ravid, the chief executive and cofounder of Albert.AlbertThe COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the growing preference of mobile banking as customers get comfortable managing their finances online.The financial app Albert has seen a similar jump in activity. Currently counting more than six million members, deposits in Albert's savings offering doubled from the start of the pandemic in March 2020 to May of this year, from $350 million to $700 million, according to new numbers released by the company. Founded in 2015, Albert offers automated budgeting and savings tools alongside guided investment portfolios. It's looked to differentiate itself through personalized features, like the ability for customers to text human financial experts.Budgeting and saving features are free on Albert. But for more tailored financial advice, customers pay a subscription fee that's a pay-what-you-can model, between $4 and $14 a month. And Albert's now banking on a new tool to bring together its investing, savings, and budgeting tools.Fintech Albert used this 10-page pitch deck to raise a $100 million Series C from General Atlantic and CapitalG 'A bank for immigrants'Priyank Singh and Rohit Mittal are the cofounders of Stilt.StiltRohit Mittal remembers the difficulties he faced when he first arrived in the United States a decade ago as a master's student at Columbia University.As an immigrant from India, Mittal had no credit score in the US and had difficulty integrating into the financial system. Mittal even struggled to get approved to rent an apartment and couch-surfed until he found a roommate willing to offer him space in his apartment in the New York neighborhood Morningside Heights.That roommate was Priyank Singh, who would go on to become Mittal's cofounder when the two started Stilt, a financial-technology company designed to address the problems Mittal faced when he arrived in the US.Stilt, which calls itself "a bank for immigrants," does not require a social security number or credit history to access its offerings, including unsecured personal loans.Instead of relying on traditional metrics like a credit score, Stilt uses data such as education and employment to predict an individual's future income stability and cash flow before issuing a loan. Stilt has seen its loan volume grow by 500% in the past 12 months, and the startup has loaned to immigrants from 160 countries since its launch. Here are the 15 slides Stilt, which calls itself 'a bank for immigrants,' used to raise a $14 million Series AAn IRA for alternativesHenry Yoshida is the co-founder and CEO of retirement fintech startup Rocket Dollar.Rocket DollarFintech startup Rocket Dollar, which helps users invest their individual retirement account (IRA) dollars into alternative assets, just raised $8 million for its Series A round, the company announced on Thursday.Park West Asset Management led the round, with participation from investors including Hyphen Capital, which focuses on backing Asian American entrepreneurs, and crypto exchange Kraken's venture arm. Co-founded in 2018 by CEO Henry Yoshida, CTO Rick Dude, and VP of marketing Thomas Young, Rocket Dollar now has over $350 million in assets under management on its platform. Yoshida sold his first startup, a roboadvisor called Honest Dollar, to Goldman Sachs' investment management division for an estimated $20 million.Yoshida told Insider that while ultra-high net worth investors have been investing self-directed retirement account dollars into alternative assets like real estate, private equity, and cryptocurrency, average investors have not historically been able to access the same opportunities to invest IRA dollars in alternative assets through traditional platforms.Here's the 34-page pitch deck a fintech that helps users invest their retirement savings in crypto and real estate assets used to nab $8 millionA trading app for activismAntoine Argouges, CEO and founder of TulipshareTulipshareAn up-and-coming fintech is taking aim at some of the world's largest corporations by empowering retail investors to push for social and environmental change by pooling their shareholder rights.London-based Tulipshare lets individuals in the UK invest as little as one pound in publicly-traded company stocks. The upstart combines individuals' shareholder rights with other like-minded investors to advocate for environmental, social, and corporate governance change at firms like JPMorgan, Apple, and Amazon.The goal is to achieve a higher number of shares to maximize the number of votes that can be submitted at shareholder meetings. Already a regulated broker-dealer in the UK, Tulipshare recently applied for registration as a broker-dealer in the US. "If you ask your friends and family if they've ever voted on shareholder resolutions, the answer will probably be close to zero," CEO and founder Antoine Argouges told Insider. "I started Tulipshare to utilize shareholder rights to bring about positive corporate change that has an impact on people's lives and our planet — what's more powerful than money to change the system we live in?"Check out the 14-page pitch deck from Tulipshare, a trading app that lets users pool their shareholder votes for activism campaignsDigital tools for independent financial advisorsJason Wenk, founder and CEO of AltruistAltruistJason Wenk started his career at Morgan Stanley in investment research over 20 years ago. Now, he's running a company that is hoping to broaden access to financial advice for less-wealthy individuals. The startup raised $50 million in Series B funding led by Insight Partners with participation from investors Vanguard and Venrock. The round brings the Los Angeles-based startup's total funding to just under $67 million.Founded in 2018, Altruist is a digital brokerage built for independent financial advisors, intended to be an "all-in-one" platform that unites custodial functions, portfolio accounting, and a client-facing portal. It allows advisors to open accounts, invest, build models, report, trade (including fractional shares), and bill clients through an interface that can advisors time by eliminating mundane operational tasks.Altruist aims to make personalized financial advice less expensive, more efficient, and more inclusive through the platform, which is designed for registered investment advisors (RIAs), a growing segment of the wealth management industry. Here's the pitch deck for Altruist, a wealth tech challenging custodians Fidelity and Charles Schwab, that raised $50 million from Vanguard and InsightRethinking debt collection Jason Saltzman, founder and CEO of ReliefReliefFor lenders, debt collection is largely automated. But for people who owe money on their credit cards, it can be a confusing and stressful process.  Relief is looking to change that. Its app automates the credit-card debt collection process for users, negotiating with lenders and collectors to settle outstanding balances on their behalf. The fintech just launched and closed a $2 million seed round led by Collaborative Ventures. Relief's fundraising experience was a bit different to most. Its pitch deck, which it shared with one investor via Google Slides, went viral. It set out to raise a $1 million seed round, but ended up doubling that and giving some investors money back to make room for others.Check out a 15-page pitch deck that went viral and helped a credit-card debt collection startup land a $2 million seed roundHelping small banks lendTKCollateralEdgeFor large corporations with a track record of tapping the credit markets, taking out debt is a well-structured and clear process handled by the nation's biggest investment banks and teams of accountants. But smaller, middle-market companies — typically those with annual revenues ranging up to $1 billion — are typically served by regional and community banks that don't always have the capacity to adequately measure the risk of loans or price them competitively. Per the National Center for the Middle Market, 200,000 companies fall into this range, accounting for roughly 33% of US private sector GDP and employment.Dallas-based fintech CollateralEdge works with these banks — typically those with between $1 billion and $50 billion in assets — to help analyze and price slices of commercial and industrial loans that previously might have gone unserved by smaller lenders.On October 20th, CollateralEdge announced a $3.5 million seed round led by Dallas venture fund Perot Jain with participation from Kneeland Youngblood (a founder of the healthcare-focused private-equity firm Pharos Capital) and other individual investors.Here's the 10-page deck CollateralEdge, a fintech streamlining how small banks lend to businesses, used to raise a $3.5 million seed roundA new way to assess creditworthinessPinwheel founders Curtis Lee, Kurt Lin, and Anish Basu.PinwheelGrowing up, Kurt Lin never saw his father get frustrated. A "traditional, stoic figure," Lin said his father immigrated to the United States in the 1970s. Becoming part of the financial system proved even more difficult than assimilating into a new culture.Lin recalled visiting bank after bank with his father as a child, watching as his father's applications for a mortgage were denied due to his lack of credit history. "That was the first time in my life I really saw him crack," Lin told Insider. "The system doesn't work for a lot of people — including my dad," he added. Lin would find a solution to his father's problem years later while working with Anish Basu, and Curtis Lee on an automated health savings account. The trio realized the payroll data integrations they were working on could be the basis of a product that would help lenders work with consumers without strong credit histories."That's when the lightbulb hit," said Lin, Pinwheel's CEO.In 2018, Lin, Basu, and Lee founded Pinwheel, an application-programming interface that shares payroll data to help both fintechs and traditional lenders serve consumers with limited or poor credit, who have historically struggled to access financial products. Here's the 9-page deck that Pinwheel, a fintech helping lenders tap into payroll data to serve consumers with little to no credit, used to raise a $50 million Series BAn alternative auto lenderTricolorAn alternative auto lender that caters to thin- and no-credit Hispanic borrowers is planning a national expansion after scoring a $90 million investment from BlackRock-managed funds. Tricolor is a Dallas-based auto lender that is a community development financial institution. It uses a proprietary artificial-intelligence engine that decisions each customer based on more than 100 data points, such as proof of income. Half of Tricolor's customers have a FICO score, and less than 12% have scores above 650, yet the average customer has lived in the US for 15 years, according to the deck.A 2017 survey by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation found 31.5% of Hispanic households had no mainstream credit compared to 14.4% of white households. "For decades, the deck has been stacked against low income or credit invisible Hispanics in the United States when it comes to the purchase and financing of a used vehicle," Daniel Chu, founder and CEO of Tricolor, said in a statement announcing the raise.An auto lender that caters to underbanked Hispanics used this 25-page deck to raise $90 million from BlackRock investors A new way to access credit The TomoCredit teamTomoCreditKristy Kim knows first-hand the challenge of obtaining credit in the US without an established credit history. Kim, who came to the US from South Korea, couldn't initially get access to credit despite having a job in investment banking after graduating college. "I was in my early twenties, I had a good income, my job was in investment banking but I could not get approved for anything," Kim told Insider. "Many young professionals like me, we deserve an opportunity to be considered but just because we didn't have a Fico, we weren't given a chance to even apply," she added.Kim started TomoCredit in 2018 to help others like herself gain access to consumer credit. TomoCredit spent three years building an internal algorithm to underwrite customers based on cash flow, rather than a credit score.TomoCredit, a fintech that lends to thin- and no-credit borrowers, used this 17-page pitch deck to raise its $10 million Series AHelping streamline how debts are repaidMethod Financial cofounders Jose Bethancourt and Marco del Carmen.Method FinancialWhen Jose Bethancourt graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in May 2019, he faced the same question that confronts over 43 million Americans: How would he repay his student loans?The problem led Bethancourt on a nearly two-year journey that culminated in the creation of a startup aimed at making it easier for consumers to more seamlessly pay off all kinds of debt.  Initially, Bethancourt and fellow UT grad Marco del Carmen built GradJoy, an app that helped users better understand how to manage student loan repayment and other financial habits. GradJoy was accepted into Y Combinator in the summer of 2019. But the duo quickly realized the real benefit to users would be helping them move money to make payments instead of simply offering recommendations."When we started GradJoy, we thought, 'Oh, we'll just give advice — we don't think people are comfortable with us touching their student loans,' and then we realized that people were saying, 'Hey, just move the money — if you think I should pay extra, then I'll pay extra.' So that's kind of the movement that we've seen, just, everybody's more comfortable with fintechs doing what's best for them," Bethancourt told Insider. Here is the 11-slide pitch deck Method Financial, a Y Combinator-backed fintech making debt repayment easier, used to raise $2.5 million in pre-seed fundingQuantum computing made easyQC Ware CEO Matt Johnson.QC WareEven though banks and hedge funds are still several years out from adding quantum computing to their tech arsenals, that hasn't stopped Wall Street giants from investing time and money into the emerging technology class. And momentum for QC Ware, a startup looking to cut the time and resources it takes to use quantum computing, is accelerating. The fintech secured a $25 million Series B on September 29 co-led by Koch Disruptive Technologies and Covestro with participation from D.E. Shaw, Citi, and Samsung Ventures.QC Ware, founded in 2014, builds quantum algorithms for the likes of Goldman Sachs (which led the fintech's Series A), Airbus, and BMW Group. The algorithms, which are effectively code bases that include quantum processing elements, can run on any of the four main public-cloud providers.Quantum computing allows companies to do complex calculations faster than traditional computers by using a form of physics that runs on quantum bits as opposed to the traditional 1s and 0s that computers use. This is especially helpful in banking for risk analytics or algorithmic trading, where executing calculations milliseconds faster than the competition can give firms a leg up. Here's the 20-page deck QC Ware, a fintech making quantum computing more accessible, used to raised its $25 million Series BSimplifying quant modelsKirat Singh and Mark Higgins, Beacon's cofounders.BeaconA fintech that helps financial institutions use quantitative models to streamline their businesses and improve risk management is catching the attention, and capital, of some of the country's biggest investment managers.Beacon Platform, founded in 2014, is a fintech that builds applications and tools to help banks, asset managers, and trading firms quickly integrate quantitative models that can help with analyzing risk, ensuring compliance, and improving operational efficiency. The company raised its Series C on Wednesday, scoring a $56 million investment led by Warburg Pincus with support from Blackstone Innovations Investments, PIMCO, and Global Atlantic. Blackstone, PIMCO, and Global Atlantic are also users of Beacon's tech, as are the Commonwealth Bank of Australia and Shell New Energies, a division of Royal Dutch Shell, among others.The fintech provides a shortcut for firms looking to use quantitative modelling and data science across various aspects of their businesses, a process that can often take considerable resources if done solo.Here's the 20-page pitch deck Beacon, a fintech helping Wall Street better analyze risk and data, used to raise $56 million from Warburg Pincus, Blackstone, and PIMCOSussing out bad actorsFrom left to right: Cofounders CTO David Movshovitz, CEO Doron Hendler, and chief architect Adi DeGaniRevealSecurityAn encounter with an impersonation hacker led Doron Hendler to found RevealSecurity, a Tel Aviv-based cybersecurity startup that monitors for insider threats.Two years ago, a woman impersonating an insurance-agency representative called Hendler and convinced him that he made a mistake with his recent health insurance policy upgrade. She got him to share his login information for his insurer's website, even getting him to give the one-time passcode sent to his phone. Once the hacker got what she needed, she disconnected the call, prompting Hendler to call back. When no one picked up the phone, he realized he had been conned.He immediately called his insurance company to check on his account. Nothing seemed out of place to the representative. But Hendler, who was previously a vice president of a software company, suspected something intangible could have been collected, so he reset his credentials."The chief of information security, who was on the call, he asked me, 'So, how do you want me to identify you? You gave your credentials; you gave your ID; you gave the one time password. How the hell can I identify that it's not you?' And I told him, 'But I never behave like this,'" Hendler recalled of the conversation.RevealSecurity, a Tel Aviv-based cyber startup that tracks user behavior for abnormalities, used this 27-page deck to raise its Series AA new data feed for bond tradingMark Lennihan/APFor years, the only way investors could figure out the going price of a corporate bond was calling up a dealer on the phone. The rise of electronic trading has streamlined that process, but data can still be hard to come by sometimes. A startup founded by a former Goldman Sachs exec has big plans to change that. BondCliQ is a fintech that provides a data feed of pre-trade pricing quotes for the corporate bond market. Founded by Chris White, the creator of Goldman Sachs' defunct corporate-bond-trading system, BondCliQ strives to bring transparency to a market that has traditionally kept such data close to the vest. Banks, which typically serve as the dealers of corporate bonds, have historically kept pre-trade quotes hidden from other dealers to maintain a competitive advantage.But tech advancements and the rise of electronic marketplaces have shifted power dynamics into the hands of buy-side firms, like hedge funds and asset managers. The investors are now able to get a fuller picture of the market by aggregating price quotes directly from dealers or via vendors.Here's the 9-page pitch deck that BondCliQ, a fintech looking to bring more data and transparency to bond trading, used to raise its Series AFraud prevention for lenders and insurersFiordaliso/Getty ImagesOnboarding new customers with ease is key for any financial institution or retailer. The more friction you add, the more likely consumers are to abandon the entire process.But preventing fraud is also a priority, and that's where Neuro-ID comes in. The startup analyzes what it calls "digital body language," or, the way users scroll, type, and tap. Using that data, Neuro-ID can identify fraudulent users before they create an account. It's built for banks, lenders, insurers, and e-commerce players."The train has left the station for digital transformation, but there's a massive opportunity to try to replicate all those communications that we used to have when we did business in-person, all those tells that we would get verbally and non-verbally on whether or not someone was trustworthy," Neuro-ID CEO Jack Alton told Insider.Founded in 2014, the startup's pitch is twofold: Neuro-ID can save companies money by identifying fraud early, and help increase user conversion by making the onboarding process more seamless. In December Neuro-ID closed a $7 million Series A, co-led by Fin VC and TTV Capital, with participation from Canapi Ventures. With 30 employees, Neuro-ID is using the fresh funding to grow its team and create additional tools to be more self-serving for customers.Here's the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that analyzes consumers' digital behavior to fight fraud used to raise a $7 million Series AAI-powered tools to spot phony online reviews FakespotMarketplaces like Amazon and eBay host millions of third-party sellers, and their algorithms will often boost items in search based on consumer sentiment, which is largely based on reviews. But many third-party sellers use fake reviews often bought from click farms to boost their items, some of which are counterfeit or misrepresented to consumers.That's where Fakespot comes in. With its Chrome extension, it warns users of sellers using potentially fake reviews to boost sales and can identify fraudulent sellers. Fakespot is currently compatible with Amazon, BestBuy, eBay, Sephora, Steam, and Walmart."There are promotional reviews written by humans and bot-generated reviews written by robots or review farms," Fakespot founder and CEO Saoud Khalifah told Insider. "Our AI system has been built to detect both categories with very high accuracy."Fakespot's AI learns via reviews data available on marketplace websites, and uses natural-language processing to identify if reviews are genuine. Fakespot also looks at things like whether the number of positive reviews are plausible given how long a seller has been active.Fakespot, a startup that helps shoppers detect robot-generated reviews and phony sellers on Amazon and Shopify, used this pitch deck to nab a $4 million Series AHelping fintechs manage dataProper Finance co-founders Travis Gibson (left) and Kyle MaloneyProper FinanceAs the flow of data becomes evermore crucial for fintechs, from the strappy startup to the established powerhouse, a thorny issue in the back office is becoming increasingly complex.Even though fintechs are known for their sleek front ends, the back end is often quite the opposite. Behind that streamlined interface can be a mosaic of different partner integrations — be it with banks, payments players and networks, or software vendors — with a channel of data running between them. Two people who know that better than the average are Kyle Maloney and Travis Gibson, two former employees of Marqeta, a fintech that provides other fintechs with payments processing and card issuance. "Take an established neobank for example. They'll likely have one or two card issuers, two to three bank partners, ACH processing for direct deposits and payouts, mobile check deposits, peer-to-peer payments, and lending," Gibson told Insider. Here's the 12-page pitch deck a startup helping fintechs manage their data used to score a $4.3 million seed from investors like Redpoint Ventures and Y CombinatorE-commerce focused business bankingMichael Rangel, cofounder and CEO, and Tyler McIntyre, cofounder and CTO of Novo.Kristelle Boulos PhotographyBusiness banking is a hot market in fintech. And it seems investors can't get enough.Novo, the digital banking fintech aimed at small e-commerce businesses, raised a $40.7 million Series A led by Valar Ventures in June. Since its launch in 2018, Novo has signed up 100,000 small businesses. Beyond bank accounts, it offers expense management, a corporate card, and integrates with e-commerce infrastructure players like Shopify, Stripe, and Wise.Founded in 2018, Novo was based in New York City, but has since moved its headquarters to Miami. Here's the 12-page pitch deck e-commerce banking startup Novo used to raise its $40 million Series AShopify for embedded financeProductfy CEO and founder, Duy VoProductfyProductfy is looking to break into embedded finance by becoming the Shopify of back-end banking services.Embedded finance — integrating banking services in non-financial settings — has taken hold in the e-commerce world. But Productfy is going after a different kind of customer in churches, universities, and nonprofits.The San Jose, Calif.-based upstart aims to help non-finance companies offer their own banking products. Productfy can help customers launch finance features in as little as a week and without additional engineering resources or background knowledge of banking compliance or legal requirements, Productfy founder and CEO Duy Vo told Insider. "You don't need an engineer to stand up Shopify, right? You can be someone who's just creating art and you can use Shopify to build your own online store," Vo said, adding that Productfy is looking to take that user experience and replicate it for banking services.Here's the 15-page pitch deck Productfy, a fintech looking to be the Shopify of embedded finance, used to nab a $16 million Series ADeploying algorithms and automation to small-business financingJustin Straight and Bernard Worthy, LoanWell co-foundersLoanWellBernard Worthy and Justin Straight, the founders of LoanWell, want to break down barriers to financing for small and medium-size businesses — and they've got algorithms and automation in their tech arsenals that they hope will do it.Worthy, the company's CEO, and Straight, its chief operating and financial officer, are powering community-focused lenders to fill a gap in the SMB financing world by boosting access to loans under $100,000. And the upstart is known for catching the attention, and dollars, of mission-driven investors. LoanWell closed a $3 million seed financing round in December led by Impact America Fund with participation from SoftBank's SB Opportunity Fund and Collab Capital.LoanWell automates the financing process — from underwriting and origination, to money movement and servicing — which shaves down an up-to-90-day process to 30 days or even same-day with some LoanWell lenders, Worthy said. SMBs rely on these loans to process quickly after two years of financial uncertainty. But the pandemic illustrated how time-consuming and expensive SMB financing can be, highlighted by efforts like the federal government's Paycheck Protection Program.Community banks, once the lifeline to capital for many local businesses, continue to shutter. And demands for smaller loan amounts remain largely unmet. More than half of business-loan applicants sought $100,000 or less, according to 2018 data from the Federal Reserve. But the average small-business bank loan was closer to six times that amount, according to the latest data from a now discontinued Federal Reserve survey.Here's the 14-page pitch deck LoanWell used to raise $3 million from investors like SoftBank.Branded cards for SMBsJennifer Glaspie-Lundstrom is the cofounder and CEO of Tandym.TandymJennifer Glaspie-Lundstrom is no stranger to the private-label credit-card business. As a former Capital One exec, she worked in both the card giant's co-brand partnerships division and its tech organization during her seven years at the company.Now, Glaspie-Lundstrom is hoping to use that experience to innovate a sector that was initially created in malls decades ago.Glaspie-Lundstrom is the cofounder and CEO of Tandym, which offers private-label digital credit cards to merchants. Store and private-label credit cards aren't a new concept, but Tandym is targeting small- and medium-sized merchants with less than $1 billion in annual revenue. Glaspie-Lundstrom said that group often struggles to offer private-label credit due to the expense of working with legacy players."What you have is this example of a very valuable product type that merchants love and their customers love, but a huge, untapped market that has heretofore been unserved, and so that's what we're doing with Tandym," Glaspi-Lundstrom told Insider.A former Capital One exec used this deck to raise $60 million for a startup helping SMBs launch their own branded credit cardsCatering to 'micro businesses'Stefanie Sample is the founder and CEO of FundidFundidStartups aiming to simplify the often-complex world of corporate cards have boomed in recent years.Business-finance management startup Brex was last valued at $12.3 billion after raising $300 million last year. Startup card provider Ramp announced an $8.1 billion valuation in March after growing its revenue nearly 10x in 2021. Divvy, a small business card provider, was acquired by Bill.com in May 2021 for approximately $2.5 billion.But despite how hot the market has gotten, Stefanie Sample said she ended up working in the space by accident. Sample is the founder and CEO of Fundid, a new fintech that provides credit and lending products to small businesses.This May, Fundid announced a $3.25 million seed round led by Nevcaut Ventures. Additional investors include the Artemis Fund and Builders and Backers. The funding announcement capped off the company's first year: Sample introduced the Fundid concept in April 2021, launched its website in May, and began raising capital in August."I never meant to do Fundid," Sample told Insider. "I never meant to do something that was venture-backed."Read the 12-page deck used by Fundid, a fintech offering credit and lending tools for 'micro businesses'Embedded payments for SMBsThe Highnote teamHighnoteBranded cards have long been a way for merchants with the appropriate bank relationships to create additional revenue and build customer loyalty. The rise of embedded payments, or the ability to shop and pay in a seamless experience within a single app, has broadened the number of companies looking to launch branded cards.Highnote is a startup that helps small to mid-sized merchants roll out their own debit and pre-paid digital cards. The fintech emerged from stealth on Tuesday to announce it raised $54 million in seed and Series A funding.Here's the 12-page deck Highnote, a startup helping SMBs embed payments, used to raise $54 million in seed and Series A fundingSpeeding up loans for government contractors OppZo cofounders Warren Reed and Randy GarrettOppZoThe massive market for federal government contracts approached $700 billion in 2020, and it's likely to grow as spending accelerates amid an ongoing push for investment in the nation's infrastructure. Many of those dollars flow to small-and-medium sized businesses, even though larger corporations are awarded the bulk of contracts by volume. Of the roughly $680 billion in federal contracts awarded in 2020, roughly a quarter, according to federal guidelines, or some $146 billion that year, went to smaller businesses.But peeking under the hood of the procurement process, the cofounders of OppZo — Randy Garrett and Warren Reed — saw an opportunity to streamline how smaller-sized businesses can leverage those contracts to tap in to capital.  Securing a deal is "a government contractor's best day and their worst day," as Garrett, OppZo's president, likes to put it."At that point they need to pay vendors and hire folks to start the contract. And they may not get their first contract payment from the government for as long as 120 days," Reed, the startup's CEO,  told Insider. Check out the 12-page pitch deck OppZo, a fintech that has figured out how to speed up loans to small government contractors, used to raise $260 million in equity and debtHelping small businesses manage their taxesComplYant's founder Shiloh Jackson wants to help people be present in their bookkeeping.ComplYantAfter 14 years in tax accounting, Shiloh Johnson had formed a core philosophy around corporate accounting: everyone deserves to understand their business's money and business owners need to be present in their bookkeeping process.She wanted to help small businesses understand "this is why you need to do what you're doing and why you have to change the way you think about tax and be present in your bookkeeping process," she told Insider. The Los Angeles native wanted small businesses to not only understand business tax no matter their size but also to find the tools they needed to prepare their taxes in one spot. So Johnson developed a software platform that provides just that.The 13-page pitch deck ComplYant used to nab $4 million that details the tax startup's plan to be Turbotax, Quickbooks, and Xero rolled into one for small business ownersAutomating accounting ops for SMBsDecimal CEO Matt Tait.DecimalSmall- and medium-sized businesses can rely on any number of payroll, expense management, bill pay, and corporate-card startups promising to automate parts of their financial workflow. Smaller firms have adopted this corporate-financial software en masse, boosting growth throughout the pandemic for relatively new entrants like Ramp and massive, industry stalwarts like Intuit. But it's no easy task to connect all of those tools into one, seamless process. And while accounting operations might be far from where many startup founders want to focus their time, having efficient back-end finances does mean time — and capital — freed up to spend elsewhere. For Decimal CEO Matt Tait, there's ample opportunity in "the boring stuff you have to do to survive as a company," he told Insider. Launched in 2020, Decimal provides a back-end tech layer that small- and medium-sized businesses can use to integrate their accounting and business-management software tools in one place.On Wednesday, Decimal announced a $9 million seed fundraising round led by Minneapolis-based Arthur Ventures, alongside Service Providers Capital and other angel investors. See the 13-page pitch deck for Decimal, a startup automating accounting ops for small businessesInvoice financing for SMBsStacey Abrams and Lara Hodgson, Now co-foundersNowAbout a decade ago, politician Stacey Abrams and entrepreneur Lara Hodgson were forced to fold their startup because of a kink in the supply chain — but not in the traditional sense.Nourish, which made spill-proof bottled water for children, had grown quickly from selling to small retailers to national ones. And while that may sound like a feather in the small business' cap, there was a hang-up."It was taking longer and longer to get paid, and as you can imagine, you deliver the product and then you wait and you wait, but meanwhile you have to pay your employees and you have to pay your vendors," Hodgson told Insider. "Waiting to get paid was constraining our ability to grow."While it's not unusual for small businesses to grapple with working capital issues, the dust was still settling from the Great Recession. Abrams and Hodgson couldn't secure a line of credit or use financing tools like factoring to solve their problem. The two entrepreneurs were forced to close Nourish in 2012, but along the way they recognized a disconnect in the system.  "Why are we the ones borrowing money, when in fact we're the lender here because every time you send an invoice to a customer, you've essentially extended a free loan to that customer by letting them pay later," Hodgson said. "And the only reason why we were going to need to possibly borrow money was because we had just given ours away for free to Whole Foods," she added.Check out the 7-page deck that Now, Stacey Abrams' fintech that wants to help small businesses 'grow fearlessly', used to raise $29 millionCheckout made easyRyan Breslow.Ryan BreslowAmazon has long dominated e-commerce with its one-click checkout flows, offering easier ways for consumers to shop online than its small-business competitors.Bolt gives small merchants tools to offer the same easy checkouts so they can compete with the likes of Amazon.The startup raised its $393 million Series D to continue adding its one-click checkout feature to merchants' own websites in October.Bolt markets to merchants themselves. But a big part of Bolt's pitch is its growing network of consumers — currently over 5.6 million — that use its features across multiple Bolt merchant customers. Roughly 5% of Bolt's transactions were network-driven in May, meaning users that signed up for a Bolt account on another retailer's website used it elsewhere. The network effects were even more pronounced in verticals like furniture, where 49% of transactions were driven by the Bolt network."The network effect is now unleashed with Bolt in full fury, and that triggered the raise," Bolt's founder and CEO Ryan Breslow told Insider.Here's the 12-page deck that one-click checkout Bolt used to outline its network of 5.6 million consumers and raise its Series DPayments infrastructure for fintechsQolo CEO and co-founder Patricia MontesiQoloThree years ago, Patricia Montesi realized there was a disconnect in the payments world. "A lot of new economy companies or fintech companies were looking to mesh up a lot of payment modalities that they weren't able to," Montesi, CEO and co-founder of Qolo, told Insider.Integrating various payment capabilities often meant tapping several different providers that had specializations in one product or service, she added, like debit card issuance or cross-border payments. "The way people were getting around that was that they were creating this spider web of fintech," she said, adding that "at the end of it all, they had this mess of suppliers and integrations and bank accounts."The 20-year payments veteran rounded up a group of three other co-founders — who together had more than a century of combined industry experience — to start Qolo, a business-to-business fintech that sought out to bundle back-end payment rails for other fintechs.Here's the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that provides payments infrastructure for other fintechs used to raise a $15 million Series ABetter use of payroll dataAtomic's Head of Markets, Lindsay DavisAtomicEmployees at companies large and small know the importance — and limitations — of how firms manage their payrolls. A new crop of startups are building the API pipes that connect companies and their employees to offer a greater level of visibility and flexibility when it comes to payroll data and employee verification. On Thursday, one of those names, Atomic, announced a $40 million Series B fundraising round co-led by Mercato Partners and Greylock, alongside Core Innovation Capital, Portage, and ATX Capital. The round follows Atomic's Series A round announced in October, when the startup raised a $22 million Series A from investors including Core Innovation Capital, Portage, and Greylock.Payroll startup Atomic just raised a $40 million Series B. Here's an internal deck detailing the fintech's approach to the red-hot payments space.Saving on vendor invoicesHoward Katzenberg, Glean's CEO and cofounderGleanWhen it comes to high-flying tech startups, headlines and investors typically tend to focus on industry "disruption" and the total addressable market a company is hoping to reach. Expense cutting as a way to boost growth typically isn't part of the conversation early on, and finance teams are viewed as cost centers relative to sales teams. But one fast-growing area of business payments has turned its focus to managing those costs. Startups like Ramp and established names like Bill.com have made their name offering automated expense-management systems. Now, one new fintech competitor, Glean, is looking to take that further by offering both automated payment services and tailored line-item accounts-payable insights driven by machine-learning models. Glean's CFO and founder, Howard Katzenberg, told Insider that the genesis of Glean was driven by his own personal experience managing the finance teams of startups, including mortgage lender Better.com, which Katzenberg left in 2019, and online small-business lender OnDeck. "As a CFO of high-growth companies, I spent a lot of time focused on revenue and I had amazing dashboards in real time where I could see what is going on top of the funnel, what's going on with conversion rates, what's going on in terms of pricing and attrition," Katzenberg told Insider. See the 15-slide pitch deck Glean, a startup using machine learning to find savings in vendor invoices, used to raise $10.8 million in seed fundingReal-estate management made easyAgora founders Noam Kahan, CTO, Bar Mor, CEO, and Lior Dolinski, CPOAgoraFor alternative asset managers of any type, the operations underpinning sales and investor communications are a crucial but often overlooked part of the business. Fund managers love to make bets on markets, not coordinate hundreds of wire transfers to clients each quarter or organize customer-relationship-management databases.Within the $10.6 trillion global market for professionally managed real-estate investing, that's where Tel Aviv and New York-based startup Agora hopes to make its mark.Founded in 2019, Agora offers a set of back-office, investor relations, and sales software tools that real-estate investment managers can plug into their workflows. On Wednesday, Agora announced a $9 million seed round, led by Israel-based venture firm Aleph, with participation from River Park Ventures and Maccabee Ventures. The funding comes on the heels of an October 2020 pre-seed fund raise worth $890,000, in which Maccabee also participated.Here's the 15-slide pitch deck that Agora, a startup helping real-estate investors manage communications and sales with their clients, used to raise a $9 million seed roundAccess to commercial real-estate investing LEX Markets cofounders and co-CEOs Drew Sterrett and Jesse Daugherty.LEX MarketsDrew Sterrett was structuring real-estate deals while working in private equity when he realized the inefficiencies that existed in the market. Only high-net worth individuals or accredited investors could participate in commercial real-estate deals. If they ever wanted to leave a partnership or sell their stake in a property, it was difficult to find another investor to replace them. Owners also struggled to sell minority stakes in their properties and didn't have many good options to recapitalize an asset if necessary.In short, the market had a high barrier to entry despite the fact it didn't always have enough participants to get deals done quickly. "Most investors don't have access to high-quality commercial real-estate investments. How do we have the oldest and largest asset class in the world and one of the largest wealth creators with no public and liquid market?" Sterrett told Insider. "It sort of seems like a no-brainer, and that this should have existed 50 or 60 years ago."This 15-page pitch deck helped LEX Markets, a startup making investing in commercial real estate more accessible, raise $15 millionInsurance goes digitalJamie Hale, CEO and cofounder of LadderLadderFintechs looking to transform how insurance policies are underwritten, issued, and experienced by customers have grown as new technology driven by digital trends and artificial intelligence shape the market. And while verticals like auto, homeowner's, and renter's insurance have seen their fair share of innovation from forward-thinking fintechs, one company has taken on the massive life-insurance market. Founded in 2017, Ladder uses a tech-driven approach to offer life insurance with a digital, end-to-end service that it says is more flexible, faster, and cost-effective than incumbent players.Life, annuity, and accident and health insurance within the US comprise a big chunk of the broader market. In 2020, premiums written on those policies totaled some $767 billion, compared to $144 billion for auto policies and $97 billion for homeowner's insurance.Here's the 12-page deck that Ladder, a startup disrupting the 'crown jewel' of the insurance market, used to nab $100 millionData science for commercial insuranceTanner Hackett, founder and CEO of CounterpartCounterpartThere's been no shortage of funds flowing into insurance-technology companies over the past few years. Private-market funding to insurtechs soared to $15.4 billion in 2021, a 90% increase compared to 2020. Some of the most well-known consumer insurtech names — from Oscar (which focuses on health insurance) to Metromile (which focuses on auto) — launched on the public markets last year, only to fall over time or be acquired as investors questioned the sustainability of their business models. In the commercial arena, however, the head of one insurtech company thinks there is still room to grow — especially for those catering to small businesses operating in an entirely new, pandemic-defined environment. "The bigger opportunity is in commercial lines," Tanner Hackett, the CEO of management liability insurer Counterpart, told Insider."Everywhere I poke, I'm like, 'Oh my goodness, we're still in 1.0, and all the other businesses I've built were on version three.' Insurance is still in 1.0, still managing from spreadsheets and PDFs," added Hackett, who also previously co-founded Button, which focuses on mobile marketing. See the 8-page pitch deck Counterpart, a startup disrupting commercial insurance with data science, used to raise a $30 million Series BSmarter insurance for multifamily propertiesItai Ben-Zaken, cofounder and CEO of Honeycomb.HoneycombA veteran of the online-insurance world is looking to revolutionize the way the industry prices risk for commercial properties with the help of artificial intelligence.Insurance companies typically send inspectors to properties before issuing policies to better understand how the building is maintained and identify potential risks or issues with it. It's a process that can be time-consuming, expensive, and inefficient, making it hard to justify for smaller commercial properties, like apartment and condo buildings.Insurtech Honeycomb is looking to fix that by using AI to analyze a combination of third-party data and photos submitted by customers through the startup's app to quickly identify any potential risks at a property and more accurately price policies."That whole physical inspection thing had really good things in it, but it wasn't really something that is scalable and, it's also expensive," Itai Ben-Zaken, Honeycomb's cofounder and CEO, told Insider. "The best way to see a property right now is Google street view. Google street view is usually two years old."Here's the 10-page Series A pitch deck used by Honeycomb, a startup that wants to revolutionize the $26 billion market for multifamily property insuranceHelping freelancers with their taxesJaideep Singh is the CEO and co-founder of FlyFin, an AI-driven tax preparation software program for freelancers.FlyFinSome people, particularly those with families or freelancing businesses, spend days searching for receipts for tax season, making tax preparation a time consuming and, at times, taxing experience. That's why in 2020 Jaideep Singh founded FlyFin, an artificial-intelligence tax preparation program for freelancers that helps people, as he puts it, "fly through their finances." FlyFin is set up to connect to a person's bank accounts, allowing the AI program to help users monitor for certain expenses that can be claimed on their taxes like business expenditures, the interest on mortgages, property taxes, or whatever else that might apply. "For most individuals, people have expenses distributed over multiple financial institutions. So we built an AI platform that is able to look at expenses, understand the individual, understand your profession, understand the freelance population at large, and start the categorization," Singh told Insider.Check out the 7-page pitch deck a startup helping freelancers manage their taxes used to nab $8 million in fundingDigital banking for freelancersJGalione/Getty ImagesLance is a new digital bank hoping to simplify the life of those workers by offering what it calls an "active" approach to business banking. "We found that every time we sat down with the existing tools and resources of our accountants and QuickBooks and spreadsheets, we just ended up getting tangled up in the whole experience of it," Lance cofounder and CEO Oona Rokyta told Insider. Lance offers subaccounts for personal salaries, withholdings, and savings to which freelancers can automatically allocate funds according to custom preset levels. It also offers an expense balance that's connected to automated tax withholdings.In May, Lance announced the closing of a $2.8 million seed round that saw participation from Barclays, BDMI, Great Oaks Capital, Imagination Capital, Techstars, DFJ Frontier, and others.Here's the 21-page pitch deck Lance, a digital bank for freelancers, used to raise a $2.8 million seed round from investors including BarclaysSoftware for managing freelancersWorksome cofounder and CEO Morten Petersen.WorksomeThe way people work has fundamentally changed over the past year, with more flexibility and many workers opting to freelance to maintain their work-from-home lifestyles.But managing a freelance or contractor workforce is often an administrative headache for employers. Worksome is a startup looking to eliminate all the extra work required for employers to adapt to more flexible working norms.Worksome started as a freelancer marketplace automating the process of matching qualified workers with the right jobs. But the team ultimately pivoted to a full suite of workforce management software, automating administrative burdens required to hire, pay, and account for contract workers.In May, Worksome closed a $13 million Series A backed by European angel investor Tommy Ahlers and Danish firm Lind & Risør.Here's the 21-slide pitch deck used by a startup that helps firms like Carlsberg and Deloitte manage freelancersPayments and operations support HoneyBook cofounders Dror Shimoni, Oz Alon, and Naama Alon.HoneyBookWhile countless small businesses have been harmed by the pandemic, self-employment and entrepreneurship have found ways to blossom as Americans started new ventures.Half of the US population may be freelance by 2027, according to a study commissioned by remote-work hiring platform Upwork. HoneyBook, a fintech startup that provides payment and operations support for freelancers, in May raised $155 million in funding and achieved unicorn status with its $1 billion-plus valuation.Durable Capital Partners led the Series D funding with other new investors including renowned hedge fund Tiger Global, Battery Ventures, Zeev Ventures, and 01 Advisors. Citi Ventures, Citigroup's startup investment arm that also backs fintech robo-advisor Betterment, participated as an existing investor in the round alongside Norwest Venture partners. The latest round brings the company's fundraising total to $227 million to date.Here's the 21-page pitch deck a Citi-backed fintech for freelancers used to raise $155 million from investors like hedge fund Tiger GlobalPay-as-you-go compliance for banks, fintechs, and crypto startupsNeepa Patel, Themis' founder and CEOThemisWhen Themis founder and CEO Neepa Patel set out to build a new compliance tool for banks, fintech startups, and crypto companies, she tapped into her own experience managing risk at some of the nation's biggest financial firms. Having worked as a bank regulator at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and in compliance at Morgan Stanley, Deutsche Bank, and the enterprise blockchain company R3, Patel was well-placed to assess the shortcomings in financial compliance software. But Patel, who left the corporate world to begin work on Themis in 2020, drew on more than just her own experience and frustrations to build the startup."It's not just me building a tool based on my personal pain points. I reached out to regulators. I reached out to bank compliance officers and members in the fintech community just to make sure that we're building it exactly how they do their work," Patel told Insider. "That was the biggest problem: No one built a tool that was reflective of how people do their work."Check out the 9-page pitch deck Themis, which offers pay-as-you-go compliance for banks, fintechs, and crypto startups, used to raise $9 million in seed fundingConnecting startups and investorsHum Capital cofounder and CEO Blair SilverbergHum CapitalBlair Silverberg is no stranger to fundraising.For six years, Silverberg was a venture capitalist at Draper Fisher Jurvetson and Private Credit Investments making bets on startups."I was meeting with thousands of founders in person each year, watching them one at a time go through this friction where they're meeting a ton of investors, and the investors are all asking the same questions," Silverberg told Insider. He switched gears about three years ago, moving to the opposite side of the metaphorical table, to start Hum Capital, which uses artificial intelligence to match investors with startups looking to fundraise.On August 31, the New York-based fintech announced its $9 million Series A. The round was led by Future Ventures with participation from Webb Investment Network, Wavemaker Partners, and Partech. This 11-page pitch deck helped Hum Capital, a fintech using AI to match investors with startups, raise a $9 million Series A.Helping LatAm startups get up to speedKamino cofounders Gut Fragoso, Rodrigo Perenha, Benjamin Gleason, and Gonzalo ParejoKaminoThere's more venture capital flowing into Latin America than ever before, but getting the funds in founders' hands is not exactly a simple process.In 2021, investors funneled $15.3 billion into Latin American companies, more than tripling the previous record of $4.9 billion in 2019. Fintech and e-commerce sectors drove funding, accounting for 39% and 25% of total funding, respectively.  However, for many startup founders in the region who have successfully sold their ideas and gotten investors on board, there's a patchwork of corporate structuring that's needed to access the funds, according to Benjamin Gleason, who was the chief financial officer at Groupon LatAm prior to cofounding Brazil-based fintech Kamino.It's a process Gleason and his three fellow Kamino cofounders have been through before as entrepreneurs and startup execs themselves. Most often, startups have to set up offshore financial accounts outside of Brazil, which "entails creating a Cayman [Islands] holding company, a Delaware LLC, and then connecting it to a local entity here and also opening US bank accounts for the Cayman entity, which is not trivial from a KYC perspective," said Gleason, who founded open-banking fintech Guiabolso in Sao Paulo. His partner, Gonzalo Parejo, experienced the same toils when he founded insurtech Bidu."Pretty much any international investor will usually ask for that," Gleason said, adding that investors typically cite liability issues."It's just a massive amount of bureaucracy, complexity, a lot of time from the founders. All of this just to get the money from the investor that wants to give them the money," he added.Here's the 8-page pitch deck Kamino, a fintech helping LatAm startups with everything from financing to corporate credit cards, used to raise a $6.1M pre-seed roundThe back-end tech for beautyDanielle Cohen-Shohet, CEO and founder of GlossGeniusGlossGeniusDanielle Cohen-Shohet might have started as a Goldman Sachs investment analyst, but at her core she was always a coder.After about three years at Goldman Sachs, Cohen-Shohet left the world of traditional finance to code her way into starting her own company in 2016. "There was a period of time where I did nothing, but eat, sleep, and code for a few weeks," Cohen-Shohet told Insider. Her technical edge and knowledge of the point-of-sale payment space led her to launch a software company focused on providing behind-the-scenes tech for beauty and wellness small businesses.Cohen-Shohet launched GlossGenius in 2017 to provide payments tech for hair stylists, nail technicians, blow-out bars, and other small businesses in the space.Here's the 11-page deck GlossGenius, a startup that provides back-end tech for the beauty industry, used to raise $16 millionRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 30th, 2022

