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OLED DDI supply may fall short of demand in 2022

OLED display driver ICs (DDI) supply may fall short of demand in 2022, with the chip shortage likely to disrupt shipments for smartphones, according to industry sources......»»

Category: topSource: digitimesNov 25th, 2021

Futures Surge After Powell-Driven Rout Proves To Be "Transitory"

Futures Surge After Powell-Driven Rout Proves To Be "Transitory" Heading into yesterday's painful close to one of the ugliest months since March 2020, which saw a huge forced liquidation rebalance with more than $8 billion in Market on Close orders, we said that while we are seeing "forced selling dump into the close today" this would be followed by "forced Dec 1 buying frontrunning after the close." Forced selling dump into the close today. Forced Dec 1 buying frontrunning after the close — zerohedge (@zerohedge) November 30, 2021 And just as expected, despite yesterday's dramatic hawkish pivot by Powell, who said it was time to retire the word transitory in describing the inflation outlook (the same word the Fed used hundreds of times earlier in 2021 sparking relentless mockery from this website for being clueless as usual) while also saying the U.S. central bank would consider bringing forward plans for tapering its bond buying program at its next meeting in two weeks, the frontrunning of new monthly inflows is in full force with S&P futures rising over 1.2%, Nasdaq futures up 1.3%, and Dow futures up 0.9%, recovering almost all of Tuesday’s decline. The seemingly 'hawkish' comments served as a double whammy for markets, which were already nervous about the spread of the Omicron coronavirus variant and its potential to hinder a global economic recovery. "At this point, COVID does not appear to be the biggest long-term Street fear, although it could have the largest impact if the new (or next) variant turns out to be worse than expected," Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst for S&P and Dow Jones indices, said in a note. "That honor goes to inflation, which continues to be fed by supply shortages, labor costs, worker shortages, as well as consumers, who have not pulled back." However, new month fund flows proved too powerful to sustain yesterday's month-end dump and with futures rising - and panic receding - safe havens were sold and the 10-year Treasury yield jumped almost 6bps, approaching 1.50%. The gap between yields on 5-year and 30-year Treasuries was around the narrowest since March last year. Crude oil and commodity-linked currencies rebounded. Gold remained just under $1,800 and bitcoin traded just over $57,000. There was more good news on the covid front with a WHO official saying some of the early indications are that most Omicron cases are mild with no severe cases. Separately Merck gained 3.8% in premarket trade after a panel of advisers to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration narrowly voted to recommend the agency authorize the drugmaker's antiviral pill to treat COVID-19. Travel and leisure stocks also rebounded, with cruiseliners Norwegian, Carnival, Royal Caribbean rising more than 2.5% each. Easing of covid fears also pushed airlines and travel stocks higher in premarket trading: Southwest +2.9%, Delta +2.5%, Spirit +2.3%, American +2.2%, United +1.9%, JetBlue +1.3%. Vaccine makers traded modestly lower in pre-market trading after soaring in recent days as Wall Street weighs the widening spread of the omicron variant. Merck & Co. bucked the trend after its Covid-19 pill narrowly gained a key recommendation from advisers to U.S. regulators. Moderna slips 2.1%, BioNTech dips 1.3% and Pfizer is down 0.2%. Elsewhere, Occidental Petroleum led gains among the energy stocks, up 3.2% as oil prices climbed over 4% ahead of OPEC's meeting. Shares of major Wall Street lenders also moved higher after steep falls on Tuesday. Here are some of the other biggest U.S. movers today: Salesforce (CRM US) drops 5.9% in premarket trading after results and guidance missed estimates, with analysts highlighting currency-related headwinds and plateauing growth at the MuleSoft integration software business. Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE US) falls 1.3% in premarket after the computer equipment maker’s quarterly results showed the impact of the global supply chain crunch. Analysts noted solid order trends. Merck (MRK US) shares rise 5.8% in premarket after the company’s Covid-19 pill narrowly wins backing from FDA advisers, which analysts say is a sign of progress despite lingering challenges. Chinese electric vehicle makers were higher in premarket, leading U.S. peers up, after Nio, Li and XPeng reported strong deliveries for November; Nio (NIO US) +4%, Li (LI US ) +6%, XPeng (XPEV US) +4.3%. Ardelyx (ARDX US) shares gain as much as 34% in premarket, extending the biotech’s bounce after announcing plans to launch its irritable bowel syndrome treatment Ibsrela in the second quarter. CTI BioPharma (CTIC US) shares sink 18% in premarket after the company said the FDA extended the review period for a new drug application for pacritinib. Allbirds (BIRD US) fell 7.5% postmarket after the low