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Trump-endorsed Senate candidate Herschel Walker supports a total abortion ban: "there"s no exception in my mind"

Ahead of the Georgia primary on Tuesday, Trump-backed GOP Senate candidate Herschel Walker said he "is pro-life and will not apologize for that." Herschel Walker speaks at a September 2021 Trump rally in Georgia.Sean Rayford/Getty Images Herschel Walker on Wednesday said he supports a total abortion ban with no exceptions for rape or incest. "There's no exception in my mind," Walker said. "Like I say, I believe in life. I believe in life." The Georgia primary takes place on Tuesday with Trump-backed Walker ahead in the polls. Following a campaign event on Wednesday, Georgia GOP candidate for Senate Herschel Walker said he supports a total abortion ban with no exception for rape, incest, or the health of the mother. "There's no exception in my mind," Walker said after a campaign speech, The Hill reported. "Like I say, I believe in life. I believe in life."Walker's campaign confirmed to The Hill the former professional football player turned politician "is pro-life and will not apologize for that."The Georgia state primary election is set to take place Tuesday, with Herschel, a Trump-endorsed GOP candidate, leading in the polls and likely to secure the Republican nomination for Senate. Should he secure the nomination, Walker will face off against incumbent Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in November.Walker's campaign did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.  Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 22nd, 2022

Live updates: Experts say more women of color could be investigated for miscarriages with Roe overturned

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. A 10-year-old was forced to cross state lines for an abortion after Ohio's ban went into place. The Indiana doctor who helped her will soon be unable to assist others.Abortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesWith abortion outlawed after six weeks in Ohio, physicians in neighboring Indiana described an influx of out-of-state patients seeking care. Among them: a pregnant 10-year-old.Dr. Caitlin Bernard, an Indianapolis obstetrician-gynecologist, told the Indianapolis Star that just three days after the federal right to an abortion was reversed she received a call from a colleague, a child abuse doctor in Ohio, who needed her help. The physician had a pregnant patient, a 10-year-old, who could no longer legally undergo the procedure in her home state. Despite the influx of patients seeking care across state lines, with abortion access likely to be restricted in Indiana, Bernard's ability to help those seeking the procedure in the future is uncertain.Keep ReadingWith Roe overturned, experts say more women of color could be investigated for miscarriagesAbortion rights activist Nadine Seiler wears tape on her mouth with the words "Second Class Citizen" while protesting in front of the Supreme Court building following the announcement to the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization rulingProbal Rashid/LightRocket via Getty ImagesIn December 2018, Marshae Jones was shot in the stomach and lost her unborn child. But it wasn't the shooter who was charged with murder. Instead, it was Jones, a Black woman who was pregnant when she was shot, who was indicted for killing her baby.Prosecutors dropped the case a few weeks later, but the damage was already done. Activists decried the incident as punishing women for pregnancy, and highlighted the dangers of a justice system that holds a fetus' rights over its mother's. Alabama has long had one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the country.Now that the Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, cases like Jones' will only become more common as more states ban abortion, according to experts. That's especially the case for women of color, who are already more likely to be charged for manslaughter after having stillbirths, miscarriages, or abortions.Read Full StoryJudges in 5 states have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday. Here's where abortion access currently stands, and where courts have temporarily blocked abortion bans so far.Read Full Story37 countries have expanded abortion access since 2000. By overturning Roe v. Wade, the US is going backward, activist saidRebecca Gomperts, founder of the Dutch organization Women on Waves, poses in Amsterdam, on September 23, 2020.Photo by REMKO DE WAAL/ANP/AFP via Getty ImagesSince 2000, thirty-seven countries have expanded the legal grounds upon which pregnant people can access abortion, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. Decriminalization, legalization, and eased access are all trending around the globe. But the Supreme Court's decision earlier this month to overturn Roe v. Wade and kick the question of abortion rights back to the states has made the US a global outlier, as the country walks back nearly five decades of federal protections. It's a move that Rebecca Gomperts, the founder of several international abortion-rights organizations, isn't particularly accustomed to. Read Full StorySupreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas repeated misleading claims that COVID-19 vaccines were made using cells of 'aborted children'Associate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in 2007.AP Photo/Charles DharapakJustice Clarence Thomas repeated a misleading claim on Thursday that COVID-19 vaccines were developed using cell lines from "aborted children."On Thursday, the Supreme Court ruled in a 6-3 vote to leave New York's vaccine mandate for healthcare workers in place after petitioners challenged the mandate over its lack of a religious exemption.In his dissenting opinion, Thomas wrote that the petitioners — which included 16 healthcare workers from the state — "object on religious grounds to all available COVID-19 vaccines because they were developed using cell lines derived from aborted children," citing the petitioners' complaint in his dissent.While it is true that fetal cell lines were crucial for testing the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines, the fact is often misconstrued into debunked claims that recently aborted fetuses were used to create the vaccines or that the vaccines themselves contain aborted fetal cells.In reality, the cell lines were grown in a laboratory by extracting cells from two elective abortions performed several decades ago, according to a handout guide from the North Dakota Department of Health addressing the subject of vaccines and fetal cell lines. Specifically, the cells came from a kidney cell line isolated from a fetus in 1973 and a retinal cell line from an aborted fetus in 1985. Read Full StoryMifepristone in Moldova: Women on Waves founder wants to use the abortion pill as contraception in the wake of Roe v. Wade reversalRebecca Gomperts, founder of the Dutch organization Women on Waves, speaks after a press conference at the Pez Vela Marina in the port of San Jose, Escuintla department, 120 km south of Guatemala City, on February 23, 2017.JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP via Getty ImagesA prominent reproductive-rights activist is turning to the abortion pill mifepristone as a possible salve in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade.Rebecca Gomperts, a Dutch physician who founded Women on Waves and several other reproductive rights organizations, has spent the last two decades helping women in abortion-restrictive countries access medical abortion through the use of boats, robots, and drones. But Gomperts is always interested in the next big thing, she told Insider in an interview this week, and she's betting that the future of reproductive justice might lie in a 50-milligram dose of mifepristone.Mifepristone, one of two drugs under the umbrella of the "abortion pill," stops pregnancy by halting progesterone production. The medicine is taken orally and can be used to induce abortions up until about nine weeks."It has amazing health benefits for women," she said. "It works really well against endometriosis. It works really well against myoma. It's a very effective morning after pill, and it's a very effective contraceptive pill once a week that doesn't have the side effects of hormonal contraceptives."Read Full StoryFlorida judge blocks the state's 15-week abortion banDemonstrators chant slogans during a rally in support of abortion rights in Miami, Florida.Lynne Sladky/AP PhotoA Florida judge blocked the state's 15-week abortion ban that was set to go into effect Friday.The ban violated Florida Constitution's right to privacy, Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper ruled.Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, who signed the restrictions into law, said his administration will appeal the decision.Read Full StoryBiden says he supports a filibuster exception to protect abortion and privacy rightsPresident Joe BidenSTEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said he now supports the Senate making an exception to the filibuster rule to pass protections for abortion and privacy rights."If the filibuster gets in the way, it's like voting rights ... we should require an exception to the filibuster for this action," Biden saidBiden's push to overturn the filibuster has run into opposition from moderate Democrats Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, key votes in the evenly divided 50-50 Senate.Read Full StoryBiden to appoint anti-abortion judge to lifetime federal post: reportPresident Joe Biden addresses the Supreme Court’s decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade June 24, 2022 in Cross Hall at the White House in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion.Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden will reportedly nominate an anti-abortion judge to a lifetime position in federal court — days after he vowed to protect abortion rights.Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth and other unnamed officials told the Louisville Courier-Journal that Biden planned to nominate lawyer Chad Meredith, who has defended Kentucky's anti-abortion legislation.Yarmuth said it was "clear" that the pending nomination was "part of some larger deal" with Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell.On the day the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe was handed down, Biden vowed to do "all in my power to protect a woman's right in states where they will face the consequences of today's decision." The White House and McConnell's office did not respond to requests for comment.Read MoreDem's slim majority in Congress and a conservative Supreme Court make it unlikely Roe v. Wade can be savedActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesDespite calls from Democrats to protect abortion rights, it's unlikely that the Supreme Court's latest decision to throw out the constitutional right to an abortion will be overturned anytime soon."I don't think that we are going to see a reversal in Dobbs," Radhika Rao, a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law, told Insider. "We're not going to see the return of the abortion right." Conservative justices have a 6-3 stranglehold on the nation's highest court, while Democrats have too slim of a majority in Congress to overcome Republicans' filibusters.Read MoreGeorge Washington University refuses to fire SCOTUS Justice Clarence ThomasJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesGeorge Washington University has rejected calls for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to be fired from a teaching position after he joined the court's other conservative justices in overturning Roe v. Wade."Because we steadfastly support the robust exchange of ideas and deliberation, and because debate is an essential part of our university's academic and educational mission to train future leaders who are prepared to address the world's most urgent problems, the university will neither terminate Justices Thomas' employment nor cancel his class in response to his legal opinions," a letter stated.Read Full StoryKansas voters will be the first to address abortion rights after SCOTUS rulingThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade sent the question of abortion back to the states. — and the first direct electoral test of abortion rights in the post-Roe era will take place in Kansas.On Aug. 2, voters in Kansas will vote on a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to an abortion in the state.The amendment would overturn a 2019 state court ruling that established a right to an abortion.Keep Reading Missouri health system restarts emergency contraception amid abortion ban fearsState laws banning abortion "from the moment of fertilization" could interfere with access to emergency contraception.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesA Missouri health system announced it would stop providing emergency contraception over concerns that its patients and staff could be prosecuted under the state's strict new abortion ban — then reversed course hours later.Missouri was the first state to make abortion illegal after the US Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. Advocates fear that sweeping and vague abortion bans could also impede access to contraception or fertility treatment.Saint Luke's Health System referenced those concerns in their announcement, saying they would stop giving emergency contraception "until the law in this area becomes better defined."The medical system later said they would resume giving out the contraception. The sudden shift shows the confusion and uncertainty over how far state-level abortion bans apply.Read Full StoryHere's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJul 1st, 2022

Live updates: Judges in 5 states have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortions

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Judges in 5 states have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday. Here's where abortion access currently stands, and where courts have temporarily blocked abortion bans so far.Read Full Story37 countries have expanded abortion access since 2000. By overturning Roe v. Wade, the US is going backward, activist saidRebecca Gomperts, founder of the Dutch organization Women on Waves, poses in Amsterdam, on September 23, 2020.Photo by REMKO DE WAAL/ANP/AFP via Getty ImagesSince 2000, thirty-seven countries have expanded the legal grounds upon which pregnant people can access abortion, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. Decriminalization, legalization, and eased access are all trending around the globe. But the Supreme Court's decision earlier this month to overturn Roe v. Wade and kick the question of abortion rights back to the states has made the US a global outlier, as the country walks back nearly five decades of federal protections. It's a move that Rebecca Gomperts, the founder of several international abortion-rights organizations, isn't particularly accustomed to. Read Full StorySupreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas repeated misleading claims that COVID-19 vaccines were made using cells of 'aborted children'Associate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in 2007.AP Photo/Charles DharapakJustice Clarence Thomas repeated a misleading claim on Thursday that COVID-19 vaccines were developed using cell lines from "aborted children."On Thursday, the Supreme Court ruled in a 6-3 vote to leave New York's vaccine mandate for healthcare workers in place after petitioners challenged the mandate over its lack of a religious exemption.In his dissenting opinion, Thomas wrote that the petitioners — which included 16 healthcare workers from the state — "object on religious grounds to all available COVID-19 vaccines because they were developed using cell lines derived from aborted children," citing the petitioners' complaint in his dissent.While it is true that fetal cell lines were crucial for testing the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines, the fact is often misconstrued into debunked claims that recently aborted fetuses were used to create the vaccines or that the vaccines themselves contain aborted fetal cells.In reality, the cell lines were grown in a laboratory by extracting cells from two elective abortions performed several decades ago, according to a handout guide from the North Dakota Department of Health addressing the subject of vaccines and fetal cell lines. Specifically, the cells came from a kidney cell line isolated from a fetus in 1973 and a retinal cell line from an aborted fetus in 1985. Read Full StoryMifepristone in Moldova: Women on Waves founder wants to use the abortion pill as contraception in the wake of Roe v. Wade reversalRebecca Gomperts, founder of the Dutch organization Women on Waves, speaks after a press conference at the Pez Vela Marina in the port of San Jose, Escuintla department, 120 km south of Guatemala City, on February 23, 2017.JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP via Getty ImagesA prominent reproductive-rights activist is turning to the abortion pill mifepristone as a possible salve in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade.Rebecca Gomperts, a Dutch physician who founded Women on Waves and several other reproductive rights organizations, has spent the last two decades helping women in abortion-restrictive countries access medical abortion through the use of boats, robots, and drones. But Gomperts is always interested in the next big thing, she told Insider in an interview this week, and she's betting that the future of reproductive justice might lie in a 50-milligram dose of mifepristone.Mifepristone, one of two drugs under the umbrella of the "abortion pill," stops pregnancy by halting progesterone production. The medicine is taken orally and can be used to induce abortions up until about nine weeks."It has amazing health benefits for women," she said. "It works really well against endometriosis. It works really well against myoma. It's a very effective morning after pill, and it's a very effective contraceptive pill once a week that doesn't have the side effects of hormonal contraceptives."Read Full StoryFlorida judge blocks the state's 15-week abortion banDemonstrators chant slogans during a rally in support of abortion rights in Miami, Florida.Lynne Sladky/AP PhotoA Florida judge blocked the state's 15-week abortion ban that was set to go into effect Friday.The ban violated Florida Constitution's right to privacy, Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper ruled.Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, who signed the restrictions into law, said his administration will appeal the decision.Read Full StoryBiden says he supports a filibuster exception to protect abortion and privacy rightsPresident Joe BidenSTEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said he now supports the Senate making an exception to the filibuster rule to pass protections for abortion and privacy rights."If the filibuster gets in the way, it's like voting rights ... we should require an exception to the filibuster for this action," Biden saidBiden's push to overturn the filibuster has run into opposition from moderate Democrats Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, key votes in the evenly divided 50-50 Senate.Read Full StoryBiden to appoint anti-abortion judge to lifetime federal post: reportPresident Joe Biden addresses the Supreme Court’s decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade June 24, 2022 in Cross Hall at the White House in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion.Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden will reportedly nominate an anti-abortion judge to a lifetime position in federal court — days after he vowed to protect abortion rights.Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth and other unnamed officials told the Louisville Courier-Journal that Biden planned to nominate lawyer Chad Meredith, who has defended Kentucky's anti-abortion legislation.Yarmuth said it was "clear" that the pending nomination was "part of some larger deal" with Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell.On the day the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe was handed down, Biden vowed to do "all in my power to protect a woman's right in states where they will face the consequences of today's decision." The White House and McConnell's office did not respond to requests for comment.Read MoreDem's slim majority in Congress and a conservative Supreme Court make it unlikely Roe v. Wade can be savedActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesDespite calls from Democrats to protect abortion rights, it's unlikely that the Supreme Court's latest decision to throw out the constitutional right to an abortion will be overturned anytime soon."I don't think that we are going to see a reversal in Dobbs," Radhika Rao, a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law, told Insider. "We're not going to see the return of the abortion right." Conservative justices have a 6-3 stranglehold on the nation's highest court, while Democrats have too slim of a majority in Congress to overcome Republicans' filibusters.Read MoreGeorge Washington University refuses to fire SCOTUS Justice Clarence ThomasJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesGeorge Washington University has rejected calls for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to be fired from a teaching position after he joined the court's other conservative justices in overturning Roe v. Wade."Because we steadfastly support the robust exchange of ideas and deliberation, and because debate is an essential part of our university's academic and educational mission to train future leaders who are prepared to address the world's most urgent problems, the university will neither terminate Justices Thomas' employment nor cancel his class in response to his legal opinions," a letter stated.Read Full StoryKansas voters will be the first to address abortion rights after SCOTUS rulingThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade sent the question of abortion back to the states. — and the first direct electoral test of abortion rights in the post-Roe era will take place in Kansas.On Aug. 2, voters in Kansas will vote on a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to an abortion in the state.The amendment would overturn a 2019 state court ruling that established a right to an abortion.Keep Reading Missouri health system restarts emergency contraception amid abortion ban fearsState laws banning abortion "from the moment of fertilization" could interfere with access to emergency contraception.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesA Missouri health system announced it would stop providing emergency contraception over concerns that its patients and staff could be prosecuted under the state's strict new abortion ban — then reversed course hours later.Missouri was the first state to make abortion illegal after the US Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. Advocates fear that sweeping and vague abortion bans could also impede access to contraception or fertility treatment.Saint Luke's Health System referenced those concerns in their announcement, saying they would stop giving emergency contraception "until the law in this area becomes better defined."The medical system later said they would resume giving out the contraception. The sudden shift shows the confusion and uncertainty over how far state-level abortion bans apply.Read Full StoryHere's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 30th, 2022