How Netflix, Hollywood"s most innovative disruptor, is facing disruption with layoffs, streaming competition, and subscriber loss

Since Netflix began making original shows in 2013, the streaming giant has upended show business with its ambitious innovation. Now it's being disrupted by competitors like Disney+, has lost subscribers, and is making layoffs. Netflix.SOPA Images/Getty Images. Netflix has been disrupting the business of Hollywood since the streamer started making original shows in 2013. But now Netflix is being disrupted by increased competition, a stock price plunge, and subscriber loss.  The streamer has reined in spending and laid off hundreds of employees across divisions. Netflix, the disruptive streaming company whose innovative strategy and meteoric growth remade the entertainment industry, is facing some challenges of its own. After it lost subscribers for the first time ever earlier in 2022, the company's stock price tumbled. Though Longtime Netflix bears like Wedbush analyst Michael Pachter were somewhat vindicated by this development, its impact has rippled through the company. Layoffs hit employees through the spring — first, at Netflix fan site Tudum, then in two additional rounds that affected hundreds of employees and full-time contractors.With Disney reporting stronger results, including subscriber growth in its first quarter, Netflix has found itself on the back foot — and its troubles have sent shock waves through Hollywood's creative community. Writers, producers, agents, and more stakeholders spoke to Insider about concerns that the company might reduce its creative ambitions, production budgets, and content spend along with its workforce.Read more about Hollywood insiders fears that Netflix's golden creative age is over after explosive growth created 'a quality control issue'SUBHEDBut Netflix moved quickly to reset the perception that its dominant position in Hollywood was at risk. In addition to announcing plans for an ad-supported tier, set to launch later in 2022, the company also began work to develop live streaming capabilities. Read more about who Netflix might hire to run its advertising businessNetflix even made a play for the US rights to Formula 1 racing, the streamer's first foray into live sports (Disney's ESPN eventually won the bid).In May, Netflix launched one of its most ambitious live event yet, a massive comedy festival that featured performers from Dave Chappelle to Amy Schumer in venues across Los Angeles — it was a massive logistical undertaking that served to promote the Netflix brand and also highlight the streamer as a supportive creative home for top comedians, even controversial ones. Read more about how Netflix staged its massive 11-day comedy festival with more than 300 starsThe company also published a new update to its famous culture memo, affirming its commitment to both representation anD artists' freedom of expression — principles that could occasionally come into conflict, according to one expert. "Sometimes content can harm individuals and communities," said Y-Vonne Hutchinson, cofounder and CEO of ReadySet, a boutique consulting firm focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion.Read more about how Netflix's overhauled culture memo could create conflict at the companyAs competition for streaming subscribers has intensified, Netflix has also broadened its appetite when it comes to new shows. Insider reviewed internal Hollywood agency documents that revealed some series on the streamer's 2022 wishlist: a female "Jack Ryan," its own version of "New Girl," and an "American Idol"-style reality competition.Read more about what Netflix is looking for in its next series, according to leaked agency documentsAt Netflix, disruption starts with its contentIt was just a decade ago that Netflix released its first original series, Norwegian mob drama "Lilyhammer," but in that time the streamer has challenged the entertainment industry with its global approach to making, marketing, and distributing content.Netflix, which started as a DVD-by-mail business, is now the global leader in subscription streaming entertainment, ending 2021 with 222 million paid members. The company's success in streaming has pushed legacy media businesses including Disney, Warner Bros. Discovery, and NBCUniversal to pursue direct-to-consumer strategies of their own. And Netflix hasn't stopped there, in recent years expanding its domain to include publishing, live events, gaming, and other adjacent businesses. Read more about how Netflix's video-game strategy is starting to take shapeWith its headquarters in Los Gatos, California, Netflix has always been product- and data-driven. This has kept it steps ahead of the rest of Hollywood when it comes to creating consumer-facing experiences. For example, after years of offering almost no data about its viewership, Netflix unveiled a list of the platform's most popular shows and movies in the US and around the world. In 2021, Netflix went a step further and introduced a Top 10 website to share information about its most-viewed titles. Though what's offered is only a piece of the full picture about how people consume content on the platform, the site unveils more data than any other streamer provides. Read more about why new viewership data gives Netflix an advantage over Disney+ and other players in the streaming wars How Netflix first disrupted the TV screen and moved into merch and moreWhen Netflix first arrived in Hollywood, its rivals valued it as a platform for their long-forgotten back catalog shows and movies. The checks Netflix wrote for library titles in those early days helped prop up revenue at the studios. But soon it became clear that the company's appetite for content would encompass more than just licensed programming. The streamer launched original programming with a focus on prestige projects from high-profile creatives — series like "House of Cards" and "Orange Is the New Black" came to define its early slate of originals. But over the years, Netflix has systematically moved to conquer each major genre, from documentaries to standup specials to reality TV to YA programming. Netflix's first reality show launched in 2017 — "Ultimate Beastmaster" was a global competition series in the vein of "American Ninja Warrior" that put contestants on complicated, flashy obstacle courses shaped like a literal beast. Netflix has since minted reality hits from "Love Is Blind" to "Selling Sunset."Check out the pitch deck that sold Netflix on "Ultimate Beastmaster," the streamer's first reality showThe company also made a big investment in original programming for kids, in a bid to create loyal viewers and potentially reduce subscriber churn. But like its competitor Disney, Netflix is increasingly leaning into existing IP for its kids shows. "A real hit in the kids space needs a lot of years to build an audience. It needs like 5, 6, 7 seasons to really get its sea legs and then be able to sell backpacks at Walmart," said Cyma Zarghami, the former president of Nickelodeon who now runs kids-focused media company MiMo Studios. Read more about how Netflix and other streamers are fighting to find the next 'CoComelon' amid a streaming war for kids contentToday, the streamer makes and distributes hundreds of original titles each year, minting global hits out of shows including "Stranger Things" and "Bridgerton" and movies from "Red Notice" to "Don't Look Up." Netflix has also upended the notion that international programming doesn't resonate with US audiences, turning South Korean thriller "Squid Game" and Spanish drama "Money Heist" into two of its most-watched shows. Read more about the reasons 'Squid Game' became a global phenomenon, according to a Netflix marketing execNetflix has been able to ramp up international production because it kept tabs on global content trends for years. After slowly moving into a few markets outside the US, the company in 2016 launched a large-scale expansion, making its service available in 130 countries all at once. It now operates in every country except China, North Korea, Russia, and Syria.Read more about how Netflix's 'Squid Game' is part of a robust international TV strategy that's far ahead of rivals, especially in South KoreaIn September 2020, Netflix — which is led by co-CEOs Reed Hastings and Ted Sarandos — promoted longtime entertainment executive Bela Bajaria to the role of global head of TV. She had previously overseen the company's local-language originals and her promotion, which led to the departure of Netflix veteran Cindy Holland, signaled that the company would prioritize international programming going forward. Now, all of Netflix's rivals — including Disney+ and HBO Max — are increasing their global programming efforts. View our full interactive chart of Netflix's top leaders Netflix is expanding into publishing, events, and other consumer businessesAs Netflix's constellation of original IP grows, the company has been looking for new ways to boost fandom around the world, including with large-scale live events like Tudum, which streamed for fans globally in September 2021, and the more selective The Queen's Ball: A Bridgerton Experience, which is touring the US and Canada. Read more about how 'Bridgerton' live events boost a broader strategy to retain subscribers and build fandomsNetflix's first attempt at adapting its IP for the physical world was through merchandise. It now sells "Stranger Things" cassette players and "Squid Game" track suits at Walmart in just another example of how it's looking to create touchpoints with fans. Read more about Netflix's partnership with Walmart to sell 'Squid Game,' 'Stranger Things,' and 'Ada Twist' merchNetflix also has moved aggressively into publishing, hiring former Condé Nast employees to create fandom site Tudum, which releases news about upcoming Netflix titles and interviews with stars. Read more about how Netflix hired Condé Nast and Time Inc. journalists to build a 'fandom engine' to market its showsWith Tudum, Netflix is now competing directly with fan sites like Whats-on-Netflix.com, which obsessively tracks the comings and goings of programming on the service. The streamer also is going up against children's publications like Highlights with Netflix Jr. magazine, which it will ship to the homes of viewers with young children. And it's tackling Hollywood trade publications like Variety and The Hollywood Reporter with Queue, which is edited by Vanity Fair alum Krista Smith and pushes awards contenders with photos and profiles. Read more about the 'Netflix stan' who runs the website What's on NetflixAwards is an area where Netflix has made a particularly sizable investment. Though its studio rivals also spend lavishly to give their films and TV shows the best shot at nabbing Oscars and Emmys, Netflix has gone a step further. It owns highly visible billboards around Los Angeles and hosts premieres at the theaters it purchased there and in New York.That Apple TV+ beat Netflix to become the first streamer to nab the best picture Oscar — with its 2022 win for "CODA" —  is a signal of how much Netflix is still seen as an interloper by many in Hollywood.  Read more about how Netflix built Hollywood's noisiest awards operation in its quest for the best picture OscarRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 29th, 2022