end of the shoe retailer’s 2021 revenue forecast missed the average analyst estimate. Zscaler (ZS US) posted “yet another impressive quarter,” according to BMO. Several analysts increased their price targets for the security software company. Shares rose 4.6% in postmarket. Ambarella (AMBA US) rose 14% in postmarket after forecasting revenue for the fourth quarter that beat the average analyst estimate. Emcore (EMKR US) fell 9% postmarket after the aerospace and communications supplier reported fiscal fourth-quarter Ebitda that missed the average analyst estimate. Box (BOX US) shares gained as much as 10% in postmarket trading after the cloud company raised its revenue forecast for the full year. Meanwhile, the omicron variant continues to spread around the globe, though symptoms so far appear to be relatively mild. The Biden administration plans to tighten rules on travel to the U.S., and Japan said it would bar foreign residents returning from 10 southern African nations. As Bloomberg notes, volatility is buffeting markets as investors scrutinize whether the pandemic recovery can weather diminishing monetary policy support and potential risks from the omicron virus variant. Global manufacturing activity stabilized last month, purchasing managers’ gauges showed Wednesday, and while central banks are scaling back ultra-loose settings, financial conditions remain favorable in key economies. “The reality is hotter inflation coupled with a strong economic backdrop could end the Fed’s bond buying program as early as the first quarter of next year,” Charlie Ripley, senior investment strategist at Allianz Investment Management, said in emailed comments. “With potential changes in policy on the horizon, market participants should expect additional market volatility in this uncharted territory.” Looking ahead, Powell is back on the Hill for day 2, and is due to testify before a House Financial Services Committee hybrid hearing at 10 a.m. ET. On the economic data front, November readings on U.S. private payrolls and manufacturing activity will be closely watched later in the day to gauge the health of the American economy. Investors are also awaiting the Fed's latest "Beige Book" due at 2:00 p.m. ET. On the economic data front, November readings on U.S. private payrolls and manufacturing activity will be closely watched later in the day to gauge the health of the American economy. European equities soared more than 1.2%, with travel stocks and carmakers leading broad-based gain in the Stoxx Europe 600 index, all but wiping out Tuesday’s decline that capped only the third monthly loss for the benchmark this year.  Travel, miners and autos are the strongest sectors. Here are some of the biggest European movers today: Proximus shares rise as much as 6.5% after the company said it’s started preliminary talks regarding a potential deal involving TeleSign, with a SPAC merger among options under consideration. Dr. Martens gains as much as 4.6% to the highest since Sept. 8 after being upgraded to overweight from equal- weight at Barclays, which says the stock’s de-rating is overdone. Husqvarna advances as much as 5.3% after the company upgraded financial targets ahead of its capital markets day, including raising the profit margin target to 13% from 10%. Wizz Air, Lufthansa and other travel shares were among the biggest gainers as the sector rebounded after Tuesday’s losses; at a conference Wizz Air’s CEO reiterated expansion plans. Wizz Air gains as much as 7.5%, Lufthansa as much as 6.8% Elis, Accor and other stocks in the French travel and hospitality sector also rise after the country’s government pledged to support an industry that’s starting to get hit by the latest Covid-19 wave. Pendragon climbs as much as 6.5% after the car dealer boosted its outlook after the company said a supply crunch in the new vehicle market wasn’t as bad as it had anticipated. UniCredit rises as much as 3.6%, outperforming the Stoxx 600 Banks Index, after Deutsche Bank added the stock to its “top picks” list alongside UBS, and Bank of Ireland, Erste, Lloyds and Societe Generale. Earlier in the session, Asian stocks also soared, snapping a three-day losing streak, led by energy and technology shares, as traders assessed the potential impact from the omicron coronavirus variant and U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell’s hawkish pivot. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index rose as much as 1.3% Wednesday. South Korea led regional gains after reporting strong export figures, which bolsters growth prospects despite record domestic Covid-19 cases. Hong Kong stocks also bounced back after falling Tuesday to their lowest level since September 2020. Asia’s stock benchmark rebounded from a one-year low, though sentiment remained clouded by lingering concerns on the omicron strain and Fed’s potentially faster tapering pace. Powell earlier hinted that the U.S. central bank will accelerate its asset purchases at its meeting later this month.  “A faster taper in the U.S. is still dependent on omicron not causing a big setback to the outlook in the next few weeks,” said Shane Oliver, head of investment strategy and chief economist at AMP Capital, adding that he expects the Fed’s policy rate “will still be low through next year, which should still enable good global growth which will benefit Asia.” Chinese equities edged up after the latest economic data showed manufacturing activity remained at relatively weak levels in November, missing economists’ expectations. Earlier, Chinese Vice Premier Liu He said he’s fully confident in the nation’s economic growth in 2022 Japanese stocks rose, overcoming early volatility as traders parsed hawkish comments from Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell. Electronics and auto makers were the biggest boosts to the Topix, which closed 0.4% higher after swinging between a gain of 0.9% and loss of 0.7% in the morning session. Daikin and Fanuc were the largest contributors to a 0.4% rise in the Nikkei 225, which similarly fluctuated. The Topix had dropped 4.8% over the previous three sessions due to concerns over the omicron virus variant. The benchmark fell 3.6% in November, its worst month since July 2020. “The market’s tolerance to risk is quite low at the moment, with people responding in a big way to the smallest bit of negative news,” said Tomo Kinoshita, a global market strategist at Invesco Asset Management in Tokyo. “But the decline in Japanese equities was far worse than those of other developed markets, so today’s market may find a bit of calm.” U.S. shares tumbled Tuesday after Powell said officials should weigh removing pandemic support at a faster pace and retired the word “transitory” to describe stubbornly high inflation In rates, bonds trade heavy, as yield curves bear-flatten. Treasuries extended declines with belly of the curve cheapening vs wings as traders continue to price in additional rate-hike premium over the next two years. Treasury yields were cheaper by up to 5bp across belly of the curve, cheapening 2s5s30s spread by ~5.5bp on the day; 10-year yields around 1.48%, cheaper by ~4bp, while gilts lag by additional 2bp in the sector. The short-end of the gilt curve markedly underperforms bunds and Treasuries with 2y yields rising ~11bps near 0.568%. Peripheral spreads widen with belly of the Italian curve lagging. The flattening Treasury yield curve “doesn’t suggest imminent doom for the equity market in and of itself,” Liz Ann Sonders, chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab & Co., said on Bloomberg Television. “Alarm bells go off in terms of recession” when the curve gets closer to inverting, she said. In FX, the Turkish lira had a wild session, offered in early London trade before fading. USD/TRY dropped sharply to lows of 12.4267 on reports of central bank FX intervention due to “unhealthy price formations” before, once again, fading TRY strength after comments from Erdogan. The rest of G-10 FX is choppy; commodity currencies retain Asia’s bid tone, havens are sold: the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index inched lower, as the greenback traded mixed versus its Group-of-10 peers. The euro moved in a narrow range and Bund yields followed U.S. yields higher. The pound advanced as risk sentiment stabilized with focus still on news about the omicron variant. The U.K. 10-, 30-year curve flirted with inversion as gilts flattened, with money markets betting on 10bps of BOE tightening this month for the first time since Friday. The Australian and New Zealand dollars advanced as rising commodity prices fuel demand from exporters and leveraged funds. Better-than-expected growth data also aided the Aussie, with GDP expanding by 3.9% in the third quarter from a year earlier, beating the 3% estimated by economists. Austrian lawmakers extended a nationwide lockdown for a second 10-day period to suppress the latest wave of coronavirus infections before the Christmas holiday period.  The yen declined by the most among the Group-of-10 currencies as Powell’s comments renewed focus on yield differentials. 10-year yields rose ahead of Thursday’s debt auction In commodities, crude futures rally. WTI adds over 4% to trade on a $69-handle, Brent recovers near $72.40 after Goldman said overnight that oil had gotten extremely oversold. Spot gold fades a pop higher to trade near $1,785/oz. Base metals trade well with LME copper and nickel outperforming. Looking at the day ahead, once again we’ll have Fed Chair Powell and Treasury Secretary Yellen appearing, this time before the House Financial Services Committee. In addition to that, the Fed will be releasing their Beige Book, and BoE Governor Bailey is also speaking. On the data front, the main release will be the manufacturing PMIs from around the world, but there’s also the ADP’s report of private payrolls for November in the US, the ISM manufacturing reading in the US as well for November, and German retail sales for October. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures up 1.2% to 4,620.75 STOXX Europe 600 up 1.0% to 467.58 MXAP up 0.9% to 191.52 MXAPJ up 1.1% to 626.09 Nikkei up 0.4% to 27,935.62 Topix up 0.4% to 1,936.74 Hang Seng Index up 0.8% to 23,658.92 Shanghai Composite up 0.4% to 3,576.89 Sensex up 1.0% to 57,656.51 Australia S&P/ASX 200 down 0.3% to 7,235.85 Kospi up 2.1% to 2,899.72 Brent Futures up 4.2% to $72.15/bbl Gold spot up 0.2% to $1,778.93 U.S. Dollar Index little changed at 95.98 German 10Y yield little changed at -0.31% Euro down 0.1% to $1.1326 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken will meet Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov Thursday, the first direct contact between officials of the two countries in weeks as tensions grow amid western fears Russia may be planning to invade Ukraine Oil rebounded from a sharp drop on speculation that recent deep losses were excessive and OPEC+ may on Thursday decide to pause hikes in production, with the abrupt reversal fanning already- elevated volatility The EU is set to recommend that member states review essential travel restrictions on a daily basis in the wake of the omicron variant, according to a draft EU document seen by Bloomberg China is planning to ban companies from going public on foreign stock markets through variable interest entities, according to people familiar with the matter, closing a loophole long used by the country’s technology industry to raise capital from overseas investors Manufacturing activity in Asia outside China stabilized last month amid easing lockdown and border restrictions, setting the sector on course to face a possible new challenge from the omicron variant of the coronavirus Germany urgently needs stricter measures to check a surge in Covid-19 infections and protect hospitals from a “particularly dangerous situation,” according to the head of the country’s DIVI intensive-care medicine lobby. A more detailed breakdown of global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asian equity markets traded mostly positive as regional bourses atoned for the prior day’s losses that were triggered by Omicron concerns, but with some of the momentum tempered by recent comments from Fed Chair Powell and mixed data releases including the miss on Chinese Caixin Manufacturing PMI. ASX 200 (-0.3%) was led lower by underperformance in consumer stocks and with utilities also pressured as reports noted that Shell and Telstra’s entrance in the domestic electricity market is set to ignite fierce competition and force existing players to overhaul their operations, although the losses in the index were cushioned following the latest GDP data which showed a narrower than feared quarterly contraction in Australia’s economy. Nikkei 225 (+0.4%) was on the mend after yesterday’s sell-off with the index helped by favourable currency flows and following a jump in company profits for Q3, while the KOSPI (+2.1%) was also boosted by strong trade data. Hang Seng (+0.8%) and Shanghai Comp. (+0.4%) were somewhat varied as a tech resurgence in Hong Kong overcompensated for the continued weakness in casinos stocks amid ongoing SunCity woes which closed all VIP gaming rooms in Macau after its Chairman's recent arrest, while the mood in the mainland was more reserved after a PBoC liquidity drain and disappointing Chinese Caixin Manufacturing PMI data which fell short of estimates and slipped back into contraction territory. Finally, 10yr JGBs were lower amid the gains in Japanese stocks and after the pullback in global fixed income peers in the aftermath of Fed Chair Powell’s hawkish comments, while a lack of BoJ purchases further contributed to the subdued demand for JGBs. Top Asian News Asia Stocks Bounce Back from One-Year Low Despite Looming Risks Gold Swings on Omicron’s Widening Spread, Inflation Worries Shell Sees Hedge Funds Moving to LNG, Supporting Higher Prices Abe Warns China Invading Taiwan Would Be ‘Economic Suicide’ Bourses in Europe are firmer across the board (Euro Stoxx 50 +1.6%; Stoxx 600 +1.1%) as the positive APAC sentiment reverberated into European markets. US equity futures are also on the front foot with the cyclical RTY (+2.0%) outpacing its peers: ES (+1.2%), NQ (+1.5%), YM (+0.8%). COVID remains a central theme for the time being as the Omicron variant is observed for any effects of concern – which thus far have not been reported. Analysts at UBS expect market focus to shift away from the variant and more towards growth and earnings. The analysts expect Omicron to fuse into the ongoing Delta outbreak that economies have already been tackling. Under this scenario, the desk expects some of the more cyclical markets and sectors to outperform. The desk also flags two tails risks, including an evasive variant and central bank tightening – particularly after Fed chair Powell’s commentary yesterday. Meanwhile, BofA looks for an over-10% fall in European stocks next year. Sticking with macro updates, the OECD, in their latest economic outlook, cut US, China, Eurozone growth forecasts for 2021 and 2022, with Omicron cited as a factor. Back to trade, broad-based gains are seen across European cash markets. Sectors hold a clear cyclical bias which consists of Travel & Leisure, Basic Resources, Autos, Retail and Oil & Gas as the top performers – with the former bolstered by the seemingly low appetite for coordination on restrictions and measures at an EU level – Deutsche Lufthansa (+6%) and IAG (+5.1%) now reside at the top of the Stoxx 600. The other side of the spectrum sees the defensive sectors – with