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Turkey Angrily Cancels Key NATO Talks With Sweden & Finland

Turkey Angrily Cancels Key NATO Talks With Sweden & Finland As expected Turkey on Tuesday announced it has indefinitely postponed any future rounds of talks with Sweden and Finland regarding their NATO membership bids.  A major meeting was expected to take place in Brussels in February, but this has been dramatically canceled, Turkish state broadcaster TRT reported based on diplomatic sources.  Via AFP NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg was supposed to attend the talks, and when it was planned the two countries were widely perceived as very close to their NATO accession being approved. President Erdogan himself on Monday lashed out at Sweden in particular, blasting Swedish authorities for allowing a far-right activist to burn a Quran in front of the Turkish embassy in Stockholm over the weekend.  Erdogan stated bluntly that Sweden should no longer expect support from Turkey to join NATO given it allows "terrorists" in its midst. Turkey has also expressed deep dissatisfaction at both Nordic countries' failure to crack down on Kurdish groups banned by the Turkish state. Amid continuing Turkish anger, Finnish Foreign Minister Pekka Haavisto has said a diplomatic "time-out" is now needed in order to reassess.  At the same time, Finland has suggested it could seek NATO membership without Sweden, after the two earlier indicated a joint membership bid process. Tyler Durden Tue, 01/24/2023 - 21:45.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJan 24th, 2023

"There Is No Left & Right" - Austin Fitts Warns Corruption Out Of Control In "Spending Machine Financed With Our Taxes"

"There Is No Left & Right" - Austin Fitts Warns Corruption Out Of Control In "Spending Machine Financed With Our Taxes" Via Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com, Catherine Austin Fitts (CAF), Publisher of The Solari Report and former Assistant Secretary of Housing (Bush 41 Admin.), says the U.S. government is so fraudulent that it will self-destruct much sooner than later.  CAF predicts, “If you look at FTX, my question is how much of the money sent to Ukraine got laundered right back for the (2022 midterm) election?" "  So, to me, Ukraine is not a destination point, it is a through put point... At this point, and I hate to say it, but we are in full scale implosion.  The corruption is that bad.  That’s why I am telling you what we need is sovereignty.  The federal government is not going to deliver... The financial coup has reached a point where if you want sovereignty, the only person who can deliver that is your state governor and your legislature... If you’ve got a great state AG, if you have great legislature, if you have a great governor, you better start supporting them.  They are the people that can protect your sovereignty.  You need governmental sovereignty if you are going to have individual sovereignty, and you better do it now.  You have no time to be entertained by Joe Biden, Trump and Hunter Biden.” The federal government corruption was turbocharged in 2019.  CAF says, “While everyone was focusing on the teenage sex life of the Supreme Court nominee Kavanaugh, the House, the Senate, the White House, Democrat and Republican, both sides of the aisle got together and approved Statement 56 of the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) which said they could keep secret books.  That was everybody—together.  So, there is no Right vs Left.  There is no Trump vs Biden.  There is a machine in control of a spending machine that is financed with our taxes, and debt borrowed in our name, that is being sold into our pension funds and retirement accounts... That machine, to keep balancing the books, is implementing a depopulation plan.  That is the reality that has to be faced and changing the President won’t matter... If you want to make real progress against the machine, you’ve got to talk turkey about where your money is going, who are the local leaders and who are your state legislators who are going to support you when this machine fails you completely.  If it doesn’t fail you in 2023, it will fail you in 2024.  So, you better be ready.” CAF says a big trend in 2023 that is already underway is people realizing the CV19 injections were not meant to save you but harm and kill you.  CAF say the CV19 injections were a bioweapon meant for depopulation, and everybody in America will know this in 2023.  CAF says, “The mainstream media has done a good job painting a different picture, but at some point, you cannot defy reality, and that is coming out.  We have already seen it translate into market action.  We see life insurance companies trading down 30% and the funeral home business trading up 20%.  That is a 50% divergence.” CAF talks about the importance of physical gold and silver in the not-so-distant future.  CAF also talks about using cash, growing clean food, paying down debts, Central Bank Digital Currency, places to live to weather the coming storm, taxes and the strength of binding together for sovereignty against the machine. In closing, CAF says, “Get out of fear and stay out of fear. . . .You think a snowflake is weak and fragile until enough of them get together, and then they can shut down New York City. . . . If we can face it, God can fix it.  Don’t go to fear.” There is much more in the 1-hour and 5-minute interview. Join Greg Hunter of USAWatchdog.com as he goes One-on-One with the Publisher of The Solari Report, Catherine Austin Fitts for 2.20.22. *  *  * To Donate to USAWatchdog.com Click Here There is much free information on Solari.com.  You can search for all the free information CAF talked about by using the search box in the upper right-hand corner on the homepage of Solari.com. Tyler Durden Wed, 12/21/2022 - 15:00.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytDec 21st, 2022

Stoltenberg Reaffirms Ukraine Will One Day Enter NATO

Stoltenberg Reaffirms Ukraine Will One Day Enter NATO NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg in a Tuesday press briefing issued an ultra-provocative statement telling Ukraine that "NATO's door is open".  He pledged that one day the eastern European country which has for nine months been under Russian invasion will become a NATO member. This of course is a prime issue for Moscow which triggered Putin's "special operation" in the first place.  Image source: nato.int Stoltenberg issued the reaffirmation in the presence of US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and other top diplomats of NATO countries, who are currently gathered in Romania to discuss continued support to Kiev headed into the harsh winter months.  Stoltenberg further touted (and seemed to directly taunt Moscow) that Scandinavian countries Finland and Sweden are soon to be the next full members of the Western military alliance:  "Russia does not have a veto" on countries joining, he said about the recent entry of North Macedonia and Montenegro into the security alliance. He added that Russian President Vladimir Putin "will get Finland and Sweden as NATO members" soon. On this front, Turkey's government has recently described "progress" made by Finland and Sweden regarding Ankara's demands that they take more action against the Kurdish PKK and associated individuals living in their countries.  Turkish foreign ministry officials assessed the following to come out of the latest talks:  "We exchanged a series of ideas with the police and their colleagues in Türkiye to speed up the fight against the terrorist threat to Türkiye from the PKK," Oscar Stenström told local radio after Turkish, Swedish and Finnish delegations met in Stockholm on Nov. 25. ...A joint statement issued by the three countries after the meeting stated that Türkiye had accepted that "NATO candidates had taken steps that fulfilled their commitments." “We had a very good tone, and for the first time in a joint statement, we signaled that progress was being made," Stenström said. Norway's government has meanwhile seconded Stoltenberg's call for eventual Ukraine admission into NATO: "We stand by that, too, on membership for Ukraine," a Norwegian official said. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/30/2022 - 04:15.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 30th, 2022

Elon Musk"s legal team is frustrated after Twitter"s CEO cancels his deal deposition on short notice

Twitter and Elon Musk are set to go to trial in October over the billionaire's attempt to back out of acquiring the social media company. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images Parag Agrawal canceled an interview with Elon Musk's lawyer the day before it was set to take place. The CEO has yet to reschedule, although the interview is expected to happen. Musk is expected to be interviewed later this week as part of the ongoing lawsuit. Twitter's Parag Agrawal canceled on short notice a scheduled deposition as part of his company's lawsuit against Elon Musk, frustrating the billionaire's legal team, people familiar with the case told Insider.The Twitter CEO was set to be interviewed for 10 hours in San Francisco on Monday in a deposition scheduled to start at 9 am local time. Agrawal was to be questioned at length by Musk's New York-based lawyer Alex Spiro, a partner at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan. On Sunday, lawyers for Twitter emailed Musk's side to cancel Agrawal's deposition, citing "personal reasons." The deposition is expected to be rescheduled, but a new date is yet to be decided, the people familiar with the case said.The sudden rescheduling and alleged "no show" of Agrawal created a swirl of speculation that Twitter and Musk were possibly engaging in talks about an out of court settlement. While some of the depositions so far in the $44 billion legal battle have been done virtually or over video conference, like that of former CEO Jack Dorsey, Musk's side is said to have demanded that Agrawal be interviewed in person. The lawsuit is Twitter's attempt to force Musk to acquire the company on the terms he agreed to in April, with Musk accusing Twitter of fraud largely based on his allegation that it misled the public about how many authentic user accounts it has. A five-day trial is still set to take place the week of October 17.Meanwhile, Musk is still set to be deposed sometime this week, one of the people familiar said, although it is also being rescheduled. His interview will also happen in person, but likely no longer in Delaware, where it was initially set to take place. One of his closest associates, Jared Birchall, was deposed last week in New York. Another, Antonia Gracias, is set to be deposed on Tuesday in Chicago.Are you a Twitter employee or someone with insight to share? Contact Kali Hays at khays@insider.com, on secure messaging app Signal at 949-280-0267, or through Twitter DM at @hayskali. Reach out using a non-work device.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderSep 26th, 2022

14 recent discoveries that have changed the way we think about dinosaurs

From what color they were to how fast a T rex walks, here are 14 things we learned about dinosaurs from recent studies. An artist's reconstruction of a Mussaurus patagonicus nest.Jorge Gonzalez Dinosaurs died 66 million years ago but scientists are still learning more about them. A slew of recent papers has provided new clues about their lives and behavior.  Here are 14 discoveries about dinosaurs to emerge in the last few years.  Paleontologists are still discovering new information about dinosaurs, even 66 million years after they were wiped out.Here are 14 things that we've learned through a slew of recent reports shedding new light on their biology, their lives, and the world around them.Tyrannosaurus rexes walked about as fast as humans did.A T. rex is seen at a screening of the "Jurassic World: Dominion" prologue.Universal StudiosT. rexes preferred a leisurely pace most of the time, strolling around at about 3 mph, according to a study published in 2021.Scientists built a 3D computer model to understand the ideal "resonance" of the T. rex bodies.Every animal has an ideal resonance, meaning the walking speed at which they can move their body forward most comfortably while spending the least energy. "Many animals have a roughly similar preferred walking speeds," between 2.2 and 3.1 mph, Pasha van Bijlert, an author on the study, told Insider at the time.If the study calculation are correct, T. rex would have been no exception. "Humans and T. rex would not, if the study is right, have had very different walking speeds," John Hutchinson, an evolutionary biomechanics expert at the Royal Veterinary College in London who was not involved in the research, told Insider at the time. T. rexes could go faster, but at a big risk.A T. Rex skeleton at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago.Antonio Perez /Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty ImagesThat doesn't mean the dinosaurs could not outrun a human: scientists think they could speed up their walk, hitting peak speeds of about 25 mph, Insider previously reported.That's much faster than the average human's running speed.But any strut above 12 mph and the tons-heavy predators would risk shattering their bones, a 2017 study found.  Early dinosaurs laid soft-shelled eggs — a discovery that shattered our understanding of their evolution.The clutch of fossilized Protoceratops eggs and embryos examined in this study was discovered in the Gobi Desert of Mongolia at Ukhaa Tolgod.M. Ellison/©AMNHBecause birds and crocodiles lay hard-shelled eggs, paleontologists had assumed their ancestors did too. But a 2020 analysis of egg fossils found in the Gobi desert upended that theory. It revealed the eggs, from a 75-million-year-old, sheep-sized herbivore called Protoceratops, were likely soft-shelled, like those of turtles, lizards, and snakes. That may why it has been difficult to find eggs from some species of dinosaurs."We have all these other animals, but we don't have any eggs. It's bizarre," Mark Norell, lead author of the study, told Insider at the time. "My guess is they were all laying soft-shelled eggs."As many as 2.5 billion T. rexes may have roamed the Earth.An artist's depiction of a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex.Julius T. CsotonyiAs many as 2.5 billion T. rexes may have lived in total, a 2021 study estimated. The study looked at the average size of a T. rexes' territory — about 40 miles — how much they would have eaten, and the other resources they needed over the 2.5 million years they existed. The scientists estimated that as many as 20,000 adult T. rexes were alive at any one time. Fossilized dinosaur nests provided a peek into the animals' social life.An artist's reconstruction of a Mussaurus patagonicus nest.Jorge GonzalezAccording to a 2021 study, fossils of 100 eggs and 80 skeletons were found at one site in Patagonia, suggesting these dinosaurs, of the Mussaurus patagonicus species, may have lived in a herd. A fossilized egg of Mussaurus patagonicus that's 192 million years old, found in southern Patagonia, Argentina.Roger SmithThe eggs were clustered by groups of 8 or 30, close enough to suggest this may have been a breeding ground. Nest with eggs of Mussaurus patagonicus dated to 192 million years ago, found in southern Patagonia, Argentina.Diego PolRemains of juveniles and adults were also found at the site. "I went to this site aiming to find at least one nice dinosaur skeleton. We ended up with 80 skeletons and more than 100 eggs (some with embryos preserved inside!)" Diego Pol, a researcher with the Egidio Feruglio paleontology museum in Patagonia and the lead author of the new study, told Insider via email. A baby T. rex was small and fuzzy and the size of a large turkey.A T rex hatchling.R. Peterson / © AMNHAccording to a 2019 exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History, called "T. rex: The Ultimate Predator," hatchlings were surprisingly vulnerable. They had a 60% chance of dying within their first year of life, and were only the size of a turkey. They had an incredible growth spurt, gaining up to 1,700 pounds per year until they reached full adult size at age 20.  T. rexes were not the only 'armless' dinosaursBrendon Thorne/Getty ImagesThere is no end to memes about the T. rexes' tiny arms.Compared to their giant, razor-teeth-filled heads, their forearms look comically small.Scientists have long wondered why T. rexes' arms were so small.Some have suggested it's simply that the arms fell out of use, so natural selection made them smaller and smaller over time. But a series of discoveries have come to challenge this idea.  Another big, meat-eating dinosaur had tiny arms.Meraxes gigas.Jorge A. GonzalesA 2022 study described the skeleton of a new species of carcadontosaurs called Meraxes gigas. Like a T. rex, it had an enormous head and was very big: about 36 ft long.   Meraxes gigas.Carlos PapolioAnd like the T. rex, it had tiny little arms. The surprise was that this animal died 20 million years before the T. rex. So the tiny arms evolved independently.  Three types of dinosaurs evolved independently to have tiny armsThe bones found at the dig for Meraxes gigas are shown in white.Canale and colleagues, Current Biology (2022)Paleontologists have known since the late 2000s that another branch of the dinosaur family, the abelisaurs, were also "armless.""This is a real repeated pattern among giant carnivores: They are shrinking the arms down," said Dave Hone, a paleontologist from Queen Mary University in London who was not involved in the paper, speaking to Insider at the time. "Once is a novelty. Twice is: huh! Third time? Okay, this is happening again and again," said Hone.    That means the arms likely had a function. What it was, however, remains a mystery.Juan Ignocio Canales stands next to a reconstruction of Meraxes Gigas' skull bones.Courtesy of Juan Ignacio CanalesThat three huge carnivorous with tiny heads could have evolved independently to have tiny little arms probably means they had an evolutionary purpose. Scientists have put forward many ideas for their use.Some have suggested that the arms were used to help grasp a mate during sex, or to counterbalance their massive heads during attacks.Others said that perhaps the arms helped the predator rise from a fall, or to topple triceratopses over during hunting (this is called the "cow-tipping" hypothesis). Hone is doubtful about any of them. "I'm all in favor of the possibility of a mechanical function in these reduced arms. But I want a reason that stands up to even 10 seconds of thought and scrutiny and I've yet to see one," he said at the time.An incredibly rich fossil site was found in the US, and became guarded fiercely.A meteor impact 66 million years ago generated a tsunami-like wave in an inland sea that killed and buried fish, mammals, insects and a dinosaur.Graphic courtesy of Robert DePalmaThe site, nicknamed "Tanis" after the last resting place of the Ark of the Covenant in the 1981 film "Raiders of the Lost Ark," was highlighted in a 2022 BBC documentary that showed its fossils of incredible quality.Tanis, in North Dakota, has yielded some amazing fossils.    The skin of a triceratops, perfectly preserved in this fossil found at the Tanis site, is being filmed by the BBC documentary crew.BBC Studios/Eric BurgeThese include triceratops skin, pictured above, and a Thescelosaurus leg, seen in a video here. Spherules are seen in sediment.BBC Studios/Ali ParesTiny glass-like particles of molten rock were found lodged in the gills of fish fossils found at the site. The scientists that study the site have said these were kicked up in the sky following the impact of the 7.5 mile-wide meteorite that hit the earth 66 million years ago, wiping out the dinosaurs. But the discovery has been shrouded in mystery.Tanis dig-leader Robert De Palma talks with a colleague.BBC / Tom TraiesKate Wong, science editor of Scientific American, said in a 2019 tweet that the findings from the site "have met with a good deal of skepticism from the paleontology community."According to a 2019 New Yorker article about the site, the owner of the fossils had an inremarkable academic career until the discovery of the site.Robert DePalma, a relative of cinematographer Brian de Palma, insisted on contractual clauses that give him oversight over the specimens.He has submitted very few academic papers about his findings, limiting the scrutiny other scientists can give to the findings.  A newly-discovered species of dinosaur was the first with a peculiar 'war club' tailA model of the stegouros in Santiago, Chile, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021.(AP Photo/Esteban Felix)Results of a dig in southernmost Chile, published in 2021 revealed a new type of dinosaur with a tail "unlike any dinosaur."The 6.5-ft-long dinosaur, named Stegouros, had a tail "resembling an Aztec war club, with seven pairs of blades lining the tail."It would have supposedly used the tail to fight off predators.This cute dinosaur was brown and science can prove it.The skeleton of a Psittacosaurus dinosaur at the Grand Palais Museum in ParisReutersA 2016 study using cutting-edge technology was able to recreate the actual color of this dinosaur, called Psittacosaurus, meaning "parrot lizard."This was the third time scientists were able to figure out the color of a dinosaur from melanosomes, bits of cells that make the component that color the skin, like melanin in humans. Using this technology, scientists think this 120 million-year-old dinosaur, which has a parrot beak and was about 5 ft. long with a bushy tail, was mainly brown with a slightly lighter underbelly, per Reuters.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytSep 4th, 2022

Here"s what we know about Todd Palin — ex-husband of former Alaska governor Sarah Palin

Todd Palin's father and stepmother reportedly threw a party for the opponent of Sarah Palin, his politician ex-wife. Here's who he is. Former U.S. Republican vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin and her husband Todd take in Game 3 of the NBA Eastern Conference final basketball playoff series between the Miami Heat and the Indiana Pacers in Indianapolis, Indiana, May 26, 2013.Reuters/Brent Smith Todd Palin, the ex-husband of former Alaska governor Sarah Palin, filed for divorce in 2019. Todd didn't often make headlines, even when Sarah was the vice presidential nominee in 2008. Here's what we know about Todd, whose father and stepmother are supporters of Sarah Palin's GOP opponent. Todd Palin is the ex-husband of former Alaska governor and 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin, who on Tuesday made it through to the general election to represent Alaska in the US House of Representatives.His ex-wife will face off against Republicans Nick Begich III and Tara Sweeney and Democrat Mary Peltola — the four to advance in Tuesday's ranked-choice primary — in a November general election. The winner will take over the late Rep. Don Young's seat for the remainder of his term.The father and stepmother of Todd Palin have been vocal supporters of the opponent of their former daughter-in-law, Sarah Palin, in the ongoing race for Alaska's sole seat in the House.Todd Palin's father, Jim, and his stepmother, Faye, threw a party for Begich in their backyard on Monday evening, the day before Tuesday election night, Must Read Alaska reported. Though Sarah Palin stepped into the public eye after being tapped to be vice president for Republican presidential nominee John McCain in 2008, Todd himself didn't often make headlines and avoided publicity, even after the Palin family got into the reality TV show business.Here's what we know about Todd Palin:He shares five children with Sarah Palin.Then-vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin, far right, with her family at the Republican National Convention in St. Paul, Minnesota, on September 3, 2008.AP Photo/Ron EdmondsTodd and Sarah Palin share five children: Track, Bristol, Willow, Piper, and Trig, whom Todd has asked for shared custody, according to the divorce filing.Source: NBC NewsReports have shown he played a role in his wife's political career when she served as the governor of Alaska.In this June 8, 2009, file photo, Republican Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and her husband Todd Palin arrive at a Republican congressional fundraiser in Washington. Court documents appear to show that the husband of former Alaska governor and 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin is seeking a divorce. The papers, which provide only initials, were filed Friday by T.M.P. against S.L.P. Todd Palin's middle name is Mitchell and Sarah Palin's middle name is Louise. The documents say the couple married Aug. 29, 1988 — the same as the Palins. Birthdates for the two also correspond. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)Associated PressWhile Todd Palin, known informally as the "first dude," did not regularly appear in headlines as much as his wife, he still played a role in her political career when she served as governor of Alaska. Emails obtained by NBC News showed that he regularly communicated with other Alaskan political figures on government affairs.Sarah Palin became governor of Alaska in 2006 and resigned before the end of her four-year term in 2009, following her time as presidential running mate for the late Sen. John McCain in 2008.When asked if Todd helps his wife Sarah with her speeches, Jim Palin, Todd's father, told Newsweek in a 2011 interview that "he helps her prepare, but he doesn't critique."Known for his talent on a snowmobile, Todd was involved in an unfortunate accident in 2016 that left him with several injuries.Todd Palin holds his daughter Piper and then-Gov. Sarah Palin, right, talks to a friend during the start of the 2007 Iron Dog snowmachine race.AP Photo/Al GrilloTodd Palin was known for his prowess on a snowmobile after winning Alaska's Iron Dog snowmobile race four times, Newsweek reported. His wife Sarah even made a bid for him to get his own reality TV show showcasing his passion.However, in one of the few times he made headlines, Todd sustained "broken and fractured ribs, a collapsed lung, a broken shoulder blade, a broken clavicle, and leg injuries" in a snowmobile accident in 2016, NBC News reported.Read more: Sarah Palin cancels appearance at Trump event after husband injured in 'very serious' snowmobile crashIn December 2017, Sarah and Todd's eldest son, Track Palin, was accused of breaking into his parents' home and assaulting his father.Track Palin sits with Willow and Trig Palin at the 2008 Republican National Convention.Getty/Justin SullivanIn December 2017, Sarah and Todd's eldest son, Track Palin, was accused of breaking into his parents' home. Track was also accused with assaulting his father when Todd confronted him with a gun, leaving Todd with bleeding cuts on his head, The Washington Post reported.Track pleaded guilty to a lesser charge in veteran's court, NBC News reported.Sarah Palin posted a picture of her husband on Instagram a few weeks after the attack. Trailering snowmachines to trailhead for trek out to the cabin... perfect way to usher in the new year! May 2018 be a year of breakthrough, joy & victory for all! A post shared by Sarah Palin (@sarahpalin97) on Dec 31, 2017 at 2:58pm PSTDec 31, 2017 at 2:58pm PST  Todd filed for divorce from Sarah in 2019.Vice-presidential nominee Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and husband Todd Palin walk out on stage during the election night rally at the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa on November 4, 2008 in Phoenix, Arizona.David McNew/Getty ImagesTodd Palin filed for divorce from his wife in September 2019. The divorce was finalized in 2020, putting an end to more than 30 years of marriage. The complaint cites divorce on the basis of "incompatibility of temperament" and that "they find it impossible to live together as husband and wife," NBC News reported.The divorce complaint filed at the Anchorage Superior Court only uses initials instead of full names  — SLP (Sarah Louise Palin) and TMP (Todd Mitchell Palin). Details from the filing include dates of birth that match the profiles of both Sarah and Todd, as well as information corresponding to the Palin family as a whole, such as number of children.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytAug 17th, 2022

I do customer service at Southwest. I just want to help, but sometimes people get so mad police have to step in.