"Stranger Things" season 4 returns with its final 2 episodes on July 1 &mdash; here"s how to watch the hit sci-fi series

The first seven episodes of "Stranger Things" season four are now available, and the remaining two episodes debut on Netflix on July 1. When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more."Stranger Things."Netflix The final two episodes of "Stranger Things" season four premiere on July 1. You can catch up on the season's first seven episodes right now. Netflix starts at $10/month and goes up to $20/month for 4K streaming. Volume two of "Stranger Things" season four hits Netflix on July 1. The second volume consists of the season's final two episodes, including a feature-length finale that's over two hours long.Season four is set six months after the conclusion of season three, and finds the show's core group of friends separated as they start high school. When a new supernatural threat makes itself known, the gang discovers they may finally be able to put an end to the horrors of the Upside Down for good. Check out the trailer for 'Stranger Things' season 4, volume 2Stars David Harbour, Winona Ryder, Millie Bobby Brown, Finn Wolfhard, Noah Schnapp, Gaten Matarazzo, and Caleb McLaughlin all return for the show's fourth season. "Stranger Things" has consistently earned critical acclaim since its premiere in 2016, and season four currently holds a "89% Fresh" rating on review-aggregation site Rotten Tomatoes. How to watch 'Stranger Things' season 4You can watch "Stranger Things" season four exclusively on Netflix. The first seven episodes premiered on May 27, and the final two episodes premiere on July 1. The first three seasons of "Stranger Things" are also included as part of a Netflix subscription. Netflix's Basic plan starts at $10/month for standard definition streaming on one screen at a time. The Standard plan costs $15.49/month for two screens at a time in high definition. For the best quality, we recommend opting for Netflix's Premium plan. This tier costs $20/month and offers support for 4K streaming and up to four screens at once. You can watch Netflix's app on most connected devices, including media players like Roku, Apple TV, Fire TV, and Chromecast, as well as Android and Apple phones, and most smart TVs. How to watch the 'Stranger Things 4' Netflix watch party premiereNetflix and Scener are hosting a watch party event for the final two episodes of "Stranger Things" season four. The interactive experience kicks off at 11:15 p.m. PT on June 30.Cast members David Harbour, Brett Gelman, Joe Quinn, and Jamie Campbell Bower will be answering questions from fans during a live Q&A before the virtual screening begins at 12 a.m. PT. You can sign up for the watch party through the event's website. To join the watch party, you'll need to download the Scener web browser extention and have active Scener and Netflix accounts. When is 'Stranger Things' season 4 coming out? Season four of "Stranger Things" is being released in two parts. The first part premiered on May 27. Volume two will be released on July 1.How many episodes are in 'Stranger Things' season 4? "Stranger Things" season four consists of nine new episodes. Seven episodes are currently available to stream, while the final two will debut on July 1. The show's creators confirmed that the split release is due to the season's runtime being double that of a typical season. How long are episodes in 'Stranger Things' season 4?"Stranger Things" season four features longer episodes than previous seasons, with every installment clocking in at over one hour.Here are the final episode runtimes for 'Stranger Things' season 4:Volume oneChapter One: The Hellfire Club — one hour, 16 minutesChapter Two: Vecna's Curse — one hour, 15 minutesChapter Three: The Monster and the Superhero — one hour, three minutesChapter Four: Dear Billy — one hour, 17 minutesChapter Five: The Nina Project — one hour, 14 minutesChapter Six: The Dive — one hour, 13 minutesChapter Seven: The Massacre at Hawkins Lab — one hour, 38 minutesVolume twoChapter Eight: Papa — one hour, 25 minutesChapter Nine: The Piggyback — two hours, 19 minutesWhat time do new episodes of 'Stranger Things' premiere?The final two episodes of "Stranger Things" season four will premiere at 12 a.m. PT/3 a.m. ET on July 1.Has 'Stranger Things' been renewed for a fifth season? A still from "Stranger Things" season four.NetflixIn February 2022, "Stranger Things" creators the Duffer Brothers announced that Netflix greenlit a fifth season of the show. It was also announced that the fifth season will serve as the show's last.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 29th, 2022

These 44 pitch decks helped fintechs disrupting trading, investing, and banking raise millions in funding