Healthcare, Household Goods, Food & Beverages as the straddlers. In terms of induvial movers, German-listed Adler Group (+22%) following a divestment, whilst Blue Prism (+1.7%) is firmer after SS&C raised its offer for the Co. Top European News Wizz Says Travelers Are Booking at Shorter and Shorter Notice Turkey Central Bank Intervenes in FX Markets to Stabilize Lira Gold Swings on Omicron’s Widening Spread, Inflation Worries Former ABG Sundal Collier Partner Starts Advisory Firm In FX, the Dollar remains mixed against majors, but well off highs prompted by Fed chair Powell ditching transitory from the list of adjectives used to describe inflation and flagging that a faster pace of tapering will be on the agenda at December’s FOMC. However, the index is keeping tabs on the 96.000 handle and has retrenched into a tighter 95.774-96.138 range, for the time being, as trade remains very choppy and volatility elevated awaiting clearer medical data and analysis on Omicron to gauge its impact compared to the Delta strain and earlier COVID-19 variants. In the interim, US macro fundamentals might have some bearing, but the bar is high before NFP on Friday unless ADP or ISM really deviate from consensus or outside the forecast range. Instead, Fed chair Powell part II may be more pivotal if he opts to manage hawkish market expectations, while the Beige Book prepared for next month’s policy meeting could also add some additional insight. NZD/AUD/CAD/GBP - Broad risk sentiment continues to swing from side to side, and currently back in favour of the high beta, commodity and cyclical types, so the Kiwi has bounced firmly from worst levels on Tuesday ahead of NZ terms of trade, the Aussie has pared a chunk of its declines with some assistance from a smaller than anticipated GDP contraction and the Loonie is licking wounds alongside WTI in advance of Canadian building permits and Markit’s manufacturing PMI. Similarly, Sterling has regained some poise irrespective of relatively dovish remarks from BoE’s Mann and a slender downward revision to the final UK manufacturing PMI. Nzd/Usd is firmly back above 0.6800, Aud/Usd close to 0.7150 again, Usd/Cad straddling 1.2750 and Cable hovering on the 1.3300 handle compared to circa 0.6772, 0.7063, 1.2837 and 1.3195 respectively at various fairly adjacent stages yesterday. JPY/EUR/CHF - All undermined by the aforementioned latest upturn in risk appetite or less angst about coronavirus contagion, albeit to varying degrees, as the Yen retreats to retest support sub-113.50, Euro treads water above 1.1300 and Franc straddles 0.9200 after firmer than forecast Swiss CPI data vs a dip in the manufacturing PMI. In commodities, WTI and Brent front month futures are recovering following yesterday’s COVID and Powell-induced declines in the run-up to the OPEC meetings later today. The complex has also been underpinned by the reduced prospects of coordinated EU-wide restrictions, as per the abandonment of the COVID video conference between EU leaders. However, OPEC+ will take centre stage over the next couple of days, with a deluge of source reports likely as OPEC tests the waters. The case for OPEC+ to pause the planned monthly relaxation of output curbs by 400k BPD has been strengthening. There have been major supply and demand developments since the prior meeting. The recent emergence of the Omicron COVID variant and coordinated release of oil reserves have shifted the balance of expectations relative to earlier in the month (full Newsquawk preview available in the Research Suite). In terms of the schedule, the OPEC meeting is slated for 13:00GMT/08:00EST followed by the JTC meeting at 15:00GMT/10:00EST, whilst tomorrow sees the JMMC meeting at 12:00GMT/07:00EST; OPEC+ meeting at 13:00GMT/08:00EST. WTI Jan has reclaimed a USD 69/bbl handle (vs USD 66.20/bbl low) while Brent Feb hovers around USD 72.50/bbl (vs low USD 69.38/bbl) at the time of writing. Elsewhere, spot gold and silver trade with modest gains and largely in tandem with the Buck. Spot gold failed to sustain gains above the cluster of DMAs under USD 1,800/oz (100 DMA at USD 1,792/oz, 200 DMA at USD 1,791/oz, and 50 DMA at USD 1,790/oz) – trader should be aware of the potential for a technical Golden Cross (50 DMA > 200 DMA). Turning to base metals, copper is supported by the overall risk appetite, with the LME contract back above USD 9,500/t. Overnight, Chinese coking coal and coke futures rose over 5% apiece, with traders citing disrupted supply from Mongolia amid the COVID outbreak in the region. US Event Calendar 7am: Nov. MBA Mortgage Applications, prior 1.8% 8:15am: Nov. ADP Employment Change, est. 525,000, prior 571,000 9:45am: Nov. Markit US Manufacturing PMI, est. 59.1, prior 59.1 10am: Oct. Construction Spending MoM, est. 0.4%, prior -0.5% 10am: Nov. ISM Manufacturing, est. 61.2, prior 60.8 2pm: U.S. Federal Reserve Releases Beige Book Nov. Wards Total Vehicle Sales, est. 13.4m, prior 13m Central Banks 10am: Powell, Yellen Testify Before House Panel on CARES Act Relief DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap If you’re under 10 and reading this there’s a spoiler alert today in this first para so please skip beyond and onto the second. Yes my heart broke a little last night as my little 6-year old Maisie said to me at bedtime that “Santa isn’t real is he Daddy?”