"This past weekend alone felt like a lifetime of shifts," a 47-year-old customer-service representative who's been at Southwest since 2008 said. "All I want customers to remember is that we're not robots; we're regular people," a customer-service rep who's worked for Southwest since 2008 said.Jonathan Weiss/Shutterstock A 47-year-old customer-service representative for Southwest Airlines says it's been a challenge. They've worked there since 2008 and the airline pays them $30 an hour. This is what it's been like with delays and cancellations, as told to writer Katherine Stinson. This as-told-to essay is based on a conversation with a 47-year-old customer-service representative who works at Southwest Airlines. They asked to speak on condition of anonymity for fear of professional repercussions, but Insider has verified their identity and employment with documentation. The following has been edited for length and clarity."American Idol" inspired me to apply for a customer-service-representative job at Southwest Airlines back in 2008. My friend always bragged — as mothers do — about her son being a contestant on the show. She became a frequent flyer to support her son and other children, who encouraged her to get a job of her own. So one day she told me: "If I'm going to work for a company, it's going to be Southwest."That was all the inspiration I needed at the time. The company initially hired me to work as a customer-service representative for one of Southwest's call centers. I gained experience fielding customer calls and concerns without ever seeing their faces. However, I found working at the airport truly fulfilling — the call center overwhelmed me after six years. I decided to apply at the San Antonio International Airport. I would lose the seniority I'd earned working at the San Antonio call center, but to me, it was the right choice. After going through another interview, the airport hired me in 2015. The thing about Southwest Airline employees, or at least the ones I work with, is their dedication. If you ever fly into the San Antonio International Airport, the employees you interact with have likely been there for years. The turnover rate is, typically, quite low. The company pays me $30 an hour, a benefit of my dedication to Southwest. It's been challenging for us seasoned employees lately It's a universal truth that nobody wants an airline to delay their flight, or heaven forbid, cancel it outright. I've dealt with my fair share of "Karens" and "Kens" who don't understand that we have to comply with FAA regulations for everyone's safety. Recently, a man and his family — the group looked to have around 13 people in total — arrived far too late to check in for their 8 a.m. flight. The man was not happy when we informed him that it was too late for us to check in his party; we have a policy to abide by. He got hysterical and angry. As a result, we had to bring over a police officer and their dog. It's almost like a scare tactic because we don't know what these people are going to do in these types of situations; it was frightening because he was slamming his hand on the table. We told him, "You need to calm down as soon as possible, sir." But I do want to help. I was working down in baggage claim — every shift we rotate to different stations at the airport — during the last-minute summer trips before people started coming back to school this past weekend. Because of the seemingly endless delays, we had to reroute scores of luggage. I'm not even sure if the elderly customer I helped whose luggage left without him got his belongings back. All of his valuables were in there, but he was one of around 30 people in line that day alone that were understandably upset about their lost luggage. We have to stick to the rules, even when it isn't convenient for anyone involvedFlyers really don't understand that the airlines can delay their flights, which means that they should think of backup options the day before. This past weekend alone felt like a lifetime of shifts. We had delays galore. One customer I interacted with missed their wedding rehearsal when their airline canceled the day's last flight to Las Vegas. I can't tell you how many customers didn't wait for us to accommodate them. They told us, often angrily, to cancel their flights so they could rebook with airlines that had options they needed at the moment. We do try to rebook customers to the next available flight when we're able to, but when it's the last Southwest flight of the night, all we can do is rebook them for a flight the next day. Another thing we can do for customers in the event of a mechanical-related delay or cancellation is give them a $200 voucher and book a hotel for them that night if they aren't from San Antonio. However, we can't do this if the issue is nonmechanical, like if there's an unexpected weather delay. My advice for anyone flying is to always have a backup plan to alleviate the stress of delayed or canceled flightsOf course, we'll always try to rebook you or get you on the next-best possible flight, but flyers never have a Plan B in case of emergency. My go-to suggestion for customers at the San Antonio Airport is to utilize the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. It's only about an hour-and-15-minute drive from the San Antonio Airport.As stressful as angry flyers are, the one flyer who truly got to me was a lady who simply said, "I would hate to have your job." I didn't say anything; I just looked at her. She left me momentarily speechless. It's very difficult, especially at 4 in the morning, to wake up at 2 a.m. — I do typically prefer working earlier in the morning, and I'm grateful my job has different shift times for flexibility — and have somebody tell you something like that.It's like a stab in the back. Yes, I'm here to make money and everything, but we're truly here to make you happy, too. Ultimately, all I could say to her was, "Have a good day, ma'am." I just want flyers to remember we're human, tooIt's usually easier working at the check-in counter because you're only with customers for a few minutes before they head to security. Any issue from that point forward is something the customer-service representatives at the gates handle. When you work at the gates, you're the one stuck with the onslaught of angry customers if an airline delays or cancels a flight. We get assigned a different station every day so no employee is in a certain spot all the time. All I want customers to remember is that we're not robots; we're regular people. Even the pilots deal with knee problems after sitting in a confined space for hours on their flights. We see a lot of cancellations throughout the day. I'd say 50% of our customers are understanding, and 50% aren't. The 50% that are understanding totally agree with us regarding our lack of control over cancellations and delays, and actually feel sorry for us. The thing is, I don't want people to feel sorry for us, exactly. I just want them to understand. What if your daughter was in our shoes? Would you treat them that way? Maybe you would, maybe you wouldn't, but we're just human beings. I do find fulfilment helping those in need I'm not the best Spanish speaker, but I practice my Spanish every day. So it does make me happy when we're able to get foreign passengers to their destination. I make it a point to be extra nice to them because some people aren't, because of global politics. It reminds me that we're here for a purpose, and our purpose is to help. I get a lot of happiness from helping customers that have no idea what they're doing. I love it. I try to make the best of my day because I'm the one who provides health insurance for me and my husband, and I want to make sure we're taken care of because at any moment, we can get sick. That's the No. 1 reason why I go to work every day.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytAug 16th, 2022

Explosive Report Confirms Expansive CIA "Stealth Network" Of Spies & Commandos Inside Ukraine

Explosive Report Confirms Expansive CIA 'Stealth Network' Of Spies & Commandos Inside Ukraine A fresh New York Times report has confirmed what many already suspected - that the CIA is still very active inside Ukraine - especially with training as well coordinating weapons among its Ukrainian allies. The Times report details "a stealthy network of commandos and spies rushing to provide weapons, intelligence and training," based on US and European intelligence officials with knowledge of the operations. The report says Ukrainian forces are reliant on this Western clandestine network "more than ever" while outgunned by the Russians. This comes months after investigative journalist Zach Dorfman's bombshell expose in Yahoo News which detailed how a prior 8-year long CIA covert program to train Ukrainian fighters helped provoke the Russian invasion. The only question that remained after that March report was the extent to which the CIA was still active in the ongoing fight against the invading Russians. Special operations file image, via Sandboxx The new Times reporting confirms that the US program is not only active and ongoing, but appears larger in scale than previously thought given the CIA's close cooperation with the Ukrainians is happening both inside and outside the country, across multiple locations. "Much of this work happens outside Ukraine, at bases in Germany, France and Britain, for example. But even as the Biden administration has declared it will not deploy American troops to Ukraine, some C.I.A. personnel have continued to operate in the country secretly, mostly in the capital, Kyiv, directing much of the vast amounts of intelligence the United States is sharing with Ukrainian forces, according to current and former officials," the report indicates. It appears much the CIA's work in Ukraine is centered on coordinating intelligence with local intel services and counterparts. "Few other details have emerged about what the C.I.A. personnel or the commandos are doing, but their presence in the country — on top of the diplomatic staff members who returned after Russia gave up its siege of Kyiv — hints at the scale of the secretive effort to assist Ukraine that is underway and the risks that Washington and its allies are taking," NY Times continues. Over the weekend, Canada also has been reported to have special operations troops inside Ukraine. This was reported months ago, but with a separate NYT report offering further confirmation. "Both CTV and Global News reported in late January that Canadian special forces had been sent to Ukraine, but National Defence did not comment on that deployment," Ottawa Citizen writes Sunday. Back in January, a full two months before the invasion, Yahoo News disclosed the following: The CIA is overseeing a secret intensive training program in the U.S. for elite Ukrainian special operations forces and other intelligence personnel, according to five former intelligence and national security officials familiar with the initiative. The program, which started in 2015, is based at an undisclosed facility in the Southern U.S., according to some of those officials. The CIA-trained forces could soon play a critical role on Ukraine’s eastern border, where Russian troops have massed in what many fear is preparation for an invasion. The U.S. and Russia started security talks earlier this week in Geneva but have failed thus far to reach any concrete agreement. While the covert program, run by paramilitaries working for the CIA’s Ground Branch — now officially known as Ground Department — was established by the Obama administration after Russia’s invasion and annexation of Crimea in 2014, and expanded under the Trump administration, the Biden administration has further augmented it, said a former senior intelligence official in touch with colleagues in government. These details further seems to authenticate those voices which have been insisting NATO and Russia are in fact waging a proxy war inside Ukraine, a label which Biden administration officials have previously sought to deny and downplay. New York Times: The CIA has no idea what's happening on the ground in Ukraine. New York Times, 17 days later: Ukraine is full of CIA personnel. pic.twitter.com/zlea6upOWm — Caitlin Johnstone ⏳ (@caitoz) June 25, 2022 Writes NY Times further of the international nature of Ukraine's on-the-ground assistance, "At the same time, a few dozen commandos from other NATO countries, including Britain, France, Canada and Lithuania, also have been working inside Ukraine." But the report adds the caveat that "The United States withdrew its own 150 military instructors before the war began in February, but commandos from these allies either remained or have gone in and out of the country since then, training and advising Ukrainian troops and providing an on-the-ground conduit for weapons and other aid, three U.S. officials said." This strongly suggests the very scenario that many long suspected: that CIA operations which had gone on for eight years in Ukraine didn't wind down or cease upon the Feb.24 start of the Russian invasion, but only increased and were ramped up. Of course, the same goes for the Pentagon's special operations presence inside the country and along its Western borders, particularly in Poland. On Sunday, the Kremlin underscored angrily that even as such clandestine programs are made public via deliberate "leaks" to the media, Washington has refused to answer simple questions regarding Western operatives and mercenaries inside Ukraine - also after a couple of American fighters were recently captured. So the NYT confirms that CIA and NATO “boots on the ground” have been in Ukraine all along, but two months ago you were a totally unhinged disinformation agent if you suspected this — Michael Tracey (@mtracey) June 26, 2022 Russian Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said on Sunday: "As [Russian Ambassador to London Andrey] Kelin said, they [Western countries] are writing some provocative, boorish things. They don’t want to answer the question we ask about their activities." She charged the West with only seeking to perpetuate the conflict, saying, "They are sparing no effort so that the conflict in Ukraine continued as long as possible. We remember what US 43rd President George Bush Jr said: Ukraine’s mission is to kill as many Russians as possible.... They have endowed Ukraine and the Kiev regime with this duty. "They are using (Ukraine - TASS) as an instrument and the entire logistics are centered round that - weapons supplies, sending people, anything to keep the conflict burning, as [UK Prime Minister] Boris Johnson told [French President Emmanuel] Macron today, to prevent the settlement of this situation. Otherwise, their plan will fail," Zakharova said according to TASS. Tyler Durden Sun, 06/26/2022 - 19:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 26th, 2022

The Biden Administration"s Ignorant Energy Policies: Higher Gas Prices Are Only The Beginning

The Biden Administration's Ignorant Energy Policies: Higher Gas Prices Are Only The Beginning Authored by Doug French via The Mises Institute, While Americans angrily grit their teeth while filling their gas tanks, the very first United States special presidential envoy for climate said: This year, we have to implement those promises and what it means is that we have to decarbonize the power sector five times faster than we are right now. We have to deploy renewables five times faster than we are right now. We have to transition to electric vehicles about 20 times faster than we are right now. And we have to fully transition to a resilient Net Zero economy faster. If reality was beyond his reach before, John Kerry surely lost touch when he married into the Heinz condiment colossus in 1995. He talks as if he were ordering lunch from his harried house staff, “Faster, Jeeves. Can’t you hurry up and decarbonize already?” All of this service to the country has left Kerry clueless as to physics, not to mention economics. “And to say it is to expose a level of ignorance that is scary,” the green cartoon chicken known as Doomberg told Tony Greer on Real Vision: Actually, that our politicians would think despite all the evidence before them, that somehow, we can wave a magic wand and accelerate the adoption of electric vehicles by a factor of 20 when we don't have enough lithium, nickel or cobalt to even support the current growth trajectory. It's just crazy. Where's the diesel going to come from to mine all the cobalt and nickel and lithium that we're going to need? Global consumption of petroleum and liquid fuels will average just short of a hundred million barrels a day this year, an increase of 2.2 million barrels a day from 2021. Yet, Chevron CEO Mike Wirth stresses, "there hasn’t been a refinery built in this country since the 1970s." More ominously, he predicts, "I personally don’t believe there will be a new petroleum refinery ever built in this country again." A good’s increased price should be a signal to entrepreneurs to produce more of that product. In a free market that would be the case. But, as Mr. Wirth explains, "at every level of the system, the policy of our government is to reduce demand, and so it’s very hard in a business where investments have a payout period of a decade or more." "And the stated policy of the government for a long time has been to reduce demand for [petroleum] products." In his book Omnipotent Government, Ludwig von Mises explained: The dangerous fact is that while the government is hampered in endeavors to make a commodity cheaper by intervention, it certainly has the power to make it more expensive. So, Joe Biden jawbones about lowering prices at the pump while gas prices hit new highs (and the summer driving season has yet to arrive). Doomberg puts a finer point on the lack of refineries:  The last major refinery to be built in the US was in 1977. And by major, I mean more than 100,000 barrels a day. There's been some small ones put in, and some specialty ones here and there. But by and large, because of environmental pressure, the US has not made a new refinery at scale in 40 years, 45 years, which is pretty incredible. And, that’s not the worst of it. “But also, what's happened concurrently is especially on the East Coast and the West Coast, big surprise, many refineries have been shut down because of environmental pressure,” Doomberg said. With these closures, the net effect was something like 17.8 million barrels a day in the 1980’s. And it’s 18 million barrels a day today. “When you consider how much GDP growth that's exploded over that time period, you can see where the constraints are,” said Doomberg. According to Doomberg, The world's running out of diesel. And if we run out of diesel, that's a really big deal. The consequence of demand destruction is going to be a severe economic recession slash depression. As Mises pointed out, one government intervention inevitably leads to another, and Doomberg predicts “the Biden administration [will] push for a ban on diesel exports, which is going to be a lot easier to sell politically.” This will hurt refiners, as diesel prices internationally are much higher for the 650,000 barrels they export a day.  The environmental crowd, now armed with government power, may believe they are doing God’s work, but as Mises pointed out: The effect of its interference is that people are prevented from using their knowledge and abilities, their labor and their material means of production in the way in which they would earn the highest returns and satisfy their needs as much as possible. Such interference makes people poorer and less satisfied. When you fill up your tank, that’s how you feel, “poorer and less satisfied.”  Tyler Durden Sat, 06/18/2022 - 13:30.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 18th, 2022

Wimbledon Officially Bans Russian And Belarusian Tennis Pros Over Ukraine Conflict 

Wimbledon Officially Bans Russian And Belarusian Tennis Pros Over Ukraine Conflict  Update (1142ET): A statement published by the All England Club has declared that all Russian and Belarusian tennis pros will be banned from participating at Wimbledon this year because of the conflict in Ukraine.  "It is our responsibility to play our part in the widespread efforts ... to limit Russia's global influence through the strongest means possible," the statement read. "In the circumstances of such unjustified and unprecedented military aggression, it would be unacceptable for the Russian regime to derive any benefits from the involvement of Russian or Belarusian players with The Championships." Statement regarding Russian and Belarusian individuals at The Championships 2022. — Wimbledon (@Wimbledon) April 20, 2022 Here's the full statement:  On behalf of the All England Club and the Committee of Management of The Championships, we wish to express our ongoing support for all those impacted by the conflict in Ukraine during these shocking and distressing times. We share in the universal condemnation of Russia's illegal actions and have carefully considered the situation in the context of our duties to the players, to our community and to the broader UK public as a British sporting institution. We have also taken into account guidance set out by the UK Government specifically in relation to sporting bodies and events. Given the profile of The Championships in the United Kingdom and around the world, it is our responsibility to play our part in the widespread efforts of Government, industry, sporting and creative institutions to limit Russia's global influence through the strongest means possible. In the circumstances of such unjustified and unprecedented military aggression, it would be unacceptable for the Russian regime to derive any benefits from the involvement of Russian or Belarusian players with The Championships. It is therefore our intention, with deep regret, to decline entries from Russian and Belarusian players to The Championships 2022. Ian Hewitt, Chairman of the All England Club, commented: "We recognise that this is hard on the individuals affected, and it is with sadness that they will suffer for the actions of the leaders of the Russian regime. "We have very carefully considered the alternative measures that might be taken within the UK Government guidance but, given the high profile environment of The Championships, the importance of not allowing sport to be used to promote the Russian regime and our broader concerns for public and player (including family) safety, we do not believe it is viable to proceed on any other basis at The Championships." If circumstances change materially between now and June, we will consider and respond accordingly. We also welcome the LTA's decision in declining entries from Russian and Belarusian players to UK events to ensure that British tennis is delivering a consistent approach across the summer. * * *  Wimbledon will be the first major tennis tournament to ban players from Russia and Belarus due to the invasion of Ukraine, according to The NYTimes, citing a top international tennis official with direct knowledge of the situation. As Paul Joseph Watson reports, the ban contradicts the statements of WTA chief Steve Simon, who last month asserted that individual athletes shouldn’t be punished for the actions of their governments. “You never know what the future may bring. But I can tell you that we have never banned athletes from participating on our tour as the result of political positions their leadership may take,” said Simon. The decision supersedes an earlier directive by tennis authorities the ITF, WTA and ATP which said that Russian and Belarusian players could continue to appear at tour events, but only as neutrals and without displaying national colors. The decision was made after top UK tennis authorities and lawmakers held discussions over whether to ban Russian and Belarussian athletes. On Tuesday, the Lawn Tennis Association was in "complex" talks with Prime Minister Boris Johnson about the issue.  The Kremlin reacted angrily to the reports deeming it "unacceptable". "Once again they simply turn athletes into hostages to political prejudice, political intrigues," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters. "This is unacceptable." "Taking into account that Russia is a very strong tennis country, our athletes are at the top of world rankings, the competition itself will suffer from their removal," he added. The ban will affect several players, notably Daniil Medvedev, Andrey Rublev, and Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova.  Nigel Huddleston, the British sports minister, told a parliamentary hearing in March that Russians should show their ideological conformity to the current narrative surrounding the war to be able to compete.  "We need some potential assurance that they are not supporters of Putin and we are considering what requirements we may need to try and get some assurances along those lines," said Huddleston. However, competing as a neutral athlete wasn't good enough for Huddleston and UK lawmakers, as the outright ban of these players appears to be imminently announced.  Russophobia is on full display in the UK. Keeping a bunch of Russian tennis pros out of sporting events will have absolutely no impact on Russia's war effort in Ukraine.  Wimbledon hasn't banned players from specific countries since the end of World War II.  Tyler Durden Wed, 04/20/2022 - 11:42.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeApr 20th, 2022

Perception Vs. Reality

Perception Vs. Reality Authored by Michael Snyder via The Economic Collapse blog, If you only get your news from the mainstream media, you would be tempted to believe that global conditions are relatively stable right now.  Yes, there is a war between Russia and Ukraine, but the mainstream media is assuring us that Ukraine is winning that war.  Other than that, the mainstream media seems to think that everything is just fine. Of course the truth is that our planet is facing a whole host of extremely challenging problems at the moment.  The UN has warned that we are entering the worst global food crisis since World War II, inflation has started to spiral out of control all over the world, the war in Ukraine is making our supply chain nightmares even worse and an absolutely horrifying bird flu plague is killing millions upon millions of chickens and turkeys. But if you flip on one of the corporate news channels tonight, they will be focusing on other things. And you probably won’t even hear them talk about the food riots that have suddenly begun erupting around the world at all. For example, a “curfew” has just been imposed on the capital of Peru after a series of extremely passionate protests that were sparked by rapidly rising fuel and food prices… Peruvian President Pedro Castillo announced a curfew for Tuesday in the capital Lima and neighboring port city Callao, after demonstrations across the country over fuel prices caused roadblocks and “acts of violence”. Protests had erupted across Peru in recent days due to a hike in fuel prices and tolls, during a time of rising food prices. Is this the first time that you have heard about this? For many of you it will be, and that is because the mainstream media in the U.S. is largely ignoring this. In Sri Lanka, severe shortages of “food, medicine and fuel” have caused a full-blown economic collapse and tremendous chaos in the streets… In Sri Lanka, where an economic crisis is growing, more than 40 lawmakers walked out of the ruling coalition today. That leaves the government of President Gotabaya Rajapaksa in the minority in Parliament. There have been new calls today for both the president and prime minister to step down after the entire Cabinet resigned on Sunday. Shortages of food, medicine and fuel have sparked countrywide protests, and security forces have fired tear gas and water cannons at protesters marching on the president’s home. Most of you have probably not heard about that either, and that is because our largest news outlets are being really quiet about it. But USA Today wants to make sure that you know about a new promotion that McDonald’s is running: “McDonald’s brings back Spicy Chicken McNuggets to select restaurants for a limited time”. More than ever before, our perception of the world around us is shaped by the corporate elite.  Americans get more than 90 percent of the “television news” that they consume from just five giant media corporations, and so that gives those corporations an incredible amount of influence over how our society views reality. For example, far more Americans are talking about “the slap” at the Academy Awards than about the fact that North Korea just threatened South Korea with nuclear war… North Korea opposes war but would use nuclear weapons if South Korea attacked, Kim Yo Jong, the powerful sister of leader Kim Jong Un, said on Tuesday, in a warning that analysts said is probably aimed at the South’s incoming conservative president. Kim Yo Jong, a senior official in the government and ruling party, said it was a “very big mistake” for South Korea’s minister of defence to make recent remarks discussing attacks on the North, state news agency KCNA reported. The war in Ukraine is not going to be the last war that erupts.  I believe that China is very strongly considering an invasion of Taiwan in the not too distant future, and a major war between Israel and Iran could literally start at any time. But instead of alarming the American people about such things, CNN wants you to know that Coke has a brand new flavor: “Coke’s latest flavor is here. And it’s a weird one”. I suppose that we should be thankful to CNN, because I probably never would have heard about that new flavor unless they ran that story. Meanwhile, the number of poultry flocks in Minnesota that have been hit by the new bird flu pandemic just doubled… The Minnesota Board of Animal Health on Tuesday reported the latest outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza in the state is now affecting a total of 15 poultry flocks — up from seven last Friday. Minnesota is the number one state for turkey production, and so this is a really big deal. Overall, the national death toll just continues to climb.  The first case at a commercial facility in the United States was confirmed less than two months ago, and now the death toll has risen to nearly 28 million… The new cases mean that across the nation, farmers have had to kill about 22 million egg-laying chickens, 1.8 million broiler chickens, 1.9 million pullet and other commercial chickens, and 1.9 million turkeys. Will MSNBC lead with this story tonight? Of course not. But I did find the following story on MSNBC’s homepage earlier today: “Garlic cloves up your nose? What to know about the health trends taking TikTok by storm”. What a bunch of nonsense. I am so grateful for the alternative media, because they often cover stories that the mainstream media never talks about. For example, our friends at Zero Hedge have informed us that the price of jet fuel in New York has risen “more than 162% since mid-March”… Wholesale jet fuel prices in New York have risen more than 162% since mid-March, as buyers at some of the world’s busiest airports, located on the US East Coast, anticipate dwindling supplies as Western sanctions shun Russian energy exports. On Monday, jet fuel prices jumped 93 cents to $7.61 a gallon, a new record high, according to Bloomberg data going back to 1988. That is crazy. We are seeing so much inflation all throughout the system right now.  A few hours ago, I came across a post by a supermarket employee on a very popular Internet forum that really got my attention.  According to this employee, workers at this particular store were given 52 pages of price changes just this week… Tyson Chicken strip jumped up $3 Eggs went up to $3.50 they were 2.25 32 pack of water went to $5.50 originally 3.75 There was 35 pages of price changes on the dry side and 17 pages in freezer and cooler they are planning to have that many pages or more next week also A trip to the grocery store is going to become very, very painful in the months ahead. But just be thankful that you don’t live in one of the poorest countries on the planet. At this point, even Vladimir Putin is telling us that the food shortages that we are now witnessing are going to get even worse… Putin said higher energy prices and fertilizer shortages would mean Western nations would have to print more money to buy supplies, which would cause food shortages in poorer countries. “They will inevitably exacerbate food shortages in the poorest regions of the world, spur new waves of migration, and, in general, drive food prices even higher,” Putin said in a meeting on developing food production, Reuters reported. A full-blown global meltdown has now begun, and it is going to go to an entirely new level in the months ahead. But the mainstream media will try to distract you with stories about Will Smith, Kourtney Kardashian and other celebrities for as long as they can. Personally, I don’t really care that Kourtney Kardashian just married Travis Barker in Las Vegas.  What I do care about is the fact that our society is coming apart at the seams all around us. The news that you get from the corporate media has been carefully designed to promote certain narratives, and these days much of it is wildly inaccurate. But most of the population will continue to blindly believe whatever they are told to believe by our “professional journalists”, and that is extremely unfortunate. *  *  * It is finally here! Michael’s new book entitled “7 Year Apocalypse” is now available in paperback and for the Kindle on Amazon. Tyler Durden Thu, 04/07/2022 - 16:30.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytApr 7th, 2022