Looking for examples of real fintech pitch decks? Check out pitch decks that Qolo, Lance, and other startups used to raise money from VCs. Check out these pitch decks for examples of fintech founders sold their vision.Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech.  Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders sold their vision. See more stories on Insider's business page. Fintech funding has been on a tear.In 2021, fintech funding hit a record $132 billion globally, according to CB Insights, more than double 2020's mark.Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech. Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders are selling their vision and nabbing big bucks in the process. You'll see new financial tech geared at freelancers, fresh twists on digital banking, and innovation aimed at streamlining customer onboarding. New twists on digital bankingZach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradleyHMBradleyConsumers are getting used to the idea of branch-less banking, a trend that startup digital-only banks like Chime, N26, and Varo have benefited from. The majority of these fintechs target those who are underbanked, and rely on usage of their debit cards to make money off interchange. But fellow startup HMBradley has a different business model. "Our thesis going in was that we don't swipe our debit cards all that often, and we don't think the customer base that we're focusing on does either," Zach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradley, told Insider. "A lot of our customer base uses credit cards on a daily basis."Instead, the startup is aiming to build clientele with stable deposits. As a result, the bank is offering interest-rate tiers depending on how much a customer saves of their direct deposit.Notably, the rate tiers are dependent on the percentage of savings, not the net amount. "We'll pay you more when you save more of what comes in," Bruhnke said. "We didn't want to segment customers by how much money they had. So it was always going to be about a percentage of income. That was really important to us."Check out the 14-page pitch deck fintech HMBradley, a neobank offering interest rates as high as 3%, used to raise an $18.25 million Series APersonal finance is only a text awayYinon Ravid, the chief executive and cofounder of Albert.AlbertThe COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the growing preference of mobile banking as customers get comfortable managing their finances online.The financial app Albert has seen a similar jump in activity. Currently counting more than six million members, deposits in Albert's savings offering doubled from the start of the pandemic in March 2020 to May of this year, from $350 million to $700 million, according to new numbers released by the company. Founded in 2015, Albert offers automated budgeting and savings tools alongside guided investment portfolios. It's looked to differentiate itself through personalized features, like the ability for customers to text human financial experts.Budgeting and saving features are free on Albert. But for more tailored financial advice, customers pay a subscription fee that's a pay-what-you-can model, between $4 and $14 a month. And Albert's now banking on a new tool to bring together its investing, savings, and budgeting tools.Fintech Albert used this 10-page pitch deck to raise a $100 million Series C from General Atlantic and CapitalG 'A bank for immigrants'Priyank Singh and Rohit Mittal are the cofounders of Stilt.StiltRohit Mittal remembers the difficulties he faced when he first arrived in the United States a decade ago as a master's student at Columbia University.As an immigrant from India, Mittal had no credit score in the US and had difficulty integrating into the financial system. Mittal even struggled to get approved to rent an apartment and couch-surfed until he found a roommate willing to offer him space in his apartment in the New York neighborhood Morningside Heights.That roommate was Priyank Singh, who would go on to become Mittal's cofounder when the two started Stilt, a financial-technology company designed to address the problems Mittal faced when he arrived in the US.Stilt, which calls itself "a bank for immigrants," does not require a social security number or credit history to access its offerings, including unsecured personal loans.Instead of relying on traditional metrics like a credit score, Stilt uses data such as education and employment to predict an individual's future income stability and cash flow before issuing a loan. Stilt has seen its loan volume grow by 500% in the past 12 months, and the startup has loaned to immigrants from 160 countries since its launch. Here are the 15 slides Stilt, which calls itself 'a bank for immigrants,' used to raise a $14 million Series AAn IRA for alternativesHenry Yoshida is the co-founder and CEO of retirement fintech startup Rocket Dollar.Rocket DollarFintech startup Rocket Dollar, which helps users invest their individual retirement account (IRA) dollars into alternative assets, just raised $8 million for its Series A round, the company announced on Thursday.Park West Asset Management led the round, with participation from investors including Hyphen Capital, which focuses on backing Asian American entrepreneurs, and crypto exchange Kraken's venture arm. Co-founded in 2018 by CEO Henry Yoshida, CTO Rick Dude, and VP of marketing Thomas Young, Rocket Dollar now has over $350 million in assets under management on its platform. Yoshida sold his first startup, a roboadvisor called Honest Dollar, to Goldman Sachs' investment management division for an estimated $20 million.Yoshida told Insider that while ultra-high net worth investors have been investing self-directed retirement account dollars into alternative assets like real estate, private equity, and cryptocurrency, average investors have not historically been able to access the same opportunities to invest IRA dollars in alternative assets through traditional platforms.Here's the 34-page pitch deck a fintech that helps users invest their retirement savings in crypto and real estate assets used to nab $8 millionA trading app for activismAntoine Argouges, CEO and founder of TulipshareTulipshareAn up-and-coming fintech is taking aim at some of the world's largest corporations by empowering retail investors to push for social and environmental change by pooling their shareholder rights.London-based Tulipshare lets individuals in the UK invest as little as one pound in publicly-traded company stocks. The upstart combines individuals' shareholder rights with other like-minded investors to advocate for environmental, social, and corporate governance change at firms like JPMorgan, Apple, and Amazon.The goal is to achieve a higher number of shares to maximize the number of votes that can be submitted at shareholder meetings. Already a regulated broker-dealer in the UK, Tulipshare recently applied for registration as a broker-dealer in the US. "If you ask your friends and family if they've ever voted on shareholder resolutions, the answer will probably be close to zero," CEO and founder Antoine Argouges told Insider. "I started Tulipshare to utilize shareholder rights to bring about positive corporate change that has an impact on people's lives and our planet — what's more powerful than money to change the system we live in?"Check out the 14-page pitch deck from Tulipshare, a trading app that lets users pool their shareholder votes for activism campaignsDigital tools for independent financial advisorsJason Wenk, founder and CEO of AltruistAltruistJason Wenk started his career at Morgan Stanley in investment research over 20 years ago. Now, he's running a company that is hoping to broaden access to financial advice for less-wealthy individuals. The startup raised $50 million in Series B funding led by Insight Partners with participation from investors Vanguard and Venrock. The round brings the Los Angeles-based startup's total funding to just under $67 million.Founded in 2018, Altruist is a digital brokerage built for independent financial advisors, intended to be an "all-in-one" platform that unites custodial functions, portfolio accounting, and a client-facing portal. It allows advisors to open accounts, invest, build models, report, trade (including fractional shares), and bill clients through an interface that can advisors time by eliminating mundane operational tasks.Altruist aims to make personalized financial advice less expensive, more efficient, and more inclusive through the platform, which is designed for registered investment advisors (RIAs), a growing segment of the wealth management industry. Here's the pitch deck for Altruist, a wealth tech challenging custodians Fidelity and Charles Schwab, that raised $50 million from Vanguard and InsightRethinking debt collection Jason Saltzman, founder and CEO of ReliefReliefFor lenders, debt collection is largely automated. But for people who owe money on their credit cards, it can be a confusing and stressful process.  Relief is looking to change that. Its app automates the credit-card debt collection process for users, negotiating with lenders and collectors to settle outstanding balances on their behalf. The fintech just launched and closed a $2 million seed round led by Collaborative Ventures. Relief's fundraising experience was a bit different to most. Its pitch deck, which it shared with one investor via Google Slides, went viral. It set out to raise a $1 million seed round, but ended up doubling that and giving some investors money back to make room for others.Check out a 15-page pitch deck that went viral and helped a credit-card debt collection startup land a $2 million seed roundHelping small banks lendTKCollateralEdgeFor large corporations with a track record of tapping the credit markets, taking out debt is a well-structured and clear process handled by the nation's biggest investment banks and teams of accountants. But smaller, middle-market companies — typically those with annual revenues ranging up to $1 billion — are typically served by regional and community banks that don't always have the capacity to adequately measure the risk of loans or price them competitively. Per the National Center for the Middle Market, 200,000 companies fall into this range, accounting for roughly 33% of US private sector GDP and employment.Dallas-based fintech CollateralEdge works with these banks — typically those with between $1 billion and $50 billion in assets — to help analyze and price slices of commercial and industrial loans that previously might have gone unserved by smaller lenders.On October 20th, CollateralEdge announced a $3.5 million seed round led by Dallas venture fund Perot Jain with participation from Kneeland Youngblood (a founder of the healthcare-focused private-equity firm Pharos Capital) and other individual investors.Here's the 10-page deck CollateralEdge, a fintech streamlining how small banks lend to businesses, used to raise a $3.5 million seed roundA new way to assess creditworthinessPinwheel founders Curtis Lee, Kurt Lin, and Anish Basu.PinwheelGrowing up, Kurt Lin never saw his father get frustrated. A "traditional, stoic figure," Lin said his father immigrated to the United States in the 1970s. Becoming part of the financial system proved even more difficult than assimilating into a new culture.Lin recalled visiting bank after bank with his father as a child, watching as his father's applications for a mortgage were denied due to his lack of credit history. "That was the first time in my life I really saw him crack," Lin told Insider. "The system doesn't work for a lot of people — including my dad," he added. Lin would find a solution to his father's problem years later while working with Anish Basu, and Curtis Lee on an automated health savings account. The trio realized the payroll data integrations they were working on could be the basis of a product that would help lenders work with consumers without strong credit histories."That's when the lightbulb hit," said Lin, Pinwheel's CEO.In 2018, Lin, Basu, and Lee founded Pinwheel, an application-programming interface that shares payroll data to help both fintechs and traditional lenders serve consumers with limited or poor credit, who have historically struggled to access financial products. Here's the 9-page deck that Pinwheel, a fintech helping lenders tap into payroll data to serve consumers with little to no credit, used to raise a $50 million Series BAn alternative auto lenderTricolorAn alternative auto lender that caters to thin- and no-credit Hispanic borrowers is planning a national expansion after scoring a $90 million investment from BlackRock-managed funds. Tricolor is a Dallas-based auto lender that is a community development financial institution. It uses a proprietary artificial-intelligence engine that decisions each customer based on more than 100 data points, such as proof of income. Half of Tricolor's customers have a FICO score, and less than 12% have scores above 650, yet the average customer has lived in the US for 15 years, according to the deck.A 2017 survey by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation found 31.5% of Hispanic households had no mainstream credit compared to 14.4% of white households. "For decades, the deck has been stacked against low income or credit invisible Hispanics in the United States when it comes to the purchase and financing of a used vehicle," Daniel Chu, founder and CEO of Tricolor, said in a statement announcing the raise.An auto lender that caters to underbanked Hispanics used this 25-page deck to raise $90 million from BlackRock investors A new way to access credit The TomoCredit teamTomoCreditKristy Kim knows first-hand the challenge of obtaining credit in the US without an established credit history. Kim, who came to the US from South Korea, couldn't initially get access to credit despite having a job in investment banking after graduating college. "I was in my early twenties, I had a good income, my job was in investment banking but I could not get approved for anything," Kim told Insider. "Many young professionals like me, we deserve an opportunity to be considered but just because we didn't have a Fico, we weren't given a chance to even apply," she added.Kim started TomoCredit in 2018 to help others like herself gain access to consumer credit. TomoCredit spent three years building an internal algorithm to underwrite customers based on cash flow, rather than a credit score.TomoCredit, a fintech that lends to thin- and no-credit borrowers, used this 17-page pitch deck to raise its $10 million Series AHelping streamline how debts are repaidMethod Financial cofounders Jose Bethancourt and Marco del Carmen.Method FinancialWhen Jose Bethancourt graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in May 2019, he faced the same question that confronts over 43 million Americans: How would he repay his student loans?The problem led Bethancourt on a nearly two-year journey that culminated in the creation of a startup aimed at making it easier for consumers to more seamlessly pay off all kinds of debt.  Initially, Bethancourt and fellow UT grad Marco del Carmen built GradJoy, an app that helped users better understand how to manage student loan repayment and other financial habits. GradJoy was accepted into Y Combinator in the summer of 2019. But the duo quickly realized the real benefit to users would be helping them move money to make payments instead of simply offering recommendations."When we started GradJoy, we thought, 'Oh, we'll just give advice — we don't think people are comfortable with us touching their student loans,' and then we realized that people were saying, 'Hey, just move the money — if you think I should pay extra, then I'll pay extra.' So that's kind of the movement that we've seen, just, everybody's more comfortable with fintechs doing what's best for them," Bethancourt told Insider. Here is the 11-slide pitch deck Method Financial, a Y Combinator-backed fintech making debt repayment easier, used to raise $2.5 million in pre-seed fundingQuantum computing made easyQC Ware CEO Matt Johnson.QC WareEven though banks and hedge funds are still several years out from adding quantum computing to their tech arsenals, that hasn't stopped Wall Street giants from investing time and money into the emerging technology class. And momentum for QC Ware, a startup looking to cut the time and resources it takes to use quantum computing, is accelerating. The fintech secured a $25 million Series B on September 29 co-led by Koch Disruptive Technologies and Covestro with participation from D.E. Shaw, Citi, and Samsung Ventures.QC Ware, founded in 2014, builds quantum algorithms for the likes of Goldman Sachs (which led the fintech's Series A), Airbus, and BMW Group. The algorithms, which are effectively code bases that include quantum processing elements, can run on any of the four main public-cloud providers.Quantum computing allows companies to do complex calculations faster than traditional computers by using a form of physics that runs on quantum bits as opposed to the traditional 1s and 0s that computers use. This is especially helpful in banking for risk analytics or algorithmic trading, where executing calculations milliseconds faster than the competition can give firms a leg up. Here's the 20-page deck QC Ware, a fintech making quantum computing more accessible, used to raised its $25 million Series BSimplifying quant modelsKirat Singh and Mark Higgins, Beacon's cofounders.BeaconA fintech that helps financial institutions use quantitative models to streamline their businesses and improve risk management is catching the attention, and capital, of some of the country's biggest investment managers.Beacon Platform, founded in 2014, is a fintech that builds applications and tools to help banks, asset managers, and trading firms quickly integrate quantitative models that can help with analyzing risk, ensuring compliance, and improving operational efficiency. The company raised its Series C on Wednesday, scoring a $56 million investment led by Warburg Pincus with support from Blackstone Innovations Investments, PIMCO, and Global Atlantic. Blackstone, PIMCO, and Global Atlantic are also users of Beacon's tech, as are the Commonwealth Bank of Australia and Shell New Energies, a division of Royal Dutch Shell, among others.The fintech provides a shortcut for firms looking to use quantitative modelling and data science across various aspects of their businesses, a process that can often take considerable resources if done solo.Here's the 20-page pitch deck Beacon, a fintech helping Wall Street better analyze risk and data, used to raise $56 million from Warburg Pincus, Blackstone, and PIMCOA new data feed for bond tradingMark Lennihan/APFor years, the only way investors could figure out the going price of a corporate bond was calling up a dealer on the phone. The rise of electronic trading has streamlined that process, but data can still be hard to come by sometimes. A startup founded by a former Goldman Sachs exec has big plans to change that. BondCliQ is a fintech that provides a data feed of pre-trade pricing quotes for the corporate bond market. Founded by Chris White, the creator of Goldman Sachs' defunct corporate-bond-trading system, BondCliQ strives to bring transparency to a market that has traditionally kept such data close to the vest. Banks, which typically serve as the dealers of corporate bonds, have historically kept pre-trade quotes hidden from other dealers to maintain a competitive advantage.But tech advancements and the rise of electronic marketplaces have shifted power dynamics into the hands of buy-side firms, like hedge funds and asset managers. The investors are now able to get a fuller picture of the market by aggregating price quotes directly from dealers or via vendors.Here's the 9-page pitch deck that BondCliQ, a fintech looking to bring more data and transparency to bond trading, used to raise its Series AFraud prevention for lenders and insurersFiordaliso/Getty ImagesOnboarding new customers with ease is key for any financial institution or retailer. The more friction you add, the more likely consumers are to abandon the entire process.But preventing fraud is also a priority, and that's where Neuro-ID comes in. The startup analyzes what it calls "digital body language," or, the way users scroll, type, and tap. Using that data, Neuro-ID can identify fraudulent users before they create an account. It's built for banks, lenders, insurers, and e-commerce players."The train has left the station for digital transformation, but there's a massive opportunity to try to replicate all those communications that we used to have when we did business in-person, all those tells that we would get verbally and non-verbally on whether or not someone was trustworthy," Neuro-ID CEO Jack Alton told Insider.Founded in 2014, the startup's pitch is twofold: Neuro-ID can save companies money by identifying fraud early, and help increase user conversion by making the onboarding process more seamless. In December Neuro-ID closed a $7 million Series A, co-led by Fin VC and TTV Capital, with participation from Canapi Ventures. With 30 employees, Neuro-ID is using the fresh funding to grow its team and create additional tools to be more self-serving for customers.Here's the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that analyzes consumers' digital behavior to fight fraud used to raise a $7 million Series AAI-powered tools to spot phony online reviews FakespotMarketplaces like Amazon and eBay host millions of third-party sellers, and their algorithms will often boost items in search based on consumer sentiment, which is largely based on reviews. But many third-party sellers use fake reviews often bought from click farms to boost their items, some of which are counterfeit or misrepresented to consumers.That's where Fakespot comes in. With its Chrome extension, it warns users of sellers using potentially fake reviews to boost sales and can identify fraudulent sellers. Fakespot is currently compatible with Amazon, BestBuy, eBay, Sephora, Steam, and Walmart."There are promotional reviews written by humans and bot-generated reviews written by robots or review farms," Fakespot founder and CEO Saoud Khalifah told Insider. "Our AI system has been built to detect both categories with very high accuracy."Fakespot's AI learns via reviews data available on marketplace websites, and uses natural-language processing to identify if reviews are genuine. Fakespot also looks at things like whether the number of positive reviews are plausible given how long a seller has been active.Fakespot, a startup that helps shoppers detect robot-generated reviews and phony sellers on Amazon and Shopify, used this pitch deck to nab a $4 million Series AHelping fintechs manage dataProper Finance co-founders Travis Gibson (left) and Kyle MaloneyProper FinanceAs the flow of data becomes evermore crucial for fintechs, from the strappy startup to the established powerhouse, a thorny issue in the back office is becoming increasingly complex.Even though fintechs are known for their sleek front ends, the back end is often quite the opposite. Behind that streamlined interface can be a mosaic of different partner integrations — be it with banks, payments players and networks, or software vendors — with a channel of data running between them. Two people who know that better than the average are Kyle Maloney and Travis Gibson, two former employees of Marqeta, a fintech that provides other fintechs with payments processing and card issuance. "Take an established neobank for example. They'll likely have one or two card issuers, two to three bank partners, ACH processing for direct deposits and payouts, mobile check deposits, peer-to-peer payments, and lending," Gibson told Insider. Here's the 12-page pitch deck a startup helping fintechs manage their data used to score a $4.3 million seed from investors like Redpoint Ventures and Y CombinatorE-commerce focused business bankingMichael Rangel, cofounder and CEO, and Tyler McIntyre, cofounder and CTO of Novo.Kristelle Boulos PhotographyBusiness banking is a hot market in fintech. And it seems investors can't get enough.Novo, the digital banking fintech aimed at small e-commerce businesses, raised a $40.7 million Series A led by Valar Ventures in June. Since its launch in 2018, Novo has signed up 100,000 small businesses. Beyond bank accounts, it offers expense management, a corporate card, and integrates with e-commerce infrastructure players like Shopify, Stripe, and Wise.Founded in 2018, Novo was based in New York City, but has since moved its headquarters to Miami. Here's the 12-page pitch deck e-commerce banking startup Novo used to raise its $40 million Series AShopify for embedded financeProductfy CEO and founder, Duy VoProductfyProductfy is looking to break into embedded finance by becoming the Shopify of back-end banking services.Embedded finance — integrating banking services in non-financial settings — has taken hold in the e-commerce world. But Productfy is going after a different kind of customer in churches, universities, and nonprofits.The San Jose, Calif.-based upstart aims to help non-finance companies offer their own banking products. Productfy can help customers launch finance features in as little as a week and without additional engineering resources or background knowledge of banking compliance or legal requirements, Productfy founder and CEO Duy Vo told Insider. "You don't need an engineer to stand up Shopify, right? You can be someone who's just creating art and you can use Shopify to build your own online store," Vo said, adding that Productfy is looking to take that user experience and replicate it for banking services.Here's the 15-page pitch deck Productfy, a fintech looking to be the Shopify of embedded finance, used to nab a $16 million Series ADeploying algorithms and automation to small-business financingJustin Straight and Bernard Worthy, LoanWell co-foundersLoanWellBernard Worthy and Justin Straight, the founders of LoanWell, want to break down barriers to financing for small and medium-size businesses — and they've got algorithms and automation in their tech arsenals that they hope will do it.Worthy, the company's CEO, and Straight, its chief operating and financial officer, are powering community-focused lenders to fill a gap in the SMB financing world by boosting access to loans under $100,000. And the upstart is known for catching the attention, and dollars, of mission-driven investors. LoanWell closed a $3 million seed financing round in December led by Impact America Fund with participation from SoftBank's SB Opportunity Fund and Collab Capital.LoanWell automates the financing process — from underwriting and origination, to money movement and servicing — which shaves down an up-to-90-day process to 30 days or even same-day with some LoanWell lenders, Worthy said. SMBs rely on these loans to process quickly after two years of financial uncertainty. But the pandemic illustrated how time-consuming and expensive SMB financing can be, highlighted by efforts like the federal government's Paycheck Protection Program.Community banks, once the lifeline to capital for many local businesses, continue to shutter. And demands for smaller loan amounts remain largely unmet. More than half of business-loan applicants sought $100,000 or less, according to 2018 data from the Federal Reserve. But the average small-business bank loan was closer to six times that amount, according to the latest data from a now discontinued Federal Reserve survey.Here's the 14-page pitch deck LoanWell used to raise $3 million from investors like SoftBank.Branded cards for SMBsJennifer Glaspie-Lundstrom is the cofounder and CEO of Tandym.TandymJennifer Glaspie-Lundstrom is no stranger to the private-label credit-card business. As a former Capital One exec, she worked in both the card giant's co-brand partnerships division and its tech organization during her seven years at the company.Now, Glaspie-Lundstrom is hoping to use that experience to innovate a sector that was initially created in malls decades ago.Glaspie-Lundstrom is the cofounder and CEO of Tandym, which offers private-label digital credit cards to merchants. Store and private-label credit cards aren't a new concept, but Tandym is targeting small- and medium-sized merchants with less than $1 billion in annual revenue. Glaspie-Lundstrom said that group often struggles to offer private-label credit due to the expense of working with legacy players."What you have is this example of a very valuable product type that merchants love and their customers love, but a huge, untapped market that has heretofore been unserved, and so that's what we're doing with Tandym," Glaspi-Lundstrom told Insider.A former Capital One exec used this deck to raise $60 million for a startup helping SMBs launch their own branded credit cardsCatering to 'micro businesses'Stefanie Sample is the founder and CEO of FundidFundidStartups aiming to simplify the often-complex world of corporate cards have boomed in recent years.Business-finance management startup Brex was last valued at $12.3 billion after raising $300 million last year. Startup card provider Ramp announced an $8.1 billion valuation in March after growing its revenue nearly 10x in 2021. Divvy, a small business card provider, was acquired by Bill.com in May 2021 for approximately $2.5 billion.But despite how hot the market has gotten, Stefanie Sample said she ended up working in the space by accident. Sample is the founder and CEO of Fundid, a new fintech that provides credit and lending products to small businesses.This May, Fundid announced a $3.25 million seed round led by Nevcaut Ventures. Additional investors include the Artemis Fund and Builders and Backers. The funding announcement capped off the company's first year: Sample introduced the Fundid concept in April 2021, launched its website in May, and began raising capital in August."I never meant to do Fundid," Sample told Insider. "I never meant to do something that was venture-backed."Read the 12-page deck used by Fundid, a fintech offering credit and lending tools for 'micro businesses'Embedded payments for SMBsThe Highnote teamHighnoteBranded cards have long been a way for merchants with the appropriate bank relationships to create additional revenue and build customer loyalty. The rise of embedded payments, or the ability to shop and pay in a seamless experience within a single app, has broadened the number of companies looking to launch branded cards.Highnote is a startup that helps small to mid-sized merchants roll out their own debit and pre-paid digital cards. The fintech emerged from stealth on Tuesday to announce it raised $54 million in seed and Series A funding.Here's the 12-page deck Highnote, a startup helping SMBs embed payments, used to raise $54 million in seed and Series A fundingHelping small businesses manage their taxesComplYant's founder Shiloh Jackson wants to help people be present in their bookkeeping.ComplYantAfter 14 years in tax accounting, Shiloh Johnson had formed a core philosophy around corporate accounting: everyone deserves to understand their business's money and business owners need to be present in their bookkeeping process.She wanted to help small businesses understand "this is why you need to do what you're doing and why you have to change the way you think about tax and be present in your bookkeeping process," she told Insider. The Los Angeles native wanted small businesses to not only understand business tax no matter their size but also to find the tools they needed to prepare their taxes in one spot. So Johnson developed a software platform that provides just that.The 13-page pitch deck ComplYant used to nab $4 million that details the tax startup's plan to be Turbotax, Quickbooks, and Xero rolled into one for small business ownersAutomating accounting ops for SMBsDecimal CEO Matt Tait.DecimalSmall- and medium-sized businesses can rely on any number of payroll, expense management, bill pay, and corporate-card startups promising to automate parts of their financial workflow. Smaller firms have adopted this corporate-financial software en masse, boosting growth throughout the pandemic for relatively new entrants like Ramp and massive, industry stalwarts like Intuit. But it's no easy task to connect all of those tools into one, seamless process. And while accounting operations might be far from where many startup founders want to focus their time, having efficient back-end finances does mean time — and capital — freed up to spend elsewhere. For Decimal CEO Matt Tait, there's ample opportunity in "the boring stuff you have to do to survive as a company," he told Insider. Launched in 2020, Decimal provides a back-end tech layer that small- and medium-sized businesses can use to integrate their accounting and business-management software tools in one place.On Wednesday, Decimal announced a $9 million seed fundraising round led by Minneapolis-based Arthur Ventures, alongside Service Providers Capital and other angel investors. See the 13-page pitch deck for Decimal, a startup automating accounting ops for small businessesInvoice financing for SMBsStacey Abrams and Lara Hodgson, Now co-foundersNowAbout a decade ago, politician Stacey Abrams and entrepreneur Lara Hodgson were forced to fold their startup because of a kink in the supply chain — but not in the traditional sense.Nourish, which made spill-proof bottled water for children, had grown quickly from selling to small retailers to national ones. And while that may sound like a feather in the small business' cap, there was a hang-up."It was taking longer and longer to get paid, and as you can imagine, you deliver the product and then you wait and you wait, but meanwhile you have to pay your employees and you have to pay your vendors," Hodgson told Insider. "Waiting to get paid was constraining our ability to grow."While it's not unusual for small businesses to grapple with working capital issues, the dust was still settling from the Great Recession. Abrams and Hodgson couldn't secure a line of credit or use financing tools like factoring to solve their problem. The two entrepreneurs were forced to close Nourish in 2012, but along the way they recognized a disconnect in the system.  "Why are we the ones borrowing money, when in fact we're the lender here because every time you send an invoice to a customer, you've essentially extended a free loan to that customer by letting them pay later," Hodgson said. "And the only reason why we were going to need to possibly borrow money was because we had just given ours away for free to Whole Foods," she added.Check out the 7-page deck that Now, Stacey Abrams' fintech that wants to help small businesses 'grow fearlessly', used to raise $29 millionCheckout made easyRyan Breslow.Ryan BreslowAmazon has long dominated e-commerce with its one-click checkout flows, offering easier ways for consumers to shop online than its small-business competitors.Bolt gives small merchants tools to offer the same easy checkouts so they can compete with the likes of Amazon.The startup raised its $393 million Series D to continue adding its one-click checkout feature to merchants' own websites in October.Bolt markets to merchants themselves. But a big part of Bolt's pitch is its growing network of consumers — currently over 5.6 million — that use its features across multiple Bolt merchant customers. Roughly 5% of Bolt's transactions were network-driven in May, meaning users that signed up for a Bolt account on another retailer's website used it elsewhere. The network effects were even more pronounced in verticals like furniture, where 49% of transactions were driven by the Bolt network."The network effect is now unleashed with Bolt in full fury, and that triggered the raise," Bolt's founder and CEO Ryan Breslow told Insider.Here's the 12-page deck that one-click checkout Bolt used to outline its network of 5.6 million consumers and raise its Series DPayments infrastructure for fintechsQolo CEO and co-founder Patricia MontesiQoloThree years ago, Patricia Montesi realized there was a disconnect in the payments world. "A lot of new economy companies or fintech companies were looking to mesh up a lot of payment modalities that they weren't able to," Montesi, CEO and co-founder of Qolo, told Insider.Integrating various payment capabilities often meant tapping several different providers that had specializations in one product or service, she added, like debit card issuance or cross-border payments. "The way people were getting around that was that they were creating this spider web of fintech," she said, adding that "at the end of it all, they had this mess of suppliers and integrations and bank accounts."The 20-year payments veteran rounded up a group of three other co-founders — who together had more than a century of combined industry experience — to start Qolo, a business-to-business fintech that sought out to bundle back-end payment rails for other fintechs.Here's the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that provides payments infrastructure for other fintechs used to raise a $15 million Series ABetter use of payroll dataAtomic's Head of Markets, Lindsay DavisAtomicEmployees at companies large and small know the importance — and limitations — of how firms manage their payrolls. A new crop of startups are building the API pipes that connect companies and their employees to offer a greater level of visibility and flexibility when it comes to payroll data and employee verification. On Thursday, one of those names, Atomic, announced a $40 million Series B fundraising round co-led by Mercato Partners and Greylock, alongside Core Innovation Capital, Portage, and ATX Capital. The round follows Atomic's Series A round announced in October, when the startup raised a $22 million Series A from investors including Core Innovation Capital, Portage, and Greylock.Payroll startup Atomic just raised a $40 million Series B. Here's an internal deck detailing the fintech's approach to the red-hot payments space.Saving on vendor invoicesHoward Katzenberg, Glean's CEO and cofounderGleanWhen it comes to high-flying tech startups, headlines and investors typically tend to focus on industry "disruption" and the total addressable market a company is hoping to reach. Expense cutting as a way to boost growth typically isn't part of the conversation early on, and finance teams are viewed as cost centers relative to sales teams. But one fast-growing area of business payments has turned its focus to managing those costs. Startups like Ramp and established names like Bill.com have made their name offering automated expense-management systems. Now, one new fintech competitor, Glean, is looking to take that further by offering both automated payment services and tailored line-item accounts-payable insights driven by machine-learning models. Glean's CFO and founder, Howard Katzenberg, told Insider that the genesis of Glean was driven by his own personal experience managing the finance teams of startups, including mortgage lender Better.com, which Katzenberg left in 2019, and online small-business lender OnDeck. "As a CFO of high-growth companies, I spent a lot of time focused on revenue and I had amazing dashboards in real time where I could see what is going on top of the funnel, what's going on with conversion rates, what's going on in terms of pricing and attrition," Katzenberg told Insider. See the 15-slide pitch deck Glean, a startup using machine learning to find savings in vendor invoices, used to raise $10.8 million in seed fundingReal-estate management made easyAgora founders Noam Kahan, CTO, Bar Mor, CEO, and Lior Dolinski, CPOAgoraFor alternative asset managers of any type, the operations underpinning sales and investor communications are a crucial but often overlooked part of the business. Fund managers love to make bets on markets, not coordinate hundreds of wire transfers to clients each quarter or organize customer-relationship-management databases.Within the $10.6 trillion global market for professionally managed real-estate investing, that's where Tel Aviv and New York-based startup Agora hopes to make its mark.Founded in 2019, Agora offers a set of back-office, investor relations, and sales software tools that real-estate investment managers can plug into their workflows. On Wednesday, Agora announced a $9 million seed round, led by Israel-based venture firm Aleph, with participation from River Park Ventures and Maccabee Ventures. The funding comes on the heels of an October 2020 pre-seed fund raise worth $890,000, in which Maccabee also participated.Here's the 15-slide pitch deck that Agora, a startup helping real-estate investors manage communications and sales with their clients, used to raise a $9 million seed roundAccess to commercial real-estate investing LEX Markets cofounders and co-CEOs Drew Sterrett and Jesse Daugherty.LEX MarketsDrew Sterrett was structuring real-estate deals while working in private equity when he realized the inefficiencies that existed in the market. Only high-net worth individuals or accredited investors could participate in commercial real-estate deals. If they ever wanted to leave a partnership or sell their stake in a property, it was difficult to find another investor to replace them. Owners also struggled to sell minority stakes in their properties and didn't have many good options to recapitalize an asset if necessary.In short, the market had a high barrier to entry despite the fact it didn't always have enough participants to get deals done quickly. "Most investors don't have access to high-quality commercial real-estate investments. How do we have the oldest and largest asset class in the world and one of the largest wealth creators with no public and liquid market?" Sterrett told Insider. "It sort of seems like a no-brainer, and that this should have existed 50 or 60 years ago."This 15-page pitch deck helped LEX Markets, a startup making investing in commercial real estate more accessible, raise $15 millionInsurance goes digitalJamie Hale, CEO and cofounder of LadderLadderFintechs looking to transform how insurance policies are underwritten, issued, and experienced by customers have grown as new technology driven by digital trends and artificial intelligence shape the market. And while verticals like auto, homeowner's, and renter's insurance have seen their fair share of innovation from forward-thinking fintechs, one company has taken on the massive life-insurance market. Founded in 2017, Ladder uses a tech-driven approach to offer life insurance with a digital, end-to-end service that it says is more flexible, faster, and cost-effective than incumbent players.Life, annuity, and accident and health insurance within the US comprise a big chunk of the broader market. In 2020, premiums written on those policies totaled some $767 billion, compared to $144 billion for auto policies and $97 billion for homeowner's insurance.Here's the 12-page deck that Ladder, a startup disrupting the 'crown jewel' of the insurance market, used to nab $100 millionData science for commercial insuranceTanner Hackett, founder and CEO of CounterpartCounterpartThere's been no shortage of funds flowing into insurance-technology companies over the past few years. Private-market funding to insurtechs soared to $15.4 billion in 2021, a 90% increase compared to 2020. Some of the most well-known consumer insurtech names — from Oscar (which focuses on health insurance) to Metromile (which focuses on auto) — launched on the public markets last year, only to fall over time or be acquired as investors questioned the sustainability of their business models. In the commercial arena, however, the head of one insurtech company thinks there is still room to grow — especially for those catering to small businesses operating in an entirely new, pandemic-defined environment. "The bigger opportunity is in commercial lines," Tanner Hackett, the CEO of management liability insurer Counterpart, told Insider."Everywhere I poke, I'm like, 'Oh my goodness, we're still in 1.0, and all the other businesses I've built were on version three.' Insurance is still in 1.0, still managing from spreadsheets and PDFs," added Hackett, who also previously co-founded Button, which focuses on mobile marketing. See the 8-page pitch deck Counterpart, a startup disrupting commercial insurance with data science, used to raise a $30 million Series BSmarter insurance for multifamily propertiesItai Ben-Zaken, cofounder and CEO of Honeycomb.HoneycombA veteran of the online-insurance world is looking to revolutionize the way the industry prices risk for commercial properties with the help of artificial intelligence.Insurance companies typically send inspectors to properties before issuing policies to better understand how the building is maintained and identify potential risks or issues with it. It's a process that can be time-consuming, expensive, and inefficient, making it hard to justify for smaller commercial properties, like apartment and condo buildings.Insurtech Honeycomb is looking to fix that by using AI to analyze a combination of third-party data and photos submitted by customers through the startup's app to quickly identify any potential risks at a property and more accurately price policies."That whole physical inspection thing had really good things in it, but it wasn't really something that is scalable and, it's also expensive," Itai Ben-Zaken, Honeycomb's cofounder and CEO, told Insider. "The best way to see a property right now is Google street view. Google street view is usually two years old."Here's the 10-page Series A pitch deck used by Honeycomb, a startup that wants to revolutionize the $26 billion market for multifamily property insuranceHelping freelancers with their taxesJaideep Singh is the CEO and co-founder of FlyFin, an AI-driven tax preparation software program for freelancers.FlyFinSome people, particularly those with families or freelancing businesses, spend days searching for receipts for tax season, making tax preparation a time consuming and, at times, taxing experience. That's why in 2020 Jaideep Singh founded FlyFin, an artificial-intelligence tax preparation program for freelancers that helps people, as he puts it, "fly through their finances." FlyFin is set up to connect to a person's bank accounts, allowing the AI program to help users monitor for certain expenses that can be claimed on their taxes like business expenditures, the interest on mortgages, property taxes, or whatever else that might apply. "For most individuals, people have expenses distributed over multiple financial institutions. So we built an AI platform that is able to look at expenses, understand the individual, understand your profession, understand the freelance population at large, and start the categorization," Singh told Insider.Check out the 7-page pitch deck a startup helping freelancers manage their taxes used to nab $8 million in fundingDigital banking for freelancersJGalione/Getty ImagesLance is a new digital bank hoping to simplify the life of those workers by offering what it calls an "active" approach to business banking. "We found that every time we sat down with the existing tools and resources of our accountants and QuickBooks and spreadsheets, we just ended up getting tangled up in the whole experience of it," Lance cofounder and CEO Oona Rokyta told Insider. Lance offers subaccounts for personal salaries, withholdings, and savings to which freelancers can automatically allocate funds according to custom preset levels. It also offers an expense balance that's connected to automated tax withholdings.In May, Lance announced the closing of a $2.8 million seed round that saw participation from Barclays, BDMI, Great Oaks Capital, Imagination Capital, Techstars, DFJ Frontier, and others.Here's the 21-page pitch deck Lance, a digital bank for freelancers, used to raise a $2.8 million seed round from investors including BarclaysSoftware for managing freelancersWorksome cofounder and CEO Morten Petersen.WorksomeThe way people work has fundamentally changed over the past year, with more flexibility and many workers opting to freelance to maintain their work-from-home lifestyles.But managing a freelance or contractor workforce is often an administrative headache for employers. Worksome is a startup looking to eliminate all the extra work required for employers to adapt to more flexible working norms.Worksome started as a freelancer marketplace automating the process of matching qualified workers with the right jobs. But the team ultimately pivoted to a full suite of workforce management software, automating administrative burdens required to hire, pay, and account for contract workers.In May, Worksome closed a $13 million Series A backed by European angel investor Tommy Ahlers and Danish firm Lind & Risør.Here's the 21-slide pitch deck used by a startup that helps firms like Carlsberg and Deloitte manage freelancersPayments and operations support HoneyBook cofounders Dror Shimoni, Oz Alon, and Naama Alon.HoneyBookWhile countless small businesses have been harmed by the pandemic, self-employment and entrepreneurship have found ways to blossom as Americans started new ventures.Half of the US population may be freelance by 2027, according to a study commissioned by remote-work hiring platform Upwork. HoneyBook, a fintech startup that provides payment and operations support for freelancers, in May raised $155 million in funding and achieved unicorn status with its $1 billion-plus valuation.Durable Capital Partners led the Series D funding with other new investors including renowned hedge fund Tiger Global, Battery Ventures, Zeev Ventures, and 01 Advisors. Citi Ventures, Citigroup's startup investment arm that also backs fintech robo-advisor Betterment, participated as an existing investor in the round alongside Norwest Venture partners. The latest round brings the company's fundraising total to $227 million to date.Here's the 21-page pitch deck a Citi-backed fintech for freelancers used to raise $155 million from investors like hedge fund Tiger GlobalPay-as-you-go compliance for banks, fintechs, and crypto startupsNeepa Patel, Themis' founder and CEOThemisWhen Themis founder and CEO Neepa Patel set out to build a new compliance tool for banks, fintech startups, and crypto companies, she tapped into her own experience managing risk at some of the nation's biggest financial firms. Having worked as a bank regulator at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and in compliance at Morgan Stanley, Deutsche Bank, and the enterprise blockchain company R3, Patel was well-placed to assess the shortcomings in financial compliance software. But Patel, who left the corporate world to begin work on Themis in 2020, drew on more than just her own experience and frustrations to build the startup."It's not just me building a tool based on my personal pain points. I reached out to regulators. I reached out to bank compliance officers and members in the fintech community just to make sure that we're building it exactly how they do their work," Patel told Insider. "That was the biggest problem: No one built a tool that was reflective of how people do their work."Check out the 9-page pitch deck Themis, which offers pay-as-you-go compliance for banks, fintechs, and crypto startups, used to raise $9 million in seed fundingConnecting startups and investorsHum Capital cofounder and CEO Blair SilverbergHum CapitalBlair Silverberg is no stranger to fundraising.For six years, Silverberg was a venture capitalist at Draper Fisher Jurvetson and Private Credit Investments making bets on startups."I was meeting with thousands of founders in person each year, watching them one at a time go through this friction where they're meeting a ton of investors, and the investors are all asking the same questions," Silverberg told Insider. He switched gears about three years ago, moving to the opposite side of the metaphorical table, to start Hum Capital, which uses artificial intelligence to match investors with startups looking to fundraise.On August 31, the New York-based fintech announced its $9 million Series A. The round was led by Future Ventures with participation from Webb Investment Network, Wavemaker Partners, and Partech. This 11-page pitch deck helped Hum Capital, a fintech using AI to match investors with startups, raise a $9 million Series A.Helping LatAm startups get up to speedKamino cofounders Gut Fragoso, Rodrigo Perenha, Benjamin Gleason, and Gonzalo ParejoKaminoThere's more venture capital flowing into Latin America than ever before, but getting the funds in founders' hands is not exactly a simple process.In 2021, investors funneled $15.3 billion into Latin American companies, more than tripling the previous record of $4.9 billion in 2019. Fintech and e-commerce sectors drove funding, accounting for 39% and 25% of total funding, respectively.  However, for many startup founders in the region who have successfully sold their ideas and gotten investors on board, there's a patchwork of corporate structuring that's needed to access the funds, according to Benjamin Gleason, who was the chief financial officer at Groupon LatAm prior to cofounding Brazil-based fintech Kamino.It's a process Gleason and his three fellow Kamino cofounders have been through before as entrepreneurs and startup execs themselves. Most often, startups have to set up offshore financial accounts outside of Brazil, which "entails creating a Cayman [Islands] holding company, a Delaware LLC, and then connecting it to a local entity here and also opening US bank accounts for the Cayman entity, which is not trivial from a KYC perspective," said Gleason, who founded open-banking fintech Guiabolso in Sao Paulo. His partner, Gonzalo Parejo, experienced the same toils when he founded insurtech Bidu."Pretty much any international investor will usually ask for that," Gleason said, adding that investors typically cite liability issues."It's just a massive amount of bureaucracy, complexity, a lot of time from the founders. All of this just to get the money from the investor that wants to give them the money," he added.Here's the 8-page pitch deck Kamino, a fintech helping LatAm startups with everything from financing to corporate credit cards, used to raise a $6.1M pre-seed roundThe back-end tech for beautyDanielle Cohen-Shohet, CEO and founder of GlossGeniusGlossGeniusDanielle Cohen-Shohet might have started as a Goldman Sachs investment analyst, but at her core she was always a coder.After about three years at Goldman Sachs, Cohen-Shohet left the world of traditional finance to code her way into starting her own company in 2016. "There was a period of time where I did nothing, but eat, sleep, and code for a few weeks," Cohen-Shohet told Insider. Her technical edge and knowledge of the point-of-sale payment space led her to launch a software company focused on providing behind-the-scenes tech for beauty and wellness small businesses.Cohen-Shohet launched GlossGenius in 2017 to provide payments tech for hair stylists, nail technicians, blow-out bars, and other small businesses in the space.Here's the 11-page deck GlossGenius, a startup that provides back-end tech for the beauty industry, used to raise $16 millionRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 22nd, 2022

I was highly radioactive for a month after a thyroid treatment &mdash; here"s what it was like and all the rules I had to follow