. I lied (I think it’s a lie) and said yes he was. I made up an elaborate story about how when we renovated our 100 year old house we deliberately kept the chimney purely to let Santa come down it once a year. Otherwise why would we have kept it? She then asked what about her friend who lives in a flat? I tried to bluff my way through it but maybe my answer sounded a bit like my answers as to what will happen with Omicron. I’ll test both out on clients later to see which is more convincing. Before we get to the latest on the virus, given it’s the start of the month, we’ll shortly be publishing our November performance review looking at how different assets fared over the month just gone and YTD. It arrived late on but Omicron was obviously the dominant story and led to some of the biggest swings of the year so far. It meant that oil (which is still the top performer on a YTD basis) was the worst performer in our monthly sample, with WTI and Brent seeing their worst monthly performances since the initial wave of market turmoil over Covid back in March 2020. And at the other end, sovereign bonds outperformed in November as Omicron’s emergence saw investors push back the likelihood of imminent rate hikes from central banks. So what was shaping up to be a good month for risk and a bad one for bonds flipped around in injury time. Watch out for the report soon from Henry. Back to yesterday now, and frankly the main takeaway was that markets were desperate for any piece of news they could get their hands on about the Omicron variant, particularly given the lack of proper hard data at the moment. The morning started with a sharp selloff as we discussed at the top yesterday, as some of the more optimistic noises from Monday were outweighed by that FT interview, whereby Moderna’s chief executive had said that the existing vaccines wouldn’t be as effective against the new variant. Then we had some further negative news from Regeneron, who said that analysis and modelling of the Omicron mutations indicated that its antibody drug may not be as effective, but that they were doing further analysis to confirm this. However, we later got some comments from a University of Oxford spokesperson, who said that there wasn’t any evidence so far that vaccinations wouldn’t provide high levels of protection against severe disease, which coincided with a shift in sentiment early in the European afternoon as equities begun to pare back their losses. The CEO of BioNTech and the Israeli health minister expressed similar sentiments, noting that vaccines were still likely to protect against severe disease even among those infected by Omicron, joining other officials encouraging people to get vaccinated or get booster shots. Another reassuring sign came in an update from the EU’s ECDC yesterday, who said that all of the 44 confirmed cases where information was available on severity “were either asymptomatic or had mild symptoms.” After the close, the FDA endorsed Merck’s antiviral Covid pill. While it’s not clear how the pill interacts with Omicron, the proliferation of more Covid treatments is still good news as we head into another winter. The other big piece of news came from Fed Chair Powell’s testimony to the Senate Banking Committee, where the main headline was his tapering comment that “It is appropriate to consider wrapping up a few months sooner.” So that would indicate an acceleration in the pace, which would be consistent with the view from our US economists that we’ll see a doubling in the pace of reductions at the December meeting that’s only two weeks from today. The Fed Chair made a forceful case for a faster taper despite lingering Omicron uncertainties, noting inflation is likely to stay elevated, the labour market has improved without a commensurate increase in labour supply (those sidelined because of Covid are likely to stay there), spending has remained strong, and that tapering was a removal of accommodation (which the economy doesn’t need more of given the first three points). Powell took pains to stress the risk of higher inflation, going so far as to ‘retire’ the use of the term ‘transitory’ when describing the current inflation outlook. So team transitory have seemingly had the pitch taken away from them mid match. The Chair left an exit clause that this outlook would be informed by incoming inflation, employment, and Omicron data before the December FOMC meeting. A faster taper ostensibly opens the door to earlier rate hikes and Powell’s comment led to a sharp move higher in shorter-dated Treasury yields, with the 2yr yield up +8.1bps on the day, having actually been more than -4bps lower when Powell began speaking. They were as low as 0.44% then and got as high as 0.57% before closing at 0.56%. 