Live updates: Russia advances towards Kyiv, Ukrainian death toll passes 137 as official predicts "hardest day"

Russia began its attack on Ukraine on Thursday morning. One official warned Friday would be the "hardest day." Ukrainian servicemen walk by fragments of a downed aircraft in Kyiv on February 25, 2022.AP Photo/Oleksandr Ratushniak Russia continued its attack on Ukraine on Friday, advancing toward the capital, Kyiv. One Ukrainian official warned Friday would be the "hardest day" and the military issued instructions on how to make Molotov cocktails. 137 Ukrainians were dead as of early Friday morning. The death toll has since risen. Recap: Ukraine says 137 people died on Thursday alone. The death toll has since risen.A building hit by a missile in Kyiv, Ukraine, seen on February 25, 2022.Wolfgang Schwan/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesUkrainian President Volodomyr Zelensky said that 137 people, including 10 military officers, had been killed and 316 were wounded on Thursday.He did not say how many were civilians, but Ukrainian officials have confirmed that civilians were killed.There were more deaths reported on Friday, though the exact number is not clear.Zelensky said that "people died" in heavy fighting on Friday, but did not say now many or what country they were from.One of Zelensky's advisors said that around 400 Russian soldiers had died as of Friday, the Associated Press reported. Russia has not given a death toll.Ukraine says radiation levels around Chernobyl are increasing after Russia captured itView of the Chernobyl nuclear power on April 26, 1986, after the explosion.Photo by SHONE/GAMMA/Gamma-Rapho via Getty ImagesUkraine said on Friday that the radiation levels around the Chernobyl nuclear disaster site were increasing, though Russia said on Thursday that they were still normal.Ukrainian officials said that Russian troops seized the remnants of the nuclear plant on Thursday.Experts from Ukraine's nuclear agency told Reuters that the radiation increase was caused by radioactive dust being kicked up into the air by heavy military equipment there.Read Full Story Russian foreign minister says his country will talk to Ukraine once it stops fighting, doubles down on claim it wants 'de-Nazification'Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in January 2022.Photo by DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP via Getty ImagesSergei Lavrov said on Friday that Russia will only talk to Ukraine if its troops stop fighting, adding: "We do not want Neo-Nazis to rule Ukraine."He was repeating Russia's baseless claim that its attack on Ukraine was motivated by Nazism in Ukraine.Ukraine's president is a Jewish man whose native language is Russian. He came into office after a democratic election.Russia has previously tried to justify its attack by claiming it wanted to prevent a "genocide" in Ukraine and to achieve the "de-Nazification" of the country. Kyiv mayor and former heavyweight boxing champion says he'll fight for UkraineWladimir and Vitali Klitschko.Getty/Richard HeathcoteUkrainian boxing icons Vitali and Wladimir Klitschko said they would take up arms to defend Ukraine against Russia.Vitali, who has also been the mayor of Ukraine's capital, Kyiv, since 2014, said he was ready to fight in a "bloody war.""I don't have another choice, I have to do that. I'll be fighting," he told ITV's Good Morning Britain on Friday. "I believe in Ukraine, I believe in my country and I believe in my people."Wladimir wrote in a LinkedIn post on Thursday: "Democracy cannot defend itself; it needs the will of the citizens, the commitment of everyone.""Here, we will defend ourselves with all our might and fight for freedom and democracy. You can also act. Let not fear seize us; let's not remain frozen."Read Full StoryUkraine official predicts 'hardest day' as Russia advances on KyivPeople rest in the Kyiv subway, using it as a bomb shelter on Thursday.AP Photo/Emilio MorenattiUkraine Interior Ministry advisor Anton Gerashenko said on Friday: "The hardest day will be today. The enemy's plan is to break through with tanks from Ivankiv and Chernihiv to Kyiv."Ukraine has been 'left alone' to defend itself from Russia, president saysUkrainian servicemen walk by fragments of a downed aircraft in Kyiv on February 25, 2022.AP Photo/Oleksandr RatushniakVolodomyr Zelensky said in an early Friday speech that Ukraine was not getting help on the ground, saying: "We are left alone in defense of our state.""Who is ready to fight with us? Honestly — I do not see such. Who is ready to guarantee Ukraine's accession to NATO? Honestly, everyone is afraid."Many nations have condemned Russia and sent weapons to Ukraine. But they have not sent troops, and NATO and the US have said they won't do so.Zelensky also praised the people of Ukraine in his speech, saying: "You are brilliantly defending the country from one of the most powerful countries in the world."Read Full Story Ukraine posts instructions for making Molotov cocktails and asks people who own drones for helpThe post below, from Ukraine's national guard, contained instructions on how to make Molotov cocktails to use against Russian troops.—НГУ (@ng_ukraine) February 25, 2022Ukraine's military also posted a Facebook callout on Friday asking for drone owners to help out."Do you know how to drive a drone? Join the joint patrol with units 112 of the separate brigade of the city of Kyiv!" it said.The Champions League final is moved from Russia to FranceGetty Images/Daniele BadolatoEuropean soccer governing body UEFA said Russia has been stripped of the 2022 Champions League final, and that it will now take place in Paris.UEFA said the game being moved comes after "the grave escalation of the security situation in Europe."Read Full StoryRussia 'failed to deliver' its day-one aims for invading Ukraine, UK defense secretary saysUK Secretary for Defence Ben Wallace.Luka Dakskobler/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesBen Wallace told Sky News on Friday: "Our assessment, as of this morning, is that Russia has not taken any of its major objectives,"  "In fact it's behind its hoped-for timetable. They've lost over 450 personnel.""The Russian army has failed to deliver on day one its main objective."He gave the example that Russian special forces had failed to secure a "significant" airport that was once again under Ukrainian control. Read Full Story Ukrainian leaders compare Russia's attack on Kyiv to Nazi Germany's assault in 1941A night view of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city.Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesRussia's attack on the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv has prompted comparisons to Nazi Germany's assault on the city in 1941.Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky invoked World War II while speaking directly to the Russian people in a speech Friday morning as explosions were reported over Kyiv."Tonight, you began bombing residential areas in the hero city of Kyiv. This is like 1941. I want to tell all Russian citizens who are coming out to protest: we hear you, you heard us, you started to believe us. Fight for us. Fight the war," Zelensky said.Read Full StoryRussia's richest 22 billionaires lost $39 billion in one day after the invasion of UkraineVladimir Potanin, Russia's richest man, lost $3 billion in one day on Thursday. He is now worth $26.1 billion.Mikhail Svetlov/Getty ImagesRussia's 22 richest individuals saw their net worths plunge by a collective $39 billion in less than 24 hours after their country invaded Ukraine, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.The wealth wipeout came after Moscow's benchmark MOEX Russia Index crashed and closed 33% lower on Thursday.The Russian billionaires lost more money on Thursday than they had lost year-to-date up until Wednesday, according to Bloomberg.Read Full StoryAustralian PM Scott Morrison slams China for throwing a 'lifeline' to RussiaMorrison said that it is "simply unacceptable" for China to ease trade restrictions on Russia when other countries are imposing sanctions.STEVEN SAPHORE/AFP via Getty ImagesAustralian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has condemned China for easing its restrictions on Russian wheat amid the Ukraine crisis, even as other countries impose fresh sanctions on Russia."You don't go and throw a lifeline to Russia in the middle of a period when they're invading another country," he told reporters at a press conference on Friday morning, per Australia's ABC News. Read Full StoryMitch McConnell has urged Biden to 'ratchet the sanctions all the way up' against RussiaSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has urged President Joe Biden not to hold back with tough sanctions on Russia.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday advised President Joe Biden to hold nothing back when imposing sanctions on Russia following the country's invasion of Ukraine. "We're all together at this point, and we need to be together about what should be done," McConnell said."Ratchet the sanctions all the way up. Don't hold any back," he added. "Every single available tough sanction should be employed and should be employed now." Read Full StoryLarge explosions heard in Kyiv, Ukraine's capital cityA night view of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city, as seen on Thursday.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesKyiv, the capital of Ukraine, was awakened by explosions in the early hours of Friday morning local time, CNN reported."Strikes on Kyiv with cruise or ballistic missiles continued," Anton Gerashchenko, adviser to the head of the Ministry of Internal Affairs in Ukraine, told CNN Thursday.The outlet also reported multiple bombardments — two blasts in Kyiv and an explosion in the distance. Read Full StoryUkraine is crowdfunding to shore up its defenses against the Russian militarySoldiers seen aboard a Ukrainian tank in Mariupol, Ukraine, on Thursday.REUTERS/Carlos BarriaUkraine is crowdfunding to bolster its armed forces against the Russian invasion.In a tweet on Thursday, the official Twitter account of Ukraine called for donations and provided a link to the country's official website.Collected funds will be used for the "logistical and medical support" of the Ukrainian armed forces, said the webpage, which is operated by Ukraine's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ukrainian Institution.Read Full Story5 reasons Putin and others have given for the invasionRussian President Vladimir Putin claims the Ukraine invasion is aimed at preventing the "genocide" of ethnic Russians in the country.Photo by Kay Nietfeld/picture alliance via Getty ImagesRussian forces attacked Ukraine early Thursday morning, launching a large-scale and unprovoked invasion that was feared for weeks.Here are some reasons Russian President Vladimir Putin has given for why Russia invaded Ukraine — some of which are based on falsehoods — along with what the US and NATO have said about his motivations.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration is considering training Ukrainian soldiers in an outside country, according to AxiosUkrainian soldiers patrol on the frontline in Zolote, Ukraine on January 20, 2022.Wolfgang Schwan/Getty ImagesAs Russian forces enclose on Ukraine's capital Kyiv, the Biden administration is eyeing its next steps in the ongoing conflict.Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin told House lawmakers on Thursday that the US government is considering possible ways to train Ukrainian troops outside of Ukraine, should Russia seize control of the country, according to Axios.Austin reportedly told lawmakers that officials are trying to find ways to provide more defense equipment, including ammunition to Ukrainian forces — a feat made more challenging as Russian forces assault the country.The secretary also told House members that the Biden administration will continue to support Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky's government as long as it is "viable," the outlet reported.Ukrainian president announces general mobilization of all conscripts and reservists to last 90 daysUkrainian soldiers sit on top of a military vehicle parked outside the hotel in Prypiat, Ukraine on February 4.Volodymyr Tarasov/Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty ImageUkrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Thursday ordered a general military mobilization throughout the country as Russia continues its large-scale military assault in Ukraine. The declaration ordered the conscription of conscripts and reservists for military service, as well as their delivery to military units and institutions of the Armed Forces of Ukraine in order to "ensure the defense of the state." The mobilization, which included all of Ukraine's major cities, will be carried out within 90 days, the decree said. It will provide personnel, vehicles, infrastructure, and land use for the Ukrainian government and military amid Russia's ongoing invasion, according to the decree. Ukraine has also banned all male citizens ages 18-60 from leaving the country, according to CNN, which cited the State Border Guard Service. READ FULL STORYZelensky says 'enemy sabotage groups have entered Kyiv' and that he is 'number one target'Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky delivers a statement during the 58th Munich Security Conference (MSC) on February 19, 2022 in Munich, Germany.Photo by Ronald Wittek - Pool/Getty ImagesIn his second video address on Thursday, Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said that "enemy sabotage groups" entered Kyiv, and that he plans to remain, despite being Russia's "number one target.""According to preliminary data, unfortunately, we have lost 137 of our heroes today — our citizens. Ten of them are officers," Zelensky said in his address. "316 are wounded."He also used the opportunity to dispel rumors that he had fled Kyiv, and that his family had left the country."I stay in the capital, I stay with my people. During the day, I held dozens of international talks, directly managed our country. And I will stay in the capital," he said. "My family is also in Ukraine. My children are also in Ukraine. My family is not traitors. They are the citizens of Ukraine. But I have no right to say where they are now."READ FULL STORYWhite House is 'outraged' over reports that staff at Chernobyl have been taken hostage by Russian forcesServicemen take part in a joint tactical and special exercises of the Ukrainian Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Ukrainian National Guard and Ministry Emergency in a ghost city of Pripyat, near Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on February 4, 2022.Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty ImagesPress secretary Jen Psaki said the White House is outraged over reports from Ukrainian officials that staff at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine have been taken hostage by Russian troops.Russian forces took over the remnants of Chernobyl earlier on Thursday during the country's invasion of Ukraine. The move indicated Russia is likely to assault Ukraine's capital city, Kyiv, which is located just south of Chernobyl, the site of one of the worst nuclear disasters in history."We're outraged by credible reports that Russian soldiers are currently holding the staff of the Chernobyl facility hostage," Psaki said during a press briefing on Thursday afternoon, adding "we condemn it and we request their release."Psaki said the situation at Chernobyl was not clear but that the hostage taking was "incredibly alarming and greatly concerning," adding it could hurt efforts to maintain the facility, which is dangerously contaminated with radioactivity as a result of the 1986 nuclear disaster.read full STORYUS secretary of state is 'convinced' Russia will try to overthrow the Ukrainian governmentUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken during an appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press" on April 11, 2021.Meet The Press/NBCUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Thursday said he is "convinced" Moscow will try to overthrow Ukraine's government."You don't need intelligence to tell you that that's exactly what President Putin wants. He has made clear he'd like to reconstitute the Soviet Empire, short of that he'd like to reassert a sphere of influence around the neighboring countries that were once part of the Soviet bloc," Blinken said during a national TV interview. The secretary pledged that NATO would intervene before Putin successfully accomplished his ultimate goal."Now, when it comes to a threat beyond Ukraine's borders. There's something very powerful standing in his way. That's article five of NATO, an attack on one is an attack on all," the top diplomat said.  Expert says Russia's Ukraine invasion will result in 'horrific scenes,' could be launch of 'Cold War 2.0'Ukrainians gather in front of the White House in Washington, USA to stage a protest against Russia's attack in Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Yasin Öztürk/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesA former aide to President Barack Obama is warning that Russia's invasion of Ukraine is a "game changer" in international relations that will result in "horrific scenes" in the coming days, with President Vladimir Putin intent on pursuing regime change at all costs."I think it's just a matter of time before Kyiv falls," Charles Kupchan, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations who also served on the National Security Council in both the Obama and Clinton administrations, told Insider.READ FULL STORYThe White House says it's ready to accept Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasionWhite House press secretary Jen Psaki.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe US is prepared to accept Ukrainian refugees fleeing Russia's invasion, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told CNN."We are," Psaki said when asked whether the US was ready to assist fleeing Ukrainians. "But we certainly expect that most if not the majority will want to go to Europe and neighboring countries. So, we are also working with European countries on what the needs are, where there is capacity. Poland, for example, where we are seeing an increasing flow of refugees over the last 24 hours."She added that US officials have been engaging with Europeans on the matter "for some time." Ukrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield just outside KyivUkraine army says battle under way for airbase near Kyiv on February 24, 2022Daniel LEAL / Getty ImagesUkrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city.Russian forces attacked and seized Hostomel (Gostomel) airfield, a cargo airport near Kyiv that is also known as Antonov airport, early Thursday, according to AFP. Ukraine's leadership reportedly vowed to take it back."The enemy paratroopers in Hostomel have been blocked, and troops have received an order to destroy them," Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said in a video address.Read Full StoryUkraine's health minister says dozens killed and over 160 injuredBlack smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv, Ukraine, on February 24, 2022.ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty ImagesUkraine's health minister said 57 Ukrainians have been killed and 169 were wounded after Russia attacked on Thursday, the Associated Press reported.Explosions, gunfire, and sirens were reportedly heard in Kyiv on Thursday. Witnesses also described missile blasts in other cities, including Kramatorsk, Dnipro, and Odesa, reports said. Sean Penn is filming a documentary in Ukraine while Russia invadesActor and director Sean Penn attends a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, Ukraine February 24, 2022.Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via ReutersSean Penn was spotted in Ukraine on Thursday just after Russia invaded the country. Penn was seen in the front row of a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, photos obtained by Reuters show. The actor and director has been working on a documentary about tensions in Ukraine since last year.Read Full StoryUkrainians and Russians are packing ATM lines, prompting fears of what happened in the US during the Great DepressionPeople wait in line at an ATM in Kyiv.DANIEL LEAL/AFP via Getty Images.Many Ukrainians who haven't already fled the country as Russia's threat turned into invasion stood in long lines outside of banks and ATMs hoping to take out their funds, Reuters reported on Thursday. Meanwhile in Russia, people are also queuing outside of ATMs trying to get US dollars as its citizens worry their own currency's value will continue to tank, according to the Wall Street Journal. Banks in the capital city of Moscow are running out of money, MSNBC reported. All of this has led to fears of bank runs, which is when people withdraw money en masse because they worry banks will cease to function. That's what happened in the United States during the Great Depression, and it triggered mass unemployment and loan scarcities.  Read Full StoryA top Russian business lobbyist pleaded with Putin to 'demonstrate as much as possible' that Russia wants to remain 'part of the global economy'Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and head of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs Alexander Shokhin attend a meeting of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 16, 2017.Sergei Ilnitsky/AP PhotoThe head of one of Russia's biggest business groups urged President Vladimir Putin on Thursday to avoid severe economic pain and remain "part of the global economy" as NATO members ready a harsher salvo of sanctions.Putin held a televised meeting with the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs just hours after Russian forces began attacks in Ukraine.The threat of new sanctions was enough for Alexander Shokhin, the business group's president, to raise concerns with Putin about remaining a member of the world economy.The lobbyist urged the president to pad against major economic pain and to ensure conflict in Ukraine doesn't fuel widespread harm to the global financial system."Everything should be done to demonstrate as much as possible that Russia remains part of the global economy and will not provoke, including through some kind of response measures, global negative phenomena on world markets," Shokhin said.Read Full StoryBiden says he'll try to limit what Americans pay at the gas pump as the US slaps Russia with more sanctions: 'This is critical to me'U.S. President Joe Biden answers questions after delivering remarks about Russia's “unprovoked and unjustified" military invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden sought to quell fears of another spike in gas prices on Thursday after Russia unleashed a military assault on Ukraine that threatened to upend the global economy.The threat of war in Ukraine in recent weeks has contributed to spiking oil prices, with the benchmark Brent crude oil hitting $100 for the first time since 2014 Wednesday night amid the early stages of Russia's invasion."I know this is hard and Americans are already hurting," he said at a White House address. "I will do everything in my power to limit the pain the American people are feeling at the gas pump."He opened the door to another release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, a step the Biden administration also took in November to try and provide relief at the pump.Read Full StoryBiden says Putin's Ukraine invasion will cause a 'complete rupture' in US-Russia relationsPresident Joe Biden listens to questions from reporters while speaking about the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022, in Washington.Alex Brandon/APPresident Joe Biden on Thursday said Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine will cause a "complete rupture" of US-Russia relations if it continues. Biden condemned Putin and his escalating invasion of Ukraine in a speech from the White House.Biden, who met with G7 members on Thursday morning, also announced a raft of new sanctions against Russia on Thursday."What's the risk that we are watching the beginning of another Cold War, and is there now a complete rupture in US-Russian relations?," a reporter asked Biden following his address. Read Full StoryFamed Russian rapper cancels concerts in protest, saying he can't perform while 'Russian missiles fall on Ukraine'Rapper Oxxxymiron, whose real name is Miron Fyodorov, performs during a concert in support of rapper Husky, whose real name is Dmitry Kuznetsov, in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018.AP Photo/Pavel GolovkinA prominent Russian rapper canceled his concert in protest of the Russian invasion on Ukraine, saying he can't perform while "Russian missiles fall on Ukraine."Rapper Oxxxymiron announced via a video posted to his Instagram account that he is postponing "six of my major gigs in Moscow and Saint Petersburg indefinitely," because he said he is "specifically against the war Russia has escalated against the people of Ukraine.""I'm sure you can understand me; I can't entertain you while Russian missiles fall on Ukraine, while Kyiv residents are forced to hide in the basements and subway, and while people are dying," he said.Read Full StoryUS Treasury targets Belarusian support for Russian invasion of UkraineBelarusian President Alexander LukashenkoDmitry Astakhov/Pool/AFP via Getty ImagesIn addition to the second round of sanctions imposed on Russia by the US Thursday, the US Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced it is sanctioning 24 Belarusian individuals for their support of the Russian invasion. The sanctions target Belarus's defense sector and financial institutions — two sectors closely tied to Russia.Massive protests erupted in Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg as Russians voice opposition to war in UkraineA demonstrator holding a placard reading "No to war" protests against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.Photo by SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesMassive protests erupted on Thursday in Russian President Vladimir Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg, as people voiced their opposition to the invasion of Ukraine.Videos posted to Twitter show a sea of people gathered in a section of St. Petersburg, Russia's second-largest city, chanting and holding signs to object to Russia's offensive in Ukraine.Russian government forces have threatened to arrest anti-war protesters, who took to the streets after Putin announced military action against Ukraine on Thursday.Read Full StoryPhotos show Russian authorities dragging away protesters opposed to Putin's invasion of UkrainePolice Police detain a demonstrator during a protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesAnti-war protesters in Russia quickly took to the streets following Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine. Some activists were met with hostility by Russian authorities who hauled them away. More than 1,000 anti-war protesters have already been detained in dozens of cities across Russia, according to protest-monitoring group OVD-Info. Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."Read Full StoryBiden slaps 'additional strong sanctions' on Russia as it mounts a large-scale attack on UkrainePresident Joe Biden delivers remarks during a joint news conference with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz in the East Room of the White House on February 07, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden on Thursday announced that the US will impose a second, harsher round of sanctions on Russia following its large-scale invasion of Ukraine.Biden announced that he had authorized "additional strong sanctions" and "new limitations" on what can be exported to Russia."We have purposely designed these sanctions to maximize the long term impact on Russia and minimize the impact on the United States and our allies," Biden said."We will limit Russia's ability to do business in dollars, euros, pounds and yen to be part of the global economy," the president said of the sanctions. "We're going to stop the ability to finance and grow the Russian military. We're going to impair their ability to compete in a high-tech 21st-century economy."Read Full StoryA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears and begged the world to 'save our people' from being 'murdered' by Russian forcesUkrainian Parliament member Halyna Yanchenko speaks during a CBS interviewCBS NewsA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears during an interview with CBS News and begged the international community to "save our people" from being "murdered" by Russian forces."I beg you, please save our people. Dozens of people — maybe hundreds of people — might be murdered tonight," Member of Parliament Halyna Yanchenko said as she sobbed during an interview with CBS News on Thursday.  She added: "Please save Ukrainian men, women, and children." Read Full StoryPhotos show Ukrainian families fleeing the Russian invasion amid warnings of a mass refugee crisisPeople wait for trains at a train station as they attempt to evacuate the city on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. Overnight, Russia began a large-scale attack on Ukraine, with explosions reported in multiple cities and far outside the restive eastern regions held by Russian-backed rebels.Pierre Crom/Getty Images)Ukrainian residents fled their homes after the first day of Russia's full-scale invasion. Train stations were packed with people on the move and roads filled with cars of people leaving the country, with their loved ones and prized possessions in tow.Before the invasion took place, there were warnings of a mass refugee crisis.Read Full StoryRussian government websites — including ones for the Kremlin and the legislature — went dark after cyberattacks target UkraineA night view of Kyiv as the Kyiv mayor declared a curfew from 10pm to 7am on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesMultiple Russian government websites reportedly went down on Thursday after the country launched an attack on Ukraine. NetBlocks, which tracks disruptions and shutdowns, confirmed on Twitter that multiple sites went offline shortly after 8:45 p.m. local time in Moscow.The Kremlin's website and that of the Russian Federal Assembly's lower house — or State Duma — were both down for at least 15 minutes. As of 9 p.m. local time, the State Duma website was since restored. Shortly after 9:10 p.m. local time, the Kremlin's website was also back online.  Read Full StoryPutin had a range of ways to attack Ukraine. He went with the worst-case scenario for the West.A convoy of Russian military vehicles is seen as the vehicles move towards border in Donbas region of eastern Ukraine on February 23, 2022 in Russian border city Rostov.Stringer/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesIn the build-up to Russia's assault on Ukraine, analysts and leaders envisioned numerous ways the conflict might play out, from a limited incursion to an all-out invasion.Putin used precision missile strikes and airstrikes, followed shortly later by ground maneuvers, the officials said.Analysts said attacks came from the east, south, and north, a description consistent with reports on the ground and Insider's map of the invasion.All three lines of attack — as per this analysis in The Conversation — had previously been floated as individual possibilities for an invasion.Defense analysts warned that Russia's multipronged attack was full-scale but still in an early phase, with a lot more forces to push into Ukraine to seize key areas or capture its leadership.Putin's overall endgame remains an area of pressing debate.Read Full StoryKey Democratic congressman says the US can't send support to Ukraine quickly enough 'to repel' Russia's invasionRep. Adam Smith, Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Adam Smith, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, ruled out surging supplies into Ukraine as a last-ditch effort to stall Russia's invasion, arguing it's unlikely such support would arrive quickly enough to make a difference."The odd of us being able to do that in a rapid enough fashion to be able to repel the invasion are remote," Smith told CNN on Thursday when asked about a Ukrainian official's request for more equipment. "I don't think it's realistic to think that we can reinforce them enough in the short term to be able to repel the invasion."Read Full StoryPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden are refusing to play their 2022 World Cup qualifying matches in Russia after it attacked UkraineA protester holds a poster reading "Sanctions against Russia now" during a rally in front of the Russian Embassy in Stockholm on February 24, 2022, after Russia launched military operations in Ukraine.Photo by CLAUDIO BRESCIANI/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty ImagesPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden said they are refusing to play their upcoming 2022 World Cup qualifying playoff matches in Russia after it attacked Ukraine on Thursday.Based on the latest Russian aggression against Ukraine, "the signatories to this appeal do not consider travelling to Russia and playing football matches there," the three countries said in a joint statement addressed to FIFA's General Secretary Fatma Samoura. The statement continued: "The military escalation that we are observing entails serious consequences and considerably lower safety for our national football teams and official delegations."Read Full StoryRussia's moving on Kyiv and the plan appears to be to take out Ukraine's leadership, US defense official warnsA column of army trucks approaches the Perekop checkpoint on the Ukrainian border. Early on February 24, President Putin announced a special military operation to be conducted by the Russian Armed Forces against Ukraine.Sergei MalgavkobackslashTASS via Getty ImagesRussian forces invaded Ukraine Thursday morning, and a senior US defense official says they are moving on Kyiv, likely to topple the country's government and install their own.Russia is "making a move on Kyiv" a senior defense official who addressed reporters Thursday said, according to CNN. "We would describe what you are seeing as an initial phase" of a "large-scale invasion," the official said, according to The Washington Post's Dan Lamothe.Read Full StoryMaps show Russia's invasion of UkraineMaps of Ukraine.Shayanne Gal/InsiderRussia invaded Ukraine early Thursday, leading to dozens of Ukrainian and Russian casualties.These maps show where Russian troops have attacked Ukraine, which is happening from multiple sides.Read Full StoryUK plots far harsher sanctions on Russia to punish it for invading UkraineBritish Prime Minister Boris JohnsonAdrian Dennis/Pool via REUTERS/File PhotoThe UK announced a new set of harsher sanctions on Russia after the country invaded Ukraine early Thursday. A spokesman for the UK government told journalists at a briefing that the UK plans to impose a second round of sanctions. The most intense of the new list of sanctions is an asset freeze on all major Russian banks and an asset freeze against VTB — the second largest bank with assets totaling £154 billion. The UK also plans to sanction another 100 individuals and entities.This is a large step up from the sanctions it announced Wednesday, which were limited to five smaller banks, three individuals close to Putin, and politicians in Russia who voted for military action. Russia has begun arresting anti-war protesters as demonstrations break out after Putin invades UkrainePolice officer detain a woman during an action against Russia's attack on Ukraine in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022.AP Photo/Dmitry SerebryakovThe Russian government on Thursday threatened anti-war protesters demonstrating against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, warning they could face arrest for organizing.And according to a protest monitoring group, the detentions have already begun as small protests have broken out in some Russian cities.Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens in a statement not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."The committee said that people should be aware of the "negative legal consequences of these actions," which it said includes criminal liability. Read Full StoryUkraine's official Twitter is using memes to rip into Putin's bogus comparison between it and Nazi GermanyRussian President Vladimir Putin ordered troops into eastern Ukraine on Monday.Alexei Nikolsky/Associated PressAfter Russian President Vladimir Putin gave the marching orders for an attack on Ukraine early Thursday morning, Ukraine's official Twitter account got busy. One photo showed what appeared to be caricature images of Adolf Hitler tending to a small Putin. "This is not a 'meme', but our and your reality right now," Ukraine said in a follow-up tweet.  The account also called for a so-called "Twitter-storm" at 12 p.m. local time in Kyiv on Thursday, urging people to use various hashtags to "tell the world of the ongoing Russian aggression against Ukraine and the fact that Ukraine is under attack."Ukraine's latest post said to "Tag @Russia and tell them what you think about them," racking up tens of thousands of likes and quote tweets. Read Full StoryMap shows reported movement of Russian troops in Ukraine Thursday!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 25th, 2022