The treatment for hyperthyroid meant that I became a source of radioactivity for others and had to keep away. Here's what I learned. I took radioactive iodine as part of a treatment against hyperthyroid that made me highly radioactive for a month.Marianne Guenot/Insider A recent thyroid procedure I had involved taking an iodine pill that made me highly radioactive. For about a month I was a danger to others and had to follow a long list of safety rules. My photos — including readings from a Geiger counter — show the weird experience in full.  I've been living with a hyperactive thyroid for years, a disease that has debilitating symptoms and can cause heart problems in the long term. When I was offered treatment to fix the problem, I jumped at it — but there was a catch. I had to take a concentrated dose of radioactive iodine which meant I'd be emitting gamma radiation for a month. Here's what it was like to become highly radioactive.I have Graves disease, which messes up your thyroid.The thyroid is a gland found in the throat. In my case it was overactive.Getty Images; Marianne Guenot/InsiderI have Graves disease, which means my thyroid is overactive. The thyroid controls metabolism — how quickly the body works. By spewing hormones into the body, thyroids affect how quickly body temperature, digestion, energy levels, how fast your heart pumps, and even how you think and feel. When the thyroid makes too much of these hormones, the body goes into hyperdrive. Graves disease is very uncomfortable and can be dangerous if left untreated.I couldn't do the sports I love so much.Iryna Veklich/Getty ImagesIf not treated properly, Graves can lead to heart problems.It's also really unpleasant. My heart would start racing unprompted, I would feel extremely hot in cold environments, my weight would drop or shoot up regardless of my diet, and it made me anxious and sad for no reason. I also had to stop going to the gym and doing yoga for fear of putting too much strain on my heart.Radiation nukes the thyroid to calm it down.The symptoms of Graves can be controlled with pills. But if the pills don't work, a more permanent treatment is considered.One method is to kill a good proportion of the cells in the thyroid, sharply reducing the hormone output. There are two ways to do this: one is surgery, which is quite invasive. The other is radioactive iodine, a treatment that is thought to have very few side effects that can be done as an outpatient procedure.  The dose is so high that you start emitting a level of radiation that can harm others.This card lays out the rules to follow during the treatment. I was asked to carry it at all times in case of a medical emergency.Marianne Guenot/InsiderThere were strict rules to follow to avoid harming others:For three days: don't make food for other people, and increase personal hygiene. For 16 days: avoid staying within 6 feet of others for more than 30 minutes a day, sleep alone, and no kissing or sex. For 27 days: no close contact with pregnant people and children, no non-emergency medical and dental treatments, and no busy social situations.For six months: avoid getting pregnant.  I had to follow a low iodine diet before the treatment.Delicious meals that were eaten during my low-iodine diet: an avocado toast with tomatoes, a beef and mushroom crepe, oat milk porridge with bananas and fruit, no-cheese pesto chicken.Marianne Guenot/InsiderAhead of the treatment, I followed a low-iodine diet for two weeks to flush out iodine from my thyroid. The thyroid sucks up iodine from around the body to make its hormones.That's why radioactive iodine works so well to treat hyperthyroid: it rushes to the thyroid and has its effect there. The rest of the body gets relatively little radiation.  These are some iodine-rich foods I needed to avoid: Fish.Eggs.Processed meat.Sea salt.Milk and other dairy products.By the end of the two weeks, I couldn't wait to eat a cheese sandwich. I was treated at St. Bartholomew's hospital in central London as as an outpatient.I was given the treatment in the nuclear medicine department in St. Bartholomew's Hospital in central London.Marianne Guenot/InsiderI headed to the nuclear medicine department and was given the treatment in a fairly generic room.My pill came in this thick lead container.The pill was kept in a thick container which keeps the radioactivity inside.Marianne Guenot/InsiderIt's carried around in a lead container to prevent others from being exposed. Staff wheeled it in on a cart.I wasn't supposed to touch the pill and was given a grabber to swallow it.This is what the grabber looks like.Marianne Guenot/InsiderThe grabber has little claws at the bottom to grasp the pill in the container and is hollow so I could tip the pill back into my mouth without ever touching it.Here goes!Down the hatch!Marianne Guenot/InsiderAs soon as I took the treatment, my Geiger counter started picking up radioactivity. The procedure was completely free via the UK National Health Service.I live in the UK and got the treatment through the state-owned NHS. There was no charge for any part of the treatment.As soon as I took the pill, my body gave off high levels of radioactivity.The level shown on Insider's Geiger counter was 1,300 times higher than normal "background" radiation levels.Marianne Guenot/InsiderA technical disclaimer! To be completely accurate, Geiger counter readings need to be taken in a controlled environment after the machine was calibrated by a professional.We didn't do this, so the data in this article is more of a ballpark than a precise measure.All the same — moments after taking the pill, the radioactivity measure jumped to 1,300 times higher than the "background" level expected of an average person.The doctor told me that the radioactivity then was mostly in my stomach and that as the pill was digested it would concentrate in my thyroid. I left the hospital quickly.This picture was taken moments after I took the radioactive iodine pill, as I was walking home.Marianne Guenot/InsiderFrom this moment on, I had to avoid exposing others. In some cases, hospitals decide to keep patients in special protected rooms for a few days.But I live alone and could easily isolate, so my doctors let me go. I don't have a car, so I walked home on quiet streets. This is a graph of how radioactive I was over the course of the month.Radioactivity measured at the throat shot up as the treatment started. Please note the disclaimer about the data above.Marianne Guenot/InsiderI used the Geiger counter to measure radioactivity closest to the source: around the throat.I found that radioactivity shot up at first, then dropped steadily over time, reaching normal-ish levels by the end of the treatment.The radioactivity decreased quickly as I got further and further away from the Geiger counter.As soon as I moved away from the detector, radioactivity dropped. Please note the disclaimer about the data above.Marianne Guenot/InsiderRadiation was strongest around my throat and decreased steadily as the detector was further away.That means that those who were more than 6 ft away from me would get a lot less radiation than those who were very close to me. I felt totally normal.The worst people tend to report while radioactive is a sore throat and slight nausea. I didn't even feel that.The only superpower is radioactive sweat.I was told to double flush the toilet during the first three days of treatment.Getty ImagesDuring the first few days of the treatment, you're at your most radioactive.The radioactive iodine that didn't bind to the thyroid is getting flushed out in body fluids.This is mostly via peeing, but also through things like saliva, sweat, and poop. During those first few days, you are asked to double flush the toilet. Any period pads or tampons should be double-bagged and thrown away immediately. You're also asked to use your own plates and not cook for anyone else. I felt guilty about the risk of exposing people, even a tiny bit.For me, being exposed to the radiation was OK because I had a big upside that outweighed the extra risk.For other people, there were only downsides to being near me.The rules I followed are designed to reduce the risk of exposing others to practically zero. But still, because people can't tell you're radioactive, it's up to you to decide what to say or do to manage it.I found the responsibility of potentially exposing people without their consent to be overwhelming.  For the first two weeks, you are asked to stay 6 ft away from people. In London, this essentially means staying inside.Going to the park in the early morning was a good way to stay away from people until it got busy.Marianne Guenot/InsiderStaying more than six feet from other people is trickier than I first imagined. I don't have a car and was told to avoid public transport, so any outing from my apartment had to be within walking distance. I could buy groceries so long as I moved around and left quickly, but had to avoid all non-essential contact.I found the park was the only place I could spend a little time outside of my apartment while being far enough from others.Being isolated felt like going back into COVID-19 lockdown.I had the time to reupholster a chair.Marianne Guenot/InsiderI even revived one of my pandemic hobbies: I re-upholstered an old chair and painted my kitchen walls.  You can't kiss, hug, or share a bed with your partner for two weeks.This is how far I had to be from my partner on day 1 for radiation levels to drop back to background levelsMarianne Guenot/InsiderDuring the first two weeks, my partner and I could only see each other for short periods of time, and while six feet apart.It was harder than I thought to not have physical contact. We kept forgetting I was highly radioactive and going in for a hug before remembering we shouldn't. Staying away from loved ones after a somewhat scary medical procedure was harder than I expected.An important election happened during my treatment and there was no way for me to vote.I could vote for the first round of the French presidential election but not for the second round.Marianne Guenot/InsiderI'm French, and France's two-round presidential election was happening during the treatment period.I realized there was no way I could safely stand in line to vote in the second part, a contest between Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen.I tried to vote remotely but found that still required visiting a voting center at a different time, which I couldn't do.So I couldn't vote, which felt infuriating. (Macron won the election.)I couldn't go to a gig I was really excited about.My partner had won tickets for a festival in Bristol where the band Portishead performed for the first time in seven years.I had to settle for streaming the event live at home instead.I couldn't get my hair cut.My hair was getting pretty shaggy a month inMarianne Guenot/InsiderA haircut takes more than 15 minutes. And when your hair grows fast like mine, going without means you end up looking pretty shaggy.After two weeks, places where I'd be close to people for a long time were still out because you never know who might be pregnant.This art exhibit wasn't too crowded and I could leave if it became crowded.Marianne Guenot/InsiderAfter two weeks of strict isolation, I was allowed to see adults but had to stay away from pregnant people and children. That meant that any crowded places like pubs and cinemas were still out. But I was desperate to get out of my apartment. I could go to places where it was OK to move around a lot. I found that my partner and I could go to some events together, as long as we knew they weren't going to be too busy.I went to a gig I knew wouldn't be too crowded and watched from the back.At this venue, I was sure to stay more than six feet apart from people.Marianne Guenot/InsiderAt the end of my treatment, I went to a short gig where I knew people were going to be far away from me. I had a few friends over for dinner. They had fun with the Geiger counter.The friends I was allowed to see in the last two weeks of my treatment had fun playing with my Geiger counter.Marianne GuenotI explained the situation to my friends before they came, and they were OK with the small exposure. Measuring your radioactivity turns out to be a fun party trick.Airports have detectors for radioactivity, so I got a special letter to explain myself.I had to travel with a special letter to attest that it is normal for me to be radioactive.Marianne Guenot/InsiderAfter 27 days I was allowed to go back to life as normal. But I was still giving off a slightly higher level of radiation than normal.I learned that airports have detectors to spot unnatural levels of radioactivity. So I was given a letter attesting that I was a little more radioactive than expected. Airports in Europe were no problem, but I set off a detector in a US airport.Looking pretty tired after setting off a radiation detector after a long-haul flight.Marianne Guenot/InsiderAfter a long flight from London, I set off gates at San Francisco International Airport that started beeping with bright lights. A border agent reviewed my documents and measured the radioactivity in my thyroid with a big Geiger counter.Thankfully, he didn't think I was a safety risk and let me through.The treatment worked!Back in Insider's London newsroom after the treatment.Marianne Guenot/InsiderAfter years of hyperthyroidism, my levels are down and almost back to normal!Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 11th, 2022

Microsoft is unveiling upcoming Xbox and Game Pass exclusives on June 12 &mdash; here"s how to watch the presentation

There's no E3 this year, but Xbox and Bethesda are still teaming up to showoff some of the most anticipated games coming to Xbox and PC. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Xbox The Xbox & Bethesda Games Showcase will stream live at 1 p.m. ET on June 12. Microsoft usually holds the conference at E3, but it's a part of Summer Game Fest this year. A follow-up Xbox presentation on June 14 at 1 p.m. ET will feature more gameplay and interviews. Xbox and Bethesda will hold a joint press conference on June 12 at 1 p.m. ET to showcase upcoming video games from both brands. The nearly two-hour presentation would typically be a part of E3, the industry's largest annual publisher conference, but this year's Xbox conference will be a part of Summer Games Fest, in partnership with The Game Awards.You can watch the Xbox & Bethesda Games Showcase on their official social media channels at YouTube, Twitch, Facebook or Twitter. The Summer Games Fest website will also feature the stream.Xbox and Bethesda held their first joint conference in 2021 after Microsoft agreed to acquire Bethesda for $7.5 billion. Microsoft says it plans to launch five new first-party games between July 2022 and June 2023; previously announced titles include Hellblade 2: Senua's Saga, Fable, Avowed, and State of Decay 3.Bethesda recently delayed two of its upcoming titles, Starfield and Redfall, until early 2023, but you can expect to see more of those games during the June 12 presentation. Bethesda's other hit franchises include Fallout, the Elder Scrolls series, and Doom, as well as newer releases like Deathloop and Dishonored.Xbox will follow the press conference with another extended showcase event on June 14 that's focused on gameplay footage, hands-on demonstrations, and developer interviews. The Xbox Games Extended Showcase will stream for about 90 minutes on the Xbox social channels starting at 1 p.m. ET on June 14. We'll know more about which games will be involved after Sunday's presentation.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 10th, 2022

UFC 275 features a pair of title fights on June 11 &mdash; here"s how to watch Teixeira vs. Prochazka

The UFC men's lightweight heavyweight and women's flyweight belts are on the line at UFC 275. You can stream the PPV event on June 11 with ESPN+. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Glover Teixeira (yellow trunks) strikes Anthony Smith (black trunks) during their May 2020 fight in Jacksonville, Florida.Douglas P. DeFelice / Getty Images UFC 275 will stream live on June 11 on ESPN+, with the main card starting at 10 p.m. ET for $75. Lightweight heavyweight champion Glover Teixeira will defend his title against Jirí Procházka. Taila Santos will challenge Valentina Shevchenko for the women's flyweight championship. Glover Teixeira will defend the UFC Light Heavyweight Championship for the first time against former Rizin Light Heavyweight champion Jiri Prochazka in the main event of UFC 275, streaming live from Singapore on June 11.Valentina Shevchenko will aim for her seventh successful defense of the women's flyweight championship against Taila Santos, while Chinese fighter Zhang Weili will fight Joanna Jedrzejczyk in a highly touted rematch.How to watch UFC 275The main event of UFC 275 will be streamed live via ESPN+ at 10 p.m. ET on June 11. The event is separated into three portions: the early prelims, the prelims, and the main card.The early prelims start at 5:30 p.m. ET and are only available to UFC Fight Pass subscribers. The prelims will begin at 8 p.m. ET on ESPN+ and the ESPN2 cable channel. The main card is scheduled for 10 p.m. ET and is an ESPN+ exclusive, pay-per-view event.The heart of UFC 275 is a pay-per view event, so you'll need to pay a one-time fee of $75 to watch, as well as sign up for an ESPN+ subscription. An ESPN+ membership costs $7 a month or $70 a year.You can access the ESPN+ app on all major mobile and streaming devices, including Amazon Fire, Apple TV, Android, Chromecast, PS4, Xbox One, Roku, Samsung Smart TVs, and more.How to save on the UFC 275 pay-per-view priceIf you plan on signing up for ESPN+ to watch UFC 275, you can take advantage of a special discounted package to watch the next UFC pay-per-view.New subscribers can purchase a year-long ESPN+ membership with access to UFC 275 included for a total of $99.98. That's more than 30% off the regular combined price of an annual plan and a PPV match. Following your first year of service, ESPN+ will then renew for the regular annual price of $70.Bundle the next UFC PPV with an ESPN+ Annual Plan to more than 30%Here's the fight card for UFC 275: Teixeira vs ProcházkaEarly Prelims — 7 p.m. ET,  4 p.m. PT on UFC Fight PassRamona Pascual versus Joselyne Edwards [Women's featherweight]Liang Na versus Silvana Gomez Juarez [Women's straw weight]Kyung Ho Kang versus Gatgerel Danaa [Bantamweight]Prelims — 8 p.m. ET, 5 p.m. PT on ESPN+ and ESPNAndre Fialho versus Jake Matthews [Welterweight]Maheshate versus Steve Garcia [Lightweight]Seungwoo Choi versus Josh Culibao [Featherweight]Brendan Allen versus Jacob Malkoun [Middleweight]Main Card — 10 p.m. ET, 7 p.m. PT on ESPN+Jack Della Maddalena versus Ramazan Emeev [Welterweight]Rogerio Bontorin versus Manel Kape [Flyweight]Zhang Weili versus Joanna Jedrzejczyk [Women's strawweight]Valentina Shevchenko versus Taila Santos [Women's flyweight title fight]Glover Teixeira versus Jirí Procházka [Light heavyweight title fight]Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 10th, 2022

Summer Game Fest replaces E3, the year"s biggest event for video game news &mdash; here"s how to live-stream all the announcements

As an alternative to the canceled E3 event, Summer Games Fest will stream plenty of new game announcements from Microsoft, Capcom, and more. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Street Fighter 6 / Capcom E3, the video game industry's largest annual conference, has been canceled for 2022. In E3's place, new games are being announced through events like Summer Game Fest. Summer Game Fest begins with a showcase on June 9 at 2 p.m. ET and continues through June 14. In the video game industry, the early weeks of June are typically filled with anticipation as publishers prepare for E3, the largest annual showcase for new games. However, E3 2022 is canceled due to ongoing concerns with hosting a large in-person event during the pandemic. The organizing group behind E3, the ESA, says the conference will return in 2023.In its place, we have events like Summer Games Fest, a collaborative online showcase hosted by The Game Awards and founder Geoff Keighley. Summer Games Fest begins on June 9 at 2 p.m. ET with a series of announcements and gameplay showcases presented by multiple developers. Summer Games Fest continues into the weekend with a major press conference from Xbox and Bethesda on June 12, and several more events through June 14.Below, we've broken down the schedule and streaming details for every major event during Summer Game Fest, along with info on what you can expect from the industry's biggest publishers: Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo.Summer Game Fest schedule: How to watch every event from this year's E3 replacementSummer Game Fest and Day of Devs — June 9, 2 p.m. ETThe Summer Game Fest showcase will kick things off with roughly one hour of announcements. You can expect news and trailers for upcoming games like Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2, The Callisto Protocol, Gotham Knights, and One Piece Odyssey. The stream will also feature appearances from celebrities like Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and the developers of some of the year's most anticipated games.You can stream the Days of Devs showcase at 2 p.m. ET on June 9 through the Summer Game Fest website, YouTube and Twitch.tv.Devolver Digital showcase — June 9, 6 p.m. ETWizard with a Gun is a great example of the indie games Devolver Digital works to publish."Wizard with a Gun" / Devolver DigitalDevolver Digital is a popular publisher of indie games like Hotline Miami, Loop Hero, and Trek to Yomi. The company usually makes its E3 presentations into satirical skits, and so far 2022 looks to be no different.Devolver released a teaser video parodying the anime "Neon Genesis Evangelion" and the countdown clocks that have become cliches for new video game announcements.We don't know exactly what Devolver has planned for the showcase, but some previously announced titles include Terra Nil, Cult of the Lamb, and Wizard with a Gun.The stream begins at 6 p.m. ET on June 9. You can stream it live at the Summer Game Fest site or Twitch.tv.Netflix Geeked Week: Gaming — June 10, 1 p.m. ETNetflix's "Castlevania" adaptation is set for another season.NetflixNetflix is home to several shows inspired by video games, like "Castlevania" and "Cuphead," and even more on the way, including "Sonic Prime," "Tekken: Bloodline," and a new live-action "Resident Evil" series.Netflix's Geeked Week presentation also promises info on more than 10 upcoming Netflix games, like Lucky Luna and La Casa de Papel. Netflix recently started offering games within its streaming app.The stream starts on June 10 at 1 p.m. ET on the Summer Game Fest website.Xbox and Bethesda press conference — June 12, 1 p.m. ETStarfield is an upcoming game from the creators of Fallout and The Elder Scrolls.Microsoft/Bethesda Game StudiosXbox and Bethesda usually hold two of the biggest conferences at E3, but with the two companies recently agreeing on a merger, they now host a joint showcase. Microsoft continues to focus on new additions to its Xbox Game Pass subscription, which is often compared to Netflix. Fans have been waiting for news on previously announced Xbox titles like Fable and Hellblade 2, as well as updates for existing titles, like the long-awaited multiplayer campaign for Halo Infinite.Bethesda is planning to show off some major releases too, like the sci-fi roleplaying game Starfield and the cooperative multiplayer shooter Redfall, both of which were delayed to early 2023 to allow for more development time.The Summer Game Fest site will stream the conference on June 12 at 1 p.m. ET.Capcom showcase — June 13, 6 p.m. ETCapcom's Street Fighter 6 is coming in early 2023."Street Fighter 6" / CapcomJapanese publisher Capcom will present new footage of previously announced games, including the latest additions to hit franchises like Street Fighter, Resident Evil, and Monster Hunter.Street Fighter 6 and a remake of Resident Evil 4 are due out in early 2023, but you can also expect to see reveals from Monster Hunter Rise: Sunbreak, an expansion launching on June 28. Capcom also promised visual updates for Resident Evil 2 and Resident Evil 3 to make them look even better on PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X/S.The stream kicks off at 6 p.m. ET on June 13. You can watch on the Summer Game Fest website.Nintendo Direct — TBANintendo showed off more of Pokémon Scarlet & Violet in a trailer on June 2.Pokémon Scarlet & Violet / NintendoNintendo isn't included as a Summer Games Fest partner but it's entirely possible that a Nintendo Direct presentation happens before the end of June.Nintendo revealed the launch date of Pokémon Scarlet and Violet last week, and formally delayed the sequel to The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild to Spring 2023.Sony's State of Play — Streamed on June 2While not officially a part of Summer Game Fest, Sony streamed a 40-minute presentation filled with announcements on upcoming PlayStation games on June 2. This included new footage of Street Fighter 6 and Final Fantasy 16, as well as multiple new games for the upcoming PlayStation VR2.Sony also revealed that Marvel's Spider-Man will be coming to PC in August, after being a PlayStation exclusive for nearly four years. Spider-Man: Miles Morales will come to PC this fall too.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 9th, 2022

Check out these 41 pitch decks fintechs disrupting trading, investing, and banking used to raise millions in funding