Live updates: Florida judge blocks the state"s 15-week abortion ban

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Florida judge blocks the state's 15-week abortion banDemonstrators chant slogans during a rally in support of abortion rights in Miami, Florida.Lynne Sladky/AP PhotoA Florida judge blocked the state's 15-week abortion ban that was set to go into effect Friday. The ban violated Florida Constitution's right to privacy, Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper ruled.Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, who signed the restrictions into law, said his administration will appeal the decision.Read Full StoryBiden says he supports a filibuster exception to protect abortion and privacy rightsPresident Joe BidenSTEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said he now supports the Senate making an exception to the filibuster rule to pass protections for abortion and privacy rights."If the filibuster gets in the way, it's like voting rights ... we should require an exception to the filibuster for this action," Biden saidBiden's push to overturn the filibuster has run into opposition from moderate Democrats Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, key votes in the evenly divided 50-50 Senate.Read Full StoryBiden to appoint anti-abortion judge to lifetime federal post: reportPresident Joe Biden addresses the Supreme Court’s decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade June 24, 2022 in Cross Hall at the White House in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion.Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden will reportedly nominate an anti-abortion judge to a lifetime position in federal court — days after he vowed to protect abortion rights.Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth and other unnamed officials told the Louisville Courier-Journal that Biden planned to nominate lawyer Chad Meredith, who has defended Kentucky's anti-abortion legislation.Yarmuth said it was "clear" that the pending nomination was "part of some larger deal" with Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell.On the day the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe was handed down, Biden vowed to do "all in my power to protect a woman's right in states where they will face the consequences of today's decision." The White House and McConnell's office did not respond to requests for comment.Read MoreDem's slim majority in Congress and a conservative Supreme Court make it unlikely Roe v. Wade can be savedActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesDespite calls from Democrats to protect abortion rights, it's unlikely that the Supreme Court's latest decision to throw out the constitutional right to an abortion will be overturned anytime soon."I don't think that we are going to see a reversal in Dobbs," Radhika Rao, a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law, told Insider. "We're not going to see the return of the abortion right." Conservative justices have a 6-3 stranglehold on the nation's highest court, while Democrats have too slim of a majority in Congress to overcome Republicans' filibusters.Read MoreGeorge Washington University refuses to fire SCOTUS Justice Clarence ThomasJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesGeorge Washington University has rejected calls for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to be fired from a teaching position after he joined the court's other conservative justices in overturning Roe v. Wade."Because we steadfastly support the robust exchange of ideas and deliberation, and because debate is an essential part of our university's academic and educational mission to train future leaders who are prepared to address the world's most urgent problems, the university will neither terminate Justices Thomas' employment nor cancel his class in response to his legal opinions," a letter stated.Read Full StoryKansas voters will be the first to address abortion rights after SCOTUS rulingThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade sent the question of abortion back to the states. — and the first direct electoral test of abortion rights in the post-Roe era will take place in Kansas.On Aug. 2, voters in Kansas will vote on a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to an abortion in the state.The amendment would overturn a 2019 state court ruling that established a right to an abortion.Keep Reading Missouri health system restarts emergency contraception amid abortion ban fearsState laws banning abortion "from the moment of fertilization" could interfere with access to emergency contraception.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesA Missouri health system announced it would stop providing emergency contraception over concerns that its patients and staff could be prosecuted under the state's strict new abortion ban — then reversed course hours later.Missouri was the first state to make abortion illegal after the US Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. Advocates fear that sweeping and vague abortion bans could also impede access to contraception or fertility treatment.Saint Luke's Health System referenced those concerns in their announcement, saying they would stop giving emergency contraception "until the law in this area becomes better defined."The medical system later said they would resume giving out the contraception. The sudden shift shows the confusion and uncertainty over how far state-level abortion bans apply.Read Full StoryHere's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 30th, 2022

Live updates: Biden supports filibuster exception to protect abortion rights

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Biden says he supports a filibuster exception to protect abortion and privacy rightsPresident Joe BidenSTEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said he now supports the Senate making an exception to the filibuster rule to pass protections for abortion and privacy rights."If the filibuster gets in the way, it's like voting rights ... we should require an exception to the filibuster for this action," Biden saidBiden's push to overturn the filibuster has run into opposition from moderate Democrats Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, key votes in the evenly divided 50-50 Senate.Read Full StoryBiden to appoint anti-abortion judge to lifetime federal post: reportPresident Joe Biden addresses the Supreme Court’s decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade June 24, 2022 in Cross Hall at the White House in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion.Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden will reportedly nominate an anti-abortion judge to a lifetime position in federal court — days after he vowed to protect abortion rights.Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth and other unnamed officials told the Louisville Courier-Journal that Biden planned to nominate lawyer Chad Meredith, who has defended Kentucky's anti-abortion legislation.Yarmuth said it was "clear" that the pending nomination was "part of some larger deal" with Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell.On the day the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe was handed down, Biden vowed to do "all in my power to protect a woman's right in states where they will face the consequences of today's decision." The White House and McConnell's office did not respond to requests for comment.Read MoreDem's slim majority in Congress and a conservative Supreme Court make it unlikely Roe v. Wade can be savedActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesDespite calls from Democrats to protect abortion rights, it's unlikely that the Supreme Court's latest decision to throw out the constitutional right to an abortion will be overturned anytime soon."I don't think that we are going to see a reversal in Dobbs," Radhika Rao, a professor at the University of California Hastings College of Law, told Insider. "We're not going to see the return of the abortion right." Conservative justices have a 6-3 stranglehold on the nation's highest court, while Democrats have too slim of a majority in Congress to overcome Republicans' filibusters.Read MoreGeorge Washington University refuses to fire SCOTUS Justice Clarence ThomasJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesGeorge Washington University has rejected calls for Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to be fired from a teaching position after he joined the court's other conservative justices in overturning Roe v. Wade."Because we steadfastly support the robust exchange of ideas and deliberation, and because debate is an essential part of our university's academic and educational mission to train future leaders who are prepared to address the world's most urgent problems, the university will neither terminate Justices Thomas' employment nor cancel his class in response to his legal opinions," a letter stated.Read Full StoryKansas voters will be the first to address abortion rights after SCOTUS rulingThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade sent the question of abortion back to the states. — and the first direct electoral test of abortion rights in the post-Roe era will take place in Kansas.On Aug. 2, voters in Kansas will vote on a state constitutional amendment that would remove the right to an abortion in the state.The amendment would overturn a 2019 state court ruling that established a right to an abortion.Keep Reading Missouri health system restarts emergency contraception amid abortion ban fearsState laws banning abortion "from the moment of fertilization" could interfere with access to emergency contraception.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesA Missouri health system announced it would stop providing emergency contraception over concerns that its patients and staff could be prosecuted under the state's strict new abortion ban — then reversed course hours later.Missouri was the first state to make abortion illegal after the US Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. Advocates fear that sweeping and vague abortion bans could also impede access to contraception or fertility treatment.Saint Luke's Health System referenced those concerns in their announcement, saying they would stop giving emergency contraception "until the law in this area becomes better defined."The medical system later said they would resume giving out the contraception. The sudden shift shows the confusion and uncertainty over how far state-level abortion bans apply.Read Full StoryHere's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 30th, 2022

Why Did Vladimir Putin Invade Ukraine?