Live updates: Ukraine official says Friday will be "hardest day" as Russia advances toward capital Kyiv

Russia attacked Ukraine on Thursday morning and was reported to be advancing toward the capital, Kyiv, on Friday. Ukrainian servicemen walk by fragments of a downed aircraft in Kyiv on February 25, 2022.AP Photo/Oleksandr Ratushniak Russia continued its attack on Ukraine on Friday, advancing toward the capital, Kyiv. One Ukrainian official warned Friday would be the "hardest day" and the president called for help. The UK's defense minister said Russia did not achieve what it wanted on the first day of its attack. Russian foreign minister says it will talk to Ukraine once it stops fighting, doubles down on claim it wants 'de-Nazification' if UkraineRussian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in January 2022.Photo by DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP via Getty ImagesSergei Lavrov said on Friday that Russia will only talk to Ukraine if its troops stop fighting, and said: "We do not want Neo-Nazis to rule Ukraine."He was repeating Russia's baseless claim that its attack on Ukraine was motiviated by Naziism in Ukraine.Ukraine's president is a Jewish man whose native language is Russian and who came into office after a democratic election.Russia has tried to justify its attacks by claiming it wants to prevent a "genocide" in Ukraine and to achieve the "de-Nazification" of the country. Former heavyweight boxing champions Vitali and Wladimir Klitschko say they'll go to war for Ukraine against RussiaWladimir and Vitali Klitschko.Getty/Richard HeathcoteUkrainian boxing icons Vitali and Wladimir Klitschko said they would take up arms to defend Ukraine against Russia.Vitali, who has been the mayor of Ukraine's capital, Kyiv, since 2014, said he was ready to fight in a "bloody war.""I don't have another choice, I have to do that. I'll be fighting," he told ITV's Good Morning Britain on Friday."I believe in Ukraine, I believe in my country and I believe in my people."Wladimir wrote in a LinkedIn post on Thursday: "Democracy cannot defend itself; it needs the will of the citizens, the commitment of everyone," he wrote. "Basically, there is no democracy without democrats."Here, we will defend ourselves with all our might and fight for freedom and democracy. You can also act. Let not fear seize us; let's not remain frozen."Read Full StoryUkraine official predicts 'hardest day' as Russia advances on KyivPeople rest in the Kyiv subway, using it as a bomb shelter on Thursday.AP Photo/Emilio MorenattiUkraine Interior Ministry advisor Anton Gerashenko said on Friday: "The hardest day will be today. The enemy's plan is to break through with tanks from Ivankiv and Chernihiv to Kyiv."Ukraine has been 'left alone' to defend itself from Russia, president saysUkrainian servicemen walk by fragments of a downed aircraft in Kyiv on February 25, 2022.AP Photo/Oleksandr RatushniakVolodomyr Zelensky said in an early Friday speech that Ukraine was not getting help on the ground, saying: "We are left alone in defense of our state.""Who is ready to fight with us? Honestly — I do not see such. Who is ready to guarantee Ukraine's accession to NATO? Honestly, everyone is afraid."Many nations have condemned Russia and sent weapons to Ukraine. But they have not sent troops, and NATO and the US have said they won't do so.Zelensky also praised the people of Ukraine in his speech, saying: "You are brilliantly defending the country from one of the most powerful countries in the world."Read Full Story Ukraine posts instructions for making Molotov cocktails and asks people who own drones for helpThe post below, from Ukraine's national guard, contained instructions on how to make Molotov cocktails to use against Russian troops.—НГУ (@ng_ukraine) February 25, 2022Ukraine's military also posted a Facebook callout on Friday asking for drone owners to help out."Do you know how to drive a drone? Join the joint patrol with units 112 of the separate brigade of the city of Kyiv!" it said.The Champions League final is moved from Russia to FranceGetty Images/Daniele BadolatoEuropean soccer governing body UEFA said Russia has been stripped of the 2022 Champions League final, and that it will now take place in Paris.UEFA said the game being moved comes after "the grave escalation of the security situation in Europe."Read Full StoryRussia 'failed to deliver' its day-one aims for invading Ukraine, UK defense secretary saysUK Secretary for Defence Ben Wallace.Luka Dakskobler/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesBen Wallace told Sky News on Friday: "Our assessment, as of this morning, is that Russia has not taken any of its major objectives,"  "In fact it's behind its hoped-for timetable. They've lost over 450 personnel.""The Russian army has failed to deliver on day one its main objective."He gave the example that Russian special forces had failed to secure a "significant" airport that was once again under Ukrainian control. Read Full Story Ukrainian leaders compare Russia's attack on Kyiv to Nazi Germany's assault in 1941A night view of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city.Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesRussia's attack on the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv has prompted comparisons to Nazi Germany's assault on the city in 1941.Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky invoked World War II while speaking directly to the Russian people in a speech Friday morning as explosions were reported over Kyiv."Tonight, you began bombing residential areas in the hero city of Kyiv. This is like 1941. I want to tell all Russian citizens who are coming out to protest: we hear you, you heard us, you started to believe us. Fight for us. Fight the war," Zelensky said.Read Full StoryRussia's richest 22 billionaires lost $39 billion in one day after the invasion of UkraineVladimir Potanin, Russia's richest man, lost $3 billion in one day on Thursday. He is now worth $26.1 billion.Mikhail Svetlov/Getty ImagesRussia's 22 richest individuals saw their net worths plunge by a collective $39 billion in less than 24 hours after their country invaded Ukraine, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.The wealth wipeout came after Moscow's benchmark MOEX Russia Index crashed and closed 33% lower on Thursday.The Russian billionaires lost more money on Thursday than they had lost year-to-date up until Wednesday, according to Bloomberg.Read Full StoryAustralian PM Scott Morrison slams China for throwing a 'lifeline' to RussiaMorrison said that it is "simply unacceptable" for China to ease trade restrictions on Russia when other countries are imposing sanctions.STEVEN SAPHORE/AFP via Getty ImagesAustralian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has condemned China for easing its restrictions on Russian wheat amid the Ukraine crisis, even as other countries impose fresh sanctions on Russia."You don't go and throw a lifeline to Russia in the middle of a period when they're invading another country," he told reporters at a press conference on Friday morning, per Australia's ABC News. Read Full StoryMitch McConnell has urged Biden to 'ratchet the sanctions all the way up' against RussiaSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has urged President Joe Biden not to hold back with tough sanctions on Russia.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday advised President Joe Biden to hold nothing back when imposing sanctions on Russia following the country's invasion of Ukraine. "We're all together at this point, and we need to be together about what should be done," McConnell said."Ratchet the sanctions all the way up. Don't hold any back," he added. "Every single available tough sanction should be employed and should be employed now." Read Full StoryLarge explosions heard in Kyiv, Ukraine's capital cityA night view of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city, as seen on Thursday.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesKyiv, the capital of Ukraine, was awakened by explosions in the early hours of Friday morning local time, CNN reported."Strikes on Kyiv with cruise or ballistic missiles continued," Anton Gerashchenko, adviser to the head of the Ministry of Internal Affairs in Ukraine, told CNN Thursday.The outlet also reported multiple bombardments — two blasts in Kyiv and an explosion in the distance. Read Full StoryUkraine is crowdfunding to shore up its defenses against the Russian militarySoldiers seen aboard a Ukrainian tank in Mariupol, Ukraine, on Thursday.REUTERS/Carlos BarriaUkraine is crowdfunding to bolster its armed forces against the Russian invasion.In a tweet on Thursday, the official Twitter account of Ukraine called for donations and provided a link to the country's official website.Collected funds will be used for the "logistical and medical support" of the Ukrainian armed forces, said the webpage, which is operated by Ukraine's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ukrainian Institution.Read Full Story5 reasons Putin and others have given for the invasionRussian President Vladimir Putin claims the Ukraine invasion is aimed at preventing the "genocide" of ethnic Russians in the country.Photo by Kay Nietfeld/picture alliance via Getty ImagesRussian forces attacked Ukraine early Thursday morning, launching a large-scale and unprovoked invasion that was feared for weeks.Here are some reasons Russian President Vladimir Putin has given for why Russia invaded Ukraine — some of which are based on falsehoods — along with what the US and NATO have said about his motivations.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration is considering training Ukrainian soldiers in an outside country, according to AxiosUkrainian soldiers patrol on the frontline in Zolote, Ukraine on January 20, 2022.Wolfgang Schwan/Getty ImagesAs Russian forces enclose on Ukraine's capital Kyiv, the Biden administration is eyeing its next steps in the ongoing conflict.Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin told House lawmakers on Thursday that the US government is considering possible ways to train Ukrainian troops outside of Ukraine, should Russia seize control of the country, according to Axios.Austin reportedly told lawmakers that officials are trying to find ways to provide more defense equipment, including ammunition to Ukrainian forces — a feat made more challenging as Russian forces assault the country.The secretary also told House members that the Biden administration will continue to support Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky's government as long as it is "viable," the outlet reported.Ukrainian president announces general mobilization of all conscripts and reservists to last 90 daysUkrainian soldiers sit on top of a military vehicle parked outside the hotel in Prypiat, Ukraine on February 4.Volodymyr Tarasov/Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty ImageUkrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Thursday ordered a general military mobilization throughout the country as Russia continues its large-scale military assault in Ukraine. The declaration ordered the conscription of conscripts and reservists for military service, as well as their delivery to military units and institutions of the Armed Forces of Ukraine in order to "ensure the defense of the state." The mobilization, which included all of Ukraine's major cities, will be carried out within 90 days, the decree said. It will provide personnel, vehicles, infrastructure, and land use for the Ukrainian government and military amid Russia's ongoing invasion, according to the decree. Ukraine has also banned all male citizens ages 18-60 from leaving the country, according to CNN, which cited the State Border Guard Service. READ FULL STORYZelensky says 'enemy sabotage groups have entered Kyiv' and that he is 'number one target'Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky delivers a statement during the 58th Munich Security Conference (MSC) on February 19, 2022 in Munich, Germany.Photo by Ronald Wittek - Pool/Getty ImagesIn his second video address on Thursday, Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said that "enemy sabotage groups" entered Kyiv, and that he plans to remain, despite being Russia's "number one target.""According to preliminary data, unfortunately, we have lost 137 of our heroes today — our citizens. Ten of them are officers," Zelensky said in his address. "316 are wounded."He also used the opportunity to dispel rumors that he had fled Kyiv, and that his family had left the country."I stay in the capital, I stay with my people. During the day, I held dozens of international talks, directly managed our country. And I will stay in the capital," he said. "My family is also in Ukraine. My children are also in Ukraine. My family is not traitors. They are the citizens of Ukraine. But I have no right to say where they are now."READ FULL STORYWhite House is 'outraged' over reports that staff at Chernobyl have been taken hostage by Russian forcesServicemen take part in a joint tactical and special exercises of the Ukrainian Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Ukrainian National Guard and Ministry Emergency in a ghost city of Pripyat, near Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on February 4, 2022.Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty ImagesPress secretary Jen Psaki said the White House is outraged over reports from Ukrainian officials that staff at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine have been taken hostage by Russian troops.Russian forces took over the remnants of Chernobyl earlier on Thursday during the country's invasion of Ukraine. The move indicated Russia is likely to assault Ukraine's capital city, Kyiv, which is located just south of Chernobyl, the site of one of the worst nuclear disasters in history."We're outraged by credible reports that Russian soldiers are currently holding the staff of the Chernobyl facility hostage," Psaki said during a press briefing on Thursday afternoon, adding "we condemn it and we request their release."Psaki said the situation at Chernobyl was not clear but that the hostage taking was "incredibly alarming and greatly concerning," adding it could hurt efforts to maintain the facility, which is dangerously contaminated with radioactivity as a result of the 1986 nuclear disaster.read full STORYUS secretary of state is 'convinced' Russia will try to overthrow the Ukrainian governmentUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken during an appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press" on April 11, 2021.Meet The Press/NBCUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Thursday said he is "convinced" Moscow will try to overthrow Ukraine's government."You don't need intelligence to tell you that that's exactly what President Putin wants. He has made clear he'd like to reconstitute the Soviet Empire, short of that he'd like to reassert a sphere of influence around the neighboring countries that were once part of the Soviet bloc," Blinken said during a national TV interview. The secretary pledged that NATO would intervene before Putin successfully accomplished his ultimate goal."Now, when it comes to a threat beyond Ukraine's borders. There's something very powerful standing in his way. That's article five of NATO, an attack on one is an attack on all," the top diplomat said.  Expert says Russia's Ukraine invasion will result in 'horrific scenes,' could be launch of 'Cold War 2.0'Ukrainians gather in front of the White House in Washington, USA to stage a protest against Russia's attack in Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Yasin Öztürk/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesA former aide to President Barack Obama is warning that Russia's invasion of Ukraine is a "game changer" in international relations that will result in "horrific scenes" in the coming days, with President Vladimir Putin intent on pursuing regime change at all costs."I think it's just a matter of time before Kyiv falls," Charles Kupchan, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations who also served on the National Security Council in both the Obama and Clinton administrations, told Insider.READ FULL STORYThe White House says it's ready to accept Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasionWhite House press secretary Jen Psaki.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe US is prepared to accept Ukrainian refugees fleeing Russia's invasion, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told CNN."We are," Psaki said when asked whether the US was ready to assist fleeing Ukrainians. "But we certainly expect that most if not the majority will want to go to Europe and neighboring countries. So, we are also working with European countries on what the needs are, where there is capacity. Poland, for example, where we are seeing an increasing flow of refugees over the last 24 hours."She added that US officials have been engaging with Europeans on the matter "for some time." Ukrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield just outside KyivUkraine army says battle under way for airbase near Kyiv on February 24, 2022Daniel LEAL / Getty ImagesUkrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city.Russian forces attacked and seized Hostomel (Gostomel) airfield, a cargo airport near Kyiv that is also known as Antonov airport, early Thursday, according to AFP. Ukraine's leadership reportedly vowed to take it back."The enemy paratroopers in Hostomel have been blocked, and troops have received an order to destroy them," Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said in a video address.Read Full StoryUkraine's health minister says dozens killed and over 160 injuredBlack smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv, Ukraine, on February 24, 2022.ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty ImagesUkraine's health minister said 57 Ukrainians have been killed and 169 were wounded after Russia attacked on Thursday, the Associated Press reported.Explosions, gunfire, and sirens were reportedly heard in Kyiv on Thursday. Witnesses also described missile blasts in other cities, including Kramatorsk, Dnipro, and Odesa, reports said. Sean Penn is filming a documentary in Ukraine while Russia invadesActor and director Sean Penn attends a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, Ukraine February 24, 2022.Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via ReutersSean Penn was spotted in Ukraine on Thursday just after Russia invaded the country. Penn was seen in the front row of a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, photos obtained by Reuters show. The actor and director has been working on a documentary about tensions in Ukraine since last year.Read Full StoryUkrainians and Russians are packing ATM lines, prompting fears of what happened in the US during the Great DepressionPeople wait in line at an ATM in Kyiv.DANIEL LEAL/AFP via Getty Images.Many Ukrainians who haven't already fled the country as Russia's threat turned into invasion stood in long lines outside of banks and ATMs hoping to take out their funds, Reuters reported on Thursday. Meanwhile in Russia, people are also queuing outside of ATMs trying to get US dollars as its citizens worry their own currency's value will continue to tank, according to the Wall Street Journal. Banks in the capital city of Moscow are running out of money, MSNBC reported. All of this has led to fears of bank runs, which is when people withdraw money en masse because they worry banks will cease to function. That's what happened in the United States during the Great Depression, and it triggered mass unemployment and loan scarcities.  Read Full StoryA top Russian business lobbyist pleaded with Putin to 'demonstrate as much as possible' that Russia wants to remain 'part of the global economy'Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and head of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs Alexander Shokhin attend a meeting of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 16, 2017.Sergei Ilnitsky/AP PhotoThe head of one of Russia's biggest business groups urged President Vladimir Putin on Thursday to avoid severe economic pain and remain "part of the global economy" as NATO members ready a harsher salvo of sanctions.Putin held a televised meeting with the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs just hours after Russian forces began attacks in Ukraine.The threat of new sanctions was enough for Alexander Shokhin, the business group's president, to raise concerns with Putin about remaining a member of the world economy.The lobbyist urged the president to pad against major economic pain and to ensure conflict in Ukraine doesn't fuel widespread harm to the global financial system."Everything should be done to demonstrate as much as possible that Russia remains part of the global economy and will not provoke, including through some kind of response measures, global negative phenomena on world markets," Shokhin said.Read Full StoryBiden says he'll try to limit what Americans pay at the gas pump as the US slaps Russia with more sanctions: 'This is critical to me'U.S. President Joe Biden answers questions after delivering remarks about Russia's “unprovoked and unjustified" military invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden sought to quell fears of another spike in gas prices on Thursday after Russia unleashed a military assault on Ukraine that threatened to upend the global economy.The threat of war in Ukraine in recent weeks has contributed to spiking oil prices, with the benchmark Brent crude oil hitting $100 for the first time since 2014 Wednesday night amid the early stages of Russia's invasion."I know this is hard and Americans are already hurting," he said at a White House address. "I will do everything in my power to limit the pain the American people are feeling at the gas pump."He opened the door to another release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, a step the Biden administration also took in November to try and provide relief at the pump.Read Full StoryBiden says Putin's Ukraine invasion will cause a 'complete rupture' in US-Russia relationsPresident Joe Biden listens to questions from reporters while speaking about the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022, in Washington.Alex Brandon/APPresident Joe Biden on Thursday said Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine will cause a "complete rupture" of US-Russia relations if it continues. Biden condemned Putin and his escalating invasion of Ukraine in a speech from the White House.Biden, who met with G7 members on Thursday morning, also announced a raft of new sanctions against Russia on Thursday."What's the risk that we are watching the beginning of another Cold War, and is there now a complete rupture in US-Russian relations?," a reporter asked Biden following his address. Read Full StoryFamed Russian rapper cancels concerts in protest, saying he can't perform while 'Russian missiles fall on Ukraine'Rapper Oxxxymiron, whose real name is Miron Fyodorov, performs during a concert in support of rapper Husky, whose real name is Dmitry Kuznetsov, in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018.AP Photo/Pavel GolovkinA prominent Russian rapper canceled his concert in protest of the Russian invasion on Ukraine, saying he can't perform while "Russian missiles fall on Ukraine."Rapper Oxxxymiron announced via a video posted to his Instagram account that he is postponing "six of my major gigs in Moscow and Saint Petersburg indefinitely," because he said he is "specifically against the war Russia has escalated against the people of Ukraine.""I'm sure you can understand me; I can't entertain you while Russian missiles fall on Ukraine, while Kyiv residents are forced to hide in the basements and subway, and while people are dying," he said.Read Full StoryUS Treasury targets Belarusian support for Russian invasion of UkraineBelarusian President Alexander LukashenkoDmitry Astakhov/Pool/AFP via Getty ImagesIn addition to the second round of sanctions imposed on Russia by the US Thursday, the US Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced it is sanctioning 24 Belarusian individuals for their support of the Russian invasion. The sanctions target Belarus's defense sector and financial institutions — two sectors closely tied to Russia.Massive protests erupted in Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg as Russians voice opposition to war in UkraineA demonstrator holding a placard reading "No to war" protests against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.Photo by SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesMassive protests erupted on Thursday in Russian President Vladimir Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg, as people voiced their opposition to the invasion of Ukraine.Videos posted to Twitter show a sea of people gathered in a section of St. Petersburg, Russia's second-largest city, chanting and holding signs to object to Russia's offensive in Ukraine.Russian government forces have threatened to arrest anti-war protesters, who took to the streets after Putin announced military action against Ukraine on Thursday.Read Full StoryPhotos show Russian authorities dragging away protesters opposed to Putin's invasion of UkrainePolice Police detain a demonstrator during a protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesAnti-war protesters in Russia quickly took to the streets following Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine. Some activists were met with hostility by Russian authorities who hauled them away. More than 1,000 anti-war protesters have already been detained in dozens of cities across Russia, according to protest-monitoring group OVD-Info. Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."Read Full StoryBiden slaps 'additional strong sanctions' on Russia as it mounts a large-scale attack on UkrainePresident Joe Biden delivers remarks during a joint news conference with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz in the East Room of the White House on February 07, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden on Thursday announced that the US will impose a second, harsher round of sanctions on Russia following its large-scale invasion of Ukraine.Biden announced that he had authorized "additional strong sanctions" and "new limitations" on what can be exported to Russia."We have purposely designed these sanctions to maximize the long term impact on Russia and minimize the impact on the United States and our allies," Biden said."We will limit Russia's ability to do business in dollars, euros, pounds and yen to be part of the global economy," the president said of the sanctions. "We're going to stop the ability to finance and grow the Russian military. We're going to impair their ability to compete in a high-tech 21st-century economy."Read Full StoryA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears and begged the world to 'save our people' from being 'murdered' by Russian forcesUkrainian Parliament member Halyna Yanchenko speaks during a CBS interviewCBS NewsA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears during an interview with CBS News and begged the international community to "save our people" from being "murdered" by Russian forces."I beg you, please save our people. Dozens of people — maybe hundreds of people — might be murdered tonight," Member of Parliament Halyna Yanchenko said as she sobbed during an interview with CBS News on Thursday.  She added: "Please save Ukrainian men, women, and children." Read Full StoryPhotos show Ukrainian families fleeing the Russian invasion amid warnings of a mass refugee crisisPeople wait for trains at a train station as they attempt to evacuate the city on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. Overnight, Russia began a large-scale attack on Ukraine, with explosions reported in multiple cities and far outside the restive eastern regions held by Russian-backed rebels.Pierre Crom/Getty Images)Ukrainian residents fled their homes after the first day of Russia's full-scale invasion. Train stations were packed with people on the move and roads filled with cars of people leaving the country, with their loved ones and prized possessions in tow.Before the invasion took place, there were warnings of a mass refugee crisis.Read Full StoryRussian government websites — including ones for the Kremlin and the legislature — went dark after cyberattacks target UkraineA night view of Kyiv as the Kyiv mayor declared a curfew from 10pm to 7am on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesMultiple Russian government websites reportedly went down on Thursday after the country launched an attack on Ukraine. NetBlocks, which tracks disruptions and shutdowns, confirmed on Twitter that multiple sites went offline shortly after 8:45 p.m. local time in Moscow.The Kremlin's website and that of the Russian Federal Assembly's lower house — or State Duma — were both down for at least 15 minutes. As of 9 p.m. local time, the State Duma website was since restored. Shortly after 9:10 p.m. local time, the Kremlin's website was also back online.  Read Full StoryPutin had a range of ways to attack Ukraine. He went with the worst-case scenario for the West.A convoy of Russian military vehicles is seen as the vehicles move towards border in Donbas region of eastern Ukraine on February 23, 2022 in Russian border city Rostov.Stringer/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesIn the build-up to Russia's assault on Ukraine, analysts and leaders envisioned numerous ways the conflict might play out, from a limited incursion to an all-out invasion.Putin used precision missile strikes and airstrikes, followed shortly later by ground maneuvers, the officials said.Analysts said attacks came from the east, south, and north, a description consistent with reports on the ground and Insider's map of the invasion.All three lines of attack — as per this analysis in The Conversation — had previously been floated as individual possibilities for an invasion.Defense analysts warned that Russia's multipronged attack was full-scale but still in an early phase, with a lot more forces to push into Ukraine to seize key areas or capture its leadership.Putin's overall endgame remains an area of pressing debate.Read Full StoryKey Democratic congressman says the US can't send support to Ukraine quickly enough 'to repel' Russia's invasionRep. Adam Smith, Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Adam Smith, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, ruled out surging supplies into Ukraine as a last-ditch effort to stall Russia's invasion, arguing it's unlikely such support would arrive quickly enough to make a difference."The odd of us being able to do that in a rapid enough fashion to be able to repel the invasion are remote," Smith told CNN on Thursday when asked about a Ukrainian official's request for more equipment. "I don't think it's realistic to think that we can reinforce them enough in the short term to be able to repel the invasion."Read Full StoryPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden are refusing to play their 2022 World Cup qualifying matches in Russia after it attacked UkraineA protester holds a poster reading "Sanctions against Russia now" during a rally in front of the Russian Embassy in Stockholm on February 24, 2022, after Russia launched military operations in Ukraine.Photo by CLAUDIO BRESCIANI/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty ImagesPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden said they are refusing to play their upcoming 2022 World Cup qualifying playoff matches in Russia after it attacked Ukraine on Thursday.Based on the latest Russian aggression against Ukraine, "the signatories to this appeal do not consider travelling to Russia and playing football matches there," the three countries said in a joint statement addressed to FIFA's General Secretary Fatma Samoura. The statement continued: "The military escalation that we are observing entails serious consequences and considerably lower safety for our national football teams and official delegations."Read Full StoryRussia's moving on Kyiv and the plan appears to be to take out Ukraine's leadership, US defense official warnsA column of army trucks approaches the Perekop checkpoint on the Ukrainian border. Early on February 24, President Putin announced a special military operation to be conducted by the Russian Armed Forces against Ukraine.Sergei MalgavkobackslashTASS via Getty ImagesRussian forces invaded Ukraine Thursday morning, and a senior US defense official says they are moving on Kyiv, likely to topple the country's government and install their own.Russia is "making a move on Kyiv" a senior defense official who addressed reporters Thursday said, according to CNN. "We would describe what you are seeing as an initial phase" of a "large-scale invasion," the official said, according to The Washington Post's Dan Lamothe.Read Full StoryMaps show Russia's invasion of UkraineMaps of Ukraine.Shayanne Gal/InsiderRussia invaded Ukraine early Thursday, leading to dozens of Ukrainian and Russian casualties.These maps show where Russian troops have attacked Ukraine, which is happening from multiple sides.Read Full StoryUK plots far harsher sanctions on Russia to punish it for invading UkraineBritish Prime Minister Boris JohnsonAdrian Dennis/Pool via REUTERS/File PhotoThe UK announced a new set of harsher sanctions on Russia after the country invaded Ukraine early Thursday. A spokesman for the UK government told journalists at a briefing that the UK plans to impose a second round of sanctions. The most intense of the new list of sanctions is an asset freeze on all major Russian banks and an asset freeze against VTB — the second largest bank with assets totaling £154 billion. The UK also plans to sanction another 100 individuals and entities.This is a large step up from the sanctions it announced Wednesday, which were limited to five smaller banks, three individuals close to Putin, and politicians in Russia who voted for military action. Russia has begun arresting anti-war protesters as demonstrations break out after Putin invades UkrainePolice officer detain a woman during an action against Russia's attack on Ukraine in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022.AP Photo/Dmitry SerebryakovThe Russian government on Thursday threatened anti-war protesters demonstrating against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, warning they could face arrest for organizing.And according to a protest monitoring group, the detentions have already begun as small protests have broken out in some Russian cities.Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens in a statement not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."The committee said that people should be aware of the "negative legal consequences of these actions," which it said includes criminal liability. Read Full StoryUkraine's official Twitter is using memes to rip into Putin's bogus comparison between it and Nazi GermanyRussian President Vladimir Putin ordered troops into eastern Ukraine on Monday.Alexei Nikolsky/Associated PressAfter Russian President Vladimir Putin gave the marching orders for an attack on Ukraine early Thursday morning, Ukraine's official Twitter account got busy. One photo showed what appeared to be caricature images of Adolf Hitler tending to a small Putin. "This is not a 'meme', but our and your reality right now," Ukraine said in a follow-up tweet.  The account also called for a so-called "Twitter-storm" at 12 p.m. local time in Kyiv on Thursday, urging people to use various hashtags to "tell the world of the ongoing Russian aggression against Ukraine and the fact that Ukraine is under attack."Ukraine's latest post said to "Tag @Russia and tell them what you think about them," racking up tens of thousands of likes and quote tweets. Read Full StoryMap shows reported movement of Russian troops in Ukraine Thursday!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 25th, 2022