2yr yields have taken another leg higher overnight, increasing +2.5bps to 0.592%. Long-end yields moved lower though and failed to back up the early day moves even after Powell, leading to a major flattening in the yield curve on the back of those remarks, with the 2s10s down -13.7bps to 87.3bps, which is its flattest level since early January. Overnight 10yr yields are back up +3bps but the curve is only a touch steeper. My 2 cents on the yield curve are that the 2s10s continues to be my favourite US recession indicator. It’s worked over more cycles through history than any other. No recession since the early 1950s has occurred without the 2s10s inverting. But it takes on average 12-18 months from inversion to recession. The shortest was the covid recession at around 7 months which clearly doesn’t count but I think we were very late cycle in early 2020 and the probability of recession in the not too distant future was quite high but we will never know.The shortest outside of that was around 9 months. So with the curve still at c.+90bps we are moving in a more worrying direction but I would still say 2023-24 is the very earliest a recession is likely to occur (outside of a unexpected shock) and we’ll need a rapid flattening in 22 to encourage that. History also suggests markets tend to ignore the YC until it’s too late. So I wouldn’t base my market views in 22 on the yield curve and recession signal yet. However its something to look at as the Fed seemingly embarks on a tightening cycle in the months ahead. Onto markets and those remarks from Powell (along with the additional earlier pessimism about Omicron) proved incredibly unhelpful for equities yesterday, with the S&P 500 (-1.90%) giving up the previous day’s gains to close at its lowest level in over a month. It’s hard to overstate how broad-based this decline was, as just 7 companies in the entire S&P moved higher yesterday, which is the lowest number of the entire year so far and the lowest since June 11th, 2020, when 1 company ended in the green. Over in Europe it was much the same story, although they were relatively less affected by Powell’s remarks, and the STOXX 600 (-0.92%) moved lower on the day as well. Overnight in Asia, stocks are trading higher though with the KOSPI (+2.02%), Hang Seng (+1.40%), the Nikkei (+0.37%), Shanghai Composite (+0.11%) and CSI (+0.09%) all in the green. Australia’s Q3 GDP contracted (-1.9% qoq) less than -2.7% consensus while India’s Q3 GDP grew at a firm +8.4% year-on-year beating the +8.3% consensus. In China the Caixin Manufacturing PMI for November came in at 49.9 against a 50.6 consensus. Futures markets are indicating a positive start to markets in US & Europe with the S&P 500 (+0.73%) and DAX (+0.44%) trading higher again. Back in Europe, there was a significant inflation story amidst the other headlines above, since Euro Area inflation rose to its highest level since the creation of the single currency, with the flash estimate for November up to +4.9% (vs. +4.5% expected). That exceeded every economist’s estimate on Bloomberg, and core inflation also surpassed expectations at +2.6% (vs. +2.3% expected), again surpassing the all-time high since the single currency began. That’s only going to add to the pressure on the ECB, and yesterday saw Germany’s incoming Chancellor Scholz say that “we have to do something” if inflation doesn’t ease. European sovereign bonds rallied in spite of the inflation reading, with those on 10yr bunds (-3.1bps), OATs (-3.5bps) and BTPs (-0.9bps) all moving lower. Peripheral spreads widened once again though, and the gap between Italian and German 10yr yields closed at its highest level in just over a year. Meanwhile governments continued to move towards further action as the Omicron variant spreads, and Greece said that vaccinations would be mandatory for everyone over 60 soon, with those refusing having to pay a monthly €100 fine. Separately in Germany, incoming Chancellor Scholz said that there would be a parliamentary vote on the question of compulsory vaccinations, saying to the Bild newspaper in an interview that “My recommendation is that we don’t do this as a government, because it’s an issue of conscience”. In terms of other data yesterday, German unemployment fell by -34k in November (vs. -25k expected). Separately, the November CPI readings from France at +3.4% (vs. +3.2% expected) and Italy at +4.0% (vs. +3.3% expected) surprised to the upside as well. In the US, however, the Conference Board’s consumer confidence measure in November fell to its lowest since February at 109.5 (vs. 110.9 expected), and the MNI Chicago PMI for November fell to 61.8 9vs. 67.0 expected). To the day ahead now, and once again we’ll have Fed Chair Powell and Treasury Secretary Yellen appearing, this time before the House Financial Services Committee. In addition to that, the Fed will be releasing their Beige Book, and BoE Governor Bailey is also speaking. On the data front, the main release will be the manufacturing PMIs from around the world, but there’s also the ADP’s report of private payrolls for November in the US, the ISM manufacturing reading in the US as well for November, and German retail sales for October. Tyler Durden Wed, 12/01/2021 - 07:47.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeDec 1st, 2021

Risk Cracks After Moderna CEO Comments Spark Global Stock Rout