Why Did Vladimir Putin Invade Ukraine? Authored by Soeren Kern via The Gatestone Institute, Nearly three weeks have passed since Russian President Vladimir Putin began his invasion of Ukraine, but it still is not clear why he did so and what he hopes to achieve. Western analysts, commentators and government officials have put forward more than a dozen theories to explain Putin's actions, motives, and objectives. Some analysts posit that Putin is motivated by a desire to rebuild the Russian Empire. Others say he is obsessed with bringing Ukraine back into Russia's sphere of influence. Some believe that Putin wants to control Ukraine's vast offshore energy resources. Still others speculate that Putin, an aging autocrat, is seeking to maintain his grip on power. While some argue that Putin has a long-term proactive strategy aimed at establishing Russian primacy in Europe, others believe he is a short-term reactionary seeking to preserve what remains of Russia's diminishing position on the world stage. Following is a compilation of eight differing but complementary theories that try to explain why Putin invaded Ukraine. 1. Empire Building The most common explanation for Russia's invasion of Ukraine is that Putin, burning with resentment over the demise of the Soviet Empire, is determined to reestablish Russia (generally considered a regional power) as a great power that can exert influence on a global scale. According to this theory, Putin aims to regain control over the 14 post-Soviet states — often referred to as Russia's "near abroad" — that became independent after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. This is part of greater plan to rebuild the Russian Empire, which territorially was even more expansive than the Soviet Empire. The Russian Empire theory holds that Putin's invasion of Georgia in 2008 and Crimea in 2014, as well as his 2015 decision to intervene militarily in Syria, were all parts of a strategy to restore Russia's geopolitical position — and erode the U.S.-led rules-based international order. Those who believe Putin is trying to reestablish Russia as a great power say that once he gains control over Ukraine, he will turn his focus to other former Soviet republics, including the Baltic countries of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, and eventually Bulgaria, Romania and even Poland. Putin's ultimate objective, they say, is to drive the United States out of Europe, establish an exclusive great-power sphere of influence for Russia on the continent and dominate the European security order. Russian literature supports this view. In 1997, for instance, Russian strategist Aleksandr Dugin, a friend of Putin, published a highly influential book — "Foundation of Geopolitics: The Geopolitical Future of Russia" — which argued that Russia's long-term goal should be the creation, not of a Russian Empire, but of a Eurasian Empire. Dugin's book, which is required reading in Russian military academies, states that to make Russia great again, Georgia should be dismembered, Finland should be annexed and Ukraine should cease to exist: "Ukraine, as an independent state with certain territorial ambitions, represents an enormous danger for all of Eurasia." Dugin, who has been described as "Putin's Rasputin," added: "The Eurasian Empire will be constructed on the fundamental principle of the common enemy: the rejection of Atlanticism, the strategic control of the USA, and the refusal to allow liberal values to dominate us." In April 2005, Putin echoed this sentiment when, in his annual state of the nation address, he described the collapse of the Soviet empire as "the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the 20th century." Since then, Putin has repeatedly criticized the U.S.-led world order, in which Russia has a subordinate position. In February 2007, during a speech to the Munich Conference on Security Policy, Putin attacked the idea of a "unipolar" world order in which the United States, as the sole superpower, was able to spread its liberal democratic values to other parts of the world, including Russia. In October 2014, in a speech to the Valdai Discussion Club, a high-profile Russian think tank close to the Kremlin, Putin criticized the post-World War II liberal international order, whose principles and norms — including adherence to the rule of law, respect for human rights and the promotion of liberal democracy, as well as preserving the sanctity of territorial sovereignty and existing boundaries — have regulated the conduct of international relations for nearly 80 years. Putin called for the creation of a new multipolar world order that is more friendly to the interests of an autocratic Russia. The late Zbigniew Brzezinski (former National Security Advisor to U.S. President Jimmy Carter), in his 1997 book "The Grand Chessboard," wrote that Ukraine is essential to Russian imperial ambitions: "Without Ukraine, Russia ceases to be a Eurasian empire.... However, if Moscow regains control over Ukraine, with its 52 million people and major resources as well as its access to the Black Sea, Russia automatically again regains the wherewithal to become a powerful imperial state, spanning Europe and Asia." The German historian Jan Behrends tweeted: "Make no mistake: For #Putin it's not about EU or NATO, it is about his mission to restore Russian empire. No more, no less. #Ukraine is just a stage, NATO is just one irritant. But the ultimate goal is Russian hegemony in Europe." Ukraine expert Peter Dickinson, writing for the Atlantic Council, noted: "Putin's extreme animosity towards Ukraine is shaped by his imperialistic instincts. It is often suggested that Putin wishes to recreate the Soviet Union, but this is actually far from the case. In fact, he is a Russian imperialist who dreams of a revived Czarist Empire and blames the early Soviet authorities for handing over ancestral Russian lands to Ukraine and other Soviet republics." Bulgarian scholar Ivan Krastev agreed: "America and Europe aren't divided on what Mr. Putin wants. For all the speculation about motives, that much is clear: The Kremlin wants a symbolic break from the 1990s, burying the post-Cold War order. That would take the form of a new European security architecture that recognizes Russia's sphere of influence in the post-Soviet space and rejects the universality of Western values. Rather than the restoration of the Soviet Union, the goal is the recovery of what Mr. Putin regards as historic Russia." Transatlantic security analyst Andrew Michta added that Putin's invasion of Ukraine was: "The culmination of almost two decades of policy aimed at reconstructing the Russian empire and bringing Russia back into European politics as one of the principal players empowered to shape the Continent's future." Writing for the national security blog 1945, Michta elaborated: "From Moscow's perspective the Ukrainian war is in effect the final battle of the Cold War — for Russia a time to reclaim its place on the European chessboard as a great empire, empowered to shape the Continent's destiny going forward. The West needs to understand and accept that only once Russia is unequivocally defeated in Ukraine will a genuine post-Cold War settlement finally be possible." 2. Buffer Zone Many analysts attribute the Russian invasion of Ukraine to geopolitics, which attempts to explain the behavior of states through the lens of geography. Most of the western part of Russia sits on the Russian Plain, a vast mountain-free area that extends over 4,000,000 square kilometers (1.5 million square miles). Also called the East European Plain, the vast flatland presents Russia with an acute security problem: an enemy army invading from central or eastern Europe would encounter few geographical obstacles to reach the Russian heartland. In other words, Russia, due to its geography, is especially difficult to defend. The veteran geopolitical analyst Robert Kaplan wrote that geography is the starting point for understanding everything else about Russia: "Russia remains illiberal and autocratic because, unlike Britain and America, it is not an island nation, but a vast continent with few geographical features to protect it from invasion. Putin's aggression stems ultimately from this fundamental geographical insecurity." Russia's leaders historically have sought to obtain strategic depth by pushing outward to create buffer zones — territorial barriers that increase the distance and time invaders would encounter to reach Moscow. The Russian Empire included the Baltics, Finland and Poland, all of which served as buffers. The Soviet Union created the Warsaw Pact — which included Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland and Romania — as a vast buffer to protect against potential invaders. Most of the former Warsaw Pact countries are now members of NATO. That leaves Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine, strategically located between Russia and the West, as the only eastern European countries left to serve as Russian buffer states. Some analysts argue that Russia's perceived need for a buffer is the primary factor in Putin's decision to invade Ukraine. Mark Galeotti, a leading British scholar of Russian power politics, noted that the possession of a buffer zone is intrinsic to Russia's understanding of great-power status: "From Putin's point of view, he has built so much of his political identity around the notion of making Russia a great power and making it recognized as a great power. When he thinks of great power, he is essentially a 19th century geopolitician. It's not the power of economic connectivity, or technological innovation, let alone soft power. No. Great power, in good old-fashioned terms, has a sphere of influence, countries whose sovereignty is subordinate to your own." Others believe that the concept of buffer states is obsolete. International security expert Benjamin Denison, for instance, argued that Russia cannot legitimately justify the need for a buffer zone: "Once nuclear weapons were invented ... buffer states were no longer seen as necessary regardless of geography, as nuclear deterrence worked to ensure the territorial integrity of great powers with nuclear capabilities.... The utility of buffer states and the concerns of geography invariably changed following the nuclear revolution. Without the concern of quick invasions into the homeland of a rival great power, buffer states lose their utility regardless of the geography of the territory.... "Narrowly defining national interests to geography, and mandating that geography pushes states to replicate past actions throughout history, only fosters inaccurate thinking and forgives Russian land-grabs as natural." 3. Ukrainian Independence Closely intertwined with theories about empire-building and geopolitics is Putin's obsession with extinguishing Ukrainian sovereignty. Putin contends that Ukraine has been part of Russia for centuries, and that its independence in August 1991 was a historical mistake. Ukraine, he claims, does not have a right to exist. Putin has repeatedly downplayed or negated Ukraine's right to statehood and sovereignty: In 2008, Putin told William Burns, then the U.S. ambassador to Russia (now director of the CIA): "Don't you know that Ukraine is not even a real country? Part of it is really East European and part is really Russian." In July 2021, Putin penned a 7,000-word essay — "On the Historical Unity of Russians and Ukrainians" — in which he expressed contempt for Ukrainian statehood, questioned the legitimacy of Ukraine's borders and argued that modern-day Ukraine occupies "the lands of historical Russia." He concluded: "I am confident that true sovereignty of Ukraine is possible only in partnership with Russia." In February 2022, just three days before he launched his invasion, Putin asserted that Ukraine was a fake state created by Vladimir Lenin, the founder of the Soviet Union: "Modern Ukraine was entirely created by Russia or, to be more precise, by Bolshevik, Communist Russia. This process started practically right after the 1917 revolution, and Lenin and his associates did it in a way that was extremely harsh on Russia — by separating, severing what is historically Russian land.... Soviet Ukraine is the result of the Bolsheviks' policy and can be rightfully called 'Vladimir Lenin's Ukraine.' He was its creator and architect." Russia scholar Mark Katz, in an essay — "Blame It on Lenin: What Putin Gets Wrong About Ukraine" — argued that Putin should draw lessons from Lenin's realization that a more accommodating approach toward Ukrainian nationalism would better serve Russia's long-term interests: "Putin cannot escape the problem that Lenin himself had to deal with of how to reconcile non-Russians to being ruled by Russia. The forceful imposition of Russian rule in part — much less all — of Ukraine will not bring about such a reconciliation. For even if Ukrainians cannot resist the forceful imposition of Russian rule over part or all of Ukraine now, Putin's success in imposing it is only likely to intensify feelings of Ukrainian nationalism and lead it to burst forth again whenever the opportunity arises." Ukraine's political independence has been accompanied by a long-running feud with Russia over religious allegiance. In January 2019, in what was described as "the biggest rift in Christianity in centuries," the Orthodox church in Ukraine gained independence (autocephaly) from the Russian church. The Ukrainian church had been under the jurisdiction of the Moscow patriarchate since 1686. Its autonomy dealt a blow to the Russian church, which lost around one-fifth of the 150 million Orthodox Christians under its authority. The Ukrainian government claimed that Moscow-backed churches in Ukraine were being used by the Kremlin to spread propaganda and to support Russian separatists in the eastern Donbas region. Putin wants the Ukrainian church to return to Moscow's orbit, and has warned of "a heavy dispute, if not bloodshed" over any attempts to transfer ownership of church property. The head of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Kirill of Moscow, has declared that Kyiv, where the Orthodox religion began, is comparable in terms of its historic importance to Jerusalem: "Ukraine is not on the periphery of our church. We call Kiev 'the mother of all Russian cities'. For us Kiev is what Jerusalem is for many. Russian Orthodoxy began there, so under no circumstances can we abandon this historical and spiritual relationship. The whole unity of our Local Church is based on these spiritual ties." On March 6, Kirill — a former KGB agent who is known as "Putin's altar boy" due to his subservience to the Russian leader — publicly endorsed the invasion of Ukraine. In a sermon he repeated Putin's claims that the Ukrainian government was carrying out a "genocide" of Russians in Ukraine: "For eight years, the suppression, extermination of people has been underway in Donbass. Eight years of suffering and the entire world is silent." German geopolitical analyst Ulrich Speck wrote: "For Putin, destroying Ukraine's independence has become an obsession.... Putin has often said, and even written, that Ukraine is not a separate nation, and should not exist as a sovereign state. It is this fundamental denial that has led Putin to wage this totally senseless war that he cannot win. And that leads us to the problem of making peace: either Ukraine has the right to exist as a nation and a sovereign state, or it hasn't. Sovereignty is indivisible. Putin denies it, Ukraine defends it. How can you make a compromise about the existence of Ukraine as a sovereign state? Impossible. That's why both sides can only fight on until they win. "Normally wars that take place between states are about conflicts they have between them. Yet this is a war about the existence of one state, which is denied by the aggressor. That's why the usual concepts of peacemaking — finding a compromise — do not apply. If Ukraine continues to exist as a sovereign state, Putin will have lost. He is not interested in territorial gain as such — it's rather a burden for him. He is only interested in controlling the entire country. Everything else for him is defeat." Ukraine expert Taras Kuzio added: "The real cause of today's crisis is Putin's quest to return Ukraine to the Russian orbit. For the past eight years, he has used a combination of direct military intervention, cyber-attacks, disinformation campaigns, economic pressure, and coercive diplomacy to try and force Ukraine into abandoning its Euro-Atlantic ambitions.... "Putin's ultimate objective is Ukraine's capitulation and the country's absorption into the Russian sphere of influence. His obsessive pursuit of this goal has already plunged the world into a new Cold War.... "Nothing less than Ukraine's return to the Kremlin orbit will satisfy Putin or assuage his fears over the further breakup of Russia's imperial inheritance. He will not stop until he is stopped. In order to achieve this, the West must become far more robust in responding to Russian imperial aggression, while also expediting Ukraine's own Euro-Atlantic integration." 4. NATO This theory holds that Putin invaded Ukraine to prevent it from joining NATO. The Russian president has repeatedly demanded that the West "immediately" guarantee that Ukraine will not be allowed to join NATO or the European Union. A vocal proponent of this viewpoint is the American international relations theorist John Mearsheimer, who, in a controversial essay, "Why the Ukraine Crisis Is the West's Fault," argued that the eastward expansion of NATO provoked Putin to act militarily against Ukraine: "The United States and its European allies share most of the responsibility for the crisis. The taproot of the trouble is NATO enlargement, the central element of a larger strategy to move Ukraine out of Russia's orbit and integrate it into the West.... "Since the mid-1990s, Russian leaders have adamantly opposed NATO enlargement, and in recent years, they have made it clear that they would not stand by while their strategically important neighbor turned into a Western bastion." In a recent interview with The New Yorker, Mearsheimer blamed the United States and its European allies for the current conflict: "I think all the trouble in this case really started in April 2008, at the NATO Summit in Bucharest, where afterward NATO issued a statement that said Ukraine and Georgia would become part of NATO." In fact, Putin has not always opposed NATO expansion. Several times he went so far as to say that the eastward expansion of NATO was none of Russia's concern. In March 2000, for instance, Putin, in an interview with the late BBC television presenter David Frost, was asked whether he viewed NATO as a potential partner, rival or enemy. Putin responded: "Russia is part of the European culture. And I cannot imagine my own country in isolation from Europe and what we often call the civilized world. So, it is hard for me to visualize NATO as an enemy." In November 2001, in an interview with National Public Radio, Putin was asked if he opposed the admission of the three Baltic states — Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia — into NATO. He replied: "We of course are not in a position to tell people what to do. We cannot forbid people to make certain choices if they want to increase the security of their nations in a particular way." In May 2002, Putin, when asked about the future of relations between NATO and Ukraine, said matter-of-factly that he did not care one way or the other: "I am absolutely convinced that Ukraine will not shy away from the processes of expanding interaction with NATO and the Western allies as a whole. Ukraine has its own relations with NATO; there is the Ukraine-NATO Council. At the end of the day the decision is to be taken by NATO and Ukraine. It is a matter for those two partners." Putin's position on NATO expansion radically changed after the 2004 Orange Revolution, which was triggered by Moscow's attempt to steal Ukraine's presidential election. A massive pro-democracy uprising ultimately led to the defeat of Putin's preferred candidate, Viktor Yanukovych, who eventually did become president of Ukraine in 2010 but was ousted in the 2014 Euromaidan Revolution. Former NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, in a recent interview with Radio Free Europe, discussed how Putin's views about NATO have changed: "Mr. Putin has changed over the years. My first meeting took place in 2002...and he was very positive regarding cooperation between Russia and the West. Then, gradually, he changed his mind. And from around 2005 to 2006, he got increasingly negative toward the West. And in 2008, he attacked Georgia.... In 2014, he took Crimea, and now we have seen a full-scale invasion of Ukraine. So, he has really changed over the years. "I think the revolutions in Georgia and Ukraine in 2004 and 2005 contributed to his change of mind. We shouldn't forget that Vladimir Putin grew up in the KGB. So, his thinking is very much impacted by that past. I think he suffers from paranoia. And he thought that after color revolutions in Georgia and Ukraine, that the aim [of the West] was to initiate a regime change in the Kremlin — in Moscow — as well. And that's why he turned against the West. "I put the blame entirely on Putin and Russia. Russia is not a victim. We have reached out to Russia several times during history.... First, we approved the NATO Russia Founding Act in 1997.... Next time, it was in 2002, we reached out once again, established something very special, namely the NATO-Russia Council. And in 2010, we decided at a NATO-Russia summit that we would develop a strategic partnership between Russia and NATO. So, time and again, we reached out to Russia. "I think we should have done more to deter Putin. Back in 2008, he attacked Georgia, took de facto Abkhazia and South Ossetia. We could have reacted much more determinedly already in that time." In recent years, Putin repeatedly has claimed that the post-Cold War enlargement of NATO poses a threat to Russia, which has been left with no other choice than to defend itself. He also has accused the West of trying to encircle Russia. In fact, of the 14 countries that have borders with Russia, only five are NATO members. The borders of those five countries — Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway and Poland — are contiguous with only 5% of Russia's total borders. Putin has claimed that NATO broke solemn promises it made in the 1990s that the alliance would not expand to the east. "You promised us in the 1990s that NATO would not move an inch to the east. You brazenly cheated us," he said in during a press conference in December 2021. Mikhail Gorbachev, then president of the Soviet Union, countered that such promises were never made. Putin recently issued three wildly unrealistic demands: NATO must withdraw its forces to its 1997 borders; NATO must not offer membership to other countries, including Finland, Sweden, Moldova or Georgia; NATO must provide written guarantees that Ukraine will never join the alliance. Writing for Foreign Affairs, Russian historian Dmitri Trenin, in an essay — "What Putin Really Wants in Ukraine" — argued that Putin wants stop NATO expansion, not to annex more territory: "Putin's actions suggest that his true goal is not to conquer Ukraine and absorb it into Russia but to change the post-Cold War setup in Europe's east. That setup left Russia as a rule-taker without much say in European security, which was centered on NATO. If he manages to keep NATO out of Ukraine, Georgia, and Moldova, and U.S. intermediate-range missiles out of Europe, he thinks he could repair part of the damage Russia's security sustained after the Cold War ended. Not coincidentally, that could serve as a useful record to run on in 2024, when Putin would be up for re-election." 5. Democracy This theory holds that Ukraine, a flourishing democracy, poses an existential threat to Putin's autocratic model of governance. The continued existence of a Western-aligned, sovereign, free and democratic Ukraine could inspire the Russian people to demand the same. Former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul and Robert Person, a professor at the United States Military Academy, wrote that Putin is terrified of democracy in Ukraine: "Over the last thirty years, the salience of the issue [NATO expansion] has risen and fallen not primarily because of the waves of NATO expansion, but due instead to waves of democratic expansion in Eurasia. In a very clear pattern, Moscow's complaints about NATO spike after democratic breakthroughs.... "Because the primary threat to Putin and his autocratic regime is democracy, not NATO, that perceived threat would not magically disappear with a moratorium on NATO expansion. Putin would not stop seeking to undermine democracy and sovereignty in Ukraine, Georgia, or the region as a whole if NATO stopped expanding. As long as citizens in free countries exercise their democratic rights to elect their own leaders and set their own course in domestic and foreign politics, Putin will keep them in his crosshairs.... "The more serious cause of tensions has been a series of democratic breakthroughs and popular protests for freedom throughout the 2000s, what many refer to as the "Color Revolutions." Putin believes that Russian national interests have been threatened by what he portrays as U.S.-supported coups. After each of them — Serbia in 2000, Georgia in 2003, Ukraine in 2004, the Arab Spring in 2011, Russia in 2011-12, and Ukraine in 2013-14 — Putin has pivoted to more hostile policies toward the United States, and then invoked the NATO threat as justification for doing so.... "Ukrainians who rose up in defense of their freedom were, in Putin's own assessment, Slavic brethren with close historical, religious, and cultural ties to Russia. If it could happen in Kyiv, why not in Moscow?" Ukraine expert Taras Kuzio agrees: "Putin remains haunted by the wave of pro-democracy uprisings that swept Eastern Europe in the late 1980s, setting the stage for the subsequent Soviet collapse. He sees Ukraine's fledgling democracy as a direct challenge to his own authoritarian regime and recognizes that Ukraine's historical closeness to Russia makes this threat particularly acute." 6. Energy Ukraine holds the second-biggest known reserves — more than one trillion cubic meters — of natural gas in Europe after Russia. These reserves, under the Black Sea, are concentrated around the Crimean Peninsula. In addition, large deposits of shale gas have been discovered in eastern Ukraine, around Kharkiv and Donetsk. In January 2013, Ukraine signed a 50-year, $10 billion deal with Royal Dutch Shell to explore and drill for natural gas in eastern Ukraine. Later that year, Kyiv signed a 50-year, $10 billion shale gas production-sharing agreement with the American energy company Chevron. Shell and Chevron pulled out of those deals after Russia annexed the Crimean Peninsula. Some analysts believe Putin annexed Crimea to prevent Ukraine from becoming a major oil and gas provider to Europe and thereby challenge Russia's energy supremacy. Russia, they argue, was also worried that as Europe's second-largest petrostate, Ukraine would have been granted fast-track membership to the EU and NATO. According to this theory, Russia's invasion of Ukraine is aimed at forcing Kyiv to officially acknowledge Crimea as Russian, and recognize the separatist republics of Donetsk and Lugansk as independent states, so that Moscow can legally secure control over the natural resources in these areas. 7. Water On February 24, the first day of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Russian troops restored water flow to a strategically important canal linking the Dnieper River to Russian-controlled Crimea. Ukraine blocked the Soviet-era North Crimean Canal, which supplies 85% of Crimea's water needs, after Russia annexed the peninsula in 2014. The water shortages resulted in a massive reduction in agricultural production on the peninsula and forced Russia to spend billions of rubles each year to supply water from the mainland to sustain the Crimean population. The water crisis was a major source of tension between Ukraine and Russia. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky insisted that the water supply would not be restored until Russia returns the Crimean Peninsula. Security analyst Polina Vynogradova noted that any resumption of water supply would have amounted to a de facto recognition of Russian authority in Crimea and would have undermined Ukraine's claim to the peninsula. It would also have weakened Ukrainian leverage over negotiations on Donbas. Even if Russian troops eventually withdraw from Ukraine, Russia likely will maintain permanent control over the entire 400-kilometer North Crimean Canal to ensure there are no more disruptions to Crimea's water supply. 8. Regime Survival This theory holds that the 69-year-old Putin, who has been in power since 2000, seeks perpetual military conflict as a way of remaining popular with the Russian public. Some analysts believe that after public uprisings in Belarus and Kazakhstan, Putin decided to invade Ukraine due to a fear of losing his grip on power. In an interview with Politico, Bill Browder, the American businessman who heads up the Global Magnitsky Justice Campaign, said that Putin feels the need to look strong at all times: "I don't think that this war is about NATO; I don't think this war is about Ukrainian people or the EU or even about Ukraine; this war is about starting a war in order to stay in power. Putin is a dictator, and he's a dictator whose intention is to stay in power until the end of his natural life. He said to himself that the writing's on the wall for him unless he does something dramatic. Putin is just thinking short-term ... 'how do I stay in power from this week to the next? And then next week to the next?'" Anders Åslund, a leading specialist on economic policy in Russia and Ukraine, agreed: "How to understand Putin's war in Ukraine. It is not about NATO, EU, USSR or even Ukraine. Putin needs a war to justify his rule & his swiftly increasing domestic repression.... It is really all about Putin, not about neo-imperialism, Russian nationalism or even the KGB." Russia expert Anna Borshchevskaya wrote that the invasion of Ukraine could be the beginning of the end for Putin: "Though he is not democratically elected, he worries about public opinion and protests at home, seeing them as threats to retaining his grip on power.... While Putin may have hoped that invading Ukraine would quickly expand Russian territory and help restore the grandeur of the former Russian empire, it could do the opposite." Tyler Durden Tue, 03/15/2022 - 02:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeMar 15th, 2022

Live updates: Biden to nominate anti-abortion judge days after SCOTUS ruling, congressman says

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Biden to appoint anti-abortion judge to lifetime federal post: reportPresident Joe Biden addresses the Supreme Court’s decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade June 24, 2022 in Cross Hall at the White House in Washington, DC. The Court's decision in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health overturns the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case and erases a federal right to an abortion.Photo by Alex Wong/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden will reportedly nominate an anti-abortion judge to a lifetime position in federal court — days after he vowed to protect abortion rights.Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth and other unnamed officials told the Louisville Courier-Journal that Biden planned to nominate lawyer Chad Meredith, who has defended Kentucky's anti-abortion legislation.Yarmuth said it was "clear" that the pending nomination was "part of some larger deal" with Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell.On the day the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe was handed down, Biden vowed to do "all in my power to protect a woman's right in states where they will face the consequences of today's decision." The White House and McConnell's office did not respond to requests for comment.Read MoreMissouri health system restarts emergency contraception amid abortion ban fearsState laws banning abortion "from the moment of fertilization" could interfere with access to emergency contraception.Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesA Missouri health system announced it would stop providing emergency contraception over concerns that its patients and staff could be prosecuted under the state's strict new abortion ban — then reversed course hours later.Missouri was the first state to make abortion illegal after the US Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling. Advocates fear that sweeping and vague abortion bans could also impede access to contraception or fertility treatment.Saint Luke's Health System referenced those concerns in their announcement, saying they would stop giving emergency contraception "until the law in this area becomes better defined."The medical system later said they would resume giving out the contraception. The sudden shift shows the confusion and uncertainty over how far state-level abortion bans apply.Read Full StoryHere's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 30th, 2022

Sen. Marco Rubio supported banning almost all abortions in a newly uncovered 2010 questionnaire