Live updates: Ukraine official says Friday will be "hardest day" as Russia advances toward country"s capital

Russia started its attack on Ukraine on Thursday morning. President Volodomyr Zelensky said Ukraine needs help from the rest of the world. Ukrainian servicemen walk by fragments of a downed aircraft seen in in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Friday.AP Photo/Oleksandr Ratushniak Russia continued its attack on Ukraine on Friday, advancing towards the capital. One Ukrainian official warned Friday would be the "hardest day" and the president said Ukraine needs help. The UK's defense minister said Russia did not achieve what it wanted on its first day of attack. Ukraine official predicts 'hardest day' as Russia advances on KyivPeople rest in the Kyiv subway, using it as a bomb shelter on Thursday.AP Photo/Emilio MorenattiUkraine Interior Ministry advisor Anton Gerashenko said on Friday: "The hardest day will be today. The enemy's plan is to break through with tanks from Ivankiv and Chernihiv to Kyiv." Ukraine has been 'left alone' to defend itself from Russia, president saysUkrainian servicemen walk at fragments of a downed aircraft seen in in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, Feb. 25, 2022AP Photo/Oleksandr RatushniakVolodomyr Zelensky said in a Friday speech that Ukraine was not getting on-the-ground help, saying "we are left alone in defense of our state.""Who is ready to fight with us? Honestly — I do not see such. Who is ready to guarantee Ukraine's accession to NATO? Honestly, everyone is afraid."Many nations have condemned Russia, and sent weapons to Ukraine. But they have not sent troops, and NATO and the US have said they won't do so.Zelensky also praised the people of Ukraine in his speech, saying: "You are brilliantly defending the country from one of the most powerful countries in the world."Read Full Story Ukraine national guard posts instructions for making Molotov Cocktails—НГУ (@ng_ukraine) February 25, 2022 The Champions League final has been moved from Russia to FranceGetty Images/Daniele BadolatoSoccer's biggest annual match has been moved from Russia.European soccer governing body UEFA said Russia has been stripped of the 2022 Champions League final, and that it will now take place in Paris.UEFA said the game being moved comes after "the grave escalation of the security situation in Europe."Read Full StoryRussia 'failed to deliver' its day-one aims for invading Ukraine, the UK defense secretary saysThe UK Secretary of State for Defense, Ben Wallace.Luka Dakskobler/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty ImagesBen Wallace told Sky News on Friday: "Our assessment, as of this morning, is that Russia has not taken any of its major objectives,"  "In fact it's behind its hoped-for timetable. They've lost over 450 personnel.""The Russian army has failed to deliver on day one its main objective."He gave the example that Russian special forces had failed to secure a "significant" airport that was once again under Ukrainian control. Read Full Story Ukrainian leaders compare Russia's attack on Kyiv to Nazi Germany's assault in 1941A night view of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city.Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesRussia's attack on the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv has prompted comparisons to Nazi Germany's assault on the city in 1941.Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky invoked World War II while speaking directly to the Russian people in a speech Friday morning as explosions were reported over Kyiv."Tonight, you began bombing residential areas in the hero city of Kyiv. This is like 1941. I want to tell all Russian citizens who are coming out to protest: we hear you, you heard us, you started to believe us. Fight for us. Fight the war," Zelensky said.Read Full StoryRussia's richest 22 billionaires lost $39 billion in one day after the invasion of UkraineVladimir Potanin, Russia's richest man, lost $3 billion in one day on Thursday. He is now worth $26.1 billion.Mikhail Svetlov/Getty ImagesRussia's 22 richest individuals saw their net worths plunge by a collective $39 billion in less than 24 hours after their country invaded Ukraine, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.The wealth wipeout came after Moscow's benchmark MOEX Russia Index crashed and closed 33% lower on Thursday.The Russian billionaires lost more money on Thursday than they had lost year-to-date up until Wednesday, according to Bloomberg.Read Full StoryAustralian PM Scott Morrison slams China for throwing a 'lifeline' to RussiaMorrison said that it is "simply unacceptable" for China to ease trade restrictions on Russia when other countries are imposing sanctions.STEVEN SAPHORE/AFP via Getty ImagesAustralian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has condemned China for easing its restrictions on Russian wheat amid the Ukraine crisis, even as other countries impose fresh sanctions on Russia."You don't go and throw a lifeline to Russia in the middle of a period when they're invading another country," he told reporters at a press conference on Friday morning, per Australia's ABC News. Read Full StoryMitch McConnell has urged Biden to 'ratchet the sanctions all the way up' against RussiaSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has urged President Joe Biden not to hold back with tough sanctions on Russia.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesSenate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday advised President Joe Biden to hold nothing back when imposing sanctions on Russia following the country's invasion of Ukraine. "We're all together at this point, and we need to be together about what should be done," McConnell said."Ratchet the sanctions all the way up. Don't hold any back," he added. "Every single available tough sanction should be employed and should be employed now." Read Full StoryLarge explosions heard in Kyiv, Ukraine's capital cityA night view of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city, as seen on Thursday.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesKyiv, the capital of Ukraine, was awakened by explosions in the early hours of Friday morning local time, CNN reported."Strikes on Kyiv with cruise or ballistic missiles continued," Anton Gerashchenko, adviser to the head of the Ministry of Internal Affairs in Ukraine, told CNN Thursday.The outlet also reported multiple bombardments — two blasts in Kyiv and an explosion in the distance. Read Full StoryUkraine is crowdfunding to shore up its defenses against the Russian militarySoldiers seen aboard a Ukrainian tank in Mariupol, Ukraine, on Thursday.REUTERS/Carlos BarriaUkraine is crowdfunding to bolster its armed forces against the Russian invasion.In a tweet on Thursday, the official Twitter account of Ukraine called for donations and provided a link to the country's official website.Collected funds will be used for the "logistical and medical support" of the Ukrainian armed forces, said the webpage, which is operated by Ukraine's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ukrainian Institution.Read Full Story5 reasons Putin and others have given for the invasionRussian President Vladimir Putin claims the Ukraine invasion is aimed at preventing the "genocide" of ethnic Russians in the country.Photo by Kay Nietfeld/picture alliance via Getty ImagesRussian forces attacked Ukraine early Thursday morning, launching a large-scale and unprovoked invasion that was feared for weeks.Here are some reasons Russian President Vladimir Putin has given for why Russia invaded Ukraine — some of which are based on falsehoods — along with what the US and NATO have said about his motivations.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration is considering training Ukrainian soldiers in an outside country, according to AxiosUkrainian soldiers patrol on the frontline in Zolote, Ukraine on January 20, 2022.Wolfgang Schwan/Getty ImagesAs Russian forces enclose on Ukraine's capital Kyiv, the Biden administration is eyeing its next steps in the ongoing conflict.Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin told House lawmakers on Thursday that the US government is considering possible ways to train Ukrainian troops outside of Ukraine, should Russia seize control of the country, according to Axios.Austin reportedly told lawmakers that officials are trying to find ways to provide more defense equipment, including ammunition to Ukrainian forces — a feat made more challenging as Russian forces assault the country.The secretary also told House members that the Biden administration will continue to support Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky's government as long as it is "viable," the outlet reported.Ukrainian president announces general mobilization of all conscripts and reservists to last 90 daysUkrainian soldiers sit on top of a military vehicle parked outside the hotel in Prypiat, Ukraine on February 4.Volodymyr Tarasov/Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty ImageUkrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Thursday ordered a general military mobilization throughout the country as Russia continues its large-scale military assault in Ukraine. The declaration ordered the conscription of conscripts and reservists for military service, as well as their delivery to military units and institutions of the Armed Forces of Ukraine in order to "ensure the defense of the state." The mobilization, which included all of Ukraine's major cities, will be carried out within 90 days, the decree said. It will provide personnel, vehicles, infrastructure, and land use for the Ukrainian government and military amid Russia's ongoing invasion, according to the decree. Ukraine has also banned all male citizens ages 18-60 from leaving the country, according to CNN, which cited the State Border Guard Service. READ FULL STORYZelensky says 'enemy sabotage groups have entered Kyiv' and that he is 'number one target'Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky delivers a statement during the 58th Munich Security Conference (MSC) on February 19, 2022 in Munich, Germany.Photo by Ronald Wittek - Pool/Getty ImagesIn his second video address on Thursday, Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said that "enemy sabotage groups" entered Kyiv, and that he plans to remain, despite being Russia's "number one target.""According to preliminary data, unfortunately, we have lost 137 of our heroes today — our citizens. Ten of them are officers," Zelensky said in his address. "316 are wounded."He also used the opportunity to dispel rumors that he had fled Kyiv, and that his family had left the country."I stay in the capital, I stay with my people. During the day, I held dozens of international talks, directly managed our country. And I will stay in the capital," he said. "My family is also in Ukraine. My children are also in Ukraine. My family is not traitors. They are the citizens of Ukraine. But I have no right to say where they are now."READ FULL STORYWhite House is 'outraged' over reports that staff at Chernobyl have been taken hostage by Russian forcesServicemen take part in a joint tactical and special exercises of the Ukrainian Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Ukrainian National Guard and Ministry Emergency in a ghost city of Pripyat, near Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on February 4, 2022.Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty ImagesPress secretary Jen Psaki said the White House is outraged over reports from Ukrainian officials that staff at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine have been taken hostage by Russian troops.Russian forces took over the remnants of Chernobyl earlier on Thursday during the country's invasion of Ukraine. The move indicated Russia is likely to assault Ukraine's capital city, Kyiv, which is located just south of Chernobyl, the site of one of the worst nuclear disasters in history."We're outraged by credible reports that Russian soldiers are currently holding the staff of the Chernobyl facility hostage," Psaki said during a press briefing on Thursday afternoon, adding "we condemn it and we request their release."Psaki said the situation at Chernobyl was not clear but that the hostage taking was "incredibly alarming and greatly concerning," adding it could hurt efforts to maintain the facility, which is dangerously contaminated with radioactivity as a result of the 1986 nuclear disaster.read full STORYUS secretary of state is 'convinced' Russia will try to overthrow the Ukrainian governmentUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken during an appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press" on April 11, 2021.Meet The Press/NBCUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Thursday said he is "convinced" Moscow will try to overthrow Ukraine's government."You don't need intelligence to tell you that that's exactly what President Putin wants. He has made clear he'd like to reconstitute the Soviet Empire, short of that he'd like to reassert a sphere of influence around the neighboring countries that were once part of the Soviet bloc," Blinken said during a national TV interview. The secretary pledged that NATO would intervene before Putin successfully accomplished his ultimate goal."Now, when it comes to a threat beyond Ukraine's borders. There's something very powerful standing in his way. That's article five of NATO, an attack on one is an attack on all," the top diplomat said.  Expert says Russia's Ukraine invasion will result in 'horrific scenes,' could be launch of 'Cold War 2.0'Ukrainians gather in front of the White House in Washington, USA to stage a protest against Russia's attack in Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Yasin Öztürk/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesA former aide to President Barack Obama is warning that Russia's invasion of Ukraine is a "game changer" in international relations that will result in "horrific scenes" in the coming days, with President Vladimir Putin intent on pursuing regime change at all costs."I think it's just a matter of time before Kyiv falls," Charles Kupchan, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations who also served on the National Security Council in both the Obama and Clinton administrations, told Insider.READ FULL STORYThe White House says it's ready to accept Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasionWhite House press secretary Jen Psaki.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe US is prepared to accept Ukrainian refugees fleeing Russia's invasion, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told CNN."We are," Psaki said when asked whether the US was ready to assist fleeing Ukrainians. "But we certainly expect that most if not the majority will want to go to Europe and neighboring countries. So, we are also working with European countries on what the needs are, where there is capacity. Poland, for example, where we are seeing an increasing flow of refugees over the last 24 hours."She added that US officials have been engaging with Europeans on the matter "for some time." Ukrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield just outside KyivUkraine army says battle under way for airbase near Kyiv on February 24, 2022Daniel LEAL / Getty ImagesUkrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city.Russian forces attacked and seized Hostomel (Gostomel) airfield, a cargo airport near Kyiv that is also known as Antonov airport, early Thursday, according to AFP. Ukraine's leadership reportedly vowed to take it back."The enemy paratroopers in Hostomel have been blocked, and troops have received an order to destroy them," Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said in a video address.Read Full StoryUkraine's health minister says dozens killed and over 160 injuredBlack smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv, Ukraine, on February 24, 2022.ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty ImagesUkraine's health minister said 57 Ukrainians have been killed and 169 were wounded after Russia attacked on Thursday, the Associated Press reported.Explosions, gunfire, and sirens were reportedly heard in Kyiv on Thursday. Witnesses also described missile blasts in other cities, including Kramatorsk, Dnipro, and Odesa, reports said. Sean Penn is filming a documentary in Ukraine while Russia invadesActor and director Sean Penn attends a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, Ukraine February 24, 2022.Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via ReutersSean Penn was spotted in Ukraine on Thursday just after Russia invaded the country. Penn was seen in the front row of a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, photos obtained by Reuters show. The actor and director has been working on a documentary about tensions in Ukraine since last year.Read Full StoryUkrainians and Russians are packing ATM lines, prompting fears of what happened in the US during the Great DepressionPeople wait in line at an ATM in Kyiv.DANIEL LEAL/AFP via Getty Images.Many Ukrainians who haven't already fled the country as Russia's threat turned into invasion stood in long lines outside of banks and ATMs hoping to take out their funds, Reuters reported on Thursday. Meanwhile in Russia, people are also queuing outside of ATMs trying to get US dollars as its citizens worry their own currency's value will continue to tank, according to the Wall Street Journal. Banks in the capital city of Moscow are running out of money, MSNBC reported. All of this has led to fears of bank runs, which is when people withdraw money en masse because they worry banks will cease to function. That's what happened in the United States during the Great Depression, and it triggered mass unemployment and loan scarcities.  Read Full StoryA top Russian business lobbyist pleaded with Putin to 'demonstrate as much as possible' that Russia wants to remain 'part of the global economy'Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and head of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs Alexander Shokhin attend a meeting of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 16, 2017.Sergei Ilnitsky/AP PhotoThe head of one of Russia's biggest business groups urged President Vladimir Putin on Thursday to avoid severe economic pain and remain "part of the global economy" as NATO members ready a harsher salvo of sanctions.Putin held a televised meeting with the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs just hours after Russian forces began attacks in Ukraine.The threat of new sanctions was enough for Alexander Shokhin, the business group's president, to raise concerns with Putin about remaining a member of the world economy.The lobbyist urged the president to pad against major economic pain and to ensure conflict in Ukraine doesn't fuel widespread harm to the global financial system."Everything should be done to demonstrate as much as possible that Russia remains part of the global economy and will not provoke, including through some kind of response measures, global negative phenomena on world markets," Shokhin said.Read Full StoryBiden says he'll try to limit what Americans pay at the gas pump as the US slaps Russia with more sanctions: 'This is critical to me'U.S. President Joe Biden answers questions after delivering remarks about Russia's “unprovoked and unjustified" military invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden sought to quell fears of another spike in gas prices on Thursday after Russia unleashed a military assault on Ukraine that threatened to upend the global economy.The threat of war in Ukraine in recent weeks has contributed to spiking oil prices, with the benchmark Brent crude oil hitting $100 for the first time since 2014 Wednesday night amid the early stages of Russia's invasion."I know this is hard and Americans are already hurting," he said at a White House address. "I will do everything in my power to limit the pain the American people are feeling at the gas pump."He opened the door to another release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, a step the Biden administration also took in November to try and provide relief at the pump.Read Full StoryBiden says Putin's Ukraine invasion will cause a 'complete rupture' in US-Russia relationsPresident Joe Biden listens to questions from reporters while speaking about the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022, in Washington.Alex Brandon/APPresident Joe Biden on Thursday said Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine will cause a "complete rupture" of US-Russia relations if it continues. Biden condemned Putin and his escalating invasion of Ukraine in a speech from the White House.Biden, who met with G7 members on Thursday morning, also announced a raft of new sanctions against Russia on Thursday."What's the risk that we are watching the beginning of another Cold War, and is there now a complete rupture in US-Russian relations?," a reporter asked Biden following his address. Read Full StoryFamed Russian rapper cancels concerts in protest, saying he can't perform while 'Russian missiles fall on Ukraine'Rapper Oxxxymiron, whose real name is Miron Fyodorov, performs during a concert in support of rapper Husky, whose real name is Dmitry Kuznetsov, in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018.AP Photo/Pavel GolovkinA prominent Russian rapper canceled his concert in protest of the Russian invasion on Ukraine, saying he can't perform while "Russian missiles fall on Ukraine."Rapper Oxxxymiron announced via a video posted to his Instagram account that he is postponing "six of my major gigs in Moscow and Saint Petersburg indefinitely," because he said he is "specifically against the war Russia has escalated against the people of Ukraine.""I'm sure you can understand me; I can't entertain you while Russian missiles fall on Ukraine, while Kyiv residents are forced to hide in the basements and subway, and while people are dying," he said.Read Full StoryUS Treasury targets Belarusian support for Russian invasion of UkraineBelarusian President Alexander LukashenkoDmitry Astakhov/Pool/AFP via Getty ImagesIn addition to the second round of sanctions imposed on Russia by the US Thursday, the US Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced it is sanctioning 24 Belarusian individuals for their support of the Russian invasion. The sanctions target Belarus's defense sector and financial institutions — two sectors closely tied to Russia.Massive protests erupted in Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg as Russians voice opposition to war in UkraineA demonstrator holding a placard reading "No to war" protests against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.Photo by SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesMassive protests erupted on Thursday in Russian President Vladimir Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg, as people voiced their opposition to the invasion of Ukraine.Videos posted to Twitter show a sea of people gathered in a section of St. Petersburg, Russia's second-largest city, chanting and holding signs to object to Russia's offensive in Ukraine.Russian government forces have threatened to arrest anti-war protesters, who took to the streets after Putin announced military action against Ukraine on Thursday.Read Full StoryPhotos show Russian authorities dragging away protesters opposed to Putin's invasion of UkrainePolice Police detain a demonstrator during a protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesAnti-war protesters in Russia quickly took to the streets following Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine. Some activists were met with hostility by Russian authorities who hauled them away. More than 1,000 anti-war protesters have already been detained in dozens of cities across Russia, according to protest-monitoring group OVD-Info. Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."Read Full StoryBiden slaps 'additional strong sanctions' on Russia as it mounts a large-scale attack on UkrainePresident Joe Biden delivers remarks during a joint news conference with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz in the East Room of the White House on February 07, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden on Thursday announced that the US will impose a second, harsher round of sanctions on Russia following its large-scale invasion of Ukraine.Biden announced that he had authorized "additional strong sanctions" and "new limitations" on what can be exported to Russia."We have purposely designed these sanctions to maximize the long term impact on Russia and minimize the impact on the United States and our allies," Biden said."We will limit Russia's ability to do business in dollars, euros, pounds and yen to be part of the global economy," the president said of the sanctions. "We're going to stop the ability to finance and grow the Russian military. We're going to impair their ability to compete in a high-tech 21st-century economy."Read Full StoryA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears and begged the world to 'save our people' from being 'murdered' by Russian forcesUkrainian Parliament member Halyna Yanchenko speaks during a CBS interviewCBS NewsA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears during an interview with CBS News and begged the international community to "save our people" from being "murdered" by Russian forces."I beg you, please save our people. Dozens of people — maybe hundreds of people — might be murdered tonight," Member of Parliament Halyna Yanchenko said as she sobbed during an interview with CBS News on Thursday.  She added: "Please save Ukrainian men, women, and children." Read Full StoryPhotos show Ukrainian families fleeing the Russian invasion amid warnings of a mass refugee crisisPeople wait for trains at a train station as they attempt to evacuate the city on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. Overnight, Russia began a large-scale attack on Ukraine, with explosions reported in multiple cities and far outside the restive eastern regions held by Russian-backed rebels.Pierre Crom/Getty Images)Ukrainian residents fled their homes after the first day of Russia's full-scale invasion. Train stations were packed with people on the move and roads filled with cars of people leaving the country, with their loved ones and prized possessions in tow.Before the invasion took place, there were warnings of a mass refugee crisis.Read Full StoryRussian government websites — including ones for the Kremlin and the legislature — went dark after cyberattacks target UkraineA night view of Kyiv as the Kyiv mayor declared a curfew from 10pm to 7am on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesMultiple Russian government websites reportedly went down on Thursday after the country launched an attack on Ukraine. NetBlocks, which tracks disruptions and shutdowns, confirmed on Twitter that multiple sites went offline shortly after 8:45 p.m. local time in Moscow.The Kremlin's website and that of the Russian Federal Assembly's lower house — or State Duma — were both down for at least 15 minutes. As of 9 p.m. local time, the State Duma website was since restored. Shortly after 9:10 p.m. local time, the Kremlin's website was also back online.  Read Full StoryPutin had a range of ways to attack Ukraine. He went with the worst-case scenario for the West.A convoy of Russian military vehicles is seen as the vehicles move towards border in Donbas region of eastern Ukraine on February 23, 2022 in Russian border city Rostov.Stringer/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesIn the build-up to Russia's assault on Ukraine, analysts and leaders envisioned numerous ways the conflict might play out, from a limited incursion to an all-out invasion.Putin used precision missile strikes and airstrikes, followed shortly later by ground maneuvers, the officials said.Analysts said attacks came from the east, south, and north, a description consistent with reports on the ground and Insider's map of the invasion.All three lines of attack — as per this analysis in The Conversation — had previously been floated as individual possibilities for an invasion.Defense analysts warned that Russia's multipronged attack was full-scale but still in an early phase, with a lot more forces to push into Ukraine to seize key areas or capture its leadership.Putin's overall endgame remains an area of pressing debate.Read Full StoryKey Democratic congressman says the US can't send support to Ukraine quickly enough 'to repel' Russia's invasionRep. Adam Smith, Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Adam Smith, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, ruled out surging supplies into Ukraine as a last-ditch effort to stall Russia's invasion, arguing it's unlikely such support would arrive quickly enough to make a difference."The odd of us being able to do that in a rapid enough fashion to be able to repel the invasion are remote," Smith told CNN on Thursday when asked about a Ukrainian official's request for more equipment. "I don't think it's realistic to think that we can reinforce them enough in the short term to be able to repel the invasion."Read Full StoryPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden are refusing to play their 2022 World Cup qualifying matches in Russia after it attacked UkraineA protester holds a poster reading "Sanctions against Russia now" during a rally in front of the Russian Embassy in Stockholm on February 24, 2022, after Russia launched military operations in Ukraine.Photo by CLAUDIO BRESCIANI/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty ImagesPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden said they are refusing to play their upcoming 2022 World Cup qualifying playoff matches in Russia after it attacked Ukraine on Thursday.Based on the latest Russian aggression against Ukraine, "the signatories to this appeal do not consider travelling to Russia and playing football matches there," the three countries said in a joint statement addressed to FIFA's General Secretary Fatma Samoura. The statement continued: "The military escalation that we are observing entails serious consequences and considerably lower safety for our national football teams and official delegations."Read Full StoryRussia's moving on Kyiv and the plan appears to be to take out Ukraine's leadership, US defense official warnsA column of army trucks approaches the Perekop checkpoint on the Ukrainian border. Early on February 24, President Putin announced a special military operation to be conducted by the Russian Armed Forces against Ukraine.Sergei MalgavkobackslashTASS via Getty ImagesRussian forces invaded Ukraine Thursday morning, and a senior US defense official says they are moving on Kyiv, likely to topple the country's government and install their own.Russia is "making a move on Kyiv" a senior defense official who addressed reporters Thursday said, according to CNN. "We would describe what you are seeing as an initial phase" of a "large-scale invasion," the official said, according to The Washington Post's Dan Lamothe.Read Full StoryMaps show Russia's invasion of UkraineMaps of Ukraine.Shayanne Gal/InsiderRussia invaded Ukraine early Thursday, leading to dozens of Ukrainian and Russian casualties.These maps show where Russian troops have attacked Ukraine, which is happening from multiple sides.Read Full StoryUK plots far harsher sanctions on Russia to punish it for invading UkraineBritish Prime Minister Boris JohnsonAdrian Dennis/Pool via REUTERS/File PhotoThe UK announced a new set of harsher sanctions on Russia after the country invaded Ukraine early Thursday. A spokesman for the UK government told journalists at a briefing that the UK plans to impose a second round of sanctions. The most intense of the new list of sanctions is an asset freeze on all major Russian banks and an asset freeze against VTB — the second largest bank with assets totaling £154 billion. The UK also plans to sanction another 100 individuals and entities.This is a large step up from the sanctions it announced Wednesday, which were limited to five smaller banks, three individuals close to Putin, and politicians in Russia who voted for military action. Russia has begun arresting anti-war protesters as demonstrations break out after Putin invades UkrainePolice officer detain a woman during an action against Russia's attack on Ukraine in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022.AP Photo/Dmitry SerebryakovThe Russian government on Thursday threatened anti-war protesters demonstrating against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, warning they could face arrest for organizing.And according to a protest monitoring group, the detentions have already begun as small protests have broken out in some Russian cities.Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens in a statement not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."The committee said that people should be aware of the "negative legal consequences of these actions," which it said includes criminal liability. Read Full StoryUkraine's official Twitter is using memes to rip into Putin's bogus comparison between it and Nazi GermanyRussian President Vladimir Putin ordered troops into eastern Ukraine on Monday.Alexei Nikolsky/Associated PressAfter Russian President Vladimir Putin gave the marching orders for an attack on Ukraine early Thursday morning, Ukraine's official Twitter account got busy. One photo showed what appeared to be caricature images of Adolf Hitler tending to a small Putin. "This is not a 'meme', but our and your reality right now," Ukraine said in a follow-up tweet.  The account also called for a so-called "Twitter-storm" at 12 p.m. local time in Kyiv on Thursday, urging people to use various hashtags to "tell the world of the ongoing Russian aggression against Ukraine and the fact that Ukraine is under attack."Ukraine's latest post said to "Tag @Russia and tell them what you think about them," racking up tens of thousands of likes and quote tweets. Read Full StoryMap shows reported movement of Russian troops in Ukraine Thursday!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 25th, 2022