Looking for examples of real fintech pitch decks? Check out pitch decks that Qolo, Lance, and other startups used to raise money from VCs. Check out these pitch decks for examples of fintech founders sold their vision.Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech.  Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders sold their vision. See more stories on Insider's business page. Fintech funding has been on a tear.In 2021, fintech funding hit a record $132 billion globally, according to CB Insights, more than double 2020's mark.Insider has been tracking the next wave of hot new startups that are blending finance and tech. Check out these pitch decks to see how fintech founders are selling their vision and nabbing big bucks in the process. You'll see new financial tech geared at freelancers, fresh twists on digital banking, and innovation aimed at streamlining customer onboarding. New twists on digital bankingZach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradleyHMBradleyConsumers are getting used to the idea of branch-less banking, a trend that startup digital-only banks like Chime, N26, and Varo have benefited from. The majority of these fintechs target those who are underbanked, and rely on usage of their debit cards to make money off interchange. But fellow startup HMBradley has a different business model. "Our thesis going in was that we don't swipe our debit cards all that often, and we don't think the customer base that we're focusing on does either," Zach Bruhnke, cofounder and CEO of HMBradley, told Insider. "A lot of our customer base uses credit cards on a daily basis."Instead, the startup is aiming to build clientele with stable deposits. As a result, the bank is offering interest-rate tiers depending on how much a customer saves of their direct deposit.Notably, the rate tiers are dependent on the percentage of savings, not the net amount. "We'll pay you more when you save more of what comes in," Bruhnke said. "We didn't want to segment customers by how much money they had. So it was always going to be about a percentage of income. That was really important to us."Check out the 14-page pitch deck fintech HMBradley, a neobank offering interest rates as high as 3%, used to raise an $18.25 million Series APersonal finance is only a text awayYinon Ravid, the chief executive and cofounder of Albert.AlbertThe COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the growing preference of mobile banking as customers get comfortable managing their finances online.The financial app Albert has seen a similar jump in activity. Currently counting more than six million members, deposits in Albert's savings offering doubled from the start of the pandemic in March 2020 to May of this year, from $350 million to $700 million, according to new numbers released by the company. Founded in 2015, Albert offers automated budgeting and savings tools alongside guided investment portfolios. It's looked to differentiate itself through personalized features, like the ability for customers to text human financial experts.Budgeting and saving features are free on Albert. But for more tailored financial advice, customers pay a subscription fee that's a pay-what-you-can model, between $4 and $14 a month. And Albert's now banking on a new tool to bring together its investing, savings, and budgeting tools.Fintech Albert used this 10-page pitch deck to raise a $100 million Series C from General Atlantic and CapitalG 'A bank for immigrants'Priyank Singh and Rohit Mittal are the cofounders of Stilt.StiltRohit Mittal remembers the difficulties he faced when he first arrived in the United States a decade ago as a master's student at Columbia University.As an immigrant from India, Mittal had no credit score in the US and had difficulty integrating into the financial system. Mittal even struggled to get approved to rent an apartment and couch-surfed until he found a roommate willing to offer him space in his apartment in the New York neighborhood Morningside Heights.That roommate was Priyank Singh, who would go on to become Mittal's cofounder when the two started Stilt, a financial-technology company designed to address the problems Mittal faced when he arrived in the US.Stilt, which calls itself "a bank for immigrants," does not require a social security number or credit history to access its offerings, including unsecured personal loans.Instead of relying on traditional metrics like a credit score, Stilt uses data such as education and employment to predict an individual's future income stability and cash flow before issuing a loan. Stilt has seen its loan volume grow by 500% in the past 12 months, and the startup has loaned to immigrants from 160 countries since its launch. Here are the 15 slides Stilt, which calls itself 'a bank for immigrants,' used to raise a $14 million Series AAn IRA for alternativesHenry Yoshida is the co-founder and CEO of retirement fintech startup Rocket Dollar.Rocket DollarFintech startup Rocket Dollar, which helps users invest their individual retirement account (IRA) dollars into alternative assets, just raised $8 million for its Series A round, the company announced on Thursday.Park West Asset Management led the round, with participation from investors including Hyphen Capital, which focuses on backing Asian American entrepreneurs, and crypto exchange Kraken's venture arm. Co-founded in 2018 by CEO Henry Yoshida, CTO Rick Dude, and VP of marketing Thomas Young, Rocket Dollar now has over $350 million in assets under management on its platform. Yoshida sold his first startup, a roboadvisor called Honest Dollar, to Goldman Sachs' investment management division for an estimated $20 million.Yoshida told Insider that while ultra-high net worth investors have been investing self-directed retirement account dollars into alternative assets like real estate, private equity, and cryptocurrency, average investors have not historically been able to access the same opportunities to invest IRA dollars in alternative assets through traditional platforms.Here's the 34-page pitch deck a fintech that helps users invest their retirement savings in crypto and real estate assets used to nab $8 millionA trading app for activismAntoine Argouges, CEO and founder of TulipshareTulipshareAn up-and-coming fintech is taking aim at some of the world's largest corporations by empowering retail investors to push for social and environmental change by pooling their shareholder rights.London-based Tulipshare lets individuals in the UK invest as little as one pound in publicly-traded company stocks. The upstart combines individuals' shareholder rights with other like-minded investors to advocate for environmental, social, and corporate governance change at firms like JPMorgan, Apple, and Amazon.The goal is to achieve a higher number of shares to maximize the number of votes that can be submitted at shareholder meetings. Already a regulated broker-dealer in the UK, Tulipshare recently applied for registration as a broker-dealer in the US. "If you ask your friends and family if they've ever voted on shareholder resolutions, the answer will probably be close to zero," CEO and founder Antoine Argouges told Insider. "I started Tulipshare to utilize shareholder rights to bring about positive corporate change that has an impact on people's lives and our planet — what's more powerful than money to change the system we live in?"Check out the 14-page pitch deck from Tulipshare, a trading app that lets users pool their shareholder votes for activism campaignsDigital tools for independent financial advisorsJason Wenk, founder and CEO of AltruistAltruistJason Wenk started his career at Morgan Stanley in investment research over 20 years ago. Now, he's running a company that is hoping to broaden access to financial advice for less-wealthy individuals. The startup raised $50 million in Series B funding led by Insight Partners with participation from investors Vanguard and Venrock. The round brings the Los Angeles-based startup's total funding to just under $67 million.Founded in 2018, Altruist is a digital brokerage built for independent financial advisors, intended to be an "all-in-one" platform that unites custodial functions, portfolio accounting, and a client-facing portal. It allows advisors to open accounts, invest, build models, report, trade (including fractional shares), and bill clients through an interface that can advisors time by eliminating mundane operational tasks.Altruist aims to make personalized financial advice less expensive, more efficient, and more inclusive through the platform, which is designed for registered investment advisors (RIAs), a growing segment of the wealth management industry. Here's the pitch deck for Altruist, a wealth tech challenging custodians Fidelity and Charles Schwab, that raised $50 million from Vanguard and InsightRethinking debt collection Jason Saltzman, founder and CEO of ReliefReliefFor lenders, debt collection is largely automated. But for people who owe money on their credit cards, it can be a confusing and stressful process.  Relief is looking to change that. Its app automates the credit-card debt collection process for users, negotiating with lenders and collectors to settle outstanding balances on their behalf. The fintech just launched and closed a $2 million seed round led by Collaborative Ventures. Relief's fundraising experience was a bit different to most. Its pitch deck, which it shared with one investor via Google Slides, went viral. It set out to raise a $1 million seed round, but ended up doubling that and giving some investors money back to make room for others.Check out a 15-page pitch deck that went viral and helped a credit-card debt collection startup land a $2 million seed roundHelping small banks lendTKCollateralEdgeFor large corporations with a track record of tapping the credit markets, taking out debt is a well-structured and clear process handled by the nation's biggest investment banks and teams of accountants. But smaller, middle-market companies — typically those with annual revenues ranging up to $1 billion — are typically served by regional and community banks that don't always have the capacity to adequately measure the risk of loans or price them competitively. Per the National Center for the Middle Market, 200,000 companies fall into this range, accounting for roughly 33% of US private sector GDP and employment.Dallas-based fintech CollateralEdge works with these banks — typically those with between $1 billion and $50 billion in assets — to help analyze and price slices of commercial and industrial loans that previously might have gone unserved by smaller lenders.On October 20th, CollateralEdge announced a $3.5 million seed round led by Dallas venture fund Perot Jain with participation from Kneeland Youngblood (a founder of the healthcare-focused private-equity firm Pharos Capital) and other individual investors.Here's the 10-page deck CollateralEdge, a fintech streamlining how small banks lend to businesses, used to raise a $3.5 million seed roundA new way to assess creditworthinessPinwheel founders Curtis Lee, Kurt Lin, and Anish Basu.PinwheelGrowing up, Kurt Lin never saw his father get frustrated. A "traditional, stoic figure," Lin said his father immigrated to the United States in the 1970s. Becoming part of the financial system proved even more difficult than assimilating into a new culture.Lin recalled visiting bank after bank with his father as a child, watching as his father's applications for a mortgage were denied due to his lack of credit history. "That was the first time in my life I really saw him crack," Lin told Insider. "The system doesn't work for a lot of people — including my dad," he added. Lin would find a solution to his father's problem years later while working with Anish Basu, and Curtis Lee on an automated health savings account. The trio realized the payroll data integrations they were working on could be the basis of a product that would help lenders work with consumers without strong credit histories."That's when the lightbulb hit," said Lin, Pinwheel's CEO.In 2018, Lin, Basu, and Lee founded Pinwheel, an application-programming interface that shares payroll data to help both fintechs and traditional lenders serve consumers with limited or poor credit, who have historically struggled to access financial products. Here's the 9-page deck that Pinwheel, a fintech helping lenders tap into payroll data to serve consumers with little to no credit, used to raise a $50 million Series BAn alternative auto lenderTricolorAn alternative auto lender that caters to thin- and no-credit Hispanic borrowers is planning a national expansion after scoring a $90 million investment from BlackRock-managed funds. Tricolor is a Dallas-based auto lender that is a community development financial institution. It uses a proprietary artificial-intelligence engine that decisions each customer based on more than 100 data points, such as proof of income. Half of Tricolor's customers have a FICO score, and less than 12% have scores above 650, yet the average customer has lived in the US for 15 years, according to the deck.A 2017 survey by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation found 31.5% of Hispanic households had no mainstream credit compared to 14.4% of white households. "For decades, the deck has been stacked against low income or credit invisible Hispanics in the United States when it comes to the purchase and financing of a used vehicle," Daniel Chu, founder and CEO of Tricolor, said in a statement announcing the raise.An auto lender that caters to underbanked Hispanics used this 25-page deck to raise $90 million from BlackRock investors A new way to access credit The TomoCredit teamTomoCreditKristy Kim knows first-hand the challenge of obtaining credit in the US without an established credit history. Kim, who came to the US from South Korea, couldn't initially get access to credit despite having a job in investment banking after graduating college. "I was in my early twenties, I had a good income, my job was in investment banking but I could not get approved for anything," Kim told Insider. "Many young professionals like me, we deserve an opportunity to be considered but just because we didn't have a Fico, we weren't given a chance to even apply," she added.Kim started TomoCredit in 2018 to help others like herself gain access to consumer credit. TomoCredit spent three years building an internal algorithm to underwrite customers based on cash flow, rather than a credit score.TomoCredit, a fintech that lends to thin- and no-credit borrowers, used this 17-page pitch deck to raise its $10 million Series AHelping streamline how debts are repaidMethod Financial cofounders Jose Bethancourt and Marco del Carmen.Method FinancialWhen Jose Bethancourt graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in May 2019, he faced the same question that confronts over 43 million Americans: How would he repay his student loans?The problem led Bethancourt on a nearly two-year journey that culminated in the creation of a startup aimed at making it easier for consumers to more seamlessly pay off all kinds of debt.  Initially, Bethancourt and fellow UT grad Marco del Carmen built GradJoy, an app that helped users better understand how to manage student loan repayment and other financial habits. GradJoy was accepted into Y Combinator in the summer of 2019. But the duo quickly realized the real benefit to users would be helping them move money to make payments instead of simply offering recommendations."When we started GradJoy, we thought, 'Oh, we'll just give advice — we don't think people are comfortable with us touching their student loans,' and then we realized that people were saying, 'Hey, just move the money — if you think I should pay extra, then I'll pay extra.' So that's kind of the movement that we've seen, just, everybody's more comfortable with fintechs doing what's best for them," Bethancourt told Insider. Here is the 11-slide pitch deck Method Financial, a Y Combinator-backed fintech making debt repayment easier, used to raise $2.5 million in pre-seed fundingQuantum computing made easyQC Ware CEO Matt Johnson.QC WareEven though banks and hedge funds are still several years out from adding quantum computing to their tech arsenals, that hasn't stopped Wall Street giants from investing time and money into the emerging technology class. And momentum for QC Ware, a startup looking to cut the time and resources it takes to use quantum computing, is accelerating. The fintech secured a $25 million Series B on September 29 co-led by Koch Disruptive Technologies and Covestro with participation from D.E. Shaw, Citi, and Samsung Ventures.QC Ware, founded in 2014, builds quantum algorithms for the likes of Goldman Sachs (which led the fintech's Series A), Airbus, and BMW Group. The algorithms, which are effectively code bases that include quantum processing elements, can run on any of the four main public-cloud providers.Quantum computing allows companies to do complex calculations faster than traditional computers by using a form of physics that runs on quantum bits as opposed to the traditional 1s and 0s that computers use. This is especially helpful in banking for risk analytics or algorithmic trading, where executing calculations milliseconds faster than the competition can give firms a leg up. Here's the 20-page deck QC Ware, a fintech making quantum computing more accessible, used to raised its $25 million Series BSimplifying quant modelsKirat Singh and Mark Higgins, Beacon's cofounders.BeaconA fintech that helps financial institutions use quantitative models to streamline their businesses and improve risk management is catching the attention, and capital, of some of the country's biggest investment managers.Beacon Platform, founded in 2014, is a fintech that builds applications and tools to help banks, asset managers, and trading firms quickly integrate quantitative models that can help with analyzing risk, ensuring compliance, and improving operational efficiency. The company raised its Series C on Wednesday, scoring a $56 million investment led by Warburg Pincus with support from Blackstone Innovations Investments, PIMCO, and Global Atlantic. Blackstone, PIMCO, and Global Atlantic are also users of Beacon's tech, as are the Commonwealth Bank of Australia and Shell New Energies, a division of Royal Dutch Shell, among others.The fintech provides a shortcut for firms looking to use quantitative modelling and data science across various aspects of their businesses, a process that can often take considerable resources if done solo.Here's the 20-page pitch deck Beacon, a fintech helping Wall Street better analyze risk and data, used to raise $56 million from Warburg Pincus, Blackstone, and PIMCOA new data feed for bond tradingMark Lennihan/APFor years, the only way investors could figure out the going price of a corporate bond was calling up a dealer on the phone. The rise of electronic trading has streamlined that process, but data can still be hard to come by sometimes. A startup founded by a former Goldman Sachs exec has big plans to change that. BondCliQ is a fintech that provides a data feed of pre-trade pricing quotes for the corporate bond market. Founded by Chris White, the creator of Goldman Sachs' defunct corporate-bond-trading system, BondCliQ strives to bring transparency to a market that has traditionally kept such data close to the vest. Banks, which typically serve as the dealers of corporate bonds, have historically kept pre-trade quotes hidden from other dealers to maintain a competitive advantage.But tech advancements and the rise of electronic marketplaces have shifted power dynamics into the hands of buy-side firms, like hedge funds and asset managers. The investors are now able to get a fuller picture of the market by aggregating price quotes directly from dealers or via vendors.Here's the 9-page pitch deck that BondCliQ, a fintech looking to bring more data and transparency to bond trading, used to raise its Series AFraud prevention for lenders and insurersFiordaliso/Getty ImagesOnboarding new customers with ease is key for any financial institution or retailer. The more friction you add, the more likely consumers are to abandon the entire process.But preventing fraud is also a priority, and that's where Neuro-ID comes in. The startup analyzes what it calls "digital body language," or, the way users scroll, type, and tap. Using that data, Neuro-ID can identify fraudulent users before they create an account. It's built for banks, lenders, insurers, and e-commerce players."The train has left the station for digital transformation, but there's a massive opportunity to try to replicate all those communications that we used to have when we did business in-person, all those tells that we would get verbally and non-verbally on whether or not someone was trustworthy," Neuro-ID CEO Jack Alton told Insider.Founded in 2014, the startup's pitch is twofold: Neuro-ID can save companies money by identifying fraud early, and help increase user conversion by making the onboarding process more seamless. In December Neuro-ID closed a $7 million Series A, co-led by Fin VC and TTV Capital, with participation from Canapi Ventures. With 30 employees, Neuro-ID is using the fresh funding to grow its team and create additional tools to be more self-serving for customers.Here's the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that analyzes consumers' digital behavior to fight fraud used to raise a $7 million Series AAI-powered tools to spot phony online reviews FakespotMarketplaces like Amazon and eBay host millions of third-party sellers, and their algorithms will often boost items in search based on consumer sentiment, which is largely based on reviews. But many third-party sellers use fake reviews often bought from click farms to boost their items, some of which are counterfeit or misrepresented to consumers.That's where Fakespot comes in. With its Chrome extension, it warns users of sellers using potentially fake reviews to boost sales and can identify fraudulent sellers. Fakespot is currently compatible with Amazon, BestBuy, eBay, Sephora, Steam, and Walmart."There are promotional reviews written by humans and bot-generated reviews written by robots or review farms," Fakespot founder and CEO Saoud Khalifah told Insider. "Our AI system has been built to detect both categories with very high accuracy."Fakespot's AI learns via reviews data available on marketplace websites, and uses natural-language processing to identify if reviews are genuine. Fakespot also looks at things like whether the number of positive reviews are plausible given how long a seller has been active.Fakespot, a startup that helps shoppers detect robot-generated reviews and phony sellers on Amazon and Shopify, used this pitch deck to nab a $4 million Series AE-commerce focused business bankingMichael Rangel, cofounder and CEO, and Tyler McIntyre, cofounder and CTO of Novo.Kristelle Boulos PhotographyBusiness banking is a hot market in fintech. And it seems investors can't get enough.Novo, the digital banking fintech aimed at small e-commerce businesses, raised a $40.7 million Series A led by Valar Ventures in June. Since its launch in 2018, Novo has signed up 100,000 small businesses. Beyond bank accounts, it offers expense management, a corporate card, and integrates with e-commerce infrastructure players like Shopify, Stripe, and Wise.Founded in 2018, Novo was based in New York City, but has since moved its headquarters to Miami. Here's the 12-page pitch deck e-commerce banking startup Novo used to raise its $40 million Series AShopify for embedded financeProductfy CEO and founder, Duy VoProductfyProductfy is looking to break into embedded finance by becoming the Shopify of back-end banking services.Embedded finance — integrating banking services in non-financial settings — has taken hold in the e-commerce world. But Productfy is going after a different kind of customer in churches, universities, and nonprofits.The San Jose, Calif.-based upstart aims to help non-finance companies offer their own banking products. Productfy can help customers launch finance features in as little as a week and without additional engineering resources or background knowledge of banking compliance or legal requirements, Productfy founder and CEO Duy Vo told Insider. "You don't need an engineer to stand up Shopify, right? You can be someone who's just creating art and you can use Shopify to build your own online store," Vo said, adding that Productfy is looking to take that user experience and replicate it for banking services.Here's the 15-page pitch deck Productfy, a fintech looking to be the Shopify of embedded finance, used to nab a $16 million Series ADeploying algorithms and automation to small-business financingJustin Straight and Bernard Worthy, LoanWell co-foundersLoanWellBernard Worthy and Justin Straight, the founders of LoanWell, want to break down barriers to financing for small and medium-size businesses — and they've got algorithms and automation in their tech arsenals that they hope will do it.Worthy, the company's CEO, and Straight, its chief operating and financial officer, are powering community-focused lenders to fill a gap in the SMB financing world by boosting access to loans under $100,000. And the upstart is known for catching the attention, and dollars, of mission-driven investors. LoanWell closed a $3 million seed financing round in December led by Impact America Fund with participation from SoftBank's SB Opportunity Fund and Collab Capital.LoanWell automates the financing process — from underwriting and origination, to money movement and servicing — which shaves down an up-to-90-day process to 30 days or even same-day with some LoanWell lenders, Worthy said. SMBs rely on these loans to process quickly after two years of financial uncertainty. But the pandemic illustrated how time-consuming and expensive SMB financing can be, highlighted by efforts like the federal government's Paycheck Protection Program.Community banks, once the lifeline to capital for many local businesses, continue to shutter. And demands for smaller loan amounts remain largely unmet. More than half of business-loan applicants sought $100,000 or less, according to 2018 data from the Federal Reserve. But the average small-business bank loan was closer to six times that amount, according to the latest data from a now discontinued Federal Reserve survey.Here's the 14-page pitch deck LoanWell used to raise $3 million from investors like SoftBank.Catering to 'micro businesses'Stefanie Sample is the founder and CEO of FundidFundidStartups aiming to simplify the often-complex world of corporate cards have boomed in recent years.Business-finance management startup Brex was last valued at $12.3 billion after raising $300 million last year. Startup card provider Ramp announced an $8.1 billion valuation in March after growing its revenue nearly 10x in 2021. Divvy, a small business card provider, was acquired by Bill.com in May 2021 for approximately $2.5 billion.But despite how hot the market has gotten, Stefanie Sample said she ended up working in the space by accident. Sample is the founder and CEO of Fundid, a new fintech that provides credit and lending products to small businesses.This May, Fundid announced a $3.25 million seed round led by Nevcaut Ventures. Additional investors include the Artemis Fund and Builders and Backers. The funding announcement capped off the company's first year: Sample introduced the Fundid concept in April 2021, launched its website in May, and began raising capital in August."I never meant to do Fundid," Sample told Insider. "I never meant to do something that was venture-backed."Read the 12-page deck used by Fundid, a fintech offering credit and lending tools for 'micro businesses'Embedded payments for SMBsThe Highnote teamHighnoteBranded cards have long been a way for merchants with the appropriate bank relationships to create additional revenue and build customer loyalty. The rise of embedded payments, or the ability to shop and pay in a seamless experience within a single app, has broadened the number of companies looking to launch branded cards.Highnote is a startup that helps small to mid-sized merchants roll out their own debit and pre-paid digital cards. The fintech emerged from stealth on Tuesday to announce it raised $54 million in seed and Series A funding.Here's the 12-page deck Highnote, a startup helping SMBs embed payments, used to raise $54 million in seed and Series A fundingHelping small businesses manage their taxesComplYant's founder Shiloh Jackson wants to help people be present in their bookkeeping.ComplYantAfter 14 years in tax accounting, Shiloh Johnson had formed a core philosophy around corporate accounting: everyone deserves to understand their business's money and business owners need to be present in their bookkeeping process.She wanted to help small businesses understand "this is why you need to do what you're doing and why you have to change the way you think about tax and be present in your bookkeeping process," she told Insider. The Los Angeles native wanted small businesses to not only understand business tax no matter their size but also to find the tools they needed to prepare their taxes in one spot. So Johnson developed a software platform that provides just that.The 13-page pitch deck ComplYant used to nab $4 million that details the tax startup's plan to be Turbotax, Quickbooks, and Xero rolled into one for small business ownersInvoice financing for SMBsStacey Abrams and Lara Hodgson, Now co-foundersNowAbout a decade ago, politician Stacey Abrams and entrepreneur Lara Hodgson were forced to fold their startup because of a kink in the supply chain — but not in the traditional sense.Nourish, which made spill-proof bottled water for children, had grown quickly from selling to small retailers to national ones. And while that may sound like a feather in the small business' cap, there was a hang-up."It was taking longer and longer to get paid, and as you can imagine, you deliver the product and then you wait and you wait, but meanwhile you have to pay your employees and you have to pay your vendors," Hodgson told Insider. "Waiting to get paid was constraining our ability to grow."While it's not unusual for small businesses to grapple with working capital issues, the dust was still settling from the Great Recession. Abrams and Hodgson couldn't secure a line of credit or use financing tools like factoring to solve their problem. The two entrepreneurs were forced to close Nourish in 2012, but along the way they recognized a disconnect in the system.  "Why are we the ones borrowing money, when in fact we're the lender here because every time you send an invoice to a customer, you've essentially extended a free loan to that customer by letting them pay later," Hodgson said. "And the only reason why we were going to need to possibly borrow money was because we had just given ours away for free to Whole Foods," she added.Check out the 7-page deck that Now, Stacey Abrams' fintech that wants to help small businesses 'grow fearlessly', used to raise $29 millionCheckout made easyRyan Breslow.Ryan BreslowAmazon has long dominated e-commerce with its one-click checkout flows, offering easier ways for consumers to shop online than its small-business competitors.Bolt gives small merchants tools to offer the same easy checkouts so they can compete with the likes of Amazon.The startup raised its $393 million Series D to continue adding its one-click checkout feature to merchants' own websites in October.Bolt markets to merchants themselves. But a big part of Bolt's pitch is its growing network of consumers — currently over 5.6 million — that use its features across multiple Bolt merchant customers. Roughly 5% of Bolt's transactions were network-driven in May, meaning users that signed up for a Bolt account on another retailer's website used it elsewhere. The network effects were even more pronounced in verticals like furniture, where 49% of transactions were driven by the Bolt network."The network effect is now unleashed with Bolt in full fury, and that triggered the raise," Bolt's founder and CEO Ryan Breslow told Insider.Here's the 12-page deck that one-click checkout Bolt used to outline its network of 5.6 million consumers and raise its Series DPayments infrastructure for fintechsQolo CEO and co-founder Patricia MontesiQoloThree years ago, Patricia Montesi realized there was a disconnect in the payments world. "A lot of new economy companies or fintech companies were looking to mesh up a lot of payment modalities that they weren't able to," Montesi, CEO and co-founder of Qolo, told Insider.Integrating various payment capabilities often meant tapping several different providers that had specializations in one product or service, she added, like debit card issuance or cross-border payments. "The way people were getting around that was that they were creating this spider web of fintech," she said, adding that "at the end of it all, they had this mess of suppliers and integrations and bank accounts."The 20-year payments veteran rounded up a group of three other co-founders — who together had more than a century of combined industry experience — to start Qolo, a business-to-business fintech that sought out to bundle back-end payment rails for other fintechs.Here's the 11-slide pitch deck a startup that provides payments infrastructure for other fintechs used to raise a $15 million Series ABetter use of payroll dataAtomic's Head of Markets, Lindsay DavisAtomicEmployees at companies large and small know the importance — and limitations — of how firms manage their payrolls. A new crop of startups are building the API pipes that connect companies and their employees to offer a greater level of visibility and flexibility when it comes to payroll data and employee verification. On Thursday, one of those names, Atomic, announced a $40 million Series B fundraising round co-led by Mercato Partners and Greylock, alongside Core Innovation Capital, Portage, and ATX Capital. The round follows Atomic's Series A round announced in October, when the startup raised a $22 million Series A from investors including Core Innovation Capital, Portage, and Greylock.Payroll startup Atomic just raised a $40 million Series B. Here's an internal deck detailing the fintech's approach to the red-hot payments space.Saving on vendor invoicesHoward Katzenberg, Glean's CEO and cofounderGleanWhen it comes to high-flying tech startups, headlines and investors typically tend to focus on industry "disruption" and the total addressable market a company is hoping to reach. Expense cutting as a way to boost growth typically isn't part of the conversation early on, and finance teams are viewed as cost centers relative to sales teams. But one fast-growing area of business payments has turned its focus to managing those costs. Startups like Ramp and established names like Bill.com have made their name offering automated expense-management systems. Now, one new fintech competitor, Glean, is looking to take that further by offering both automated payment services and tailored line-item accounts-payable insights driven by machine-learning models. Glean's CFO and founder, Howard Katzenberg, told Insider that the genesis of Glean was driven by his own personal experience managing the finance teams of startups, including mortgage lender Better.com, which Katzenberg left in 2019, and online small-business lender OnDeck. "As a CFO of high-growth companies, I spent a lot of time focused on revenue and I had amazing dashboards in real time where I could see what is going on top of the funnel, what's going on with conversion rates, what's going on in terms of pricing and attrition," Katzenberg told Insider. See the 15-slide pitch deck Glean, a startup using machine learning to find savings in vendor invoices, used to raise $10.8 million in seed fundingReal-estate management made easyAgora founders Noam Kahan, CTO, Bar Mor, CEO, and Lior Dolinski, CPOAgoraFor alternative asset managers of any type, the operations underpinning sales and investor communications are a crucial but often overlooked part of the business. Fund managers love to make bets on markets, not coordinate hundreds of wire transfers to clients each quarter or organize customer-relationship-management databases.Within the $10.6 trillion global market for professionally managed real-estate investing, that's where Tel Aviv and New York-based startup Agora hopes to make its mark.Founded in 2019, Agora offers a set of back-office, investor relations, and sales software tools that real-estate investment managers can plug into their workflows. On Wednesday, Agora announced a $9 million seed round, led by Israel-based venture firm Aleph, with participation from River Park Ventures and Maccabee Ventures. The funding comes on the heels of an October 2020 pre-seed fund raise worth $890,000, in which Maccabee also participated.Here's the 15-slide pitch deck that Agora, a startup helping real-estate investors manage communications and sales with their clients, used to raise a $9 million seed roundAccess to commercial real-estate investing LEX Markets cofounders and co-CEOs Drew Sterrett and Jesse Daugherty.LEX MarketsDrew Sterrett was structuring real-estate deals while working in private equity when he realized the inefficiencies that existed in the market. Only high-net worth individuals or accredited investors could participate in commercial real-estate deals. If they ever wanted to leave a partnership or sell their stake in a property, it was difficult to find another investor to replace them. Owners also struggled to sell minority stakes in their properties and didn't have many good options to recapitalize an asset if necessary.In short, the market had a high barrier to entry despite the fact it didn't always have enough participants to get deals done quickly. "Most investors don't have access to high-quality commercial real-estate investments. How do we have the oldest and largest asset class in the world and one of the largest wealth creators with no public and liquid market?" Sterrett told Insider. "It sort of seems like a no-brainer, and that this should have existed 50 or 60 years ago."This 15-page pitch deck helped LEX Markets, a startup making investing in commercial real estate more accessible, raise $15 millionInsurance goes digitalJamie Hale, CEO and cofounder of LadderLadderFintechs looking to transform how insurance policies are underwritten, issued, and experienced by customers have grown as new technology driven by digital trends and artificial intelligence shape the market. And while verticals like auto, homeowner's, and renter's insurance have seen their fair share of innovation from forward-thinking fintechs, one company has taken on the massive life-insurance market. Founded in 2017, Ladder uses a tech-driven approach to offer life insurance with a digital, end-to-end service that it says is more flexible, faster, and cost-effective than incumbent players.Life, annuity, and accident and health insurance within the US comprise a big chunk of the broader market. In 2020, premiums written on those policies totaled some $767 billion, compared to $144 billion for auto policies and $97 billion for homeowner's insurance.Here's the 12-page deck that Ladder, a startup disrupting the 'crown jewel' of the insurance market, used to nab $100 millionData science for commercial insuranceTanner Hackett, founder and CEO of CounterpartCounterpartThere's been no shortage of funds flowing into insurance-technology companies over the past few years. Private-market funding to insurtechs soared to $15.4 billion in 2021, a 90% increase compared to 2020. Some of the most well-known consumer insurtech names — from Oscar (which focuses on health insurance) to Metromile (which focuses on auto) — launched on the public markets last year, only to fall over time or be acquired as investors questioned the sustainability of their business models. In the commercial arena, however, the head of one insurtech company thinks there is still room to grow — especially for those catering to small businesses operating in an entirely new, pandemic-defined environment. "The bigger opportunity is in commercial lines," Tanner Hackett, the CEO of management liability insurer Counterpart, told Insider."Everywhere I poke, I'm like, 'Oh my goodness, we're still in 1.0, and all the other businesses I've built were on version three.' Insurance is still in 1.0, still managing from spreadsheets and PDFs," added Hackett, who also previously co-founded Button, which focuses on mobile marketing. See the 8-page pitch deck Counterpart, a startup disrupting commercial insurance with data science, used to raise a $30 million Series BSmarter insurance for multifamily propertiesItai Ben-Zaken, cofounder and CEO of Honeycomb.HoneycombA veteran of the online-insurance world is looking to revolutionize the way the industry prices risk for commercial properties with the help of artificial intelligence.Insurance companies typically send inspectors to properties before issuing policies to better understand how the building is maintained and identify potential risks or issues with it. It's a process that can be time-consuming, expensive, and inefficient, making it hard to justify for smaller commercial properties, like apartment and condo buildings.Insurtech Honeycomb is looking to fix that by using AI to analyze a combination of third-party data and photos submitted by customers through the startup's app to quickly identify any potential risks at a property and more accurately price policies."That whole physical inspection thing had really good things in it, but it wasn't really something that is scalable and, it's also expensive," Itai Ben-Zaken, Honeycomb's cofounder and CEO, told Insider. "The best way to see a property right now is Google street view. Google street view is usually two years old."Here's the 10-page Series A pitch deck used by Honeycomb, a startup that wants to revolutionize the $26 billion market for multifamily property insuranceHelping freelancers with their taxesJaideep Singh is the CEO and co-founder of FlyFin, an AI-driven tax preparation software program for freelancers.FlyFinSome people, particularly those with families or freelancing businesses, spend days searching for receipts for tax season, making tax preparation a time consuming and, at times, taxing experience. That's why in 2020 Jaideep Singh founded FlyFin, an artificial-intelligence tax preparation program for freelancers that helps people, as he puts it, "fly through their finances." FlyFin is set up to connect to a person's bank accounts, allowing the AI program to help users monitor for certain expenses that can be claimed on their taxes like business expenditures, the interest on mortgages, property taxes, or whatever else that might apply. "For most individuals, people have expenses distributed over multiple financial institutions. So we built an AI platform that is able to look at expenses, understand the individual, understand your profession, understand the freelance population at large, and start the categorization," Singh told Insider.Check out the 7-page pitch deck a startup helping freelancers manage their taxes used to nab $8 million in fundingDigital banking for freelancersJGalione/Getty ImagesLance is a new digital bank hoping to simplify the life of those workers by offering what it calls an "active" approach to business banking. "We found that every time we sat down with the existing tools and resources of our accountants and QuickBooks and spreadsheets, we just ended up getting tangled up in the whole experience of it," Lance cofounder and CEO Oona Rokyta told Insider. Lance offers subaccounts for personal salaries, withholdings, and savings to which freelancers can automatically allocate funds according to custom preset levels. It also offers an expense balance that's connected to automated tax withholdings.In May, Lance announced the closing of a $2.8 million seed round that saw participation from Barclays, BDMI, Great Oaks Capital, Imagination Capital, Techstars, DFJ Frontier, and others.Here's the 21-page pitch deck Lance, a digital bank for freelancers, used to raise a $2.8 million seed round from investors including BarclaysSoftware for managing freelancersWorksome cofounder and CEO Morten Petersen.WorksomeThe way people work has fundamentally changed over the past year, with more flexibility and many workers opting to freelance to maintain their work-from-home lifestyles.But managing a freelance or contractor workforce is often an administrative headache for employers. Worksome is a startup looking to eliminate all the extra work required for employers to adapt to more flexible working norms.Worksome started as a freelancer marketplace automating the process of matching qualified workers with the right jobs. But the team ultimately pivoted to a full suite of workforce management software, automating administrative burdens required to hire, pay, and account for contract workers.In May, Worksome closed a $13 million Series A backed by European angel investor Tommy Ahlers and Danish firm Lind & Risør.Here's the 21-slide pitch deck used by a startup that helps firms like Carlsberg and Deloitte manage freelancersPayments and operations support HoneyBook cofounders Dror Shimoni, Oz Alon, and Naama Alon.HoneyBookWhile countless small businesses have been harmed by the pandemic, self-employment and entrepreneurship have found ways to blossom as Americans started new ventures.Half of the US population may be freelance by 2027, according to a study commissioned by remote-work hiring platform Upwork. HoneyBook, a fintech startup that provides payment and operations support for freelancers, in May raised $155 million in funding and achieved unicorn status with its $1 billion-plus valuation.Durable Capital Partners led the Series D funding with other new investors including renowned hedge fund Tiger Global, Battery Ventures, Zeev Ventures, and 01 Advisors. Citi Ventures, Citigroup's startup investment arm that also backs fintech robo-advisor Betterment, participated as an existing investor in the round alongside Norwest Venture partners. The latest round brings the company's fundraising total to $227 million to date.Here's the 21-page pitch deck a Citi-backed fintech for freelancers used to raise $155 million from investors like hedge fund Tiger GlobalPay-as-you-go compliance for banks, fintechs, and crypto startupsNeepa Patel, Themis' founder and CEOThemisWhen Themis founder and CEO Neepa Patel set out to build a new compliance tool for banks, fintech startups, and crypto companies, she tapped into her own experience managing risk at some of the nation's biggest financial firms. Having worked as a bank regulator at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and in compliance at Morgan Stanley, Deutsche Bank, and the enterprise blockchain company R3, Patel was well-placed to assess the shortcomings in financial compliance software. But Patel, who left the corporate world to begin work on Themis in 2020, drew on more than just her own experience and frustrations to build the startup."It's not just me building a tool based on my personal pain points. I reached out to regulators. I reached out to bank compliance officers and members in the fintech community just to make sure that we're building it exactly how they do their work," Patel told Insider. "That was the biggest problem: No one built a tool that was reflective of how people do their work."Check out the 9-page pitch deck Themis, which offers pay-as-you-go compliance for banks, fintechs, and crypto startups, used to raise $9 million in seed fundingConnecting startups and investorsHum Capital cofounder and CEO Blair SilverbergHum CapitalBlair Silverberg is no stranger to fundraising.For six years, Silverberg was a venture capitalist at Draper Fisher Jurvetson and Private Credit Investments making bets on startups."I was meeting with thousands of founders in person each year, watching them one at a time go through this friction where they're meeting a ton of investors, and the investors are all asking the same questions," Silverberg told Insider. He switched gears about three years ago, moving to the opposite side of the metaphorical table, to start Hum Capital, which uses artificial intelligence to match investors with startups looking to fundraise.On August 31, the New York-based fintech announced its $9 million Series A. The round was led by Future Ventures with participation from Webb Investment Network, Wavemaker Partners, and Partech. This 11-page pitch deck helped Hum Capital, a fintech using AI to match investors with startups, raise a $9 million Series A.Helping LatAm startups get up to speedKamino cofounders Gut Fragoso, Rodrigo Perenha, Benjamin Gleason, and Gonzalo ParejoKaminoThere's more venture capital flowing into Latin America than ever before, but getting the funds in founders' hands is not exactly a simple process.In 2021, investors funneled $15.3 billion into Latin American companies, more than tripling the previous record of $4.9 billion in 2019. Fintech and e-commerce sectors drove funding, accounting for 39% and 25% of total funding, respectively.  However, for many startup founders in the region who have successfully sold their ideas and gotten investors on board, there's a patchwork of corporate structuring that's needed to access the funds, according to Benjamin Gleason, who was the chief financial officer at Groupon LatAm prior to cofounding Brazil-based fintech Kamino.It's a process Gleason and his three fellow Kamino cofounders have been through before as entrepreneurs and startup execs themselves. Most often, startups have to set up offshore financial accounts outside of Brazil, which "entails creating a Cayman [Islands] holding company, a Delaware LLC, and then connecting it to a local entity here and also opening US bank accounts for the Cayman entity, which is not trivial from a KYC perspective," said Gleason, who founded open-banking fintech Guiabolso in Sao Paulo. His partner, Gonzalo Parejo, experienced the same toils when he founded insurtech Bidu."Pretty much any international investor will usually ask for that," Gleason said, adding that investors typically cite liability issues."It's just a massive amount of bureaucracy, complexity, a lot of time from the founders. All of this just to get the money from the investor that wants to give them the money," he added.Here's the 8-page pitch deck Kamino, a fintech helping LatAm startups with everything from financing to corporate credit cards, used to raise a $6.1M pre-seed roundThe back-end tech for beautyDanielle Cohen-Shohet, CEO and founder of GlossGeniusGlossGeniusDanielle Cohen-Shohet might have started as a Goldman Sachs investment analyst, but at her core she was always a coder.After about three years at Goldman Sachs, Cohen-Shohet left the world of traditional finance to code her way into starting her own company in 2016. "There was a period of time where I did nothing, but eat, sleep, and code for a few weeks," Cohen-Shohet told Insider. Her technical edge and knowledge of the point-of-sale payment space led her to launch a software company focused on providing behind-the-scenes tech for beauty and wellness small businesses.Cohen-Shohet launched GlossGenius in 2017 to provide payments tech for hair stylists, nail technicians, blow-out bars, and other small businesses in the space.Here's the 11-page deck GlossGenius, a startup that provides back-end tech for the beauty industry, used to raise $16 millionRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 6th, 2022

