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Saturday links: impromptu fun

On Saturdays we catch up with the non-finance related items that we didn’t get to earlier in the week. You can check... AutosWhat it means if California bans the sale of new ICE vehicles by 2035. (newatlas.com)Bigger tires make for lower mileage and range. (bloomberg.com)Why people continue to drive on suspended licenses. (curbed.com)TransportPilot Co., which operates Pilot and Flying J travel centers, is buying a stake in autonomous truck startup Kodiak Robotics Inc. (washingtonpost.com)Wanna hit the rich? Tax private jet travel. (axios.com)Can batteries ever power container ships? (wisdomtree.com)Electric delivery vans are a no-brainer. (wired.com)EnergyJapan is making a major shift toward nuclear energy. (asia.nikkei.com)European data centers are making plans for electricity outages this winter. (ft.com)EnvironmentLiving in the American West means living with smoke. (nytimes.com)Central China is experiencing an epic heat wave/drought. (axios.com)Managed retreat isn't easy but is going to be increasingly necessary. (nytimes.com)Atmospheric methane levels are on the rise. (ft.com)BehaviorWhat to do if you catch yourself grinding. (every.to)How to enjoy a party as an introvert. (vox.com)Fear of failure boosts performance. (onlinelibrary.wiley.com)How to avoid the envy trap. (radreads.co)In praise of spontaneity. (artofmanliness.com)PsychdelicsA psilocybin-trial show promise in helping treat alcohol addiction. (statnews.com)How psychdelic experiences can lessen fears of death. (sciencedaily.com)CovidThe U.S. is still relying on vaccines to do a lot of heavy lifting. (theatlantic.com)The incubation period for Omicron is much shorter than previous variants. (fortune.com)People are more likely to get vaccinated if they know some one who has died. (papers.ssrn.com)Putting some numbers on the effect of employer vaccine mandates. (papers.ssrn.com)We're still not spending enough on improved ventilation. (vox.com)HealthWhy dealing with chronic disease is so challenging. (statnews.com)The health case for drinking more water. (theconversation.com)Communicating about viral transmission is no easy feat. (axios.com)FitnessOn the benefits of combining weight training and aerobic exercise. (nytimes.com)Why we as a society tend to cycle through fitness fads. (vox.com)SleepDoes taping your mouth shut at night actually work? (wsj.com)Compulsive phone use is robbing people of sleep. (nber.org)FoodHow water shortages are going to affect food prices. (vox.com)Cow's milk has some key micronutrients plant-based milk don't. (newscientist.com)Large scale organic farming is a bit of an oxymoron. (modernfarmer.com)Why veganism isn't wholly sustainable. (theatlantic.com)Americans are consuming more honey. (fooddive.com)Americans are going crazy for pickles. (theconversation.com)SportsThe Dallas Cowboys once again top the list of the most valuable NFL franchises at $8 billion. (forbes.com)Chess.com is buying Magnus Carlsen's online platform. (frontofficesports.com)MediaNew York City may be back, but the performing arts are still struggling. (nytimes.com)How A24 has become a powerful brand. (vulture.com)On the unique joy of watching a movie on an airplane. (theatlantic.com)CollegeHow colleges are using data to help students navigate through graduation. (wsj.com)Men don't seem to be helped by college interventions, like free tuition. (marginalrevolution.com)The U.S. is still dealing with a surplus of humanities majors. (noahpinion.substack.com)Future ProofWhy you should get off the fence to attend the Future Proof festival. (blairbellecurve.com)Future Proof is almost here! Why it is unlike any finance conference ever. (ritholtz.com)Future Proof is likely the 'best advisor event of the year.' (theirrelevantinvestor.com)Why Future Proof is a one-of-a-kind event. (tonyisola.com)Earlier on Abnormal ReturnsWhat you missed in our Friday linkfest. (abnormalreturns.com)Podcast links: the American dream. (abnormalreturns.com)Be careful relying on future generations to implement your philanthropic goals. (abnormalreturns.com)Are you a financial adviser looking for some out-of-the-box thinking? Then check out our weekly e-mail newsletter. (newsletter.abnormalreturns.com)Mixed mediaWhy some people like to go into the office on Fridays. (wsj.com)CloudKitchens is getting push back from former operators. (eater.com)The national teacher shortage story is overblown. (theatlantic.com).....»»