Live updates: Zelensky says "enemy sabotage groups have entered Kyiv" and that he is "number one target"

Russia attacked Ukraine Thursday morning. Blasts were heard across the country, with reports of artillery fire from Russian forces across the border. Black smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv, Ukraine, on February 24, 2022.Aris Messinis / AFP via Getty Images US President Joe Biden announced a new round of "strong sanctions" on Russia. Russian forces attacked Ukraine on Thursday morning. Ukraine called it a "full-scale invasion." Ukraine said eight civilians were killed, as well as dozens more troops on both sides. Large explosions heard in Kyiv, Ukraine's capital cityA night view of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city, as seen on Thursday.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesKyiv, the capital of Ukraine, was awakened by explosions in the early hours of Friday morning local time, CNN reported."Strikes on Kyiv with cruise or ballistic missiles continued," Anton Gerashchenko, adviser to the head of the Ministry of Internal Affairs in Ukraine, told CNN Thursday.The outlet also reported multiple bombardments — two blasts in Kyiv and an explosion in the distance. Read Full StoryUkraine is crowdfunding to shore up its defenses against the Russian militarySoldiers seen aboard a Ukrainian tank in Mariupol, Ukraine, on Thursday.REUTERS/Carlos BarriaUkraine is crowdfunding to bolster its armed forces against the Russian invasion.In a tweet on Thursday, the official Twitter account of Ukraine called for donations and provided a link to the country's official website.Collected funds will be used for the "logistical and medical support" of the Ukrainian armed forces, said the webpage, which is operated by Ukraine's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ukrainian Institution.Read Full Story5 reasons Putin and others have given for the invasionRussian President Vladimir Putin claims the Ukraine invasion is aimed at preventing the "genocide" of ethnic Russians in the country.Photo by Kay Nietfeld/picture alliance via Getty ImagesRussian forces attacked Ukraine early Thursday morning, launching a large-scale and unprovoked invasion that was feared for weeks.Here are some reasons Russian President Vladimir Putin has given for why Russia invaded Ukraine — some of which are based on falsehoods — along with what the US and NATO have said about his motivations.Read Full StoryThe Biden administration is considering training Ukrainian soldiers in an outside country, according to AxiosUkrainian soldiers patrol on the frontline in Zolote, Ukraine on January 20, 2022.Wolfgang Schwan/Getty ImagesAs Russian forces enclose on Ukraine's capital Kyiv, the Biden administration is eyeing its next steps in the ongoing conflict.Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin told House lawmakers on Thursday that the US government is considering possible ways to train Ukrainian troops outside of Ukraine, should Russia seize control of the country, according to Axios.Austin reportedly told lawmakers that officials are trying to find ways to provide more defense equipment, including ammunition to Ukrainian forces — a feat made more challenging as Russian forces assault the country.The secretary also told House members that the Biden administration will continue to support Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky's government as long as it is "viable," the outlet reported.Ukrainian president announces general mobilization of all conscripts and reservists to last 90 daysUkrainian soldiers sit on top of a military vehicle parked outside the hotel in Prypiat, Ukraine on February 4.Volodymyr Tarasov/Ukrinform/Future Publishing via Getty ImageUkrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Thursday ordered a general military mobilization throughout the country as Russia continues its large-scale military assault in Ukraine. The declaration ordered the conscription of conscripts and reservists for military service, as well as their delivery to military units and institutions of the Armed Forces of Ukraine in order to "ensure the defense of the state." The mobilization, which included all of Ukraine's major cities, will be carried out within 90 days, the decree said. It will provide personnel, vehicles, infrastructure, and land use for the Ukrainian government and military amid Russia's ongoing invasion, according to the decree. Ukraine has also banned all male citizens ages 18-60 from leaving the country, according to CNN, which cited the State Border Guard Service. READ FULL STORYZelensky says 'enemy sabotage groups have entered Kyiv' and that he is 'number one target'Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky delivers a statement during the 58th Munich Security Conference (MSC) on February 19, 2022 in Munich, Germany.Photo by Ronald Wittek - Pool/Getty ImagesIn his second video address on Thursday, Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said that "enemy sabotage groups" entered Kyiv, and that he plans to remain, despite being Russia's "number one target.""According to preliminary data, unfortunately, we have lost 137 of our heroes today — our citizens. Ten of them are officers," Zelensky said in his address. "316 are wounded."He also used the opportunity to dispel rumors that he had fled Kyiv, and that his family had left the country."I stay in the capital, I stay with my people. During the day, I held dozens of international talks, directly managed our country. And I will stay in the capital," he said. "My family is also in Ukraine. My children are also in Ukraine. My family is not traitors. They are the citizens of Ukraine. But I have no right to say where they are now."READ FULL STORYWhite House is 'outraged' over reports that staff at Chernobyl have been taken hostage by Russian forcesServicemen take part in a joint tactical and special exercises of the Ukrainian Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Ukrainian National Guard and Ministry Emergency in a ghost city of Pripyat, near Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on February 4, 2022.Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty ImagesPress secretary Jen Psaki said the White House is outraged over reports from Ukrainian officials that staff at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine have been taken hostage by Russian troops.Russian forces took over the remnants of Chernobyl earlier on Thursday during the country's invasion of Ukraine. The move indicated Russia is likely to assault Ukraine's capital city, Kyiv, which is located just south of Chernobyl, the site of one of the worst nuclear disasters in history."We're outraged by credible reports that Russian soldiers are currently holding the staff of the Chernobyl facility hostage," Psaki said during a press briefing on Thursday afternoon, adding "we condemn it and we request their release."Psaki said the situation at Chernobyl was not clear but that the hostage taking was "incredibly alarming and greatly concerning," adding it could hurt efforts to maintain the facility, which is dangerously contaminated with radioactivity as a result of the 1986 nuclear disaster.read full STORYUS secretary of state is 'convinced' Russia will try to overthrow the Ukrainian governmentUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken during an appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press" on April 11, 2021.Meet The Press/NBCUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken on Thursday said he is "convinced" Moscow will try to overthrow Ukraine's government."You don't need intelligence to tell you that that's exactly what President Putin wants. He has made clear he'd like to reconstitute the Soviet Empire, short of that he'd like to reassert a sphere of influence around the neighboring countries that were once part of the Soviet bloc," Blinken said during a national TV interview. The secretary pledged that NATO would intervene before Putin successfully accomplished his ultimate goal."Now, when it comes to a threat beyond Ukraine's borders. There's something very powerful standing in his way. That's article five of NATO, an attack on one is an attack on all," the top diplomat said.  Expert says Russia's Ukraine invasion will result in 'horrific scenes,' could be launch of 'Cold War 2.0'Ukrainians gather in front of the White House in Washington, USA to stage a protest against Russia's attack in Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Yasin Öztürk/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesA former aide to President Barack Obama is warning that Russia's invasion of Ukraine is a "game changer" in international relations that will result in "horrific scenes" in the coming days, with President Vladimir Putin intent on pursuing regime change at all costs."I think it's just a matter of time before Kyiv falls," Charles Kupchan, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations who also served on the National Security Council in both the Obama and Clinton administrations, told Insider.READ FULL STORYThe White House says it's ready to accept Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasionWhite House press secretary Jen Psaki.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe US is prepared to accept Ukrainian refugees fleeing Russia's invasion, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told CNN."We are," Psaki said when asked whether the US was ready to assist fleeing Ukrainians. "But we certainly expect that most if not the majority will want to go to Europe and neighboring countries. So, we are also working with European countries on what the needs are, where there is capacity. Poland, for example, where we are seeing an increasing flow of refugees over the last 24 hours."She added that US officials have been engaging with Europeans on the matter "for some time." Ukrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield just outside KyivUkraine army says battle under way for airbase near Kyiv on February 24, 2022Daniel LEAL / Getty ImagesUkrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city.Russian forces attacked and seized Hostomel (Gostomel) airfield, a cargo airport near Kyiv that is also known as Antonov airport, early Thursday, according to AFP. Ukraine's leadership reportedly vowed to take it back."The enemy paratroopers in Hostomel have been blocked, and troops have received an order to destroy them," Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said in a video address.Read Full StoryUkraine's health minister says dozens killed and over 160 injuredBlack smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv, Ukraine, on February 24, 2022.ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty ImagesUkraine's health minister said 57 Ukrainians have been killed and 169 were wounded after Russia attacked on Thursday, the Associated Press reported.Explosions, gunfire, and sirens were reportedly heard in Kyiv on Thursday. Witnesses also described missile blasts in other cities, including Kramatorsk, Dnipro, and Odesa, reports said. Sean Penn is filming a documentary in Ukraine while Russia invadesActor and director Sean Penn attends a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, Ukraine February 24, 2022.Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via ReutersSean Penn was spotted in Ukraine on Thursday just after Russia invaded the country. Penn was seen in the front row of a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, photos obtained by Reuters show. The actor and director has been working on a documentary about tensions in Ukraine since last year.Read Full StoryUkrainians and Russians are packing ATM lines, prompting fears of what happened in the US during the Great DepressionPeople wait in line at an ATM in Kyiv.DANIEL LEAL/AFP via Getty Images.Many Ukrainians who haven't already fled the country as Russia's threat turned into invasion stood in long lines outside of banks and ATMs hoping to take out their funds, Reuters reported on Thursday. Meanwhile in Russia, people are also queuing outside of ATMs trying to get US dollars as its citizens worry their own currency's value will continue to tank, according to the Wall Street Journal. Banks in the capital city of Moscow are running out of money, MSNBC reported. All of this has led to fears of bank runs, which is when people withdraw money en masse because they worry banks will cease to function. That's what happened in the United States during the Great Depression, and it triggered mass unemployment and loan scarcities.  Read Full StoryA top Russian business lobbyist pleaded with Putin to 'demonstrate as much as possible' that Russia wants to remain 'part of the global economy'Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and head of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs Alexander Shokhin attend a meeting of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 16, 2017.Sergei Ilnitsky/AP PhotoThe head of one of Russia's biggest business groups urged President Vladimir Putin on Thursday to avoid severe economic pain and remain "part of the global economy" as NATO members ready a harsher salvo of sanctions.Putin held a televised meeting with the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs just hours after Russian forces began attacks in Ukraine.The threat of new sanctions was enough for Alexander Shokhin, the business group's president, to raise concerns with Putin about remaining a member of the world economy.The lobbyist urged the president to pad against major economic pain and to ensure conflict in Ukraine doesn't fuel widespread harm to the global financial system."Everything should be done to demonstrate as much as possible that Russia remains part of the global economy and will not provoke, including through some kind of response measures, global negative phenomena on world markets," Shokhin said.Read Full StoryBiden says he'll try to limit what Americans pay at the gas pump as the US slaps Russia with more sanctions: 'This is critical to me'U.S. President Joe Biden answers questions after delivering remarks about Russia's “unprovoked and unjustified" military invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden sought to quell fears of another spike in gas prices on Thursday after Russia unleashed a military assault on Ukraine that threatened to upend the global economy.The threat of war in Ukraine in recent weeks has contributed to spiking oil prices, with the benchmark Brent crude oil hitting $100 for the first time since 2014 Wednesday night amid the early stages of Russia's invasion."I know this is hard and Americans are already hurting," he said at a White House address. "I will do everything in my power to limit the pain the American people are feeling at the gas pump."He opened the door to another release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, a step the Biden administration also took in November to try and provide relief at the pump.Read Full StoryBiden says Putin's Ukraine invasion will cause a 'complete rupture' in US-Russia relationsPresident Joe Biden listens to questions from reporters while speaking about the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022, in Washington.Alex Brandon/APPresident Joe Biden on Thursday said Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine will cause a "complete rupture" of US-Russia relations if it continues. Biden condemned Putin and his escalating invasion of Ukraine in a speech from the White House.Biden, who met with G7 members on Thursday morning, also announced a raft of new sanctions against Russia on Thursday."What's the risk that we are watching the beginning of another Cold War, and is there now a complete rupture in US-Russian relations?," a reporter asked Biden following his address. Read Full StoryFamed Russian rapper cancels concerts in protest, saying he can't perform while 'Russian missiles fall on Ukraine'Rapper Oxxxymiron, whose real name is Miron Fyodorov, performs during a concert in support of rapper Husky, whose real name is Dmitry Kuznetsov, in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018.AP Photo/Pavel GolovkinA prominent Russian rapper canceled his concert in protest of the Russian invasion on Ukraine, saying he can't perform while "Russian missiles fall on Ukraine."Rapper Oxxxymiron announced via a video posted to his Instagram account that he is postponing "six of my major gigs in Moscow and Saint Petersburg indefinitely," because he said he is "specifically against the war Russia has escalated against the people of Ukraine.""I'm sure you can understand me; I can't entertain you while Russian missiles fall on Ukraine, while Kyiv residents are forced to hide in the basements and subway, and while people are dying," he said.Read Full StoryUS Treasury targets Belarusian support for Russian invasion of UkraineBelarusian President Alexander LukashenkoDmitry Astakhov/Pool/AFP via Getty ImagesIn addition to the second round of sanctions imposed on Russia by the US Thursday, the US Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced it is sanctioning 24 Belarusian individuals for their support of the Russian invasion. The sanctions target Belarus's defense sector and financial institutions — two sectors closely tied to Russia.Massive protests erupted in Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg as Russians voice opposition to war in UkraineA demonstrator holding a placard reading "No to war" protests against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.Photo by SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesMassive protests erupted on Thursday in Russian President Vladimir Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg, as people voiced their opposition to the invasion of Ukraine.Videos posted to Twitter show a sea of people gathered in a section of St. Petersburg, Russia's second-largest city, chanting and holding signs to object to Russia's offensive in Ukraine.Russian government forces have threatened to arrest anti-war protesters, who took to the streets after Putin announced military action against Ukraine on Thursday.Read Full StoryPhotos show Russian authorities dragging away protesters opposed to Putin's invasion of UkrainePolice Police detain a demonstrator during a protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesAnti-war protesters in Russia quickly took to the streets following Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine. Some activists were met with hostility by Russian authorities who hauled them away. More than 1,000 anti-war protesters have already been detained in dozens of cities across Russia, according to protest-monitoring group OVD-Info. Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."Read Full StoryBiden slaps 'additional strong sanctions' on Russia as it mounts a large-scale attack on UkrainePresident Joe Biden delivers remarks during a joint news conference with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz in the East Room of the White House on February 07, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden on Thursday announced that the US will impose a second, harsher round of sanctions on Russia following its large-scale invasion of Ukraine.Biden announced that he had authorized "additional strong sanctions" and "new limitations" on what can be exported to Russia."We have purposely designed these sanctions to maximize the long term impact on Russia and minimize the impact on the United States and our allies," Biden said."We will limit Russia's ability to do business in dollars, euros, pounds and yen to be part of the global economy," the president said of the sanctions. "We're going to stop the ability to finance and grow the Russian military. We're going to impair their ability to compete in a high-tech 21st-century economy."Read Full StoryA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears and begged the world to 'save our people' from being 'murdered' by Russian forcesUkrainian Parliament member Halyna Yanchenko speaks during a CBS interviewCBS NewsA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears during an interview with CBS News and begged the international community to "save our people" from being "murdered" by Russian forces."I beg you, please save our people. Dozens of people — maybe hundreds of people — might be murdered tonight," Member of Parliament Halyna Yanchenko said as she sobbed during an interview with CBS News on Thursday.  She added: "Please save Ukrainian men, women, and children." Read Full StoryPhotos show Ukrainian families fleeing the Russian invasion amid warnings of a mass refugee crisisPeople wait for trains at a train station as they attempt to evacuate the city on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. Overnight, Russia began a large-scale attack on Ukraine, with explosions reported in multiple cities and far outside the restive eastern regions held by Russian-backed rebels.Pierre Crom/Getty Images)Ukrainian residents fled their homes after the first day of Russia's full-scale invasion. Train stations were packed with people on the move and roads filled with cars of people leaving the country, with their loved ones and prized possessions in tow.Before the invasion took place, there were warnings of a mass refugee crisis.Read Full StoryRussian government websites — including ones for the Kremlin and the legislature — went dark after cyberattacks target UkraineA night view of Kyiv as the Kyiv mayor declared a curfew from 10pm to 7am on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesMultiple Russian government websites reportedly went down on Thursday after the country launched an attack on Ukraine. NetBlocks, which tracks disruptions and shutdowns, confirmed on Twitter that multiple sites went offline shortly after 8:45 p.m. local time in Moscow.The Kremlin's website and that of the Russian Federal Assembly's lower house — or State Duma — were both down for at least 15 minutes. As of 9 p.m. local time, the State Duma website was since restored. Shortly after 9:10 p.m. local time, the Kremlin's website was also back online.  Read Full StoryPutin had a range of ways to attack Ukraine. He went with the worst-case scenario for the West.A convoy of Russian military vehicles is seen as the vehicles move towards border in Donbas region of eastern Ukraine on February 23, 2022 in Russian border city Rostov.Stringer/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesIn the build-up to Russia's assault on Ukraine, analysts and leaders envisioned numerous ways the conflict might play out, from a limited incursion to an all-out invasion.Putin used precision missile strikes and airstrikes, followed shortly later by ground maneuvers, the officials said.Analysts said attacks came from the east, south, and north, a description consistent with reports on the ground and Insider's map of the invasion.All three lines of attack — as per this analysis in The Conversation — had previously been floated as individual possibilities for an invasion.Defense analysts warned that Russia's multipronged attack was full-scale but still in an early phase, with a lot more forces to push into Ukraine to seize key areas or capture its leadership.Putin's overall endgame remains an area of pressing debate.Read Full StoryKey Democratic congressman says the US can't send support to Ukraine quickly enough 'to repel' Russia's invasionRep. Adam Smith, Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Adam Smith, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, ruled out surging supplies into Ukraine as a last-ditch effort to stall Russia's invasion, arguing it's unlikely such support would arrive quickly enough to make a difference."The odd of us being able to do that in a rapid enough fashion to be able to repel the invasion are remote," Smith told CNN on Thursday when asked about a Ukrainian official's request for more equipment. "I don't think it's realistic to think that we can reinforce them enough in the short term to be able to repel the invasion."Read Full StoryPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden are refusing to play their 2022 World Cup qualifying matches in Russia after it attacked UkraineA protester holds a poster reading "Sanctions against Russia now" during a rally in front of the Russian Embassy in Stockholm on February 24, 2022, after Russia launched military operations in Ukraine.Photo by CLAUDIO BRESCIANI/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty ImagesPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden said they are refusing to play their upcoming 2022 World Cup qualifying playoff matches in Russia after it attacked Ukraine on Thursday.Based on the latest Russian aggression against Ukraine, "the signatories to this appeal do not consider travelling to Russia and playing football matches there," the three countries said in a joint statement addressed to FIFA's General Secretary Fatma Samoura. The statement continued: "The military escalation that we are observing entails serious consequences and considerably lower safety for our national football teams and official delegations."Read Full StoryRussia's moving on Kyiv and the plan appears to be to take out Ukraine's leadership, US defense official warnsA column of army trucks approaches the Perekop checkpoint on the Ukrainian border. Early on February 24, President Putin announced a special military operation to be conducted by the Russian Armed Forces against Ukraine.Sergei MalgavkobackslashTASS via Getty ImagesRussian forces invaded Ukraine Thursday morning, and a senior US defense official says they are moving on Kyiv, likely to topple the country's government and install their own.Russia is "making a move on Kyiv" a senior defense official who addressed reporters Thursday said, according to CNN. "We would describe what you are seeing as an initial phase" of a "large-scale invasion," the official said, according to The Washington Post's Dan Lamothe.Read Full StoryMaps show Russia's invasion of UkraineMaps of Ukraine.Shayanne Gal/InsiderRussia invaded Ukraine early Thursday, leading to dozens of Ukrainian and Russian casualties.These maps show where Russian troops have attacked Ukraine, which is happening from multiple sides.Read Full StoryUK plots far harsher sanctions on Russia to punish it for invading UkraineBritish Prime Minister Boris JohnsonAdrian Dennis/Pool via REUTERS/File PhotoThe UK announced a new set of harsher sanctions on Russia after the country invaded Ukraine early Thursday. A spokesman for the UK government told journalists at a briefing that the UK plans to impose a second round of sanctions. The most intense of the new list of sanctions is an asset freeze on all major Russian banks and an asset freeze against VTB — the second largest bank with assets totaling £154 billion. The UK also plans to sanction another 100 individuals and entities.This is a large step up from the sanctions it announced Wednesday, which were limited to five smaller banks, three individuals close to Putin, and politicians in Russia who voted for military action. Russia has begun arresting anti-war protesters as demonstrations break out after Putin invades UkrainePolice officer detain a woman during an action against Russia's attack on Ukraine in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022.AP Photo/Dmitry SerebryakovThe Russian government on Thursday threatened anti-war protesters demonstrating against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, warning they could face arrest for organizing.And according to a protest monitoring group, the detentions have already begun as small protests have broken out in some Russian cities.Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens in a statement not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."The committee said that people should be aware of the "negative legal consequences of these actions," which it said includes criminal liability. Read Full StoryUkraine's official Twitter is using memes to rip into Putin's bogus comparison between it and Nazi GermanyRussian President Vladimir Putin ordered troops into eastern Ukraine on Monday.Alexei Nikolsky/Associated PressAfter Russian President Vladimir Putin gave the marching orders for an attack on Ukraine early Thursday morning, Ukraine's official Twitter account got busy. One photo showed what appeared to be caricature images of Adolf Hitler tending to a small Putin. "This is not a 'meme', but our and your reality right now," Ukraine said in a follow-up tweet.  The account also called for a so-called "Twitter-storm" at 12 p.m. local time in Kyiv on Thursday, urging people to use various hashtags to "tell the world of the ongoing Russian aggression against Ukraine and the fact that Ukraine is under attack."Ukraine's latest post said to "Tag @Russia and tell them what you think about them," racking up tens of thousands of likes and quote tweets. Read Full StoryMap shows reported movement of Russian troops in Ukraine Thursday!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 25th, 2022