WWDC is when Apple unveils its latest software &mdash; here"s how to live-stream the event on June 6

Apple's annual event for developers kicks off with a keynote at 1 p.m. ET on June 6, when new software announcements are expected. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Apple Mac Event 2021 M1 ProApple You can watch Apple's latest live event on June 6 at 1 p.m. ET. In the past, Apple has used WWDC to share first looks at new operating systems. The event will stream live on Apple.com, YouTube and the Apple TV app. Apple is hosting a keynote presentation to kick off this year's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) on June 6. The event will stream live at 1 p.m. ET. In the past, WWDC has been the stage for revealing major operating system updates, however Apple also recently teased new Mac hardware in the works. At its last event, Apple also teased a new Mac computer product, but it's unclear whether the company will use WWDC to formally announce that, since this event primarily focuses on software and developers — not hardware. How to watch Apple's WWDC 2022 keynoteYou can watch the 2022 WWDC event live on June 6 at 1 p.m. ET on Apple's website, YouTube, and the Apple TV app. The event will be streamed live from Apple Park in Cupertino, California. All major internet browsers, including Safari, Google Chrome, and Firefox, can stream the event live on Apple.com. If you have an Apple device, including iPhones, iPads, and Macs, you use the pre-installed Apple TV app to watch. YouTube will also have a livestream of the Keynote, but we recommend watching via Apple directly as the YouTube stream typically has a slight playback delay. What to expect from Apple's June 2022 eventDuring Apple's June 6 event, we're expecting announcements about upcoming software updates, based on previous WWDC keynote events. That will include:The first look at iOS 16 for iPhones.New versions of iPadOS, macOS, and watchOS, with the potential for an update to tvOS as well.During Apple's last event, the company teased a new Mac computer project in the works. It's possible we may see an announcement about this product, though it's less likely to happen at WWDC as this event is primarily focused on developers and not hardware.  Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 3rd, 2022

Bestselling rom-com author Emily Henry has a new novel called "Book Lovers" that might just be the best beach read of 2022

Emily Henry penned hit rom-coms like "Beach Read" and "People We Meet on Vacation." Here's why "Book Lovers" is her best yet. Prices are accurate at the time of publication.When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.Emily Henry penned hit rom-coms like "Beach Read" and "People We Meet on Vacation." "Book Lovers" is her best yet.Amazon Emily Henry is the author of "Beach Read" and "People We Meet on Vacation." Her latest book, "Book Lovers," is already a favorite on Goodreads. Here's why Henry's latest release is my favorite so far (and a perfect beach read). "Book Lovers" by Emily Henry$12.14 FROM AMAZON$15.64 FROM BOOKSHOPI used to avoid the romance genre entirely, opting instead for heart-racing thrillers or gut-punching literary fiction. Part of me thought of romance novels as just erotica or the mass-produced books you grab from the grocery store on the way to the DMV. I finally fell head-over-heels for contemporary romance novels and rom-coms a couple of years ago,  appreciating how easily I can get lost in a well-written romance and how it can remind me that I truly love to read. Emily Henry has authored and co-authored seven books, but her last two — "Beach Read" and "People We Meet on Vacation" — were New York Times bestsellers. "Book Lovers," her most recent novel, will likely make the list as well, based on its popularity on preorder lists and among Goodreads reviewers. While "Beach Read" and "People We Meet on Vacation" were easy and enjoyable reads, I found myself more invested in her latest novel than the others. Here's why "Book Lovers" is my favorite Emily Henry novel so far.1. "Book Lovers" amusingly leans into all the stereotypical small-town romance tropes.In "Book Lovers," Nora is a literary agent whose love life has always taken a back burner to her career, her personal time, and most importantly, her sister, Libby. When Libby proposes a trip for the two of them to escape New York City for the storybook town of Sunshine Falls, North Carolina, Nora agrees just to spend more time with her sister, who has a third baby on the way. As the town seems to be one out of a romance novel, the sisters create a checklist to live out every stereotypical "small town" trope, from riding a horse to saving a small business. There are still several stereotypes in the story that make it kind of predictable (high-strung NYC corporate woman who is apprehensive about the adorable small town will probably see the charm and maybe fall for a patient, hunky local). But by leaning into the romance trope cliches, Henry is able to sidestep a lot of the cheesy romance novel moments that normally make me roll my eyes. That said, there's a reason "chick flick" movies and romance novels sell so well — we enjoy a little bit of the cheesy moments and predictability. Love stories can be complicated and thunderous, but they can also end with a long monologue and happily ever after.2. The love story isn't the main plot of the book.While in Sunshine Falls, Nora runs into Charlie Lastra, an unflinchingly straightforward book editor from the city with whom Nora has had plenty of prior run-ins. As it turns out, he's from the small town and his mom runs the local bookstore (yes, another cliche). Though Nora and Charlie historically haven't gotten along, they're working together to prepare a new manuscript for publication and spend a lot of time in close proximity where the sexual tension continually builds. However, Nora and Charlie's sparking romance is not the main plot of the book. Nora's concern lies far more with Libby, who seems to be keeping a secret from her and spending a lot of time alone. Nora is hurt that Libby won't talk to her and determinedly tries to get Libby to open up. The love story is absolutely present, but I felt far more invested in Nora and Libby's sisterhood and the tangled dynamics that unfolded.3. Despite the use of rom-com tropes, Emily Henry's books are written incredibly well.In the last few years, the romance genre has seen an upheaval that has led to an amazing swell of diverse stories, from non-white or queer main characters to subplots that feature serious topics. All to say: there's a lot of competition, and what makes Emily Henry's work stand out is the writing itself. She is a fantastic writer with a clear voice, who easily weaves together relatable characters, heartfelt stories, and tender quotes.  I keep buying Henry's books for the same reason I rewatch "The Proposal" or "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days" whenever I want to be comforted by a feel-good, deeply entertaining story.The bottom lineThough "Book Lovers" follows a pretty quintessential romance novel plot, it's still a really good book. It's the perfect kind of story that allows readers to get lost for a few hundred pages and forget about real-world stressors, and I'd recommend it to any reader searching for the perfect beach read.$12.14 FROM AMAZON$15.64 FROM BOOKSHOPRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytMay 26th, 2022

"Is that the best they"ve got?": Trump was incredulous that he"d have to face Biden or Warren in the 2020 presidential election, book says

When Kellyanne Conway told Trump about a large crowd that attended an Elizabeth Warren rally in 2019, he immediately showed interest in the event. Kellyanne Conway joins former President Donald Trump at the Wildwood Convention Center in New Jersey on January 28, 2020.Spencer Platt/Getty Images President Trump was incredulous that he'd face Biden or Warren in the 2020 election, a new book says. Per ex-counselor Kellyanne Conway, Trump in 2019 showed interest in a big rally headlined by Warren. Conway compared Warren to Kamala Harris, telling Trump that her campaign didn't live up to its hype. As Democrats went through the early stages of their presidential nomination process ahead of the 2020 election, President Donald Trump kept a watchful eye on the race, eager to see who might be his challenger as he sought reelection.When Kellyanne Conway told Trump in August 2019 that Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts held a rally that attracted over 10,000 attendees, he immediately paid attention, according to her newly-released memoir.In the book, "Here's the Deal," Trump's former senior counselor wrote of the then-president's less than stellar impression of the unfolding Democratic field, despite initially showing some concern at Warren's appeal among the party's base voters."I printed up an article and some photos from the Warren rally," she wrote. "It was scheduled to be indoors but was moved outside due to the large turnout. I knew what to expect when I got to the Oval Office and started by urging the president not to overreact."Conway proceeded to mention then-Sen. Kamala Harris of California, who launched her campaign in Oakland to much fanfare before seeing her campaign message stall amid a large field of candidates."I reminded him that we had all been wrongly impressed by the twenty thousand people who'd showed up for Kamala Harris's presidential announcement rally, only to see her appeal and popularity fade almost immediately," she said.Trump then asked Conway: "So, would you rather run against Joe Biden or Elizabeth Warren?""I'd rather run against Elizabeth Warren," she responded, per the book. "But I'd rather debate Joe Biden. She would be up in your grill, finger in the face, calling you every name in the book. Pig. Sexist. Xenophobe. Racist. Disgrace."She continued: "Six months later, Warren would do exactly that to hapless billionaire Michael Bloomberg, making quick work of his failed personal billion-plus-dollar investment in his own Mike-for-president campaign. His consultants may have been the biggest winners of the cycle."Warren's sharp criticism of Bloomberg during a February 2020 Democratic debate, where she called him "a billionaire who calls women fat broads and horse-faced lesbians," was seen as a key turning point in the collapse of the former New York City mayor's presidential candidacy.Trump was less impressed with the Democratic field — including former Vice President Joe Biden — as they made their case in ousting him from the White House."Trump could not believe he'd need to face either Biden or Warren. 'Is that the best they've got?' Now the president was asking the same core question many concerned Democrats were," Conway wrote.Despite Trump's dismissal of the Democratic candidates, Biden went on to capture the nomination and defeat the then-president in the November 2020 general election, flipping the key states of Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 25th, 2022

3 Gaming Stocks to Watch Out For Despite Industry Woes

Robust demand for online betting bodes well for the Gaming industry. Stocks like LVS, MGM and ACEL are benefiting from improving industry trends. The Zacks Gaming industry is gradually recovering from the coronavirus pandemic. Although the industry has been benefiting from improving visitation in Las Vegas, dismal visitation in Macau and Singapore has been hurting the industry. The Macau and Singapore recovery remains slow, and it is still unclear when the market will return to the pre-pandemic level. However, robust demand for sports betting is driving the industry. Stocks including Las Vegas Sands Corp. LVS, MGM Resorts International MGM and Accel Entertainment, Inc. ACEL are likely to benefit from robust demand for sports betting. The gaming industry in the United States is recovering faster than anticipated.Industry DescriptionThe Zacks Gaming industry comprises companies that primarily own and operate the integrated casino, hotel, and entertainment resorts. Some of the industry players deliver technology products and services across lotteries, electronic gaming machines, sports betting and interactive gaming. Some industry participants also develop and operate gaming establishments, as well as associated lodging, restaurant, horse racing, and entertainment amenities. Some companies are involved in the development as well as the sale of gaming applications and provide e-sport or sporting event or tournament services; they offer content management systems, video software, mobile applications, and e-sports data platform solutions.Key Themes Shaping the Gaming IndustryVisitation Still Blow the Pre-Pandemic Level: Traffic has been a major cause of concern for the gaming industry since the coronavirus pandemic. Although the industry has been gradually coming out of the woods, dismal performance in Macau and Singapore has been hurting the industry. In April, Macau’s gross gaming revenue (GGR) totaled $335 million — the lowest since September 2020. GGR in April was down sharply as well. In 2021, Macau casinos' performance was better in comparison to 2020 but still well below the pre-pandemic level. In 2021, Macau’s GGR totaled $10.82 billion, up nearly 44% year over year. However, the 2021 annual figure was still 70% below the pre-pandemic level. The companies have been focusing on levels of services and staffing with selective amenities and enhanced safety and social distancing protocols on the gaming floor to welcome gamers.U.S. Commercial Gaming Revenues Hit Record Mark: The gaming industry in the United States is recovering faster than anticipated. According to data from the American Gaming Association, revenues from gambling hit a record high of $53 billion in 2021. Gambling was flourishing in the United States until the pandemic hit the industry. Prior to that, in 2019, revenues from gambling hit a record high of $43.65 billion. According to the report, 23 of the 34 operational commercial gaming jurisdictions in 2021 witnessed record revenues in 2021. The U.S. gaming industry will continue to improve.Sports Betting a Major Growth Driver: The legalization of sports betting in Delaware, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Montana, Indiana, Tennessee, Illinois and New Hampshire has been driving growth. Bettors are now able to place wagers through the digital platforms in Connecticut, Kentucky, Michigan, Massachusetts, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, Kansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, South Carolina, California, Oregon, Arizona, Montana, Colorado and other states. Some of the popular igaming applications include DraftKings, Barstool, FanDuel, BetMGM, BetRivers, Fox Bet and BetMonarch. Markedly, the applications have been an important medium for gamers to connect, learn and inspire amid the stay-at-home restrictions.Zacks Industry Rank Indicates Dismal ProspectsThe Zacks Gaming industry is grouped within the broader Zacks Consumer Discretionary sector. It carries a Zacks Industry Rank #221, which places it in the bottom 13% of more than 253 Zacks industries.The group’s Zacks Industry Rank, which is basically the average of the Zacks Rank of all the member stocks, indicates gloomy near-term prospects. Our research shows that the top 50% of the Zacks-ranked industries outperform the bottom 50% by a factor of more than 2 to 1.The industry’s position in the bottom 50% of the Zacks-ranked industries is a result of the negative earnings outlook for the constituent companies in aggregate. Looking at the aggregate earnings estimate revisions, it appears that analysts are gradually losing confidence in this group’s earnings growth potential. Since Dec 31, 2021, the industry’s earnings estimate for the current year has nosedived 444%.Despite the industry’s drab near-term prospects, we will present a few gaming stocks that one can hold in their portfolio, given their strong fundamentals. But it’s worth taking a look at the industry’s shareholder return and current valuation first.Industry Underperforms and the S&P 500The Zacks Gaming industry has lagged the S&P 500 Index and the broader Zacks Consumer Discretionary sector over the past year.The industry has declined 52.9% over this period compared with the S&P 500 Index’s and the sector’s decline of 6% and 38.1%, respectively.One-Year Price PerformanceGaming Industry's Valuation Since gaming companies are debt-laden, it makes sense to value them based on the EV/EBITDA (Enterprise Value/ Earnings before Interest Tax Depreciation and Amortization) ratio. The industry currently has a forward 12-month EV/EBITDA ratio of 16.5. The space is trading at a premium compared to the market at large, as the forward 12-month EV/EBITDA ratio for the S&P 500 is 11.75.Over the past five years, the industry has traded as high as 24.79X and as low as 6.98X, with the median being at 16.35X, as the chart below shows.Enterprise Value-to EBITDA Ratio (Past 5 Years) 3 Zacks Gaming Stocks Worth Retaining in the PortfolioLas Vegas Sands: Based in Las Vegas, NV, Las Vegas Sands is a leading international developer of multi-use integrated resorts primarily operating in the United States and Asia. A solid business model, extensive non-gaming revenue opportunities, high-quality assets and attractive property locations bode well. The company is optimistic about Macau’s recovery as visitation continues to improve in the region.Shares of this Zacks Rank #3 (Hold) company have declined 18.2% in the past six months. LVS’ 2022 earnings are anticipated to increase 45.8%. You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank (Strong Buy) stocks here. Price and Consensus: LVSMGM Resorts: Based in Las Vegas, NV, MGM Resorts is a holding company that primarily owns and operates casino resorts through wholly-owned subsidiaries. The company is benefiting from pent-up consumer demand, high domestic casino spending and robust demand for sports betting. It is also gaining from increased visitation in the Las Vegas market. Sports betting and iGaming continue to be major growth drivers.Shares of this Zacks Rank #3 company have declined 25.7% in the past six months. MGM’s 2022 earnings are anticipated to increase a whopping 219.4%. In the past 30 days, earnings estimates for 2022 has been revised upward by 100%.Price and Consensus: MGMAccel Entertainment: Headquartered in Burr Ridge, IL, Accel Entertainment operates as a distributed gaming operator in the United States. The company provides licensed establishment partners with gaming solutions that appeal to players who patronize those businesses. The company is benefiting from an increase in video gaming terminals.Shares of this Zacks Rank #3 company have declined 19.3% in the past six months. ACEL’s 2022 earnings are anticipated to improve 29.3%.Price and Consensus: ACEL Zacks Names "Single Best Pick to Double" From thousands of stocks, 5 Zacks experts each have chosen their favorite to skyrocket +100% or more in months to come. From those 5, Director of Research Sheraz Mian hand-picks one to have the most explosive upside of all. It’s a little-known chemical company that’s up 65% over last year, yet still dirt cheap. With unrelenting demand, soaring 2022 earnings estimates, and $1.5 billion for repurchasing shares, retail investors could jump in at any time. This company could rival or surpass other recent Zacks’ Stocks Set to Double like Boston Beer Company which shot up +143.0% in little more than 9 months and NVIDIA which boomed +175.9% in one year.Free: See Our Top Stock and 4 Runners Up >>Want the latest recommendations from Zacks Investment Research? Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days. Click to get this free report Las Vegas Sands Corp. (LVS): Free Stock Analysis Report MGM Resorts International (MGM): Free Stock Analysis Report Accel Entertainment, Inc. (ACEL): Free Stock Analysis Report To read this article on Zacks.com click here. Zacks Investment Research.....»»