Category: blogSource: abnormalreturnsAug 27th, 2022Related News

Elite San Francisco School Sees Record D"s And F"s After Ditching "Racist" Merit-Based Admissions

Elite San Francisco School Sees Record D's And F's After Ditching 'Racist' Merit-Based Admissions A record number of freshman students at San Francisco's elite Lowell High School earned D and F grades this past fall - the first semester after the school board eliminated merit-based admissions that were deemed "racist" by former SF Board of Education Commissioner, Alison Collins - who was ousted along with two other school board members in a February recall over the admissions debate and other issues - including a series of 2016 tweets by Collins targeting Asian Americans. Of the 620 freshman students at Lowell, 24.4% received at least one D or F during the fall semester, which compared with just 7.9% of first-year students in fall 2020 and 7.7% in fall 2019, according to internal SF Unified School District figures obtained by the San Francisco Chronicle. Overall, the number of 9th graders at Lowell with a D or F tripled from 51 in 2020 to 152 in 2021 - bringing the figures closer to those at other high schools in the city. Lowell students in grades 10 through 12 - who were admitted under the old merit-based system, saw a "slight" drop in grades over the same time period, while other city high schools did not see similar rises in D's and F's. In fact, freshman receiving low grades at other schools declined citywide between fall 2019 and 2021. The lower grades, while expected by many, are likely to become part of a fervid debate over Lowell that touches on race, equity and achievement. The grades raise questions about how students — and the school’s teachers and administrators — are adapting to the changes. However, it’s unclear exactly how much the change in admissions policy factored into the rise in D’s and F’s among Lowell’s ninth-graders, compared with other possible factors such as the pandemic. -SF Chronicle In 2020, Collins notably said merit-based achievement and standardized testing are "racist systems" and the "antithesis of fair" - prompting the school to change their admissions policy to a lottery system similar to all other SF city high schools, vs. test scores and grades. However, many parents I've spoken to disagree with that framing, pointing out that academic achievement shouldn’t be demonized. Other parents I've heard from say reform is needed but that the process shouldn’t be rushed and that community input is needed. (4/7) — Sophie Bearman (@stbearman) February 2, 2021 After the school dropped merit-based admissions, Lowell High accepted fewer asian (-4.4%) and white students (-6.5%), and more hispanic (+10%) and black students (+2.9%). According to outgoing Lowell High principal Joe Ryan Dominguez, there are "way too many variables that contributed" to the rise. "Over a year of distance learning, half of our student body new to in-person instruction at the high school level and absences among students/staff for COVID all explain this dip in performance," he said - without addressing the fact that students admitted under the merit-based system were doing better than those admitted under the lottery. "It is important not to insinuate a cause on such a sensitive topic at the risk of shaming our students and teachers who have worked very hard in a difficult year." Pressured by the pandemic, the school board approved a fast-tracked switch from merit- to lottery-based admissions at Lowell starting this school year, citing COVID disruptions to the tests and grades that underpin applications to the school. Lowell’s freshman class this year was the most diverse in decades, with more Black and Latino students. Both before and since the board’s decision, Lowell’s students, parents, educators and alumni have been locked in a debate over how the school should admit its students in the future. Lowell has long been one of the top performing public schools in the country, whose alumni include prominent figures in politics, entertainment, literature and science. It’s viewed as a high-pressure launchpad to elite colleges and has offered more advanced placement courses than other San Francisco high schools. -SF Chronicle Those opposed to the new lottery-based system say it disproportionately hurts Asian American students, who were 'overrepresented' at Lowell vs. other SFUSD schools, and that it ignores the benefits of a competitive school afforded to high-achievers. During a Tuesday school board meeting, departing district Superintendent Vincent Matthews proposed extending the lottery-based admissions system at Lowell through the 2023-2024 school year while the district launches a public process to determine a long-term solution. Tyler Durden Mon, 05/30/2022 - 19:45.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytMay 30th, 2022Related News

Bank Pictet & Cie (asia) Ltd Buys BTC iShares MSCI India ETF, Target Corp, Meta Platforms ...

Related Stocks: FB, WH, CRM, MCO, WYNN, INDA, TGT, BABA, TASK, EXAS, AMD, CTXS, LVS, QQQ, VRTX, AKAM,.....»»