Live updates: Biden slaps "strong sanctions" on Russia as Ukrainian invasion continues

Russia attacked Ukraine Thursday morning. Blasts were heard across the country, with reports of artillery fire from Russian forces across the border. Black smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv, Ukraine, on February 24, 2022.Aris Messinis / AFP via Getty Images US President Joe Biden announced a new round of "strong sanctions" on Russia. Russian forces attacked Ukraine on Thursday morning. Ukraine called it a "full-scale invasion." Ukraine said eight civilians were killed, as well as dozens more troops on both sides. Zelensky says 'enemy sabotage groups have entered Kyiv' and that he is 'number one target'Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky delivers a statement during the 58th Munich Security Conference (MSC) on February 19, 2022 in Munich, Germany.Photo by Ronald Wittek - Pool/Getty ImagesIn his second video address on Thursday, Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said that "enemy sabotage groups" entered Kyiv, and that he plans to remain, despite being Russia's "number one target.""According to preliminary data, unfortunately, we have lost 137 of our heroes today — our citizens. Ten of them are officers," Zelensky said in his address. "316 are wounded."He also used the opportunity to dispel rumors that he had fled Kyiv, and that his family had left the country."I stay in the capital, I stay with my people. During the day, I held dozens of international talks, directly managed our country. And I will stay in the capital," he said. "My family is also in Ukraine. My children are also in Ukraine. My family is not traitors. They are the citizens of Ukraine. But I have no right to say where they are now."READ FULL STORYWhite House is 'outraged' over reports that staff at Chernobyl have been taken hostage by Russian forcesServicemen take part in a joint tactical and special exercises of the Ukrainian Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Ukrainian National Guard and Ministry Emergency in a ghost city of Pripyat, near Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on February 4, 2022.Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty ImagesPress secretary Jen Psaki said the White House is outraged over reports from Ukrainian officials that staff at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine have been taken hostage by Russian troops.Russian forces took over the remnants of Chernobyl earlier on Thursday during the country's invasion of Ukraine. The move indicated Russia is likely to assault Ukraine's capital city, Kyiv, which is located just south of Chernobyl, the site of one of the worst nuclear disasters in history."We're outraged by credible reports that Russian soldiers are currently holding the staff of the Chernobyl facility hostage," Psaki said during a press briefing on Thursday afternoon, adding "we condemn it and we request their release."Psaki said the situation at Chernobyl was not clear but that the hostage taking was "incredibly alarming and greatly concerning," adding it could hurt efforts to maintain the facility, which is dangerously contaminated with radioactivity as a result of the 1986 nuclear disaster.read full STORYUS secretary of state is 'convinced' Russia will try to overthrow the Ukrainian governmentUS Secretary of State Antony Blinken during an appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press" on April 11, 2021.Meet The Press/NBCUS Secrertary of State Antony Blinken on Thursday said he is "convinced" Moscow will try to overthrow Ukraine's government."You don't need intelligence to tell you that that's exactly what President Putin wants. He has made clear he'd like to reconstitute the Soviet Empire, short of that he'd like to reassert a sphere of influence around the neighboring countries that were once part of the Soviet bloc," Blinken said during a national TV interview. The secretary pledged that NATO would intervene before Putin succesfully accomplished his ultimate goal."Now, when it comes to a threat beyond Ukraine's borders. There's something very powerful standing in his way. That's article five of NATO, an attack on one is an attack on all," the top diplomat said.  Expert says Russia's Ukraine invasion will result in 'horrific scenes,' could be launch of 'Cold War 2.0'Ukrainians gather in front of the White House in Washington, USA to stage a protest against Russia's attack in Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Yasin Öztürk/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesA former aide to President Barack Obama is warning that Russia's invasion of Ukraine is a "game changer" in international relations that will result in "horrific scenes" in the coming days, with President Vladimir Putin intent on pursuing regime change at all costs."I think it's just a matter of time before Kyiv falls," Charles Kupchan, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations who also served on the National Security Council in both the Obama and Clinton administrations, told Insider.READ FULL STORYThe White House says it's ready to accept Ukrainians fleeing the Russian invasionWhite House press secretary Jen Psaki.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe US is prepared to accept Ukrainian refugees fleeing Russia's invasion, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told CNN."We are," Psaki said when asked whether the US was ready to assist fleeing Ukrainians. "But we certainly expect that most if not the majority will want to go to Europe and neighboring countries. So, we are also working with European countries on what the needs are, where there is capacity. Poland, for example, where we are seeing an increasing flow of refugees over the last 24 hours."She added that US officials have been engaging with Europeans on the matter "for some time." Ukrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield just outside KyivUkraine army says battle under way for airbase near Kyiv on February 24, 2022Daniel LEAL / Getty ImagesUkrainian and Russian forces have been fighting for hours over a critical airfield on the outskirts of Kyiv, Ukraine's capital city.Russian forces attacked and seized Hostomel (Gostomel) airfield, a cargo airport near Kyiv that is also known as Antonov airport, early Thursday, according to AFP. Ukraine's leadership reportedly vowed to take it back."The enemy paratroopers in Hostomel have been blocked, and troops have received an order to destroy them," Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky said in a video address.Read Full StoryUkraine's health minister says dozens killed and over 160 injuredBlack smoke rises from a military airport in Chuguyev near Kharkiv, Ukraine, on February 24, 2022.ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty ImagesUkraine's health minister said 57 Ukrainians have been killed and 169 were wounded after Russia attacked on Thursday, the Associated Press reported.Explosions, gunfire, and sirens were reportedly heard in Kyiv on Thursday. Witnesses also described missile blasts in other cities, including Kramatorsk, Dnipro, and Odesa, reports said. Sean Penn is filming a documentary in Ukraine while Russia invadesActor and director Sean Penn attends a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, Ukraine February 24, 2022.Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via ReutersSean Penn was spotted in Ukraine on Thursday just after Russia invaded the country. Penn was seen in the front row of a press briefing at the Presidential Office in Kyiv, photos obtained by Reuters show. The actor and director has been working on a documentary about tensions in Ukraine since last year.Read Full StoryUkrainians and Russians are packing ATM lines, prompting fears of what happened in the US during the Great DepressionPeople wait in line at an ATM in Kyiv.DANIEL LEAL/AFP via Getty Images.Many Ukrainians who haven't already fled the country as Russia's threat turned into invasion stood in long lines outside of banks and ATMs hoping to take out their funds, Reuters reported on Thursday. Meanwhile in Russia, people are also queuing outside of ATMs trying to get US dollars as its citizens worry their own currency's value will continue to tank, according to the Wall Street Journal. Banks in the capital city of Moscow are running out of money, MSNBC reported. All of this has led to fears of bank runs, which is when people withdraw money en masse because they worry banks will cease to function. That's what happened in the United States during the Great Depression, and it triggered mass unemployment and loan scarcities.  Read Full StoryA top Russian business lobbyist pleaded with Putin to 'demonstrate as much as possible' that Russia wants to remain 'part of the global economy'Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and head of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs Alexander Shokhin attend a meeting of the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 16, 2017.Sergei Ilnitsky/AP PhotoThe head of one of Russia's biggest business groups urged President Vladimir Putin on Thursday to avoid severe economic pain and remain "part of the global economy" as NATO members ready a harsher salvo of sanctions.Putin held a televised meeting with the Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs just hours after Russian forces began attacks in Ukraine.The threat of new sanctions was enough for Alexander Shokhin, the business group's president, to raise concerns with Putin about remaining a member of the world economy.The lobbyist urged the president to pad against major economic pain and to ensure conflict in Ukraine doesn't fuel widespread harm to the global financial system."Everything should be done to demonstrate as much as possible that Russia remains part of the global economy and will not provoke, including through some kind of response measures, global negative phenomena on world markets," Shokhin said.Read Full StoryBiden says he'll try to limit what Americans pay at the gas pump as the US slaps Russia with more sanctions: 'This is critical to me'U.S. President Joe Biden answers questions after delivering remarks about Russia's “unprovoked and unjustified" military invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden sought to quell fears of another spike in gas prices on Thursday after Russia unleashed a military assault on Ukraine that threatened to upend the global economy.The threat of war in Ukraine in recent weeks has contributed to spiking oil prices, with the benchmark Brent crude oil hitting $100 for the first time since 2014 Wednesday night amid the early stages of Russia's invasion."I know this is hard and Americans are already hurting," he said at a White House address. "I will do everything in my power to limit the pain the American people are feeling at the gas pump."He opened the door to another release of oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, a step the Biden administration also took in November to try and provide relief at the pump.Read Full StoryBiden says Putin's Ukraine invasion will cause a 'complete rupture' in US-Russia relationsPresident Joe Biden listens to questions from reporters while speaking about the Russian invasion of Ukraine in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022, in Washington.Alex Brandon/APPresident Joe Biden on Thursday said Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine will cause a "complete rupture" of US-Russia relations if it continues. Biden condemned Putin and his escalating invasion of Ukraine in a speech from the White House.Biden, who met with G7 members on Thursday morning, also announced a raft of new sanctions against Russia on Thursday."What's the risk that we are watching the beginning of another Cold War, and is there now a complete rupture in US-Russian relations?," a reporter asked Biden following his address. Read Full StoryFamed Russian rapper cancels concerts in protest, saying he can't perform while 'Russian missiles fall on Ukraine'Rapper Oxxxymiron, whose real name is Miron Fyodorov, performs during a concert in support of rapper Husky, whose real name is Dmitry Kuznetsov, in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Nov. 26, 2018.AP Photo/Pavel GolovkinA prominent Russian rapper canceled his concert in protest of the Russian invasion on Ukraine, saying he can't perform while "Russian missiles fall on Ukraine."Rapper Oxxxymiron announced via a video posted to his Instagram account that he is postponing "six of my major gigs in Moscow and Saint Petersburg indefinitely," because he said he is "specifically against the war Russia has escalated against the people of Ukraine.""I'm sure you can understand me; I can't entertain you while Russian missiles fall on Ukraine, while Kyiv residents are forced to hide in the basements and subway, and while people are dying," he said.Read Full StoryUS Treasury targets Belarusian support for Russian invasion of UkraineBelarusian President Alexander LukashenkoDmitry Astakhov/Pool/AFP via Getty ImagesIn addition to the second round of sanctions imposed on Russia by the US Thursday, the US Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced it is sanctioning 24 Belarusian individuals for their support of the Russian invasion. The sanctions target Belarus's defense sector and financial institutions — two sectors closely tied to Russia.Massive protests erupted in Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg as Russians voice opposition to war in UkraineA demonstrator holding a placard reading "No to war" protests against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.Photo by SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesMassive protests erupted on Thursday in Russian President Vladimir Putin's hometown of St. Petersburg, as people voiced their opposition to the invasion of Ukraine.Videos posted to Twitter show a sea of people gathered in a section of St. Petersburg, Russia's second-largest city, chanting and holding signs to object to Russia's offensive in Ukraine.Russian government forces have threatened to arrest anti-war protesters, who took to the streets after Putin announced military action against Ukraine on Thursday.Read Full StoryPhotos show Russian authorities dragging away protesters opposed to Putin's invasion of UkrainePolice Police detain a demonstrator during a protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine in central Saint Petersburg on February 24, 2022.SERGEI MIKHAILICHENKO/AFP via Getty ImagesAnti-war protesters in Russia quickly took to the streets following Russian President Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine. Some activists were met with hostility by Russian authorities who hauled them away. More than 1,000 anti-war protesters have already been detained in dozens of cities across Russia, according to protest-monitoring group OVD-Info. Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."Read Full StoryBiden slaps 'additional strong sanctions' on Russia as it mounts a large-scale attack on UkrainePresident Joe Biden delivers remarks during a joint news conference with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz in the East Room of the White House on February 07, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden on Thursday announced that the US will impose a second, harsher round of sanctions on Russia following its large-scale invasion of Ukraine.Biden announced that he had authorized "additional strong sanctions" and "new limitations" on what can be exported to Russia."We have purposely designed these sanctions to maximize the long term impact on Russia and minimize the impact on the United States and our allies," Biden said."We will limit Russia's ability to do business in dollars, euros, pounds and yen to be part of the global economy," the president said of the sanctions. "We're going to stop the ability to finance and grow the Russian military. We're going to impair their ability to compete in a high-tech 21st-century economy."Read Full StoryA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears and begged the world to 'save our people' from being 'murdered' by Russian forcesUkrainian Parliament member Halyna Yanchenko speaks during a CBS interviewCBS NewsA Ukrainian lawmaker broke down in tears during an interview with CBS News and begged the international community to "save our people" from being "murdered" by Russian forces."I beg you, please save our people. Dozens of people — maybe hundreds of people — might be murdered tonight," Member of Parliament Halyna Yanchenko said as she sobbed during an interview with CBS News on Thursday.  She added: "Please save Ukrainian men, women, and children." Read Full StoryPhotos show Ukrainian families fleeing the Russian invasion amid warnings of a mass refugee crisisPeople wait for trains at a train station as they attempt to evacuate the city on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine. Overnight, Russia began a large-scale attack on Ukraine, with explosions reported in multiple cities and far outside the restive eastern regions held by Russian-backed rebels.Pierre Crom/Getty Images)Ukrainian residents fled their homes after the first day of Russia's full-scale invasion. Train stations were packed with people on the move and roads filled with cars of people leaving the country, with their loved ones and prized possessions in tow.Before the invasion took place, there were warnings of a mass refugee crisis.Read Full StoryRussian government websites — including ones for the Kremlin and the legislature — went dark after cyberattacks target UkraineA night view of Kyiv as the Kyiv mayor declared a curfew from 10pm to 7am on February 24, 2022 in Kyiv, Ukraine.Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty ImagesMultiple Russian government websites reportedly went down on Thursday after the country launched an attack on Ukraine. NetBlocks, which tracks disruptions and shutdowns, confirmed on Twitter that multiple sites went offline shortly after 8:45 p.m. local time in Moscow.The Kremlin's website and that of the Russian Federal Assembly's lower house — or State Duma — were both down for at least 15 minutes. As of 9 p.m. local time, the State Duma website was since restored. Shortly after 9:10 p.m. local time, the Kremlin's website was also back online.  Read Full StoryPutin had a range of ways to attack Ukraine. He went with the worst-case scenario for the West.A convoy of Russian military vehicles is seen as the vehicles move towards border in Donbas region of eastern Ukraine on February 23, 2022 in Russian border city Rostov.Stringer/Anadolu Agency via Getty ImagesIn the build-up to Russia's assault on Ukraine, analysts and leaders envisioned numerous ways the conflict might play out, from a limited incursion to an all-out invasion.Putin used precision missile strikes and airstrikes, followed shortly later by ground maneuvers, the officials said.Analysts said attacks came from the east, south, and north, a description consistent with reports on the ground and Insider's map of the invasion.All three lines of attack — as per this analysis in The Conversation — had previously been floated as individual possibilities for an invasion.Defense analysts warned that Russia's multipronged attack was full-scale but still in an early phase, with a lot more forces to push into Ukraine to seize key areas or capture its leadership.Putin's overall endgame remains an area of pressing debate.Read Full StoryKey Democratic congressman says the US can't send support to Ukraine quickly enough 'to repel' Russia's invasionRep. Adam Smith, Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRep. Adam Smith, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, ruled out surging supplies into Ukraine as a last-ditch effort to stall Russia's invasion, arguing it's unlikely such support would arrive quickly enough to make a difference."The odd of us being able to do that in a rapid enough fashion to be able to repel the invasion are remote," Smith told CNN on Thursday when asked about a Ukrainian official's request for more equipment. "I don't think it's realistic to think that we can reinforce them enough in the short term to be able to repel the invasion."Read Full StoryPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden are refusing to play their 2022 World Cup qualifying matches in Russia after it attacked UkraineA protester holds a poster reading "Sanctions against Russia now" during a rally in front of the Russian Embassy in Stockholm on February 24, 2022, after Russia launched military operations in Ukraine.Photo by CLAUDIO BRESCIANI/TT News Agency/AFP via Getty ImagesPoland, Czech Republic, and Sweden said they are refusing to play their upcoming 2022 World Cup qualifying playoff matches in Russia after it attacked Ukraine on Thursday.Based on the latest Russian aggression against Ukraine, "the signatories to this appeal do not consider travelling to Russia and playing football matches there," the three countries said in a joint statement addressed to FIFA's General Secretary Fatma Samoura. The statement continued: "The military escalation that we are observing entails serious consequences and considerably lower safety for our national football teams and official delegations."Read Full StoryRussia's moving on Kyiv and the plan appears to be to take out Ukraine's leadership, US defense official warnsA column of army trucks approaches the Perekop checkpoint on the Ukrainian border. Early on February 24, President Putin announced a special military operation to be conducted by the Russian Armed Forces against Ukraine.Sergei MalgavkobackslashTASS via Getty ImagesRussian forces invaded Ukraine Thursday morning, and a senior US defense official says they are moving on Kyiv, likely to topple the country's government and install their own.Russia is "making a move on Kyiv" a senior defense official who addressed reporters Thursday said, according to CNN. "We would describe what you are seeing as an initial phase" of a "large-scale invasion," the official said, according to The Washington Post's Dan Lamothe.Read Full StoryMaps show Russia's invasion of UkraineMaps of Ukraine.Shayanne Gal/InsiderRussia invaded Ukraine early Thursday, leading to dozens of Ukrainian and Russian casualties.These maps show where Russian troops have attacked Ukraine, which is happening from multiple sides.Read Full StoryUK plots far harsher sanctions on Russia to punish it for invading UkraineBritish Prime Minister Boris JohnsonAdrian Dennis/Pool via REUTERS/File PhotoThe UK announced a new set of harsher sanctions on Russia after the country invaded Ukraine early Thursday. A spokesman for the UK government told journalists at a briefing that the UK plans to impose a second round of sanctions. The most intense of the new list of sanctions is an asset freeze on all major Russian banks and an asset freeze against VTB — the second largest bank with assets totaling £154 billion. The UK also plans to sanction another 100 individuals and entities.This is a large step up from the sanctions it announced Wednesday, which were limited to five smaller banks, three individuals close to Putin, and politicians in Russia who voted for military action. Russia has begun arresting anti-war protesters as demonstrations break out after Putin invades UkrainePolice officer detain a woman during an action against Russia's attack on Ukraine in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022.AP Photo/Dmitry SerebryakovThe Russian government on Thursday threatened anti-war protesters demonstrating against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, warning they could face arrest for organizing.And according to a protest monitoring group, the detentions have already begun as small protests have broken out in some Russian cities.Russia's Investigative Committee warned citizens in a statement not to take part in the "unauthorized" protests "associated with the tense foreign political situation."The committee said that people should be aware of the "negative legal consequences of these actions," which it said includes criminal liability. Read Full StoryUkraine's official Twitter is using memes to rip into Putin's bogus comparison between it and Nazi GermanyRussian President Vladimir Putin ordered troops into eastern Ukraine on Monday.Alexei Nikolsky/Associated PressAfter Russian President Vladimir Putin gave the marching orders for an attack on Ukraine early Thursday morning, Ukraine's official Twitter account got busy. One photo showed what appeared to be caricature images of Adolf Hitler tending to a small Putin. "This is not a 'meme', but our and your reality right now," Ukraine said in a follow-up tweet.  The account also called for a so-called "Twitter-storm" at 12 p.m. local time in Kyiv on Thursday, urging people to use various hashtags to "tell the world of the ongoing Russian aggression against Ukraine and the fact that Ukraine is under attack."Ukraine's latest post said to "Tag @Russia and tell them what you think about them," racking up tens of thousands of likes and quote tweets. Read Full StoryMap shows reported movement of Russian troops in Ukraine Thursday!function(){"use strict";window.addEventListener("message",(function(e){if(void 0!==e.data["datawrapper-height"]){var t=document.querySelectorAll("iframe");for(var a in e.data["datawrapper-height"])for(var r=0;r.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderFeb 24th, 2022