Category: topSource: zacksMay 25th, 2022

Live election updates: Democratic runoff goes down to the wire in Texas while Trump-backed candidates have a bad night in Georgia

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and ex-Sen. David Perdue are vying for the GOP nomination, pitting a sitting governor against a Trump-backed challenger. InsiderInsider is be bringing you real-time election votes tonight for governor races, congressional races, a high-profile GOP primary over a safe Alabama senate seat, and state legislature primaries from Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, and even a few high profile runoffs in Texas.Here's what we're paying attention to:Alabama's ruby-red Senate seat is up for grabs, with a congressman vying against a former Senate chief of staff in a GOP primary for the seat.And in Texas, incumbent Rep. Henry Cuellar is facing a progressive challenger from Jessica Cisneros in a runoff election after their March primary went into overtime.Katie Britt advances in AlabamaAlabama Republican Senate candidate Katie Britt at the NASCAR Cup Series YellaWood 500 in Talladega, AL.Sean Gardner/Getty ImagesKatie Britt, a former aide and chief of staff to Sen. Richard Shelby, will advance to a June 21 primary against either Rep. Mo Brooks or businessman Mike Durant in the Alabama Senate race.— John DormanA Georgia election chief attacked by Trump holds his ownGeorgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a presser in AtlantaAP Photo/John BazemoreEarlier in the night, Georgia Republican voters resoundingly rejected Sen. David Perdue, President Donald Trump's pick to run an election grievance-based campaign against Gov. Brian Kemp. And GOP voters now may be on track to either outright reelect Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger or at least send him to a runoff against Trump's pick for the top election job, Rep. Jody Hice. As of 11 p.m. Tuesday night, Raffensperger sat just above the threshold to avoid a runoff with Hice taking about a third of the vote. -Grace Panetta Trump's tumultuous gubernatorial endorsement track recordFormer President Donald Trump.Scott Olson/Getty ImagesFor the third week in a row, a gubernatorial candidate has lost a primary election despite receiving former President Donald Trump's support. The first candidate was Charles Herbster in Nebraska — he lost his May 10 primary by three percentage points. He was followed by Janice McGeachin, who lost her Idaho primary by a landslide on May 17. And tonight, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp handily defeated Trump-endorsed David Perdue to move on to the general election.For a former president with such a powerful hold on his party, Trump's backing has not been as impactful as expected. Insider recently published an analysis breaking down Trump's endorsement power and its limitations.Trump's endorsement did, however, help in two gubernatorial races so far: incumbent Gov. Greg Abbott's in Texas and state Sen. Doug Mastriano's in Pennsylvania.— Madison HallAbrams and Kemp set for a rematch in GeorgiaStacey Abrams.Zach Gibson/Getty ImagesGeorgia's 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams easily cleared the field on Tuesday to secure the her party's nomination for 2022. She will again face off against Gov. Brian Kemp, who easily jettisoned Trump-backed primary challenger David Perdue. Kemp's win sets up a repeat of the contentious 2018 battle that catapulted Georgia into the spotlight as a possible blue-trending swing state — and made Abrams a household name. While Abrams lost that contest, which she decried as unfair and tainted by voter suppression, she spent the subsequent time at the forefront of a nationwide push for voting rights. The 2022 rematch will reopen old wounds, bring in tons of outside money, and ultimately decide Georgia's path as a battleground state. — Grace Panetta Rep. Lucy McBath beats Rep. Carolyn Bordeaux in Georgia member-vs-member primary.US House of RepresentativesRep. Lucy McBath defeated Democratic challengers Rep. Carolyn Bourdeaux and Donna McLeod on Tuesday, according to Decision Desk HQ. McBath will go on to face the winner of tonight's GOP primary race to become the next representative for Georgia's 7th Congressional District.- Madison HallSarah Huckabee Sanders, former Trump White House Press Secretary, wins GOP nomination for Arkansas governorChip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesSarah Huckabee Sanders was a fixture in the Trump White House for years, and cruises to the nomination. She secured the Republican nomination for governor of Arkansas on Tuesday night, Decision Desk HQ has called. She hopes to take the job once held by her father, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. - Madison Hall and Walt HickeyMarjorie Taylor Greene cruises to victory in bid to retain House seatRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.John Bazemore-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene easily coasted to victory on Tuesday night, bringing in well over the 50% needed to avoid a runoff. She is vying to retain her seat in Georgia's 14th Congressional District. Click here to follow the other Georgia congressional races.— Madison HallMo Brooks, mo' (financial disclosure) problemsRepublican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama conducts a news conference.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesMo Brooks, who's on the comeback trail in Alabama after getting dumped by former President Donald Trump, is one of 60 members of Congress who violated the STOCK Act in the past year. His, however, was one of the most memorable.Brooks previously railed against the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, accusing it of playing politics with its vaccine data. Despite his disdain for the pharmaceutical giant, Brooks sold up to $50,000 in Pfizer stock in August 2021, but failed to disclose it until October of the same year, violating the federal STOCK Act. The reason for the late filing? Brooks' wife, Martha. She told Insider that she runs the family's investments, including her husband's, in addition to filing disclosures. Martha also told Insider that she's in charge of deciding which stocks to buy and sell in accordance with their family's financial advisor, but never with Mo's knowledge.According to Martha, her husband didn't even know he owned any Pfizer stock to begin with.— Madison HallBush loses, embattled AG wins another termGeorge P. BushJoe Skipper/ReutersTexas AG Paxton defeated Land Commissioner George P. Bush in a primary runoff for another term as attorney general. Paxton has been under indictment for securities fraud since 2015 but has yet to stand to trial and is reportedly facing an FBI investigation for abusing his office to benefit a wealthy donor, scandals Texas' senior Sen. John Cornyn called "embarrassing." But Paxton's role in helping Trump unsuccessfully overturn his 2020 election loss earned him Trump's support and helped him defeat the last member of the Bush dynasty in elected office. -Grace Panetta  The 'Unbreakable Nine' could get broken upRep. Henry CuellarKevin Dietsch/Getty ImagesA pair of moderate House Democrats who launched a short-lived rebellion against President Joe Biden's economic agenda are battling for their political survival this evening.Reps. Henry Cuellar of Texas and Carolyn Bourdeaux of Georgia are facing off against rivals in a pair of closely-watched primary races. Cuellar is competing against Jessica Cisneros, a 28-year-old immigration attorney with endorsements from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez of New York and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont. And Bourdeaux is locked in a tight race against Rep. Lucy McBath, another candidate with strong progressive support.Progressives are hoping to oust moderates who they argue helped tank Biden's expansive social and climate spending package once known as Build Back Better. In particular, they're focused on unseating Cuellar, one of the "Unbreakable Nine" House Democrats who nearly derailed Biden's agenda. Sanders recently campaigned with Cisneros in San Antonio, Texas. He cast the race as a "battle against the billionaire class."Last year, both Cuellar and Bordeaux joined a rebellion with seven other House Democrats to split the bipartisan infrastructure law from passing alongside the Build Back Better bill. The latter measure eventually died in the Senate.— Joseph Zeballos-RoigArkansas polls have closedSen. John BoozmanBallotpediaArkansas closed its polls at 7:30 p.m. CT/8:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday and results should begin to trickle in soon. We've got two pages tracking Arkansas races: One for the Senate, where incumbent Sen. John Boozman is looking to retain his seat, and one for Arkansas' gubernatorial and local races.— Madison HallThe state of play in AlabamaAlabama Gov. Kay Ivey speaks during a news conference in Montgomery.AP Photo/Kim ChandlerIncumbent Republican Gov. Kay Ivey is believed to be a strong frontrunner to win renomination in deeply conservative Alabama, on the road to a likely GOP win this fall.And in the GOP Senate primary, GOP Rep. Mo Brooks, Katie Britt, who is Sen. Richard Shelby's former chief of staff, and businessman Mike Durant have been in a heated race for months. The 50-percent threshold is a tall one, and the top two candidates will likely head to a June 21 runoff. — John L. DormanGov. Brian Kemp trounces Trump-backed David PerdueGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp walks onstage for a campaign event in Kennesaw, Georgia.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump endorsed David Perdue, an ex-US senator, to punish Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for not supporting his efforts to overturn the 2020 election. But Perdue's campaign struggled to keep pace with Kemp's spending, and Kemp resoundingly defeated Perdue early on Tuesday night, dealing a huge blow to Trump.Perdue is now the third Trump-endorsed candidate to lose in three weeks, following Charles Herbster in Nebraska and Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin in Idaho. — Grace PanettaInsider on the ground in GeorgiaGeorgia gubernatorial hopeful David Perdue poses alongside a cardboard cutout of former President Donald Trump during a campaign stop in Augusta, Georgia.Warren Rojas/InsiderOver the past few days, Insider correspondent Warren Rojas has traveled across Georgia attending events headlined by many of the leading Republican contenders and speaking with voters about everything from Gov. Brian Kemp's standing in the party to the influence of former President Donald Trump.Here are some of the highlights:Former Vice President Mike Pence on Monday traveled to Georgia to campaign on behalf of Kemp, putting him at odds with his former boss, who is all-in for ex-Sen. David Perdue. While Kemp was thought to be vulnerable over his defense of the integrity of the 2020 presidential vote in the state, Perdue has lagged in fundraising and endorsements, and the incumbent has also effectively used his bully pulpit to work in tandem with the GOP-controlled legislature to enact conservative legislation.While Perdue has had trouble gaining traction in the polls, controversial Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene remains a major draw for conservatives. She remains a powerful force in the MAGA movement, and is highly regarded as the favorite this fall in her congressional district, which was drawn to elect a Republican.— John L. DormanWhat is Herschel Walker's John Hancock worth?Herschel Walker speaks at a Trump rally in Georgia.Sean Rayford/Getty ImagesRepublican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker has some significant — and complicated — personal finances. So significant and complicated, apparently, that Walker failed for months to properly report millions of dollars in earnings that he's required by federal law to disclose, as Insider reporter Madison Hall revealed last week.But here's another financial curiosity: If Walker wins his primary tonight as expected, then defeats incumbent Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in November's general election, he'll stand to earn a standard Senate salary of $174,000.That's less than Walker, a former football star, earned last year from "memorabilia autograph services" he provided to Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC, a firm known for monetizing athletes' John Hancocks.Walker's most recent personal financial disclosure, submitted May 15 to the US Senate, indicates Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC paid Walker "wages" of $211,544. — Dave LevinthalMarjorie Taylor Greene: Disney fan or no?Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.Megan Varner/Getty ImagesRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia faces a handful of Republican primary challengers tonight, most notably "no-nonsense conservative" Jennifer Strahan. But the bombastic freshman is expected to win her party's nomination on the strength of her ultra-MAGA platform. Recently, Greene picked a fight with Walt Disney Co. for its opposition to a new Florida law that outlaws lessons about gender identity and sexual orientation. But what many Georgia voters probably don't realize is that the lawmaker personally invests in Disney stock. Asked about this, Greene told Insider that she doesn't make her own stock trades.She reiterated this assertion during a candidate debate earlier this month when one of her opponents, Seth Synstelien, asked her about her investments in defense contractor stocks."I usually find out about stock trades when I read them in the news just like you have," Greene said. "I signed an agreement with our financial advisor that I don't know anything about trades made on behalf of me or my husband. I always find out about them when they are written by leftists like Business Insider just like you are talking about."— Dave Levinthal Stacey Abrams' campaign is spending big bucks on securityStacey Abrams addresses the Gwinnett County Democratic Party fundraiser in Norcross, Georgia.Akili-Casundria Ramsess/ APStacey Abrams will cruise to victory in Georgia's gubernatorial primary today but is gearing up for one of the most contentious races in the country.As one of the most high-profile Democrats in the nation, she's spent a substantial sum on security. In fact, her security agency, Executive Protection Agencies, was the third highest payee in her campaign expense reports, costing her campaign a total of $390,132. As Insider's C. Ryan Barber previously reported, Abrams' voting rights PAC, Fair Fight, spent more than $1.4 million on security in 2020 and 2021, with the bulk of that money going toward Executive Protection Agencies.And while these expenditures are significantly more than that of most politicians and candidates in the US, the threats are real: former congresswoman Gabby Giffords was shot in the head in 2011 at a constituent meeting and GOP Whip Rep. Steve Scalise was shot at a Congressional baseball game in 2017.— Madison HallPolls close in the Peach StateGeorgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference in Atlanta. Georgia election officials have announced an audit of presidential election results that will trigger a full hand recount.AP Photo/Brynn AndersonPolls have just officially closed in Georgia. We're watching a Senate primary, former Sen. David Perdue's challenge to Gov. Brian Kemp, another Trump-backed challenge to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, and a number of House primaries, including two Democratic House members facing off for the same Georgia district. Our Warren Rojas reports from the Kemp watch party that some counties are keeping polling locations open until 8 p.m. to account for delays at the beginning of the day, so we won't get statewide race calls until after then.–Grace PanettaInsider's Warren Rojas is in Georgia covering the governor raceGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) and former US Vice President Mike Pence attend a campaign event at the Cobb County International Airport.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFor a primer on the high stakes for the GOP in Georgia, check out this rundown of the race for Governor from Insider's Warren Rojas and Elvina Nawaguna. Rojas is in Georgia and will be reporting live from The Peach State all night. Both the former president and the former vice president have come down on opposite sides in the tense primary, they write:Perdue supporters are threatening to sit out the November elections if their candidate loses the primary rather than vote for Kemp, who they still hold responsible for Trump's 2020 loss in Georgia. Trump's team did not respond to a request for comment on the tele-rally, which comes days after news reports that he was backing away from Perdue as polls showed the candidate losing.Meanwhile, Kemp is already anticipating that pro-Trump Republicans could try to challenge his primary win after the Tuesday vote. He's trying to get ahead of it by assuring voters that any "mechanical" issues that might have marred the 2020 election have already been solved through a bill he signed into law last year.- Walt HickeyDonald Trump's funky winning ratePennsylvania Republican U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz joins former President Donald Trump onstage during a rally in support of his campaign at the Westmoreland County Fairgrounds in Greensburg, Pennsylvania.Jeff Swensen/Getty ImagesHere's what we know about former President Donald Trump's primary endorsee win record: His numbers are great when the person he's endorsing is running unopposed or faces tepid or token opposition. It's easy to pick winners when you know they're going to win, right?Where things get funky for Trump: When he endorses a candidate in a tight, tough Republican primary race.In these kinds of contests, Trump's picks have often faltered or underperformed, as Jake Lahut, Madison Hall, Brent D. Griffiths, and Warren Rojas report in this analysis with lots of cool charts.What does that mean for tonight's races? It means that in Georgia, for example, Republican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker — a Trump endorsee — will likely cruise to victory because he has minimal opposition. But on the same ballot, Trump's gubernatorial pick, former US Sen. David Perdue, could very well lose to Trump nemesis and current Gov. Brian Kemp. — Dave LevinthalLive election results start streaming in at 7 p.m. ET. Here's where to find the results.Georgia election officials counting ballots.Jessica McGowan/Getty ImagesWe're covering dozens of primary races up and down the ticket in four states — click on the links below to see live results for each race Georgia Senate Georgia governor  Georgia secretary of stateGeorgia House and state legislature Alabama Senate & HouseAlabama governor & state legislatureTexas' 28th District Democratic primary runoffTexas attorney general and congressional runoffsArkansas Senate & HouseArkansas governor & state legislaturePolls close at 7 p.m. ET in Georgia, 8 p.m. ET in Alabama and most of Texas, and 8:30 p.m. ET in Arkansas  -Grace Panetta Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytMay 25th, 2022

Live election updates: Sarah Huckabee Sanders wins nomination in Arkansas, Kemp beats Trump-backed Purdue in Georgia

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and ex-Sen. David Perdue are vying for the GOP nomination, pitting a sitting governor against a Trump-backed challenger. InsiderInsider is be bringing you real-time election votes tonight for governor races, congressional races, a high-profile GOP primary over a safe Alabama senate seat, and state legislature primaries from Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, and even a few high profile runoffs in Texas.Here's what we're paying attention to:Alabama's ruby-red Senate seat is up for grabs, with a congressman vying against a former Senate chief of staff in a GOP primary for the seat.And in Texas, incumbent Rep. Henry Cuellar is facing a progressive challenger from Jessica Cisneros in a runoff election after their March primary went into overtime.Abrams and Kemp set for a rematch in GeorgiaStacey Abrams.Zach Gibson/Getty ImagesGeorgia's 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams easily cleared the field on Tuesday to secure her party's nomination for 2022. She will again face off against Gov. Brian Kemp, who easily jettisoned Trump-backed primary challenger David Perdue. Kemp's win sets up a repeat of the contentious 2018 battle that catapulted Georgia into the spotlight as a possible blue-trending swing state — and made Abrams a household name. While Abrams lost that contest, which she decried as unfair and tainted by voter suppression, she spent the subsequent time at the forefront of a nationwide push for voting rights. The 2022 rematch will reopen old wounds, bring in tons of outside money, and ultimately decide Georgia's path as a battleground state. — Grace Panetta Rep. Lucy McBath beats Rep. Carolyn Bordeaux in Georgia member-vs-member primary.US House of RepresentativesRep. Lucy McBath defeated Democratic challengers Rep. Carolyn Bourdeaux and Donna McLeod on Tuesday, according to Decision Desk HQ. McBath will go on to face the winner of tonight's GOP primary race to become the next representative for Georgia's 7th Congressional District.- Madison HallSarah Huckabee Sanders, former Trump White House Press Secretary, wins GOP nomination for Arkansas governorChip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesSarah Huckabee Sanders was a fixture in the Trump White House for years, and cruises to the nomination. She secured the Republican nomination for governor of Arkansas on Tuesday night, Decision Desk HQ has called. She hopes to take the job once held by her father, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. - Madison Hall and Walt HickeyMarjorie Taylor Greene cruises to victory in bid to retain House seatRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.John Bazemore-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene easily coasted to victory on Tuesday night, bringing in well over the 50% needed to avoid a runoff. She is vying to retain her seat in Georgia's 14th Congressional District. Click here to follow the other Georgia congressional races.— Madison HallMo Brooks, mo' (financial disclosure) problemsRepublican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama conducts a news conference.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesMo Brooks, who's on the comeback trail in Alabama after getting dumped by former President Donald Trump, is one of 60 members of Congress who violated the STOCK Act in the past year. His, however, was one of the most memorable.Brooks previously railed against the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, accusing it of playing politics with its vaccine data. Despite his disdain for the pharmaceutical giant, Brooks sold up to $50,000 in Pfizer stock in August 2021, but failed to disclose it until October of the same year, violating the federal STOCK Act. The reason for the late filing? Brooks' wife, Martha. She told Insider that she runs the family's investments, including her husband's, in addition to filing disclosures. Martha also told Insider that she's in charge of deciding which stocks to buy and sell in accordance with their family's financial advisor, but never with Mo's knowledge.According to Martha, her husband didn't even know he owned any Pfizer stock to begin with.— Madison HallBush loses, embattled AG wins another termGeorge P. BushJoe Skipper/ReutersTexas AG Paxton defeated Land Commissioner George P. Bush in a primary runoff for another term as attorney general. Paxton has been under indictment for securities fraud since 2015 but has yet to stand to trial and is reportedly facing an FBI investigation for abusing his office to benefit a wealthy donor, scandals Texas' senior Sen. John Cornyn called "embarrassing." But Paxton's role in helping Trump unsuccessfully overturn his 2020 election loss earned him Trump's support and helped him defeat the last member of the Bush dynasty in elected office. -Grace Panetta  The 'Unbreakable Nine' could get broken upRep. Henry CuellarKevin Dietsch/Getty ImagesA pair of moderate House Democrats who launched a short-lived rebellion against President Joe Biden's economic agenda are battling for their political survival this evening.Reps. Henry Cuellar of Texas and Carolyn Bourdeaux of Georgia are facing off against rivals in a pair of closely-watched primary races. Cuellar is competing against Jessica Cisneros, a 28-year-old immigration attorney with endorsements from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez of New York and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont. And Bourdeaux is locked in a tight race against Rep. Lucy McBath, another candidate with strong progressive support.Progressives are hoping to oust moderates who they argue helped tank Biden's expansive social and climate spending package once known as Build Back Better. In particular, they're focused on unseating Cuellar, one of the "Unbreakable Nine" House Democrats who nearly derailed Biden's agenda. Sanders recently campaigned with Cisneros in San Antonio, Texas. He cast the race as a "battle against the billionaire class."Last year, both Cuellar and Bordeaux joined a rebellion with seven other House Democrats to split the bipartisan infrastructure law from passing alongside the Build Back Better bill. The latter measure eventually died in the Senate.— Joseph Zeballos-RoigArkansas polls have closedSen. John BoozmanBallotpediaArkansas closed its polls at 7:30 p.m. CT/8:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday and results should begin to trickle in soon. We've got two pages tracking Arkansas races: One for the Senate, where incumbent Sen. John Boozman is looking to retain his seat, and one for Arkansas' gubernatorial and local races.— Madison HallThe state of play in AlabamaAlabama Gov. Kay Ivey speaks during a news conference in Montgomery.AP Photo/Kim ChandlerIncumbent Republican Gov. Kay Ivey is believed to be a strong frontrunner to win renomination in deeply conservative Alabama, on the road to a likely GOP win this fall.And in the GOP Senate primary, GOP Rep. Mo Brooks, Katie Britt, who is Sen. Richard Shelby's former chief of staff, and businessman Mike Durant have been in a heated race for months. The 50-percent threshold is a tall one, and the top two candidates will likely head to a June 21 runoff. — John L. DormanGov. Brian Kemp trounces Trump-backed David PerdueGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp walks onstage for a campaign event in Kennesaw, Georgia.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump endorsed David Perdue, an ex-US senator, to punish Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for not supporting his efforts to overturn the 2020 election. But Perdue's campaign struggled to keep pace with Kemp's spending, and Kemp resoundingly defeated Perdue early on Tuesday night, dealing a huge blow to Trump.Perdue is now the third Trump-endorsed candidate to lose in three weeks, following Charles Herbster in Nebraska and Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin in Idaho. — Grace PanettaInsider on the ground in GeorgiaGeorgia gubernatorial hopeful David Perdue poses alongside a cardboard cutout of former President Donald Trump during a campaign stop in Augusta, Georgia.Warren Rojas/InsiderOver the past few days, Insider correspondent Warren Rojas has traveled across Georgia attending events headlined by many of the leading Republican contenders and speaking with voters about everything from Gov. Brian Kemp's standing in the party to the influence of former President Donald Trump.Here are some of the highlights:Former Vice President Mike Pence on Monday traveled to Georgia to campaign on behalf of Kemp, putting him at odds with his former boss, who is all-in for ex-Sen. David Perdue. While Kemp was thought to be vulnerable over his defense of the integrity of the 2020 presidential vote in the state, Perdue has lagged in fundraising and endorsements, and the incumbent has also effectively used his bully pulpit to work in tandem with the GOP-controlled legislature to enact conservative legislation.While Perdue has had trouble gaining traction in the polls, controversial Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene remains a major draw for conservatives. She remains a powerful force in the MAGA movement, and is highly regarded as the favorite this fall in her congressional district, which was drawn to elect a Republican.— John L. DormanWhat is Herschel Walker's John Hancock worth?Herschel Walker speaks at a Trump rally in Georgia.Sean Rayford/Getty ImagesRepublican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker has some significant — and complicated — personal finances. So significant and complicated, apparently, that Walker failed for months to properly report millions of dollars in earnings that he's required by federal law to disclose, as Insider reporter Madison Hall revealed last week.But here's another financial curiosity: If Walker wins his primary tonight as expected, then defeats incumbent Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in November's general election, he'll stand to earn a standard Senate salary of $174,000.That's less than Walker, a former football star, earned last year from "memorabilia autograph services" he provided to Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC, a firm known for monetizing athletes' John Hancocks.Walker's most recent personal financial disclosure, submitted May 15 to the US Senate, indicates Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC paid Walker "wages" of $211,544. — Dave LevinthalMarjorie Taylor Greene: Disney fan or no?Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.Megan Varner/Getty ImagesRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia faces a handful of Republican primary challengers tonight, most notably "no-nonsense conservative" Jennifer Strahan. But the bombastic freshman is expected to win her party's nomination on the strength of her ultra-MAGA platform. Recently, Greene picked a fight with Walt Disney Co. for its opposition to a new Florida law that outlaws lessons about gender identity and sexual orientation. But what many Georgia voters probably don't realize is that the lawmaker personally invests in Disney stock. Asked about this, Greene told Insider that she doesn't make her own stock trades.She reiterated this assertion during a candidate debate earlier this month when one of her opponents, Seth Synstelien, asked her about her investments in defense contractor stocks."I usually find out about stock trades when I read them in the news just like you have," Greene said. "I signed an agreement with our financial advisor that I don't know anything about trades made on behalf of me or my husband. I always find out about them when they are written by leftists like Business Insider just like you are talking about."— Dave Levinthal Stacey Abrams' campaign is spending big bucks on securityStacey Abrams addresses the Gwinnett County Democratic Party fundraiser in Norcross, Georgia.Akili-Casundria Ramsess/ APStacey Abrams will cruise to victory in Georgia's gubernatorial primary today but is gearing up for one of the most contentious races in the country.As one of the most high-profile Democrats in the nation, she's spent a substantial sum on security. In fact, her security agency, Executive Protection Agencies, was the third highest payee in her campaign expense reports, costing her campaign a total of $390,132. As Insider's C. Ryan Barber previously reported, Abrams' voting rights PAC, Fair Fight, spent more than $1.4 million on security in 2020 and 2021, with the bulk of that money going toward Executive Protection Agencies.And while these expenditures are significantly more than that of most politicians and candidates in the US, the threats are real: former congresswoman Gabby Giffords was shot in the head in 2011 at a constituent meeting and GOP Whip Rep. Steve Scalise was shot at a Congressional baseball game in 2017.— Madison HallPolls close in the Peach StateGeorgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference in Atlanta. Georgia election officials have announced an audit of presidential election results that will trigger a full hand recount.AP Photo/Brynn AndersonPolls have just officially closed in Georgia. We're watching a Senate primary, former Sen. David Perdue's challenge to Gov. Brian Kemp, another Trump-backed challenge to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, and a number of House primaries, including two Democratic House members facing off for the same Georgia district. Our Warren Rojas reports from the Kemp watch party that some counties are keeping polling locations open until 8 p.m. to account for delays at the beginning of the day, so we won't get statewide race calls until after then.–Grace PanettaInsider's Warren Rojas is in Georgia covering the governor raceGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) and former US Vice President Mike Pence attend a campaign event at the Cobb County International Airport.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFor a primer on the high stakes for the GOP in Georgia, check out this rundown of the race for Governor from Insider's Warren Rojas and Elvina Nawaguna. Rojas is in Georgia and will be reporting live from The Peach State all night. Both the former president and the former vice president have come down on opposite sides in the tense primary, they write:Perdue supporters are threatening to sit out the November elections if their candidate loses the primary rather than vote for Kemp, who they still hold responsible for Trump's 2020 loss in Georgia. Trump's team did not respond to a request for comment on the tele-rally, which comes days after news reports that he was backing away from Perdue as polls showed the candidate losing.Meanwhile, Kemp is already anticipating that pro-Trump Republicans could try to challenge his primary win after the Tuesday vote. He's trying to get ahead of it by assuring voters that any "mechanical" issues that might have marred the 2020 election have already been solved through a bill he signed into law last year.- Walt HickeyDonald Trump's funky winning ratePennsylvania Republican U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz joins former President Donald Trump onstage during a rally in support of his campaign at the Westmoreland County Fairgrounds in Greensburg, Pennsylvania.Jeff Swensen/Getty ImagesHere's what we know about former President Donald Trump's primary endorsee win record: His numbers are great when the person he's endorsing is running unopposed or faces tepid or token opposition. It's easy to pick winners when you know they're going to win, right?Where things get funky for Trump: When he endorses a candidate in a tight, tough Republican primary race.In these kinds of contests, Trump's picks have often faltered or underperformed, as Jake Lahut, Madison Hall, Brent D. Griffiths, and Warren Rojas report in this analysis with lots of cool charts.What does that mean for tonight's races? It means that in Georgia, for example, Republican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker — a Trump endorsee — will likely cruise to victory because he has minimal opposition. But on the same ballot, Trump's gubernatorial pick, former US Sen. David Perdue, could very well lose to Trump nemesis and current Gov. Brian Kemp. — Dave LevinthalLive election results start streaming in at 7 p.m. ET. Here's where to find the results.Georgia election officials counting ballots.Jessica McGowan/Getty ImagesWe're covering dozens of primary races up and down the ticket in four states — click on the links below to see live results for each race Georgia Senate Georgia governor  Georgia secretary of stateGeorgia House and state legislature Alabama Senate & HouseAlabama governor & state legislatureTexas' 28th District Democratic primary runoffTexas attorney general and congressional runoffsArkansas Senate & HouseArkansas governor & state legislaturePolls close at 7 p.m. ET in Georgia, 8 p.m. ET in Alabama and most of Texas, and 8:30 p.m. ET in Arkansas  -Grace Panetta Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytMay 24th, 2022