Category: blogSource: gurufocusNov 12th, 2021Related News

California"s Attempt To Hobble Gifted Students Over "Racial Disparities" Starting To Backfire

California's Attempt To Hobble Gifted Students Over 'Racial Disparities' Starting To Backfire California's attempts to eliminate accelerated math courses for gifted students was a terrible idea from the beginning. Now it's beginning to backfire. Critics of the draft said the authors were punishing high achievers.Credit...Jim Wilson/The New York Times Premised on the absurd notion that naturally gifted asian and white students simply have better opportunities than black and brown students - as opposed to differences in study habits, parental involvement, and cultural values - a draft plan to overhaul how math is taught across the state has set off a fierce debate, according to the NY Times. Source The draft proposal rejects the notion that some students are naturally gifted, and recommends against shifting certain students into gifted programs in middle school. It also proposes that math should not be 'colorblind' - and that teachers should use math lessons to explore social justice, "for example, by looking out for gender stereotypes in word problems, or applying math concepts to topics like immigration or inequality." What? Enter the backlash... Critics - including hundreds of Californians working in STEM fields who signed an open letter opposing the plan - say it would punish high achieving students by limiting options gifted programs. According to the letter, the draft constitutes "an endless river of new pedagogical fads that effectively distort and displace actual math." Even in heavily Democratic California — a state with six million public school students and an outsize influence on textbook publishing nationwide — the draft guidelines encountered scathing criticism, with charges that the framework would inject “woke” politics into a subject that is supposed to be practical and precise. The battle over math pedagogy is a tale as old as multiplication tables. An idea called “new math,” pitched as a more conceptual approach to the subject, had its heyday in the 1960s. About a decade ago, amid debates over the national Common Core standards, many parents bemoaned math exercises that they said seemed to dump line-by-line computation in favor of veritable hieroglyphs. -NYT "Math is math. Two plus two equals four," said Williamson M. Evers, a senior fellow at the Independent Institute and a former official with the Education Department during the administration of George W. Bush. Will the adults in the room prevail? Tyler Durden Sat, 11/06/2021 - 22:30.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytNov 6th, 2021Related News

2 Killed, 4 Wounded, Including Local Cop, During Mass Shooting In Boise

2 Killed, 4 Wounded, Including Local Cop, During Mass Shooting In Boise Even as the US national murder rate climbed substantially during 2020 as the pandemic transformed American society into a pressure cooker, school shootings still haven't made a comeback. In fact, they've been far less infrequent this year.  However, while school shootings have fallen in frequency, a different type of spree killer has emerged, exemplified by the disgruntled self-professed sex addict murdered a bunch of mostly asian massage parlor workers. The shooter, who is now in custody, killed two people and injured four, including a police officer, in a shooting at a shopping mall Monday in Boise Idaho. Authorities said officers exchanged gunfire with the suspect, during the news conference. The majority of the mall had been cleared, but police were still looking for any additional victims. Police didn't release any other information, saying the investigation was ongoing, and asked police to avoid the area. Police didn't provide any additional information about the incident to the press, they were interviewing dozens of people outside the entrance to Macy's, one of five large department stores at the mall, which has 153 stores in all. Police are also investigating another crime scene that occurred nearby: there's no clue yet as to whether they're related. Cheri Gypin, of Boise, was in the mall with a friend where they walk for an hour three or four times a week. She said she heard several large bangs, but thought something had fallen from the ceiling. Then about 60 people, including families pushing strollers, came running at them, some of them shouting that there was an active shooter. "My friend was trying to process it," said Gypin, 60. "I just looked at her and said, 'We've got to run.' So we just ran and kept running until we got to the outer perimeter of the parking lot." They made their way back to their car, where police told the crowd of people who had fled the mall to leave the parking area. Calls of shots fired with one person down came in at 1:50 p.m. from the Boise Towne Square Mall, Boise Police Chief Ryan Lee said at a press conference. Lee said it “would be premature to make assumptions,” of the shooter’s motive, and the investigation is ongoing.The chief refused to take additional questions from the media. "I cannot stress enough how traumatic this event is for the community at large as well as for those that were witnesses or are the families of all who were involved," Ryan said. No information on the identities of the victims or shooter has been released. We now await more details about the shootingl Tyler Durden Mon, 10/25/2021 - 20:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeOct 25th, 2021Related News

Teen Vogue"s incoming editor-in-chief has resigned after old anti-Asian tweets sparked a staff backlash

Alexi McCammond tweeted in 2011: "Now googling how to not wake up with swollen, asian eyes…," The Daily Beast reported. Alexi McCammond .....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytMar 18th, 2021Related News

The Whirr Of Helicopter Blades: Regime Change Is Coming

The Whirr Of Helicopter Blades: Regime Change Is Coming Authored by Peter Tasker via PeterTasker.asia, "The coronavirus pandemic is a public health emergency. But it is also an economic e.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeMar 21st, 2020Related News

Morgan Stanley asian financial analysts to hold analyst/industry conference call

See the rest of the story here. Theflyonthewall.com provides the latest financial news as it breaks. Known as a leader in market intelligence, The Fl.....»»

Category: blogSource: theflyonthewallFeb 13th, 2020Related News