Sen. Tim Kaine, who was stuck in a winter storm traffic jam for 27 hours, jokes that talks on reforming Senate filibuster rules are going "slow as my commute"

Kaine was among hundreds of motorists trapped on Virginia's I-95 for over a day after a winter storm led to dangerous road conditions. U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA) arrives for a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Senate Budget Committee Democrats in the Mansfield Room at the U.S. Capitol building on June 16, 2021 in Washington, DC.Samuel Corum/Getty Images Sen. Tim Kaine joked that filibuster reform talks are going "as slow as my commute."  Kaine was among hundreds of motorists trapped on Virginia's I-95 due to dangerous weather.  The Virginia Democrat is part of a group working on reforming Senate rules to pass voting rights. Sen. Tim Kaine spent nearly 27 hours in his car amid freezing temperatures and dangerous driving conditions on his way to the US Capitol — only to return to find Senate Democrat's legislative agenda also on ice.The Virginia Democrat quipped to reporters on Wednesday that ongoing talks among Democrats on reforming the Senate filibuster rules to advance voting rights legislation are going "slow as my commute," according to CNN's Ali Zaslav. Kaine was among hundreds of motorists stranded on I-95 for over 24 hours after a heavy snowfall on Monday created dangerously icy conditions on the road, leading to accidents and a miles-long backup of cars. Sustained by only an orange and barely any sleep, the senator posted updates from his journey on Twitter until he finally arrived at the US Capitol on Tuesday afternoon. "At some point, it switched from a miserable travel day into a kind of a survival-mode day for me," Kaine, calling in to CNN from the road, said on Tuesday. "Now that I'm 90 minutes from the office, I plan on eating a lot and using the restroom as soon as I pull in."—Ali Zaslav (@alizaslav) January 5, 2022Democrats, including Kaine, have turned their focus to reforming the procedural rules governing the Senate in response to Republicans filibustering three major voting rights and democracy reform bills in 2021. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has pledged to hold a vote on yet-to-be-determined rules changes on or before Martin Luther King Jr. Day on January 17. The vast majority of legislation in the Senate requires a three-fifths majority under the current filibuster rules. Senate Democrats, including Schumer, have slammed their Republican colleagues for refusing to debate any voting rights legislation. The filibuster reforms being discussed include creating a carve out to allow voting rights legislation to pass with a simple majority, returning to the talking filibuster, and lowering the threshold on motions to proceed to debate legislation, according to Schumer.Democrats can invoke the so-called nuclear option as the late Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid did in 2013. The nuclear option allows a party to bypass traditional Senate procedure to change existing rules, like the filibuster, with only a simple majority.But Sen. Joe Manchin, a key swing vote who voted against that 2013 rule change, remains skeptical of making rules changes along party lines and is worried that lowering the filibuster threshold could backfire on Democrats when they're back in the minority. "It's very difficult, it's a heavy lift," Manchin told reporters outside his office on Tuesday. "Once you change rules or have a carve out … and I've always said this: Anytime there's a carve out, you eat the whole turkey, there's nothing left, because it comes back. So you want things that'll be sustainable."Sen. Krysten Sinema of Arizona, another Democrat who has echoed Manchin's concerns about a voting rights carve out, is also opposed to lowering the threshold to advance to debate below a three-fifths majority, Axios reports. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJan 5th, 2022

Manchin tanked Biden"s spending bill as payback for a White House statement he thought was rude to him, ally suggests

The West Virginia senator was reportedly annoyed that Biden released a statement singling him out for obstructing Biden's spending plans. Sen. Joe Manchin talks with reporters in the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, December 15, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images Sen. Joe Manchin tanked President Biden's spending plans in a stunning reversal on Sunday. In a Fox News appearance, Manchin said he objected to the size and scope of the $1.75T package. But a Manchin ally said he was also driven by a White House statement he felt was rude about him. Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin decided to tank President Joe Biden in response to a White House statement he felt was rude to him, an ally of the West Virginia senator said."I've tried everything humanly possible. I can't get there," Manchin told Fox News on Sunday when he announced he would not support the bill.He cited policy reasons for rather than anything personal.However, according to Steve Clemons, a Washington journalist who The New York Times said was close to Manchin, something else was afoot.President Biden had previous Thursday had released a statement singling out Manchin as a reason his Build Back Better spending package had not yet been passed. He warned that negotiations over the legislation would spill over into 2022.Clemons said that Manchin was furious to read the statement, feeling it put too much blame on him."Joe [Biden] and Joe [Manchin] were pulling in the same direction" in negotiations over the legislation, Clemons wrote in The Hill, until the Thursday statement was released. "But then – bang! – the White House released a statement blaming Manchin for the delay," he wrote."It tried to strike a positive tone about the future, but it targeted Manchin specifically and alone."Clemons added: "I know Manchin. He believes in civility above all things."By Friday, Manchin had scheduled the appearance on "Fox News Sunday" where he would make the bombshell announcement that he would not support the legislation, The New York Times reported.Insider asked Sen. Manchin's office whether the statement specifically had prompted him to schedule the appearance on Fox News but did not receive an immediate reply.Manchin on Monday sought to blame leaks from unnamed White House staff for his decision to stop negotiating over the bill. He declined to blame President Biden himself.The senator had reacted angrily after reports, based on leaked conversations last week, suggested he did not support the child tax credit as it stood in the bill."The bottom line is, there was basically — and it's staff. It's staff-driven. I understand staff. This is not the president. This is the staff," Manchin told a West Virginia radio station."And they drove some things, and they put some things out that were absolutely inexcusable. They know what it is, and that's it."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderDec 21st, 2021

Investors Bet Big on Climate Fight—But Activists Call for Scrutiny of Their Motives

(GLASGOW, Scotland) — Governments and big investors announced fresh steps Wednesday to pour trillions of dollars into curbing global warming, reflecting the financial world’s growing embrace of efforts to fight climate change as both a business necessity and opportunity. But some social justice activists called for scrutiny of investors’ motives, warning that the same financial… (GLASGOW, Scotland) — Governments and big investors announced fresh steps Wednesday to pour trillions of dollars into curbing global warming, reflecting the financial world’s growing embrace of efforts to fight climate change as both a business necessity and opportunity. But some social justice activists called for scrutiny of investors’ motives, warning that the same financial institutions that profited from funding fossil fuel firms were now being presented as green champions. There is a growing consensus that the private sector must be involved if the world is to avoid catastrophic global warming. Speaking at the U.N. climate summit in the Scottish city of Glasgow, Britain’s Treasury chief Rishi Sunak said that while countries such as the U.K. are providing fresh funds to help poor countries cope with climate change, “public investment alone isn’t enough.” [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] He lauded a pledge Wednesday by a group of over 450 major financial institutions to align their investments with the 2015 Paris climate accord — which calls for reducing carbon dioxide emissions and other efforts to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels. “This is a historic wall of capital for the net-zero transition around the world,” Sunak said at the conference known as COP26. The Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero — launched this year by former Bank of England chief Mark Carney — promised to follow scientific guidelines for cutting carbon emissions to “net zero” by 2050. That goal — which means limiting greenhouse gas emissions to the amount that can be absorbed again through natural or artificial ways — is increasingly being embraced by companies and governments around the world. Scientists say fossil fuel use has to drop drastically over the coming decade to achieve that goal, meaning investors would likely have to dramatically cut back money going to oil, gas and coal producers. “It is huge that financial institutions managing $130 trillion in assets are now leading the charge to a net-zero future,” said Helen Mountford, a senior climate expert at the World Resources Institute think tank. She said that mobilizing massive public and private finance will be key to tackling global warming. To that end, Sunak said U.K. financial institutions and publicly traded companies will be required to publish plans detailing how green their investments and their own businesses are — in order to ensure they’re actually contributing to reductions in global warming. As home to the City of London, one of the world’s major financial centers, the U.K. “has a responsibility to lead the way” in financing efforts to fight global warming, said Sunak, potentially becoming “the world’s first net-zero aligned financial center.” But James Thornton, founder of the environmental law charity ClientEarth, questioned how effective the U.K. effort would be. “The U.K. market is still hooked on fossil fuels,” he said, calling for a task force to ensure companies don’t “greenwash” their activities — that is, using high-profile announcements of so-called green initiatives to mask other “dirty” activities. Experts also caution there are various ways to calculate net zero — and deciding on one standard definition is one of the big challenges going forward. Some campaigners were distrustful of the motives of big investors in general. “Many of the financial institutions meeting today have made a killing from the climate and ecological crisis, and we should be deeply suspicious of any attempt to spin them as the heroes,” said Dorothy Guerrero, head of policy at the nongovernmental group Global Justice Now. “Governments must regulate the process and lead the transition, instead of just handing it over the corporations.” Speaking on the same panel as Sunak, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen described combatting climate change as both a huge financial challenge, with a price tag of $100 trillion, and “the greatest economic opportunity of our time.” “Many renewables are now cheaper than carbon-based fuel alternatives and have lower long-term operating costs,” she said. “In many cases, it’s simply cost effective to go green.” U.S. President Joe Biden issued an executive order earlier this year aimed at requiring companies to disclose climate-related financial risks. Biden’s climate envoy, John Kerry, said the announcement by big investors reflected a serious push by participants at the Glasgow conference to put in place concrete measures to address climate change. “This (conference) has greater energy, more focus, an intensity that I have not felt in any of the other” U.N. climate talks, he said. But enthusiasm about the meeting was dampened among poorer countries, who noted angrily that Britain and other wealthy countries have failed to meet a previous commitment to provide $100 billion a year to finance climate-related projects in the developing world by 2020. That target is now expected to be met in 2023......»»

Category: topSource: timeNov 3rd, 2021

10 Things in Politics: Team Pete squashes 2024 talk

And the White House press secretary, Jen Psaki, tests positive for the coronavirus. Welcome back to 10 Things in Politics. Sign up here to receive this newsletter. Plus, download Insider's app for news on the go - click here for iOS and here for Android. Send tips to bgriffiths@insider.com.Here's what we're talking about:Pete Buttigieg's people really don't want you to think he's running in 2024The Supreme Court is set to hear a challenge to Texas' abortion lawWhite House press secretary tests positive for coronavirusWith Phil Rosen. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg. AP Photo/Evan Vucci 1. ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL: Pete Buttigieg's allies would kindly like you to stop talking about 2024. No, seriously. Former staffers, advisors, and donors are issuing what's akin to a brushback pitch for their fellow Buttigieg supporters who had high hopes that the transportation secretary would step in if President Joe Biden were to opt against running for reelection.Here's the latest on the private chatter in Democratic circles:Buttigieg wants to play the long game: Some former top fundraisers have speculated that Buttigieg would challenge Vice President Kamala Harris for their party's nomination if Biden were to call it quits. Not so fast, say others in Buttigieg's orbit. After all, Buttigieg would be challenging the first female vice president, who by the nature of her office would be the most powerful woman and person of color to ever embark on a presidential campaign.Key quote: "Knowing Pete, he's like: 'Fuck no. I don't want to be that person,'" said a Democrat familiar with Buttigieg and Harris' relationship who has been in the room with the two.In the meantime, Buttigieg is trying to notch policy wins: He's been closely involved in the Biden administration's efforts to overhaul the nation's infrastructure. A separate dispute over Biden's massive spending proposal has delayed the bipartisan infrastructure plan's passage. But Democrats may try to pass both proposals this week. Then again, they have said that before.Read more about how others in Buttigieg's orbit are reacting to the 2024 chatter.2. Supreme Court to hear Texas abortion case: Justices later this morning are set to hear challenges to the state law that virtually ended legal abortions in Texas, the Associated Press reports. Texas' law is particularly controversial because of its enforcement mechanism and its lack of exceptions for rape or incest. This begins a pivotal month for the future of abortion rights. Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi welcoming US President Joe Biden during the welcome ceremony on the first day of the Rome G20 summit on Saturday. Antonio Masiello/Getty Images 3. Biden uses the G20 summit to pivot foreign policy: "Biden sought to reverse key policies and approaches of former President Trump during this weekend's summit of the Group of 20," The Washington Post reports. The US agreed to lift some tariffs on steel and aluminum, resolving a long-festering dispute with the European Union. Biden also met with allies to try to reinvigorate nuclear talks with Iran. The US and other G20 nations also endorsed a historic global corporate minimum tax. A senior administration official told reporters the allies were encouraging the administration to "lock in progress as much as possible" in case Donald Trump or another similar president took power. More on what's coming out of the G20.4. World leaders didn't agree on concrete climate goals: Leaders released a joint statement agreeing that "meaningful and effective" action was needed "by all countries" to prevent global temperatures from reaching more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, as previously set forth by the Paris agreement. The G20 statement came just before a crucial global climate summit in Scotland. More on the news.5. Terry McAuliffe and Glenn Youngkin race to the finish in Virginia: Both sides sought to squeeze some final momentum into the last weekend of campaigning in the closely watched governor's race, The New York Times reports. Youngkin, the Republican challenger, greeted crowds of 1,000 or more supporters while McAuliffe, a Democratic former governor, held more sparsely attended events. Democrats are encouraged by the more than 1.1 million Virginians who have voted early, but it remains to be seen whether Youngkin's more-energetic supporters will eclipse any lead on Election Day. Here's where things stand on the ground in Virginia.6. Law enforcement failed to see red flags before January 6: "Alerts were raised by local officials, FBI informants, social-media companies, former national security officials, researchers, lawmakers, and tipsters, new documents and firsthand accounts show," The Washington Post reports in a massive new investigation based on interviews with more than 230 people and thousands of court documents. The FBI was inundated with alerts of people vowing violence at the Capitol, but the bureau largely regarded many of the posts as protected by the First Amendment. FBI senior leaders were also worried any public statements by FBI Director Chris Wray might be "asking for a desperate president to come after him," as one source told the paper. Read more of the jaw-dropping details, including how Parler tried for months to warn federal officials.Related: Journalists describe in vivid detail how January 6 shredded the rule that reporters shouldn't become the story7. American Airlines cancels hundreds of flights: As of Sunday morning, nearly 900 American Airlines flights were delayed and more than 1,500 were canceled since Friday, representing approximately 9% of the airline's total. The company blamed bad weather at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, its largest hub. But overall, as The Wall Street Journal points out, airlines are struggling to restaff to their pre-pandemic levels, which has only compounded any weather or technical problems. More on the issues that are disrupting air travel.8. Former Google CEO expresses concern about Facebook's metaverse: Eric Schmidt told The Times that while he believed the technology would soon "be everywhere," he argued it was "not necessarily the best thing for human society." Schmidt said he viewed artificial-intelligence technology, which the company now known as Meta uses to run a majority of its platforms' algorithms, as a "giant, false god" that can create unhealthy and parasocial relationships. The former Google executive isn't alone in his concerns about AI.9. White House press secretary tests positive for coronavirus: Jen Psaki said she decided not to travel with Biden on Wednesday after some members of her family tested positive for the coronavirus. She added that she had been isolating since then and tested negative every day from Wednesday to Saturday before testing positive on Sunday. Psaki last saw Biden on Tuesday, when they sat outside, more than 6 feet apart, and wore masks. More on the news.10. The best Halloween costumes from the world of sports: Aaron Rodgers grew out his hair to be John Wick. While LeBron James went all out to become Freddy Krueger. Check out how other star athletes spent the holiday.But we all know Steve Buscemi won the night.Today's trivia question: Which building housed the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence before they were moved to the National Archives? Email your answer and a suggested question to me at bgriffiths@insider.com.Friday's answer: JFK was the first president to fly in a plane specifically built for the commander in chief.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 1st, 2021

10 Things in Politics: Campaigns get into bitcoin

And one of the highest-ranking House Republicans refuses to say Trump legitimately lost. Welcome back to 10 Things in Politics. Sign up here to receive this newsletter. Plus, download Insider's app for news on the go - click here for iOS and here for Android. Send tips to bgriffiths@insider.com.Here's what we're talking about:Altcoins and bitcoin are campaign fuel for these 17 crypto-minded politicians and political groupsHigh-ranking House Republican refuses to say Trump legitimately lostFauci says it's safe for children to trick-or-treat on HalloweenWith Phil Rosen. Avishek Das/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty 1. ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL: Politicians are cashing in on the crypto boom. A growing number of candidates and political groups are interested in accepting bitcoin and altcoins. The only problem is that federal law in this area leaves a lot of open questions.Here's what you need to know:Campaigns can legally accept bitcoin: The Federal Election Commission, the agency tasked with overseeing federal elections, established this right in 2014. But its guidance on the subject leaves a lot of ambiguity, including over whether campaigns can use cryptocurrency to buy goods and services and whether it's legal to accept more than $100 worth of bitcoin. To further complicate matters, the guidance is so outdated that it applies only to bitcoin, not any of the many other cryptocurrencies like dogecoin.Things get even messier when it comes to super PACs: The FEC doesn't say whether super PACs, which may legally accept unlimited amounts of money to advocate or oppose politicians, can also accept unlimited amounts of crypto.Politicians are moving ahead anyway: The NRCC, House Republicans' campaign arm, became the first national party committee to accept crypto. It is able to get around the $100 question by converting any crypto donations into cash before it hits its account.The Yang Gang is joining too: The former Democratic presidential hopeful Andrew Yang, who just started a third party called the Forward Party, has pledged that his outfit will accept crypto too. He plans to use BitPay, which is what the NRCC uses too.Read more about how Washington is getting into crypto, including how every lawmaker has already received $50 worth of bitcoin.2. Hundreds of thousands of US troops are not fully vaccinated: Sizable portions of the military are not vaccinated even as deadlines approach for the Pentagon's COVID-19 vaccine mandate, The Washington Post reports. The vaccination rate varies within different branches and military segments. The Post, for example, found 90% of the active-duty Navy was fully vaccinated but just 72% of the Marine Corps was. The reserves and the National Guard have large numbers of unvaccinated troops. Officials say part of the delay is due to different deadlines for the services. More on the concerns about how the lagging vaccination rates will affect troop readiness.3. Taliban says US will provide humanitarian aid to Afghans: The Taliban made the claim after the first direct talks between the US and the militants since American forces withdrew, the Associated Press reports. The US appeared to confirm only that humanitarian aid had been discussed. The US is also yet to recognize the Taliban as the legitimate leaders of Afghanistan. Here's where things stand as the two sides grapple with Afghanistan's future.4. High-ranking House Republican refuses to say Trump lost: House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, the No. 2 House Republican, refused to say Joe Biden fairly won the 2020 US presidential election almost a year after it took place. Fox News' Chris Wallace repeatedly pressed Scalise on whether he believed Donald Trump's baseless claims of widespread voter fraud. Scalise refused to give a direct answer. More on what this means for the state of the GOP.5. Southwest cancels more than 1,000 flights: The airline had canceled nearly a third of its daily schedule as of early last night, the highest rate of any major US airline, the Associated Press reports. Southwest cited air-traffic-control issues and weather delays, but analysts are speculating about other possibilities, including that the airline might've scheduled too many flights and that some pilots were protesting the company's COVID-19 vaccine mandate. The union representing Southwest pilots, which is suing the airline over its pandemic policies, denied pilots were staging a protest. More on what the fallout may be for a major airline. Pool / Pool/ Getty Images 6. Fauci says Americans should enjoy trick-or-treating: Dr. Anthony Fauci on Sunday said COVID-19 cases in the US were headed in the "right direction" and Americans should feel free to enjoy outdoor Halloween festivities like trick-or-treating. He also cautioned against prematurely declaring victory over the pandemic, however, noting that past surges had sprung up after relative lulls. More on what Fauci thinks about where things stand.7. Prosecutors say a Navy nuclear engineer tried to pass secrets via a sandwich: Jonathan Toebbe is accused of attempting to sell classified data about nuclear submarines to someone he thought was a foreign agent - by popping the intel into an SD card and slotting it into a peanut-butter sandwich. "I believe this information will be of great value to your nation. This is not a hoax," prosecutors say Toebbe wrote in one message to someone he thought was a foreign intelligence agent. Instead, the FBI was on the receiving end. More on the wild details of the espionage-related charges.8. Police arrest three men after a deadly St. Paul shooting: Officers found 15 people injured when they responded to what was described as a "hellish" scene at a bar in Minnesota early Sunday morning. Fourteen people were sent to nearby hospitals, and a woman described to be in her 20s died. Here's the latest.9. Ivanka Trump nearly led the World Bank, report says: Donald Trump wanted to name his daughter to lead the World Bank in 2019, but then-Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin intervened to block the appointment, The Intercept reports. "It came incredibly close to happening," a source told the publication. More on the episode. "Squid Game." Netflix 10. The popularity of "Squid Game" has stunned Hollywood: The South Korean series has become extraordinarily popular, reaching No. 1 in 90 countries in 10 days, and Netflix co-CEO Ted Sarandos said early on that it was likely to unseat "Bridgerton" as the streamer's all-time most popular series. Netflix did little to market the show outside Asia, relying on its recommendation engine, social media, and word of mouth to get audiences to watch what has become a worldwide hit. Read more about how "Squid Game" is spawning memes and increased costume sales.Speaking of merch: Walmart is partnering with Netflix to sell merchandise related to "Squid Game," "Stranger Things," "Ada Twist," and more. Alas, "Squid Game" tracksuits won't be available until later this year.Today's trivia question: Today marks the anniversary of when former President Jimmy Carter won the Nobel Peace Prize. Who was the first president to win the high honor? (ICYMI: This year's prize went to two outspoken critical journalists from the Philippines and Russia.) bgriffiths@insider.com.Friday's answer: A reproduction of Modigliani's "Woman with a Fan" is shown in 2012's "Skyfall," the third installment in Daniel Craig's turn as James Bond. In reality, the painting was one of five stolen during a daring art heist from Paris' Musée d'Art Moderne in 2010. The thief, who stole the paintings worth an estimated $110 million, and two of his accomplices have been sentenced to prison. The art is still missing.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytOct 11th, 2021