Facing reelection in November, many Republicans such as Rubio haven't made promises about the types of abortion bans they'd work to nationalize. Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida is running for reelection in Florida.Graeme Jennings/Pool via AP Marco Rubio has never shied away from calling himself "pro-life." But as he seeks reelection he hasn't said which abortion ban a GOP-majority Senate should pursue.  Republicans have new openings on abortion restrictions now that Roe v. Wade is history. Like many Senate Republicans, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida says he's "pro-life" but has avoided calling for a national abortion ban in the wake of the Supreme Court's opinion overturning Roe v. Wade.Rubio, who is up for reelection in November, instead has championed his forthcoming bill that he says is "truly pro-life" because it would expand federal support during pregnancy and parenthood. But in a 2010 questionnaire, then-first-time US Senate candidate Rubio was far more explicit about the types of abortion restrictions he'd support.He backed a constitutional amendment to ban abortions unless a pregnancy is life-threatening, and said he'd support a bill to give spouses the right to be notified and intervene before an abortion.The questionnaire, from the National Pro-Life Alliance, asked whether Rubio would support 10 of their priorities. He replied "yes" to all of them.The questionnaire sheds some light into how Rubio views abortion, though his Senate record and public comments add more to the story.With the midterms less than five months away, Democrats are pressuring Senate Republicans to explain where precisely they stand on abortion. They hope the contrast on the issue will help them make inroads in places like Florida as they seek to expand their razor-thin majority. Now that the Supreme Court has overturned Roe, the 1973 decision that guaranteed a national right to abortion, the legality of abortion falls to state legislatures unless Congress overrides them with a national abortion guarantee or ban. Many Senate Republicans have avoided saying which ban, if any, they'll support.Twelve years after Rubio filled out the National Pro-Life Alliance questionnaire, he has followed through on some pledges.He cosponsored legislation to permanently prevent federal funds from paying for most abortions. Another bill he cosponsored would obligate doctors to give abortion pills to patients only in person, and not via telehealth video meetings or through the mail.Rubio hasn't made any comments that show he would no longer support the measures in the questionnaire, but also hasn't followed through on all the pledges from the form. For instance, while he agreed to support the Life at Conception Act, Rubio hasn't cosponsored the bill. ButRubio, who is Catholic, has said he believes life begins at conception. Rubio also has cosponsored bills not on the questionnaire. They included a bill that would ban abortion nationally after 20 weeks, and levy criminal penalties on doctors who don't comply, as well as legislation that would obligate doctors to get consent from parents for minors who travel across state lines for abortions. GOP senators haven't announced a national anti-abortion planRubio agreed with overturning Roe and has consistently opposed abortion. But he sidestepped a question from Insider in May asking which national abortion laws a Republican-controlled Senate should support. Speaking on Fox News' Sean Hannity Friday, Rubio stressed that now state legislatures could decide "whether they want to allow abortion, prohibit it, and how they want to regulate it." In Florida, a law is expected to take effect July 1 that will make abortions illegal after 15 weeks, with no exceptions for rape, incest, or human trafficking. It's not clear yet whether a Senate Republican majority would seek an all-out ban or a more incremental approach on abortion. The conservative House Republican Study Committee has endorsed a six-week ban while other House Republicans are eyeing a national 15-week ban, CNN reported. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said in May that a national abortion ban was "possible" but pledged he wouldn't do it through abolishing the filibuster, meaning lowering the voting threshold to pass major legislation to 51 votes. Still, coalescing behind legislation would tee up a bill for a future GOP president.The National Pro-Life Alliance didn't answer questions from Insider about which abortion restrictions it wanted candidates to support after Roe. Rep. Val Demings of Florida speaks before the introduction of then Vice Presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris during an early voting mobilization event at the Central Florida Fairgrounds on October 19, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. President Donald Trump won Florida in the 2016 presidential election.Photo by Octavio Jones/Getty ImagesDemocrats lean in on abortion rights In contrast to Republicans, most congressional Democrats unified behind the Women's Health Protection Act, which would make abortion legal in all states and undo most restrictions. Rubio opposed the bill in May, calling it "radical and outrageous" because it allows for undefined "health" exemptions to abortions late in a pregnancy.Rep. Val Demings of Florida, the frontrunner to be Rubio's Democratic opponent in November, voted for the bill. She also voted for a spending bill that eliminated the Hyde Amendment, a rider that blocks the federal government from paying for most abortions. Demings called for eliminating the filibuster in a USA Today column last year. When she was asked about the Supreme Court in a 2020 PBS interview she said it was"incumbent upon us to use every tool within our authority to right a wrong."But Demings didn't sign onto a House bill last year to increase the number of Supreme Court justices from nine to 12. On Tuesday, her campaign told Insider she doesn't support a court expansion. Demings also told reporters last month that she supports abortion until viability and afterward only "when it threatens the health of the woman, the mother." The Demings campaign is also going on offense on abortion. A new website accuses Rubio of having a "Radical Agenda for Women" and posted his National Pro-Life Alliance questionnaire. Her campaign has accused Rubio of opposing legal abortion even in cases of rape or incest. Asked about this in a 2015 CNN interview, Rubio said he personally believed "you do not correct one tragedy with a second tragedy."It's not yet clear whether abortion rights will be the lighting-rod issue that Democrats hope will help them keep or gain seats in November. They still have to contend with Biden's sagging approval ratings, and voters are struggling with high costs of everyday needs, from food to gas.Rubio focused on a "pro-family" approachMost Republicans did unite on an abortion bills under then-President Donald Trump, voting on a bill that dealt with botched, late-pregnancy abortions and another that would have nationally banned abortions after 20 weeks.The bills failed but Rubio voted for both while Demings voted against both. It's possible Republicans could resurface these bills or go further under pressure from anti-abortion advocates. Last week, Rubio introduced a framework for his forthcoming legislation, the Providing for Life Act. The document includes bills he has introduced before and doesn't address nationalizing abortion restrictions. Among other provisions, the bill would increase the child tax credit he pushed to double in 2017 and extend it to cover the time during pregnancy. It also would make the adoption tax credit fully refundable, require biological fathers to pay at least half of pregnancy-related medical costs, and takes from legislation he introduced in 2018 that would allow new parents to withdraw early from their Social Security in order to help fund paid leave. "Our work is far from over," Rubio wrote in the Washington Examiner on the Roe decision. "We can and must do more for unborn children and their mothers. What we need is a pro-life plan for post-Roe America."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 29th, 2022

Live updates: Here"s what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates say

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have "trigger" laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Here's what Biden can do to help Americans retain abortion access now that Roe v. Wade is overturned, advocates sayAbortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden.Stefani Reynolds/Getty ImagesAs the nation reels from the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, abortion advocates from across the political spectrum have called for sweeping measures from President Joe Biden. The suggestions raised by these advocates include expanding the Supreme Court, declaring a "public health and national emergency," establishing abortion clinics on federal land, and providing easier access to abortion medication.Read Full StoryHillary Clinton, who has known Clarence Thomas since law school, says he is a person of 'resentment, grievance, anger'Hillary Clinton has known Clarence Thomas since their days at Yale Law School in the '60s.Left: Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for The Met Museum/Vogue. Right: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.Former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said Clarence Thomas, who she's known since they were at Yale Law School together in the '60s, has always been a "person of grievance.""I went to law school with him. He's been a person of grievance for as long as I have known him," Clinton said Tuesday during an interview on "CBS This Morning" with Gayle King. "Resentment, grievance, anger," she added.In a concurring opinion released when the Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for rulings that granted individuals the right to birth control access, intimate gay relationships, and same-sex marriage."He may be on his own, but he's signaling," Clinton said of Thomas. "He has signaled in the past to lower courts, to state legislatures to find cases, pass laws, get them up," she added.Read Full StoryNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for those seeking abortions and reproductive health services in the stateFILE: Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak speaks during a news conference in March 2020.Ethan Miller/Getty ImagesNevada Gov. Steve Sisolak signed an executive order strengthening protections for out-of-state abortion patients and medical providers in the wake of the Supreme Court overturning the 1973 landmark ruling Roe v. Wade.The executive order is among a number of countermeasures being taken by Democratic state leaders after the fall of Roe."Today, I signed an Executive Order to strengthen protections for reproductive freedom in Nevada. Reproductive health care is a basic human right," Sisolak wrote in a tweet announcing the executive order. "We are committed to ensuring safe access to abortions for women seeking refuge from the restrictive laws in their state."Abortion rights in Nevada are enshrined in the state's law, making it immune to the impact of a reversal of Roe.—Governor Sisolak (@GovSisolak) June 29, 2022 Judges in Utah, Louisiana, and Texas have temporarily blocked state laws that would restrict or ban abortionsAttendees hold up signs during a Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7, 2022.Mark Felix/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday sent abortion back to each individual state to decide — and state judges are emerging as key players in the new abortion fight.Before the Supreme Court decision, 13 states had enacted "trigger" laws designed to ban abortion as soon as Roe fell, others had passed abortion bans or restrictions in earlier years designed to challenge Roe, and still others had pre-Roe abortion bans on their books that courts are now tasked with ruling whether to uphold. Abortion rights litigants are now turning to state courts and arguing under state laws and constitutions to block those trigger laws and other restrictions, with judges in two states temporarily blocking trigger laws that went into effect on Friday.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 29th, 2022

Taibbi: Taking The Neither Pill

Taibbi: Taking The Neither Pill Authored by Matt Taibbi via TK News, Last Thursday, I sat in a studio in Newark for the above interview with Ben Shapiro. It was a wide-ranging and oddly friendly discussion between a former Breitbart staffer and the author of Andrew Breitbart’s mostly infamously obscene obituary, in which the fact that the interview could even happen at all was among the most interesting things about it (more on this on a Callin discussion tomorrow). Ben and I talked about how it was the political left that years ago was famous for being willing to engage anyone, while the business model of right-wing media was a heated conversation with itself about an always-expanding regimen of enemies, a catastrophic strategy that allowed the Jon Stewarts and not-yet-unfunny Stephen Colberts of the world to win huge audiences by default. Add the lack of a sense of humor, which made Frank Zappa, Larry Flynt, and Dee Snider automatic winners over crusading curmudgeons like Jerry Falwell and John Tower, and the culture war for decades was never a real battle. “There’s no question that the left had been in the ascendancy my entire lifetime,” is how Shapiro put it. Now the script is flipped. The press mainstream has borrowed from the old Fox model and not only (as Shapiro notes) excludes dissent via the “laundering of expertise” but leads interminable crusades against an exploding list of deviationists within their own ranks. You may have thought you were solidly a progressive, but you can catch a permanent green-room ban for going against narrative on any issue, whether it’s Syria or Ukraine or Russiagate or trans issues or any of a hundred other things. This is the same losing strategy that hurt the old GOP, which logically should lead to the same losing outcome, except this is a political atmosphere where no one seems to be winning. On Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision granting women a constitutional right to abortion. This exact moment was supposedly why I owed my vote to the Democratic Party, and indeed the Supreme Court was on my mind when I pulled a lever for Hillary Clinton, a politician I couldn’t stand, in 2016. Four years later, I voted neither. The Democrats between 2016 and 2020 not only lost my vote, but reveled in the idea that they didn’t need or want it, denouncing critics in all directions as traitors, white supremacists, and terrorists, no different from the “deplorables” who voted for Donald Trump. In that time they perfected an attitude of imperious condescension and entitlement so grating that at least half of America wouldn’t piss on someone like Adam Schiff if he were on fire. Then Friday happened and it was the same song everywhere: “See! We were right all along! You do owe us! And if you ever criticized us, this was your fault! ” No, it wasn’t. Friday was the result of decades spent building a political project so incoherent, unsellable, and untrustworthy to ordinary people that in 2016 they chose Donald Trump over the person Barack Obama called the most qualified candidate in history. The justices who cast the critical votes Friday were picked by a man denounced by all of institutional America prior to election. All those voices were ignored. That total collapse in trust, not Jill Stein’s candidacy or Putin’s Facebook ads, led to Dobbs v. Jackson. Until Democrats reckon with that problem, which incidentally spread to every category of voter except white men in 2020 and looks poised to spread even more in the midterms, there will be more moments like this. Subscribers to TK News can click here to read more... Tyler Durden Tue, 06/28/2022 - 16:45.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 28th, 2022

Live updates: Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available after the fall of Roe v. Wade, top US health official says

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. The Biden administration will make abortion pills more widely available following Roe's 'despicable' demise, top health official saysHealth and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra speaks about actions the Biden administration plans to take in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, Tuesday, June 28, 2022, in Washington.Patrick Semansky/AP PhotoThe federal government will make abortion pills more readily available to patients now that states have moved to ban abortion following the Supreme Court overturning its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra said Tuesday.Becerra vowed his office will work with federal law enforcement agencies to ensure that states cannot ban abortion pills, as some Republican-led states have tried to do — though it's unclear how the laws would be enforced given that pills are sent through the mail. "Increasing access to this drug is a national imperative and in the public interest," Becerra said during a 30-minute press conference at the agency's headquarters in Washington, DC.Read MoreWhat 'packing the court' means — and why it's unlikely to happen to save Roe v. WadeActivists For Expanding The Supreme Court Rally Outside the Supreme Court on June 22, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Demand JusticeThe Supreme Court's historic decision to end federal abortion rights in the United States has triggered calls to add more justices to the bench to offset its conservative majority.But with President Joe Biden against the reform and a lack of congressional support, it's unlikely to happen.The nation's highest court voted 5-4 on Friday to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that legalized abortion almost 50 years ago. The consequential decision has led some Democrats and abortion-rights activists to demand for the Supreme Court to be expanded in size — a change that aims to counteract the current conservative majority and its rulings by establishing an ideologically balanced court.Read Full StoryWhat the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Live updates: What Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said at their confirmation hearings

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. What the Supreme Court justices who overturned Roe v. Wade said during their confirmation hearingsWhat Justices Who Overturned Roe Said About Abortion During Confirmation HearingsGetty ImagesThe conservative Supreme Court justices who voted against Roe v. Wade and stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion had spoken about the importance of legal precedent during their confirmation hearings.But they had hedged when pressed on how they'd rule in abortion cases.Video compiled by Insider shows how Justices Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett responded when asked if they'd overturn Roe v. Wade.Keep ReadingUS military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Live updates: US military will continue to provide abortions in some cases

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. US military will continue to provide abortions when a woman's health is at riskUS Military membersBo Zaunders/Getty ImagesA memo to Department of Defense leaders said the military will not stop offering abortions to service members following the Supreme Court's ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade.The US military will continue to provide abortions when the health of the woman is at risk, the memo stated."Nothing is more important than the health and well-being of our Service members, the civilian workforce, and DoD families, and we are committed to taking care of all of our people and ensuring that the entire Force remains ready and resilient," the memo said.Read Full StoryRestricting abortion rights will cause severe economic impacts for womenStates where abortion is restricted or banned will place a harsh burden on women seeking abortions — one that'll likely cause severe economic impacts.Women in these states may also lose out on earnings now that they may have to travel far to get abortion access, C. Nicole Mason, president and CEO of the Institute for Women's Policy Research, previously told Insider.Mason said women "who are already economically vulnerable" — including women of color, hourly workers, and those without paid or sick leave —  will be most impacted by abortion bans. Read Full StoryFacebook, Instagram reportedly removed posts about abortion pillsRafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesFacebook and Instagram removed posts about abortion pills immediately after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, according to the Associated Press and Vice.The AP reported that posts about how to obtain the pills — which refer to two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol — were pulled off the platforms moments after the nation's highest court stripped away the constitutional right to an abortion.When reached for comment by Insider, Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, pointed to Meta spokesperson Andy Stone's Monday tweet."Content that attempts to buy, sell, trade, gift, request or donate pharmaceuticals is not allowed," Stone said.Read Full StoryRoe's daughter slams Supreme Court ruling throwing out abortion rightsAbortion rights are under threat in the US.TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty ImagesThe biological daughter of the woman at the center of the historic Roe v. Wade court case ripped the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the historic ruling — removing the constitutional right to an abortion."I believe that the decision to have an abortion is a private, medical choice that should be between a woman, her family, and her doctor," Shelley Lynn Thornton told ABC News. "We have lived in times of uncertainty and insecurity before, but to have such a fundamental right taken away and this ruling be overturned concerns me of what lies ahead."Read MoreWisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.But this avowed opponent of abortion — who welcomed last week's Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade — is now trying to pivot conversations away from the question of reproductive rights, admitting that the issue is a boon to Democrats.In an interview with Newsmax on Monday, Mastriano was asked to comment on footage of pro-choice protesters who were dispersed by police with tear gas outside the state capitol in Arizona. Mastriano, who himself was on the front lines between police and protesters at the US Capitol on January 6, per video from the day, praised law enforcement for quelling the civil unrest.But the state senator also didn't reall.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 28th, 2022

Live updates: Wisconsin"s Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state"s near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. Wade

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Wisconsin's Democratic governor vows to grant clemency to any doctors charged under the state's near-total abortion ban following fall of Roe v. WadeWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers addresses a joint session of the Legislature in the Assembly chambers at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. on Feb. 15, 2022.AP Photo/Andy Manis, FileWisconsin Gov. Tony Evers said this weekend that he would offer clemency to any doctors charged under the state's antiquated law banning nearly all abortions, which dates back more than a century.The 1849 law was enacted long before Roe v. Wade was instated and remained a Wisconsin statute even after the landmark 1973 Supreme Court case rendered it moot. But after the nation's top court overturned Roe on Friday in a 5-4 majority decision, Wisconsin's 173-year-old abortion ban triggered back into effect. The state's ban makes performing abortions a felony and doctors charged under the statute face up to six years in prison, as well as fines up to $10,000. The law's only exception allows for abortion if it is needed to save the life of the mother. The law does not offer exceptions in instances of rape, incest, or the mother's general health. Read Full StoryUtah judge blocks state's abortion 'trigger law' ban for 14 days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. WadeProtesters hold up hand-written signs in Salt Lake City, Utah.Niki Chan WylieA Utah judge granted a restraining order that will temporarily block the state's abortion ban from immediately going into effect, allowing doctors to provide abortions for the next 14 days.The ruling comes after the Supreme Court overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade decision that granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union chapter in Utah filed a lawsuit over the weekend in a bid to block the state's "trigger law," which was set to immediately ban abortion in the state following the SCOTUS ruling, which was leaked last month.Read Full StoryAfter Roe v. Wade: Doug Mastriano, GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, now says abortion is a 'distraction'State Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, a Republican candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, takes part in a primary night election gathering in Chambersburg, Pa., Tuesday, May 17, 2022.Carolyn Kaster/AP PhotoDoug Mastriano won the Republican nomination for governor in Pennsylvania by leaning into the culture war, using his Facebook live streams to rail against vaccine requirements, "Critical Race Theory," and members of his own party who failed to embrace conspiracy theories about the 2020 ele.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Georgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is "no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians"

"I understand the sincere concerns. But those are religious concerns, or often concerns driven by personal morality," Abrams said in a CNN interview. Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty Images Stacey Abrams said in a CNN interview that she had changed her perspective on abortion rights.  The Georgia gubernatorial candidate was raised in a religious household and grew up being anti-abortion.  She said she understands religious people, but that ideology has no place in medical decisions.  Georgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."She went on to explain she had a change of heart after watching a friend face "the very real consequences" of an unwanted pregnancy that made her question her beliefs about abortion. "I understand the sincere concerns. But those are religious concerns, or often concerns driven by personal morality. And that should be your choice," Abrams said in the CNN interview. "But abortion is a medical issue. It is about a medical decision. And there is no place, in that medical decision, for ideology, or for politicians."Abrams is again running against incumbent Brian Kemp — to whom she narrowly lost the 2018 election — for Georgia Governor. In 2019, Kemp signed into law a controversial "fetal heartbeat bill" which restricted abortions after six weeks of pregnancy and criminalized women who pursued abortions at home or out of state. A federal judge permanently struck down the law in 2020, but it is unclear if a similar law will be passed following the overturning of Roe vs. Wade on Friday. "The Governor of Georgia has already said, he does not care about women, and their bodily autonomy. He does not care about their health," Abrams added in the interview. "Because he not only has already adopted and signed into law the most restrictive abortion law in Georgia's history, with the constrictions at six weeks. He has said in interviews that he intends that he also supports eliminating access for incest and rape."Other Georgia politicians, including Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene and congressional hopeful Herschel Walker have praised the Supreme Court's decision and called for even more restrictive abortion laws in the state. Walker, who is currently running for Senate, said in May the state should adopt a total abortion ban with no exceptions for rape or incest. Representatives for Abrams did not respond to Insider's request for comment.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJun 25th, 2022

Justice Samuel Alito, the architect of overturning Roe v. Wade, told senators he viewed the abortion rights landmark as "important precedent." Now he says "stare decisis" doesn"t protect it.

The majority opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson takes more than 25 pages to argue the principle of "stare decisis" doesn't protect Roe v. Wade. U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Samuel Alito testifies about the court's budget during a hearing of the House Appropriations Committee's Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee March 07, 2019 in Washington, DC.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images The Supreme Court uses a principle called "stare decisis" to respect precedent. The Dobbs v. Jackson majority decision takes more than 25 pages to argue it doesn't protect Roe v. Wade. Liberal justices said the majority failed to consider how abortion rights shape the fabric of women's lives. When US Senators questioned Samuel Alito at his confirmation hearing in 2006, the now-Supreme Court Justice, author of Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, hinted that the landmark 1973 abortion ruling was an "important precedent.""It is a precedent that has now been on the books for several decades," Alito said. "It has been challenged. It has been reaffirmed."At the same hearing, he talked about the principle of "stare decisis," where Supreme Court justices respect the precedents set by previous decisions in making their rulings. He stopped short of calling it settled law, noting that Roe v. Wade, which established a nationwide right to abortion, was "involved in litigation now at all levels."In Friday's majority opinion for Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, Alito wrote that the Roe v. Wade decision was "on a collision course with the Constitution from the day it was decided," comparing it to the Supreme Court decision that upheld racial segregation laws. "Stare decisis is not an inexorable command," he wrote in the majority opinion, and when properly applied, meant that Roe should be overturned, not upheld."Precedents should be respected, but sometimes the Court errs, and occasionally the Court issues an important decision that is egregiously wrong," Alito wrote. "When that happens, stare decisis is not a straitjacket."Alito argued that Roe v. Wade was already on thin legal iceThat the right-wing Supreme Court majority would overturn a 50-year precedent many Americans took for granted raises questions of how far they'd go to overturn other cases that have become priorities for right-wing activists.Justice Clarence Thomas, in a concurring opinion, said the court should "reconsider" rulings that protect contraception access and same-sex marriage. Like Roe v. Wade, those decisions were also based on privacy rights under the 14th Amendment of the Constitution.Alito's opinion spends more than 25 pages explaining why he believes Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, a later landmark Supreme Court decision that upheld Roe, should not be protected under the principle of stare decisis. In his view, those earlier decisions were poorly reasoned, were based on misreadings of history, and clashed with other parts of the law. He says any "fear that our decision will imperil" rights to contraception access, same-sex marriage, and sex with members of the same sex were "unfounded."Abortion-rights activists hold signs during a Mothers Day demonstration outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC.Bonnie Cash/Getty ImagesJennifer Mascott — a former clerk for Justices Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh, who both signed onto Alito's opinion — told Insider that the majority of justices believed the precedents set by Roe simply weren't workable."If a past decision was egregiously wrong and its reasoning is causing there to then be mistakes stretched beyond the opinion and cause other areas of the law to become distorted, then that's yet another reason to get it off the books, so that it doesn't continue to distort other areas of law," Mascott, now a professor at the Antonin Scalia Law School, told Insider. "And so the Court finds all of those factors here."Abortion rights have been defined by shifting legal rationales over time, with Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey each offering different regulatory rubrics.Those changes — and other tweaks over the past 50 years — indicated Roe v. Wade wasn't a good candidate for protection under the principles of stare decisis, Mascott said."The fact that it has to keep changing its justification suggests maybe there wasn't a clear constitutional basis for the right in first place," Mascott said. "The Court today is not just directly overruling Roe — there have been decades of shifts and changes in the abortion framework and the case law."Liberal justices said stare decisis should include considering women's experiencesIn overturning Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, Friday's decision ends most nationwide abortion protections and now leaves them up to the states.In their dissent, the three Supreme Court justices nominated by Democrats said those earlier decisions should be upheld, and that the majority had incorrectly applied the principles of stare decisis. They wrote that the Supreme Court should overturn earlier precedents only upon changes in legal doctrine, when the earlier decisions were only a few years old and didn't have the chance to set many precedents, or when factual changes make the earlier decisions obsolete."None of those factors apply here: Nothing — and in particular, no significant legal or factual change — supports overturning a half-century of settled law giving women control over their reproductive lives," Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan wrote.U.S. Supreme Court associate justices Samuel Alito (L) and Elana Kagan testify about the court's budget during a hearing of the House Appropriations Committee's Financial Services and General Government Subcommittee March 07, 2019 in Washington, DC. Members of the subcommittee asked the justices about court security, televising oral arguments and codes of ethics for the court.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesInstead, they wrote, the majority only overruled Roe and Casey because of former President Donald Trump's right-wing appointees."The Court reverses course today for one reason and one reason only: because the composition of this Court has changed," they wrote.In taking account of the precedent set by Roe v. Wade, the liberal justices talked about the practical effects it had on people's lives. Linda McClain, a professor of gender and legal theory at Boston University, said it was a "vast gulf" with the near-absence of any such discussion over the subject in the majority opinion."It's not only part of the fabric of our constitutional rights, but it's part of the fabric of American society," McClain said. "That there's been this expanding understanding of women's status in society, and that it is partly bound up with reproductive self-determination."There is almost no discussion in the majority opinion, McClain said, about how women live their lives and the "toll" a pregnancy — viable or not — can take on the body. Friday's decision leaves it up to individual states. "It's still the case that many pregnancies are unplanned, there's complications from pregnancy, and childbirth can be dangerous to women," she said. "There was just a total absence of focus on women in the majority opinion."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 24th, 2022

Live election updates: Democratic runoff goes down to the wire in Texas while Trump-backed candidates have a bad night in Georgia

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and ex-Sen. David Perdue are vying for the GOP nomination, pitting a sitting governor against a Trump-backed challenger. InsiderInsider is be bringing you real-time election votes tonight for governor races, congressional races, a high-profile GOP primary over a safe Alabama senate seat, and state legislature primaries from Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, and even a few high profile runoffs in Texas.Here's what we're paying attention to:Alabama's ruby-red Senate seat is up for grabs, with a congressman vying against a former Senate chief of staff in a GOP primary for the seat.And in Texas, incumbent Rep. Henry Cuellar is facing a progressive challenger from Jessica Cisneros in a runoff election after their March primary went into overtime.Katie Britt advances in AlabamaAlabama Republican Senate candidate Katie Britt at the NASCAR Cup Series YellaWood 500 in Talladega, AL.Sean Gardner/Getty ImagesKatie Britt, a former aide and chief of staff to Sen. Richard Shelby, will advance to a June 21 primary against either Rep. Mo Brooks or businessman Mike Durant in the Alabama Senate race.— John DormanA Georgia election chief attacked by Trump holds his ownGeorgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a presser in AtlantaAP Photo/John BazemoreEarlier in the night, Georgia Republican voters resoundingly rejected Sen. David Perdue, President Donald Trump's pick to run an election grievance-based campaign against Gov. Brian Kemp. And GOP voters now may be on track to either outright reelect Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger or at least send him to a runoff against Trump's pick for the top election job, Rep. Jody Hice. As of 11 p.m. Tuesday night, Raffensperger sat just above the threshold to avoid a runoff with Hice taking about a third of the vote. -Grace Panetta Trump's tumultuous gubernatorial endorsement track recordFormer President Donald Trump.Scott Olson/Getty ImagesFor the third week in a row, a gubernatorial candidate has lost a primary election despite receiving former President Donald Trump's support. The first candidate was Charles Herbster in Nebraska — he lost his May 10 primary by three percentage points. He was followed by Janice McGeachin, who lost her Idaho primary by a landslide on May 17. And tonight, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp handily defeated Trump-endorsed David Perdue to move on to the general election.For a former president with such a powerful hold on his party, Trump's backing has not been as impactful as expected. Insider recently published an analysis breaking down Trump's endorsement power and its limitations.Trump's endorsement did, however, help in two gubernatorial races so far: incumbent Gov. Greg Abbott's in Texas and state Sen. Doug Mastriano's in Pennsylvania.— Madison HallAbrams and Kemp set for a rematch in GeorgiaStacey Abrams.Zach Gibson/Getty ImagesGeorgia's 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams easily cleared the field on Tuesday to secure the her party's nomination for 2022. She will again face off against Gov. Brian Kemp, who easily jettisoned Trump-backed primary challenger David Perdue. Kemp's win sets up a repeat of the contentious 2018 battle that catapulted Georgia into the spotlight as a possible blue-trending swing state — and made Abrams a household name. While Abrams lost that contest, which she decried as unfair and tainted by voter suppression, she spent the subsequent time at the forefront of a nationwide push for voting rights. The 2022 rematch will reopen old wounds, bring in tons of outside money, and ultimately decide Georgia's path as a battleground state. — Grace Panetta Rep. Lucy McBath beats Rep. Carolyn Bordeaux in Georgia member-vs-member primary.US House of RepresentativesRep. Lucy McBath defeated Democratic challengers Rep. Carolyn Bourdeaux and Donna McLeod on Tuesday, according to Decision Desk HQ. McBath will go on to face the winner of tonight's GOP primary race to become the next representative for Georgia's 7th Congressional District.- Madison HallSarah Huckabee Sanders, former Trump White House Press Secretary, wins GOP nomination for Arkansas governorChip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesSarah Huckabee Sanders was a fixture in the Trump White House for years, and cruises to the nomination. She secured the Republican nomination for governor of Arkansas on Tuesday night, Decision Desk HQ has called. She hopes to take the job once held by her father, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. - Madison Hall and Walt HickeyMarjorie Taylor Greene cruises to victory in bid to retain House seatRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.John Bazemore-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene easily coasted to victory on Tuesday night, bringing in well over the 50% needed to avoid a runoff. She is vying to retain her seat in Georgia's 14th Congressional District. Click here to follow the other Georgia congressional races.— Madison HallMo Brooks, mo' (financial disclosure) problemsRepublican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama conducts a news conference.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesMo Brooks, who's on the comeback trail in Alabama after getting dumped by former President Donald Trump, is one of 60 members of Congress who violated the STOCK Act in the past year. His, however, was one of the most memorable.Brooks previously railed against the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, accusing it of playing politics with its vaccine data. Despite his disdain for the pharmaceutical giant, Brooks sold up to $50,000 in Pfizer stock in August 2021, but failed to disclose it until October of the same year, violating the federal STOCK Act. The reason for the late filing? Brooks' wife, Martha. She told Insider that she runs the family's investments, including her husband's, in addition to filing disclosures. Martha also told Insider that she's in charge of deciding which stocks to buy and sell in accordance with their family's financial advisor, but never with Mo's knowledge.According to Martha, her husband didn't even know he owned any Pfizer stock to begin with.— Madison HallBush loses, embattled AG wins another termGeorge P. BushJoe Skipper/ReutersTexas AG Paxton defeated Land Commissioner George P. Bush in a primary runoff for another term as attorney general. Paxton has been under indictment for securities fraud since 2015 but has yet to stand to trial and is reportedly facing an FBI investigation for abusing his office to benefit a wealthy donor, scandals Texas' senior Sen. John Cornyn called "embarrassing." But Paxton's role in helping Trump unsuccessfully overturn his 2020 election loss earned him Trump's support and helped him defeat the last member of the Bush dynasty in elected office. -Grace Panetta  The 'Unbreakable Nine' could get broken upRep. Henry CuellarKevin Dietsch/Getty ImagesA pair of moderate House Democrats who launched a short-lived rebellion against President Joe Biden's economic agenda are battling for their political survival this evening.Reps. Henry Cuellar of Texas and Carolyn Bourdeaux of Georgia are facing off against rivals in a pair of closely-watched primary races. Cuellar is competing against Jessica Cisneros, a 28-year-old immigration attorney with endorsements from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez of New York and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont. And Bourdeaux is locked in a tight race against Rep. Lucy McBath, another candidate with strong progressive support.Progressives are hoping to oust moderates who they argue helped tank Biden's expansive social and climate spending package once known as Build Back Better. In particular, they're focused on unseating Cuellar, one of the "Unbreakable Nine" House Democrats who nearly derailed Biden's agenda. Sanders recently campaigned with Cisneros in San Antonio, Texas. He cast the race as a "battle against the billionaire class."Last year, both Cuellar and Bordeaux joined a rebellion with seven other House Democrats to split the bipartisan infrastructure law from passing alongside the Build Back Better bill. The latter measure eventually died in the Senate.— Joseph Zeballos-RoigArkansas polls have closedSen. John BoozmanBallotpediaArkansas closed its polls at 7:30 p.m. CT/8:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday and results should begin to trickle in soon. We've got two pages tracking Arkansas races: One for the Senate, where incumbent Sen. John Boozman is looking to retain his seat, and one for Arkansas' gubernatorial and local races.— Madison HallThe state of play in AlabamaAlabama Gov. Kay Ivey speaks during a news conference in Montgomery.AP Photo/Kim ChandlerIncumbent Republican Gov. Kay Ivey is believed to be a strong frontrunner to win renomination in deeply conservative Alabama, on the road to a likely GOP win this fall.And in the GOP Senate primary, GOP Rep. Mo Brooks, Katie Britt, who is Sen. Richard Shelby's former chief of staff, and businessman Mike Durant have been in a heated race for months. The 50-percent threshold is a tall one, and the top two candidates will likely head to a June 21 runoff. — John L. DormanGov. Brian Kemp trounces Trump-backed David PerdueGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp walks onstage for a campaign event in Kennesaw, Georgia.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump endorsed David Perdue, an ex-US senator, to punish Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for not supporting his efforts to overturn the 2020 election. But Perdue's campaign struggled to keep pace with Kemp's spending, and Kemp resoundingly defeated Perdue early on Tuesday night, dealing a huge blow to Trump.Perdue is now the third Trump-endorsed candidate to lose in three weeks, following Charles Herbster in Nebraska and Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin in Idaho. — Grace PanettaInsider on the ground in GeorgiaGeorgia gubernatorial hopeful David Perdue poses alongside a cardboard cutout of former President Donald Trump during a campaign stop in Augusta, Georgia.Warren Rojas/InsiderOver the past few days, Insider correspondent Warren Rojas has traveled across Georgia attending events headlined by many of the leading Republican contenders and speaking with voters about everything from Gov. Brian Kemp's standing in the party to the influence of former President Donald Trump.Here are some of the highlights:Former Vice President Mike Pence on Monday traveled to Georgia to campaign on behalf of Kemp, putting him at odds with his former boss, who is all-in for ex-Sen. David Perdue. While Kemp was thought to be vulnerable over his defense of the integrity of the 2020 presidential vote in the state, Perdue has lagged in fundraising and endorsements, and the incumbent has also effectively used his bully pulpit to work in tandem with the GOP-controlled legislature to enact conservative legislation.While Perdue has had trouble gaining traction in the polls, controversial Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene remains a major draw for conservatives. She remains a powerful force in the MAGA movement, and is highly regarded as the favorite this fall in her congressional district, which was drawn to elect a Republican.— John L. DormanWhat is Herschel Walker's John Hancock worth?Herschel Walker speaks at a Trump rally in Georgia.Sean Rayford/Getty ImagesRepublican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker has some significant — and complicated — personal finances. So significant and complicated, apparently, that Walker failed for months to properly report millions of dollars in earnings that he's required by federal law to disclose, as Insider reporter Madison Hall revealed last week.But here's another financial curiosity: If Walker wins his primary tonight as expected, then defeats incumbent Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in November's general election, he'll stand to earn a standard Senate salary of $174,000.That's less than Walker, a former football star, earned last year from "memorabilia autograph services" he provided to Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC, a firm known for monetizing athletes' John Hancocks.Walker's most recent personal financial disclosure, submitted May 15 to the US Senate, indicates Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC paid Walker "wages" of $211,544. — Dave LevinthalMarjorie Taylor Greene: Disney fan or no?Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.Megan Varner/Getty ImagesRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia faces a handful of Republican primary challengers tonight, most notably "no-nonsense conservative" Jennifer Strahan. But the bombastic freshman is expected to win her party's nomination on the strength of her ultra-MAGA platform. Recently, Greene picked a fight with Walt Disney Co. for its opposition to a new Florida law that outlaws lessons about gender identity and sexual orientation. But what many Georgia voters probably don't realize is that the lawmaker personally invests in Disney stock. Asked about this, Greene told Insider that she doesn't make her own stock trades.She reiterated this assertion during a candidate debate earlier this month when one of her opponents, Seth Synstelien, asked her about her investments in defense contractor stocks."I usually find out about stock trades when I read them in the news just like you have," Greene said. "I signed an agreement with our financial advisor that I don't know anything about trades made on behalf of me or my husband. I always find out about them when they are written by leftists like Business Insider just like you are talking about."— Dave Levinthal Stacey Abrams' campaign is spending big bucks on securityStacey Abrams addresses the Gwinnett County Democratic Party fundraiser in Norcross, Georgia.Akili-Casundria Ramsess/ APStacey Abrams will cruise to victory in Georgia's gubernatorial primary today but is gearing up for one of the most contentious races in the country.As one of the most high-profile Democrats in the nation, she's spent a substantial sum on security. In fact, her security agency, Executive Protection Agencies, was the third highest payee in her campaign expense reports, costing her campaign a total of $390,132. As Insider's C. Ryan Barber previously reported, Abrams' voting rights PAC, Fair Fight, spent more than $1.4 million on security in 2020 and 2021, with the bulk of that money going toward Executive Protection Agencies.And while these expenditures are significantly more than that of most politicians and candidates in the US, the threats are real: former congresswoman Gabby Giffords was shot in the head in 2011 at a constituent meeting and GOP Whip Rep. Steve Scalise was shot at a Congressional baseball game in 2017.— Madison HallPolls close in the Peach StateGeorgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference in Atlanta. Georgia election officials have announced an audit of presidential election results that will trigger a full hand recount.AP Photo/Brynn AndersonPolls have just officially closed in Georgia. We're watching a Senate primary, former Sen. David Perdue's challenge to Gov. Brian Kemp, another Trump-backed challenge to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, and a number of House primaries, including two Democratic House members facing off for the same Georgia district. Our Warren Rojas reports from the Kemp watch party that some counties are keeping polling locations open until 8 p.m. to account for delays at the beginning of the day, so we won't get statewide race calls until after then.–Grace PanettaInsider's Warren Rojas is in Georgia covering the governor raceGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) and former US Vice President Mike Pence attend a campaign event at the Cobb County International Airport.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFor a primer on the high stakes for the GOP in Georgia, check out this rundown of the race for Governor from Insider's Warren Rojas and Elvina Nawaguna. Rojas is in Georgia and will be reporting live from The Peach State all night. Both the former president and the former vice president have come down on opposite sides in the tense primary, they write:Perdue supporters are threatening to sit out the November elections if their candidate loses the primary rather than vote for Kemp, who they still hold responsible for Trump's 2020 loss in Georgia. Trump's team did not respond to a request for comment on the tele-rally, which comes days after news reports that he was backing away from Perdue as polls showed the candidate losing.Meanwhile, Kemp is already anticipating that pro-Trump Republicans could try to challenge his primary win after the Tuesday vote. He's trying to get ahead of it by assuring voters that any "mechanical" issues that might have marred the 2020 election have already been solved through a bill he signed into law last year.- Walt HickeyDonald Trump's funky winning ratePennsylvania Republican U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz joins former President Donald Trump onstage during a rally in support of his campaign at the Westmoreland County Fairgrounds in Greensburg, Pennsylvania.Jeff Swensen/Getty ImagesHere's what we know about former President Donald Trump's primary endorsee win record: His numbers are great when the person he's endorsing is running unopposed or faces tepid or token opposition. It's easy to pick winners when you know they're going to win, right?Where things get funky for Trump: When he endorses a candidate in a tight, tough Republican primary race.In these kinds of contests, Trump's picks have often faltered or underperformed, as Jake Lahut, Madison Hall, Brent D. Griffiths, and Warren Rojas report in this analysis with lots of cool charts.What does that mean for tonight's races? It means that in Georgia, for example, Republican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker — a Trump endorsee — will likely cruise to victory because he has minimal opposition. But on the same ballot, Trump's gubernatorial pick, former US Sen. David Perdue, could very well lose to Trump nemesis and current Gov. Brian Kemp. — Dave LevinthalLive election results start streaming in at 7 p.m. ET. Here's where to find the results.Georgia election officials counting ballots.Jessica McGowan/Getty ImagesWe're covering dozens of primary races up and down the ticket in four states — click on the links below to see live results for each race Georgia Senate Georgia governor  Georgia secretary of stateGeorgia House and state legislature Alabama Senate & HouseAlabama governor & state legislatureTexas' 28th District Democratic primary runoffTexas attorney general and congressional runoffsArkansas Senate & HouseArkansas governor & state legislaturePolls close at 7 p.m. ET in Georgia, 8 p.m. ET in Alabama and most of Texas, and 8:30 p.m. ET in Arkansas  -Grace Panetta Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytMay 25th, 2022

Live election updates: Sarah Huckabee Sanders wins nomination in Arkansas, Kemp beats Trump-backed Purdue in Georgia

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and ex-Sen. David Perdue are vying for the GOP nomination, pitting a sitting governor against a Trump-backed challenger. InsiderInsider is be bringing you real-time election votes tonight for governor races, congressional races, a high-profile GOP primary over a safe Alabama senate seat, and state legislature primaries from Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, and even a few high profile runoffs in Texas.Here's what we're paying attention to:Alabama's ruby-red Senate seat is up for grabs, with a congressman vying against a former Senate chief of staff in a GOP primary for the seat.And in Texas, incumbent Rep. Henry Cuellar is facing a progressive challenger from Jessica Cisneros in a runoff election after their March primary went into overtime.Abrams and Kemp set for a rematch in GeorgiaStacey Abrams.Zach Gibson/Getty ImagesGeorgia's 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams easily cleared the field on Tuesday to secure her party's nomination for 2022. She will again face off against Gov. Brian Kemp, who easily jettisoned Trump-backed primary challenger David Perdue. Kemp's win sets up a repeat of the contentious 2018 battle that catapulted Georgia into the spotlight as a possible blue-trending swing state — and made Abrams a household name. While Abrams lost that contest, which she decried as unfair and tainted by voter suppression, she spent the subsequent time at the forefront of a nationwide push for voting rights. The 2022 rematch will reopen old wounds, bring in tons of outside money, and ultimately decide Georgia's path as a battleground state. — Grace Panetta Rep. Lucy McBath beats Rep. Carolyn Bordeaux in Georgia member-vs-member primary.US House of RepresentativesRep. Lucy McBath defeated Democratic challengers Rep. Carolyn Bourdeaux and Donna McLeod on Tuesday, according to Decision Desk HQ. McBath will go on to face the winner of tonight's GOP primary race to become the next representative for Georgia's 7th Congressional District.- Madison HallSarah Huckabee Sanders, former Trump White House Press Secretary, wins GOP nomination for Arkansas governorChip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesSarah Huckabee Sanders was a fixture in the Trump White House for years, and cruises to the nomination. She secured the Republican nomination for governor of Arkansas on Tuesday night, Decision Desk HQ has called. She hopes to take the job once held by her father, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee. - Madison Hall and Walt HickeyMarjorie Taylor Greene cruises to victory in bid to retain House seatRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.John Bazemore-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene easily coasted to victory on Tuesday night, bringing in well over the 50% needed to avoid a runoff. She is vying to retain her seat in Georgia's 14th Congressional District. Click here to follow the other Georgia congressional races.— Madison HallMo Brooks, mo' (financial disclosure) problemsRepublican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama conducts a news conference.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesMo Brooks, who's on the comeback trail in Alabama after getting dumped by former President Donald Trump, is one of 60 members of Congress who violated the STOCK Act in the past year. His, however, was one of the most memorable.Brooks previously railed against the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, accusing it of playing politics with its vaccine data. Despite his disdain for the pharmaceutical giant, Brooks sold up to $50,000 in Pfizer stock in August 2021, but failed to disclose it until October of the same year, violating the federal STOCK Act. The reason for the late filing? Brooks' wife, Martha. She told Insider that she runs the family's investments, including her husband's, in addition to filing disclosures. Martha also told Insider that she's in charge of deciding which stocks to buy and sell in accordance with their family's financial advisor, but never with Mo's knowledge.According to Martha, her husband didn't even know he owned any Pfizer stock to begin with.— Madison HallBush loses, embattled AG wins another termGeorge P. BushJoe Skipper/ReutersTexas AG Paxton defeated Land Commissioner George P. Bush in a primary runoff for another term as attorney general. Paxton has been under indictment for securities fraud since 2015 but has yet to stand to trial and is reportedly facing an FBI investigation for abusing his office to benefit a wealthy donor, scandals Texas' senior Sen. John Cornyn called "embarrassing." But Paxton's role in helping Trump unsuccessfully overturn his 2020 election loss earned him Trump's support and helped him defeat the last member of the Bush dynasty in elected office. -Grace Panetta  The 'Unbreakable Nine' could get broken upRep. Henry CuellarKevin Dietsch/Getty ImagesA pair of moderate House Democrats who launched a short-lived rebellion against President Joe Biden's economic agenda are battling for their political survival this evening.Reps. Henry Cuellar of Texas and Carolyn Bourdeaux of Georgia are facing off against rivals in a pair of closely-watched primary races. Cuellar is competing against Jessica Cisneros, a 28-year-old immigration attorney with endorsements from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez of New York and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont. And Bourdeaux is locked in a tight race against Rep. Lucy McBath, another candidate with strong progressive support.Progressives are hoping to oust moderates who they argue helped tank Biden's expansive social and climate spending package once known as Build Back Better. In particular, they're focused on unseating Cuellar, one of the "Unbreakable Nine" House Democrats who nearly derailed Biden's agenda. Sanders recently campaigned with Cisneros in San Antonio, Texas. He cast the race as a "battle against the billionaire class."Last year, both Cuellar and Bordeaux joined a rebellion with seven other House Democrats to split the bipartisan infrastructure law from passing alongside the Build Back Better bill. The latter measure eventually died in the Senate.— Joseph Zeballos-RoigArkansas polls have closedSen. John BoozmanBallotpediaArkansas closed its polls at 7:30 p.m. CT/8:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday and results should begin to trickle in soon. We've got two pages tracking Arkansas races: One for the Senate, where incumbent Sen. John Boozman is looking to retain his seat, and one for Arkansas' gubernatorial and local races.— Madison HallThe state of play in AlabamaAlabama Gov. Kay Ivey speaks during a news conference in Montgomery.AP Photo/Kim ChandlerIncumbent Republican Gov. Kay Ivey is believed to be a strong frontrunner to win renomination in deeply conservative Alabama, on the road to a likely GOP win this fall.And in the GOP Senate primary, GOP Rep. Mo Brooks, Katie Britt, who is Sen. Richard Shelby's former chief of staff, and businessman Mike Durant have been in a heated race for months. The 50-percent threshold is a tall one, and the top two candidates will likely head to a June 21 runoff. — John L. DormanGov. Brian Kemp trounces Trump-backed David PerdueGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp walks onstage for a campaign event in Kennesaw, Georgia.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump endorsed David Perdue, an ex-US senator, to punish Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for not supporting his efforts to overturn the 2020 election. But Perdue's campaign struggled to keep pace with Kemp's spending, and Kemp resoundingly defeated Perdue early on Tuesday night, dealing a huge blow to Trump.Perdue is now the third Trump-endorsed candidate to lose in three weeks, following Charles Herbster in Nebraska and Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin in Idaho. — Grace PanettaInsider on the ground in GeorgiaGeorgia gubernatorial hopeful David Perdue poses alongside a cardboard cutout of former President Donald Trump during a campaign stop in Augusta, Georgia.Warren Rojas/InsiderOver the past few days, Insider correspondent Warren Rojas has traveled across Georgia attending events headlined by many of the leading Republican contenders and speaking with voters about everything from Gov. Brian Kemp's standing in the party to the influence of former President Donald Trump.Here are some of the highlights:Former Vice President Mike Pence on Monday traveled to Georgia to campaign on behalf of Kemp, putting him at odds with his former boss, who is all-in for ex-Sen. David Perdue. While Kemp was thought to be vulnerable over his defense of the integrity of the 2020 presidential vote in the state, Perdue has lagged in fundraising and endorsements, and the incumbent has also effectively used his bully pulpit to work in tandem with the GOP-controlled legislature to enact conservative legislation.While Perdue has had trouble gaining traction in the polls, controversial Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene remains a major draw for conservatives. She remains a powerful force in the MAGA movement, and is highly regarded as the favorite this fall in her congressional district, which was drawn to elect a Republican.— John L. DormanWhat is Herschel Walker's John Hancock worth?Herschel Walker speaks at a Trump rally in Georgia.Sean Rayford/Getty ImagesRepublican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker has some significant — and complicated — personal finances. So significant and complicated, apparently, that Walker failed for months to properly report millions of dollars in earnings that he's required by federal law to disclose, as Insider reporter Madison Hall revealed last week.But here's another financial curiosity: If Walker wins his primary tonight as expected, then defeats incumbent Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in November's general election, he'll stand to earn a standard Senate salary of $174,000.That's less than Walker, a former football star, earned last year from "memorabilia autograph services" he provided to Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC, a firm known for monetizing athletes' John Hancocks.Walker's most recent personal financial disclosure, submitted May 15 to the US Senate, indicates Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC paid Walker "wages" of $211,544. — Dave LevinthalMarjorie Taylor Greene: Disney fan or no?Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.Megan Varner/Getty ImagesRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia faces a handful of Republican primary challengers tonight, most notably "no-nonsense conservative" Jennifer Strahan. But the bombastic freshman is expected to win her party's nomination on the strength of her ultra-MAGA platform. Recently, Greene picked a fight with Walt Disney Co. for its opposition to a new Florida law that outlaws lessons about gender identity and sexual orientation. But what many Georgia voters probably don't realize is that the lawmaker personally invests in Disney stock. Asked about this, Greene told Insider that she doesn't make her own stock trades.She reiterated this assertion during a candidate debate earlier this month when one of her opponents, Seth Synstelien, asked her about her investments in defense contractor stocks."I usually find out about stock trades when I read them in the news just like you have," Greene said. "I signed an agreement with our financial advisor that I don't know anything about trades made on behalf of me or my husband. I always find out about them when they are written by leftists like Business Insider just like you are talking about."— Dave Levinthal Stacey Abrams' campaign is spending big bucks on securityStacey Abrams addresses the Gwinnett County Democratic Party fundraiser in Norcross, Georgia.Akili-Casundria Ramsess/ APStacey Abrams will cruise to victory in Georgia's gubernatorial primary today but is gearing up for one of the most contentious races in the country.As one of the most high-profile Democrats in the nation, she's spent a substantial sum on security. In fact, her security agency, Executive Protection Agencies, was the third highest payee in her campaign expense reports, costing her campaign a total of $390,132. As Insider's C. Ryan Barber previously reported, Abrams' voting rights PAC, Fair Fight, spent more than $1.4 million on security in 2020 and 2021, with the bulk of that money going toward Executive Protection Agencies.And while these expenditures are significantly more than that of most politicians and candidates in the US, the threats are real: former congresswoman Gabby Giffords was shot in the head in 2011 at a constituent meeting and GOP Whip Rep. Steve Scalise was shot at a Congressional baseball game in 2017.— Madison HallPolls close in the Peach StateGeorgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference in Atlanta. Georgia election officials have announced an audit of presidential election results that will trigger a full hand recount.AP Photo/Brynn AndersonPolls have just officially closed in Georgia. We're watching a Senate primary, former Sen. David Perdue's challenge to Gov. Brian Kemp, another Trump-backed challenge to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, and a number of House primaries, including two Democratic House members facing off for the same Georgia district. Our Warren Rojas reports from the Kemp watch party that some counties are keeping polling locations open until 8 p.m. to account for delays at the beginning of the day, so we won't get statewide race calls until after then.–Grace PanettaInsider's Warren Rojas is in Georgia covering the governor raceGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) and former US Vice President Mike Pence attend a campaign event at the Cobb County International Airport.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFor a primer on the high stakes for the GOP in Georgia, check out this rundown of the race for Governor from Insider's Warren Rojas and Elvina Nawaguna. Rojas is in Georgia and will be reporting live from The Peach State all night. Both the former president and the former vice president have come down on opposite sides in the tense primary, they write:Perdue supporters are threatening to sit out the November elections if their candidate loses the primary rather than vote for Kemp, who they still hold responsible for Trump's 2020 loss in Georgia. Trump's team did not respond to a request for comment on the tele-rally, which comes days after news reports that he was backing away from Perdue as polls showed the candidate losing.Meanwhile, Kemp is already anticipating that pro-Trump Republicans could try to challenge his primary win after the Tuesday vote. He's trying to get ahead of it by assuring voters that any "mechanical" issues that might have marred the 2020 election have already been solved through a bill he signed into law last year.- Walt HickeyDonald Trump's funky winning ratePennsylvania Republican U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz joins former President Donald Trump onstage during a rally in support of his campaign at the Westmoreland County Fairgrounds in Greensburg, Pennsylvania.Jeff Swensen/Getty ImagesHere's what we know about former President Donald Trump's primary endorsee win record: His numbers are great when the person he's endorsing is running unopposed or faces tepid or token opposition. It's easy to pick winners when you know they're going to win, right?Where things get funky for Trump: When he endorses a candidate in a tight, tough Republican primary race.In these kinds of contests, Trump's picks have often faltered or underperformed, as Jake Lahut, Madison Hall, Brent D. Griffiths, and Warren Rojas report in this analysis with lots of cool charts.What does that mean for tonight's races? It means that in Georgia, for example, Republican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker — a Trump endorsee — will likely cruise to victory because he has minimal opposition. But on the same ballot, Trump's gubernatorial pick, former US Sen. David Perdue, could very well lose to Trump nemesis and current Gov. Brian Kemp. — Dave LevinthalLive election results start streaming in at 7 p.m. ET. Here's where to find the results.Georgia election officials counting ballots.Jessica McGowan/Getty ImagesWe're covering dozens of primary races up and down the ticket in four states — click on the links below to see live results for each race Georgia Senate Georgia governor  Georgia secretary of stateGeorgia House and state legislature Alabama Senate & HouseAlabama governor & state legislatureTexas' 28th District Democratic primary runoffTexas attorney general and congressional runoffsArkansas Senate & HouseArkansas governor & state legislaturePolls close at 7 p.m. ET in Georgia, 8 p.m. ET in Alabama and most of Texas, and 8:30 p.m. ET in Arkansas  -Grace Panetta Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytMay 24th, 2022

Live updates: Gov. Brian Kemp triumphs over Trump-backed David Purdue in Georgia

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and ex-Sen. David Perdue are vying for the GOP nomination, pitting a sitting governor against a Trump-backed challenger. InsiderInsider is be bringing you real-time election votes tonight for governor races, congressional races, a high-profile GOP primary over a safe Alabama senate seat, and state legislature primaries from Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, and even a few high profile runoffs in Texas.Here's what we're paying attention to:Alabama's ruby-red Senate seat is up for grabs, with a congressman vying against a former Senate chief of staff in a GOP primary for the seat.And in Texas, incumbent Rep. Henry Cuellar is facing a progressive challenger from Jessica Cisneros in a runoff election after their March primary went into overtime.Marjorie Taylor Greene cruises to victory in bid to retain House seatRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.John Bazemore-Pool/Getty ImagesGOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene easily coasted to victory on Tuesday night, bringing in well over the 50% needed to avoid a runoff. She is vying to retain her seat in Georgia's 14th Congressional District. Click here to follow the other Georgia congressional races.— Madison HallMo Brooks, mo' (financial disclosure) problemsRepublican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama conducts a news conference.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesMo Brooks, who's on the comeback trail in Alabama after getting dumped by former President Donald Trump, is one of 60 members of Congress who violated the STOCK Act in the past year. His, however, was one of the most memorable.Brooks previously railed against the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, accusing it of playing politics with its vaccine data. Despite his disdain for the pharmaceutical giant, Brooks sold up to $50,000 in Pfizer stock in August 2021, but failed to disclose it until October of the same year, violating the federal STOCK Act. The reason for the late filing? Brooks' wife, Martha. She told Insider that she runs the family's investments, including her husband's, in addition to filing disclosures. Martha also told Insider that she's in charge of deciding which stocks to buy and sell in accordance with their family's financial advisor, but never with Mo's knowledge.According to Martha, her husband didn't even know he owned any Pfizer stock to begin with.— Madison HallBush loses, embattled AG wins another termGeorge P. BushJoe Skipper/ReutersTexas AG Paxton defeated Land Commissioner George P. Bush in a primary runoff for another term as attorney general. Paxton has been under indictment for securities fraud since 2015 but has yet to stand to trial and is reportedly facing an FBI investigation for abusing his office to benefit a wealthy donor, scandals Texas' senior Sen. John Cornyn called "embarrassing." But Paxton's role in helping Trump unsuccessfully overturn his 2020 election loss earned him Trump's support and helped him defeat the last member of the Bush dynasty in elected office. -Grace Panetta  The 'Unbreakable Nine' could get broken upRep. Henry CuellarKevin Dietsch/Getty ImagesA pair of moderate House Democrats who launched a short-lived rebellion against President Joe Biden's economic agenda are battling for their political survival this evening.Reps. Henry Cuellar of Texas and Carolyn Bourdeaux of Georgia are facing off against rivals in a pair of closely-watched primary races. Cuellar is competing against Jessica Cisneros, a 28-year-old immigration attorney with endorsements from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez of New York and Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont. And Bourdeaux is locked in a tight race against Rep. Lucy McBath, another candidate with strong progressive support.Progressives are hoping to oust moderates who they argue helped tank Biden's expansive social and climate spending package once known as Build Back Better. In particular, they're focused on unseating Cuellar, one of the "Unbreakable Nine" House Democrats who nearly derailed Biden's agenda. Sanders recently campaigned with Cisneros in San Antonio, Texas. He cast the race as a "battle against the billionaire class."Last year, both Cuellar and Bordeaux joined a rebellion with seven other House Democrats to split the bipartisan infrastructure law from passing alongside the Build Back Better bill. The latter measure eventually died in the Senate.— Joseph Zeballos-RoigArkansas polls have closedSen. John BoozmanBallotpediaArkansas closed its polls at 7:30 p.m. CT/8:30 p.m. ET on Tuesday and results should begin to trickle in soon. We've got two pages tracking Arkansas races: One for the Senate, where incumbent Sen. John Boozman is looking to retain his seat, and one for Arkansas' gubernatorial and local races.— Madison HallThe state of play in AlabamaAlabama Gov. Kay Ivey speaks during a news conference in Montgomery.AP Photo/Kim ChandlerIncumbent Republican Gov. Kay Ivey is believed to be a strong frontrunner to win renomination in deeply conservative Alabama, on the road to a likely GOP win this fall.And in the GOP Senate primary, GOP Rep. Mo Brooks, Katie Britt, who is Sen. Richard Shelby's former chief of staff, and businessman Mike Durant have been in a heated race for months. The 50-percent threshold is a tall one, and the top two candidates will likely head to a June 21 runoff. — John L. DormanGov. Brian Kemp trounces Trump-backed David PerdueGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp walks onstage for a campaign event in Kennesaw, Georgia.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump endorsed David Perdue, an ex-US senator, to punish Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for not supporting his efforts to overturn the 2020 election. But Perdue's campaign struggled to keep pace with Kemp's spending, and Kemp resoundingly defeated Perdue early on Tuesday night, dealing a huge blow to Trump.Perdue is now the third Trump-endorsed candidate to lose in three weeks, following Charles Herbster in Nebraska and Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin in Idaho. — Grace PanettaInsider on the ground in GeorgiaGeorgia gubernatorial hopeful David Perdue poses alongside a cardboard cutout of former President Donald Trump during a campaign stop in Augusta, Georgia.Warren Rojas/InsiderOver the past few days, Insider correspondent Warren Rojas has traveled across Georgia attending events headlined by many of the leading Republican contenders and speaking with voters about everything from Gov. Brian Kemp's standing in the party to the influence of former President Donald Trump.Here are some of the highlights:Former Vice President Mike Pence on Monday traveled to Georgia to campaign on behalf of Kemp, putting him at odds with his former boss, who is all-in for ex-Sen. David Perdue. While Kemp was thought to be vulnerable over his defense of the integrity of the 2020 presidential vote in the state, Perdue has lagged in fundraising and endorsements, and the incumbent has also effectively used his bully pulpit to work in tandem with the GOP-controlled legislature to enact conservative legislation.While Perdue has had trouble gaining traction in the polls, controversial Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene remains a major draw for conservatives. She remains a powerful force in the MAGA movement, and is highly regarded as the favorite this fall in her congressional district, which was drawn to elect a Republican.— John L. DormanWhat is Herschel Walker's John Hancock worth?Herschel Walker speaks at a Trump rally in Georgia.Sean Rayford/Getty ImagesRepublican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker has some significant — and complicated — personal finances. So significant and complicated, apparently, that Walker failed for months to properly report millions of dollars in earnings that he's required by federal law to disclose, as Insider reporter Madison Hall revealed last week.But here's another financial curiosity: If Walker wins his primary tonight as expected, then defeats incumbent Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock in November's general election, he'll stand to earn a standard Senate salary of $174,000.That's less than Walker, a former football star, earned last year from "memorabilia autograph services" he provided to Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC, a firm known for monetizing athletes' John Hancocks.Walker's most recent personal financial disclosure, submitted May 15 to the US Senate, indicates Gary Takahashi Sports Marketing LLC paid Walker "wages" of $211,544. — Dave LevinthalMarjorie Taylor Greene: Disney fan or no?Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.Megan Varner/Getty ImagesRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia faces a handful of Republican primary challengers tonight, most notably "no-nonsense conservative" Jennifer Strahan. But the bombastic freshman is expected to win her party's nomination on the strength of her ultra-MAGA platform. Recently, Greene picked a fight with Walt Disney Co. for its opposition to a new Florida law that outlaws lessons about gender identity and sexual orientation. But what many Georgia voters probably don't realize is that the lawmaker personally invests in Disney stock. Asked about this, Greene told Insider that she doesn't make her own stock trades.She reiterated this assertion during a candidate debate earlier this month when one of her opponents, Seth Synstelien, asked her about her investments in defense contractor stocks."I usually find out about stock trades when I read them in the news just like you have," Greene said. "I signed an agreement with our financial advisor that I don't know anything about trades made on behalf of me or my husband. I always find out about them when they are written by leftists like Business Insider just like you are talking about."— Dave Levinthal Stacey Abrams' campaign is spending big bucks on securityStacey Abrams addresses the Gwinnett County Democratic Party fundraiser in Norcross, Georgia.Akili-Casundria Ramsess/ APStacey Abrams will cruise to victory in Georgia's gubernatorial primary today but is gearing up for one of the most contentious races in the country.As one of the most high-profile Democrats in the nation, she's spent a substantial sum on security. In fact, her security agency, Executive Protection Agencies, was the third highest payee in her campaign expense reports, costing her campaign a total of $390,132. As Insider's C. Ryan Barber previously reported, Abrams' voting rights PAC, Fair Fight, spent more than $1.4 million on security in 2020 and 2021, with the bulk of that money going toward Executive Protection Agencies.And while these expenditures are significantly more than that of most politicians and candidates in the US, the threats are real: former congresswoman Gabby Giffords was shot in the head in 2011 at a constituent meeting and GOP Whip Rep. Steve Scalise was shot at a Congressional baseball game in 2017.— Madison HallPolls close in the Peach StateGeorgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference in Atlanta. Georgia election officials have announced an audit of presidential election results that will trigger a full hand recount.AP Photo/Brynn AndersonPolls have just officially closed in Georgia. We're watching a Senate primary, former Sen. David Perdue's challenge to Gov. Brian Kemp, another Trump-backed challenge to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, and a number of House primaries, including two Democratic House members facing off for the same Georgia district. Our Warren Rojas reports from the Kemp watch party that some counties are keeping polling locations open until 8 p.m. to account for delays at the beginning of the day, so we won't get statewide race calls until after then.–Grace PanettaInsider's Warren Rojas is in Georgia covering the governor raceGeorgia Gov. Brian Kemp (R) and former US Vice President Mike Pence attend a campaign event at the Cobb County International Airport.Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesFor a primer on the high stakes for the GOP in Georgia, check out this rundown of the race for Governor from Insider's Warren Rojas and Elvina Nawaguna. Rojas is in Georgia and will be reporting live from The Peach State all night. Both the former president and the former vice president have come down on opposite sides in the tense primary, they write:Perdue supporters are threatening to sit out the November elections if their candidate loses the primary rather than vote for Kemp, who they still hold responsible for Trump's 2020 loss in Georgia. Trump's team did not respond to a request for comment on the tele-rally, which comes days after news reports that he was backing away from Perdue as polls showed the candidate losing.Meanwhile, Kemp is already anticipating that pro-Trump Republicans could try to challenge his primary win after the Tuesday vote. He's trying to get ahead of it by assuring voters that any "mechanical" issues that might have marred the 2020 election have already been solved through a bill he signed into law last year.- Walt HickeyDonald Trump's funky winning ratePennsylvania Republican U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz joins former President Donald Trump onstage during a rally in support of his campaign at the Westmoreland County Fairgrounds in Greensburg, Pennsylvania.Jeff Swensen/Getty ImagesHere's what we know about former President Donald Trump's primary endorsee win record: His numbers are great when the person he's endorsing is running unopposed or faces tepid or token opposition. It's easy to pick winners when you know they're going to win, right?Where things get funky for Trump: When he endorses a candidate in a tight, tough Republican primary race.In these kinds of contests, Trump's picks have often faltered or underperformed, as Jake Lahut, Madison Hall, Brent D. Griffiths, and Warren Rojas report in this analysis with lots of cool charts.What does that mean for tonight's races? It means that in Georgia, for example, Republican US Senate candidate Herschel Walker — a Trump endorsee — will likely cruise to victory because he has minimal opposition. But on the same ballot, Trump's gubernatorial pick, former US Sen. David Perdue, could very well lose to Trump nemesis and current Gov. Brian Kemp. — Dave LevinthalLive election results start streaming in at 7 p.m. ET. Here's where to find the results.Georgia election officials counting ballots.Jessica McGowan/Getty ImagesWe're covering dozens of primary races up and down the ticket in four states — click on the links below to see live results for each race Georgia Senate Georgia governor  Georgia secretary of stateGeorgia House and state legislature Alabama Senate & HouseAlabama governor & state legislatureTexas' 28th District Democratic primary runoffTexas attorney general and congressional runoffsArkansas Senate & HouseArkansas governor & state legislaturePolls close at 7 p.m. ET in Georgia, 8 p.m. ET in Alabama and most of Texas, and 8:30 p.m. ET in Arkansas  -Grace Panetta Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytMay 24th, 2022

Are Putin And Xi "Gray Champions"? Part 2

Are Putin And Xi 'Gray Champions'? Part 2 Authored by Jim Quinn via The Burning Platform blog, In Part 1 of this article I examined previous Fourth Turnings and the Gray Champions who won and lost, but made a difference in the course of history. Now I will try to peer through the fog of disinformation, lies, and false narratives to try and determine which Gray Champions will make a difference in this Fourth Turning. The U.S. and NATO are playing with fire by poking the bear. This is no longer a limited conflict between Russia and the Ukraine. In the early days of the conflict, there were constant talks between both sides, with the possibility of a negotiated resolution. The American Empire nixed those talks. The neo-cons, representing the interests of the military industrial complex uni-party, see an opportunity to further enrich themselves, while believing they can bleed and weaken Putin. But who is really being weakened in the long run? Putin’s military operation began on February 24. Oil was $93 a barrel. It is up 13% and despite economic sanctions, Russian oil revenue is higher, and the ruble is at a two year high versus the USD and Euro. Natural gas prices are up 69%. Diesel prices are up 89%. Gasoline prices are up 29%. Wheat prices are up 31%. The stock market is down 5% and at a one year low. As an exporter of oil, natural gas, and wheat, is Russia really suffering from these price increases, or are the citizens of the EU and U.S. bearing the brunt of the pain? Russians are paying $2.80 a gallon for gasoline, while Americans are paying $4.65 per gallon. Who’s winning this proxy war? Russian oil exports are up 50% in 2022. The Biden administration is amateur hour on steroids. The State Department and Defense Department are led by inept woke lightweights who are stumbling and bumbling our country into World War 3. They keep pushing Putin, attempting to instigate him into an action they can use as a basis for officially declaring war against Russia. Make no mistake about it, the U.S. is already at war with Russia and Putin knows it. Economic sanctions, even though they have backfired and hurt Europe and the U.S. far more than Russia, are an act of war. Providing the Ukraine with tactical information so they can target generals and naval ships is an act of war. Shipping high tech military weaponry, in addition to enriching U.S. arms makers, to the Ukraine is an act of war. Sending $54 billion, printed out of thin air by Powell and his cronies and exacerbating our already 40-year high inflation, to the corrupt Zelensky so he can buy U.S. arms, is an act of war. I wonder if the “Big Guy” will get his 10%. Calling for the overthrow of a world leader, who has 6,000 nuclear weapons at his disposal, is a reckless act of war. This isn’t a video game, where you get to start over if you make the wrong move. This game of Risk could end life on this planet as we know it if someone makes the wrong move. Fourth Turnings have a life of their own, with the generational juxtaposition driving events towards conflict rather than towards a negotiated resolution. The Prophet Generation leaders are sure of themselves, even when the facts argue against their plans. They will plunge forward, as their arrogance and self-absurdness convince them they are destined to achieve immortality in history books as the leader who changed or saved the world. We are in the midst of an era where events are being orchestrated by evil men whose agendas, while not totally coordinated, all coalesce around a future world of authoritarian domination by the few and passive subjugation by the many. It is clear Gates and Clinton are active conspirators in the Great Reset scheme being implemented by the billionaire global oligarchs. Trump is an enigma, as his rhetoric appears to be against these forces of evil, but his actions speak otherwise. His assessment and selection of key personnel, endorsement of candidates, and continued full throated support of the blood clot inducing Big Pharma experimental gene therapies that don’t keep you from catching or transmitting a low-risk flu, classifies him as either a clueless dupe or just controlled opposition, paid to keep half the masses distracted from their conspiracy to implement their Build Back Better New World Order. His actions in not doing everything in his power to free the January 6 hostages, rotting in government dungeons, passive support for Biden’s reckless Ukraine provocations, and endorsement of left wing lunatics like Oprah talk show host and Turkish citizen Mehmet Oz for Senate in a state where he doesn’t reside, prove his true colors. A Trump victory in the 2024 presidential election would ensure a chaotic whirlwind of domestic violence as a likely global conflict would already be underway. Is Putin the world’s last hope in derailing the WEF Great Reset agenda or is he just playing his part in enslaving the global population in squalor and debt within a techno-gulag dystopian surveillance federation, where you will own nothing and be happy while your overlords own everything and dole out your rations depending upon your level of subservience? Even though there have been tenuous links between Putin and the WEF globalist cabal, the reaction of these globalists to his military operation reveals he is not on their side. The U.S. controlled NATO has been slowly encircling Russia with missiles and the imminent admission of Sweden and Finland will put their missiles on Putin’s doorstep. Putin and his closest advisors are clear headed and understand the stakes, as stated by Dimitry Medvedev: “The pumping of Ukraine by NATO countries with weapons, the training of its troops to use Western equipment, the dispatch of mercenaries and the conduct of exercises by the countries of the Alliance near our borders increase the likelihood of a direct and open conflict between NATO and Russia instead of their ‘war by proxy. Such a conflict always has the risk of turning into a full-fledged nuclear war. This will be a disastrous scenario for everyone.” – Dimitry Medvedev – Former Russian President It appears this showdown between the failing and flailing American Empire and Putin will be the existential clash of this Fourth Turning. There is one certainty. Putin will not accept defeat in Ukraine. He plans to attain his objectives, whatever the cost. If the U.S. and NATO are foolish enough to directly intervene, they risk confirming Robert Oppenheimer’s lament – “Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds”. Putin has seen the writing on the wall since the 2014 U.S. orchestrated coup d’état and has shown tremendous restraint in his response. His Ukraine invasion has been targeted on military objectives, making all efforts to avoid civilian casualties. The Russian military is methodical, efficient, and boring, as opposed to the Shock & Awe U.S. military that has failed miserably at achieving their objectives for 20 years. The false flag Ukrainian attempts to create atrocity narratives have failed pathetically. But Putin’s restraint should not be mistaken for weakness. He is a man of his word, not one of Biden’s bloviating apparatchiks who got their job based on race, sex, or wokeness credentials. He means what he says and is willing to back up his words with actions. “If someone intends to intervene in the ongoing events from the outside and create strategic threats for Russia that are unacceptable to us, they should know that our retaliatory strikes will be lightning-fast. We have all the tools for this, and we will use them if necessary. And I want everyone to know that.”  – Vladimir Putin – April 28, 2022 There is no doubt in my mind Putin will be the most impactful of the Gray Champions over the last several years of this Crisis. The other Gray Champion who has been biding his time and generally keeping a low profile is Xi Jinping. Like Putin, a dictator for life, he can play the long game, while the U.S. fiddles and burns. He has refused to condemn Putin’s invasion and is tacitly supporting Russia by purchasing their oil and wheat, sanctioned by the West. He is also learning the U.S. and the EU are paper tigers, bogged down by immense levels of debt, vacuous leadership, a willfully ignorant populace, and militaries focused on wokeness rather than preparation for war. He continues to rattle his sword towards Taiwan, probing and testing the U.S. reaction. Xi’s aspiration is for China to dominate the 21st Century and he is applauding the foolishness of the American Empire in its death throes as it accelerates its fall by seeing its currency and military domination degraded rapidly. Xi is a serious man, on par with Putin, when it comes to tenaciously implementing his agenda. Both Russia and China have major demographic issues and as dictators, they always have the possibility of being overthrown by an internal adversary. Human rights, gender inclusivity, and choosing preferred pronouns are not high priorities for these men. Xi has been rapidly building up his military, using the hundreds of billions the U.S. has supplied buying their cheap crap for decades. China’s CCP has infiltrated American universities and stolen our technological innovations, bribing corrupt politicians, greedy corporate CEOs, spineless college administrators, and our dishonest whore media, to gain control over key aspects of our economic system. They are truly the enemy within. And the Biden crime family is beholden to both China and Ukraine. Xi played Trump like a fiddle, pretending they were personal friends and making promises he never intended to keep, as shown by our trade deficit with China up 30% from 2021 and on-track to reach an all-time high over $450 billion in 2022. Both Putin and Xi see the deterioration, degradation, and unseriousness of those steering the American ship of state into a sea of icebergs. They witness the bumbling fool of a president on a daily basis and the dimwitted sycophants running his administration behind the curtain. It would be comical if these amateurs weren’t in the process of tearing the fabric of American society to shreds, while simultaneously pushing the world into a global conflict in which the likelihood of nuclear confrontation grows by the day. Xi most certainly plans to enact a takeover of Taiwan when he believes the U.S. is too distracted, militarily stretched and bogged down in their European misadventure. Biden has already pushed Russia and China closer, along with India, while the majority of the world supports Russia in this conflict. You will not hear that from the U.S. media, but it is a fact. The U.S. Empire is not loved by the rest of the world. It has been feared, because if you stepped out of line in honoring the USD for all obligations you were summarily bombed into oblivion or cut off from the billions in “foreign aid” (aka bribes) doled out by American politicians. None of the foreign aid ever aids the people of those countries. It aids corrupt foreign leaders, arms dealers, and politicians who have a portion of the funds funneled back into their pockets. It has worked like a charm for decades, but these arrogant psychopaths went too far this time with their Covid scheme, unleashing a tsunami of inflation and destroying the just in time global supply chain they created when they sold off our manufacturing to China. The horrific reported inflation of 8.3% is really 17%, if measured as it was during Paul Volcker’s reign as Federal Reserve Chairman. Of course, he took the courageous action of raising rates to 20% in order to crush it and succeeded. The cowardly Powell has rates under 1% and will do as he is told by his globalist overlords, destroying our economy so the Great Reset can move forward unabated. History seems to be accelerating, with major developments and sudden turns every few weeks. False narratives and engineered distractions (Ukraine war, leaked abortion ruling, covid variant of the month) are designed to divert your attention from the collapse of our economy and financial markets. No one is really in control, though there are many egomaniacal self-absorbed despots who believe they can alter the course of history in the direction they choose. Klaus Schwab, Bill Gates, and the rest of the World Economic Forum authoritarian evil globalist purveyors of real disinformation want to destroy our way of life so they can implement the way of life they want us to have – owning nothing, eating bugs, obeying their commands, under constant technological surveillance, and in constant fear of being turned in if they voice dissent. Essentially, they want to impose a techno-fascist global regime upon the masses. Those pulling the strings know the jig is up. They’ve played the debt card to the hilt. It began to unravel in September 2019 when the repo market cracked. Everything since has been part of their exit strategy plan. They know the house of cards is about to come crashing down and are attempting to pull off a controlled demolition in which they retain their wealth, power, and control. Of course, their hubris will ultimately lead to their downfall, as the world is too complex, has too many variables to control, and their malevolent machinations will blow up in their faces and possibly blow up the entire world. As we see shortages of baby formula, eggs, wheat, fertilizer, diesel fuel, high tech equipment, vehicles, along with open borders allowing hordes of illegals to pour into the country, and Democrat run urban enclaves encouraging murder and mayhem, all created by purposeful decisions made at the highest levels of government and funded by the likes of Soros and Gates, you can’t help but recognize their real goal is to destroy this country. We’ve reached the point Frank Zappa warned us about a few decades ago. “The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it’s profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater.” – Frank Zappa I understand what they are trying to accomplish. With little food or fuel, and less than 1% of the population able to grow their own food to sustain themselves, the Build Back Better oligarchs expect the masses to beg them to be saved. This is where the WEF slogan, “You will own nothing and be happy” comes to fruition. You will be doled out a food ration, work menial jobs, live a squalid existence, use their global digital currency, and try to maintain a high social credit score so you are not ostracized and condemned to the gulag, or worse. The world is highly complex, and the best laid plans of these psychopaths are likely to go awry. I don’t believe they can pull off this controlled demolition without unleashing a myriad of unintended consequences. There is a pugnacious, heavily armed minority who will refuse to bend the knee to the arrogant, soft, egg head billionaires like Gates. His man boobs and pot belly don’t inspire admiration from average hard working blue collar man. A motivated minority of skilled freedom minded patriots can cause a multitude of problems for globalist totalitarians. I also believe Putin and Xi are roadblocks to the WEF agenda, explaining the fawning over failed comedic actor Zelensky and his invitation to speak at Schwab’s annual World Economic Forum. The course of this Fourth Turning now hinges upon the actions of Putin and Xi in response to the threats and warlike actions being taken by an American Empire desperately clinging to the mantle as the dominant world power. In theory I understood this Fourth Turning would ultimately lead to a bloody global conflict, but a few years into this Crisis I didn’t visualize a scenario which would lead to such an outcome. Each Fourth Turning has seen an exponential increase in deaths, as the killing technology has improved. There were approximately 65 million deaths during World War II, with Russia incurring 27 million of those deaths. That means approximately 3% of the global population were killed during the last Fourth Turning. Over 4% of the U.S. male population was killed during the Civil War. A similar death toll percentage today would exceed 250 million people. With the killing technology available today to men of dubious intellect and malicious motives, the potential loss of life could exceed our worst nightmares. I hoped for a less dismal route for this inevitable Crisis, but we are now careening towards our own rendezvous with destiny. On the current trajectory, we are running out of time on the Doomsday Clock. Strauss and Howe laid out four potential outcomes, which I have presented many times before in previous articles. Three of the four are not positive. If you asked me a few years ago, I would have selected outcome three as the most likely, as the American Empire died with a whimper, much like the British Empire after World War II. Now I realize outcomes three and four are highly unlikely. I believe outcome two is inevitable, as the dominant nation (America) has chosen to take a course which will engulf the planet in a war with an unknowable outcome. Once war starts on a grand scale, it could spin out of control and result in outcome number one. We can only hope cooler heads will prevail, but observing what is considered leadership in this day and age, I’m not optimistic. This Fourth Turning could mark the end of man. It could be an omnicidal Armageddon, destroying everything, leaving nothing. If mankind ever extinguishes itself, this will probably happen when its dominant civilization triggers a Fourth Turning that ends horribly. For this Fourth Turning to put an end to all this would require an extremely unlikely blend of social disaster, human malevolence, technological perfection, and bad luck. The Fourth Turning could mark the end of modernity. The Western saecular rhythm – which began in the mid-fifteenth century with the Renaissance – could come to an abrupt terminus. The seventh modern saeculum would be the last. This too could come from total war, terrible but not final. There could be a complete collapse of science, culture, politics, and society. Such a dire result would probably happen only when a dominant nation (like today’s America) lets a Fourth Turning ekpyrosis engulf the planet. But this outcome is well within the reach of foreseeable technology and malevolence. The Fourth Turning could spare modernity but mark the end of our nation. It could close the book on the political constitution, popular culture, and moral standing that the word America has come to signify. The nation has endured for three saecula; Rome lasted twelve, the Soviet Union only one. Fourth Turnings are critical thresholds for national survival. Each of the last three American Crises produced moments of extreme danger: In the Revolution, the very birth of the republic hung by a thread in more than one battle. In the Civil War, the union barely survived a four-year slaughter that in its own time was regarded as the most lethal war in history. In World War II, the nation destroyed an enemy of democracy that for a time was winning; had the enemy won, America might have itself been destroyed. In all likelihood, the next Crisis will present the nation with a threat and a consequence on a similar scale. Or the Fourth Turning could simply mark the end of the Millennial Saeculum. Mankind, modernity, and America would all persevere. Afterward, there would be a new mood, a new High, and a new saeculum. America would be reborn. But, reborn, it would not be the same. I’ve always preached preparedness and combining forces with like-minded people, but can you really prepare for a world where outcome one or two is the climax of this Fourth Turning? I know many bloggers make money off of doom, but I simply cannot conceive of a positive outcome based on the current dynamics driving the world towards war. I’d love to give a Knute Rockne speech to inspire the team to rally around someone who can lead us to victory. But all I see are monkeys with matches in a room full of dynamite. It’s only a matter of time until it explodes. The decline of an empire is awful to watch and even worse to live through. I wish you Godspeed and thank you for reading my ramblings. I hope I’m wrong. *  *  * The corrupt establishment will do anything to suppress sites like the Burning Platform from revealing the truth. The corporate media does this by demonetizing sites like mine by blackballing the site from advertising revenue. If you get value from this site, please keep it running with a donation. Tyler Durden Tue, 05/17/2022 - 23:45.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytMay 18th, 2022

RESULTS: Republican Doug Mastriano wins Republican primary in a crucial race for Pennsylvania governor

Mastriano, a leader of efforts to overturn the 2020 election in Pennsylvania, will vie for the governor's office this fall against AG Josh Shapiro. InsiderPennsylvania held primaries for a high-stakes gubernatorial race. Polls closed at 8 p.m. ET.The race and the stakes:Democrats and Republicans faced off for the nomination to replace term-limited outgoing Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf in Pennsylvania, a critical battleground state. Attorney General Josh Shapiro all but cleared the field for the Democratic nomination, but a crowded and unpredictable field of Republicans remained in flux on Tuesday.The Republican primary contenders included state Sen. Doug Mastriano, former congressman and 2018 Senate candidate Lou Barletta, former federal prosecutor Bill McSwain, and wealthy businessman Dave White, among others. Mastriano, who was the definite frontrunner in the race, was elected to the state senate in 2018, but soon rose to prominence through his aggressive but unsuccessful role in the plot to overturn President Donald Trump's 2020 election loss in the state.Mastriano's efforts included organizing bus transport to the protests in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2021, and pushing for a partisan review of the 2020 election results in Pennsylvania. He's been subpoenaed by the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 insurrection about his role in seeking to overturn the election, but has so far refused to testify. Mastriano has scant support from his fellow Pennsylvania lawmakers, but his work pushing the lie that the 2020 election was stolen earned him a last-minute endorsement from Trump just days before the election.  "There is no one in Pennsylvania who has done more, or fought harder, for Election Integrity than State Senator Doug Mastriano," Trump said in his endorsement statement. "He has revealed the Deceit, Corruption, and outright Theft of the 2020 Presidential Election, and will do something about it."Mastriano's election-related policy planks include eliminating no-excuse mail voting, which Pennsylvania enacted in 2019, and wiping all voters off the rolls and making them re-register to vote, which is illegal under federal law.He's also said he would sign a heartbeat-style abortion ban, implement constitutional carry for guns, ban "Critical Race Theory and Gender Theory studies" in Pennsylvania schools, and establish "strike f0rce" teams at every state agency to cut regulations. Mastriano has also tried to ban the press from his campaign events, which a CNN reporter recently circumvented by renting a room at a hotel where he held a rally in the courtyard. An aide who blocked press from a subsequent campaign event was also present near the Capitol on January 6, NBC News reported. Mastriano has been running as an unofficial ticket with Senate candidate Kathy Barnette in the Republican primaries. Barnette has also barred the press from public events, often with those blocking media access declining to identify themselves as members of the campaign or security.Mastriano's rise through a crowded field has prompted anxiety among Pennsylvania Republicans, who worry that his far-right views and ties to the Capitol riot and extremist groups could jeopardize the GOP's chances of flipping the state's governorship in the fall if he secures the nomination, NBC News and Politico reported.In Pennsylvania, which is expected to see one of the most competitive governor's races of 2022, Republicans winning back the governorship would give them full control of the state government — and allow the governor to appoint the state's chief election official.     On Thursday, just five days before the primary, state Senate President Jake Corman dropped out of the gubernatorial race and endorsed Barletta out of that exact fear, saying, "The only way that we will not be successful in the fall is if we nominate someone who can't possibly win."                        But Pennsylvania Republicans rallying around Barletta at the last minute came too late. On the day of the election, Real Clear Politics' polling average showed Mastriano leading the rest of the field by 14 points. Follow Insider's live coverage of all of Tuesday night's primariesRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 17th, 2022