Risk Cracks After Moderna CEO Comments Spark Global Stock Rout Ask a drug dealer if methadone helps cure a cocaine addition and - shockingly - you will hear that the answer is "hell no", after all an affirmative response would mean the fixer needs to get a real job. Just as shocking was the "admission" of Moderna CEO, Stéphane Bancel, who in the latest stop on his media whirlwind tour of the past 48 hours gave the FT an interview in which he predicted that existing vaccines will be much less effective at tackling Omicron than earlier strains of coronavirus and warned it would take months before pharmaceutical companies could manufacture new variant-specific jabs at scale. “There is no world, I think, where [the effectiveness] is the same level . . . we had with [the] Delta [variant],” Bancel told the Financial Times, claiming that the high number of Omicron mutations on the spike protein, which the virus uses to infect human cells, and the rapid spread of the variant in South Africa suggested that the current crop of vaccines may need to be modified next year. Here, the self-serving CEO whose sell-mode was fully engaged - after all what else would the maker of a vaccine for covid say than "yes, the world will need more of my product" - completely ignored the earlier comments from Barry Schoub, chairman of South Afruca's Ministerial Advisory Committee on Vaccines, who over the weekend said that the large number of mutations found in the omicron variant appears to destabilize the virus, which might make it less “fit” than the dominant delta strain. As such, it would be a far less virulent strain... but of course that would also reduce the need for Moderna's mRNA therapy and so Bancel failed to mention it. What is grotesque is that the Moderna CEO’s comments on existing vaccines’ effectiveness against the omicron variant is “old news so should be a fade,” says Prashant Newnaha, a senior Asia-Pacific rates strategist at TD Securities in Singapore. Indeed as Bloomberg notes, Bancel reiterated comments made by Moderna’s Chief Medical Officer Paul Burton during the weekend. Alas, the last thing algos care about is nuance and/or reading between the lines, and so moments after Bancel's interview hit, markets hit risk off mode on Tuesday, and yesterday’s bounce in markets immediately reversed amid fresh worries about the efficacy of currently available vaccines with U.S. equity futures dropping along with stocks in Europe. Bonds gained as investors sought havens. After dropping as much as 1.2%, S&P futures pared losses to -0.7%, down 37 points just above 4,600. Dow Eminis were down 339 points or 1% and Nasdaq was down -0.8%. Adding to concerns is Fed Chair Jerome Powell who today will speak, alongside Janet Yellen, at the Senate Banking Committee in congressional oversight hearings related to pandemic stimulus. Last night Powell made a dovish pivot saying the new variant poses downside risks to employment and growth while adding to uncertainty about inflation. Powell's comments dragged yields lower and hit bank stocks overnight. “The market’s reaction to reports such as Moderna’s suggest the ball is still very much in the court of proving that this will not escalate,” said Patrick Bennett, head of macro strategy for Asia at Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in Hong Kong. “Until that time, mode is to sell recoveries in risk and not to try and pick the extent of the selloff” U.S. airline and cruiseliner stocks dropped in premarket trading Tuesday, after vaccine maker Moderna’s top executives reiterated that the omicron variant of the coronavirus may require new vaccines. Most U.S. airline stocks were down: Alaska Air -5%, United -3.2%, American -3%, Spirit -2.7%, Delta -2.6%, JetBlue -2.6%, Southwest -1.7%. Here are some other notable movers today: U.S. banks decline in premarket trading following comments from Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell that may push back bets on when the central bank will raise rates. Citigroup (C US) -2.4%, JPMorgan (JPM US) -2.2%, Morgan Stanley (MS US) -2.6% Vaccine manufacturers mixed in U.S. premarket trading after rallying in recent days and following further comments from Moderna about treating the new omicron Covid-19 variant. Pfizer (PFE US) +1.6%, Novavax  (NVAS US) +1.3%, Moderna (MRNA US) -3.8% U.S. airline and cruiseliner stocks dropped in premarket trading Tuesday, after vaccine maker Moderna’s top executives reiterated that the omicron variant of the coronavirus may require new vaccines. Alaska Air (ALK US) -5%, United (UAL US) -3.2%, American (AAL US) -3% Krystal Biotech (KRYS US) jumped 4.3% in postmarket trading on Monday, extending gains after a 122% jump during the regular session. The company is offering $200m of shares via Goldman Sachs, BofA, Cowen, William Blair, according to a postmarket statement MEI Pharma (MEIP US) gained 8% postmarket after the cancer-treatment company said it will hold a webcast Tuesday to report on data from the ongoing Phase 2 Tidal study evaluating zandelisib in patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma Intuit (INTU US) declined 3.4% postmarket after holder Dan Kurzius, co-founder of Mailchimp, offered the stake via Goldman Sachs In Europe, the Stoxx 600 index fell to almost a seven-week low. Cyclical sectors including retail, travel and carmakers were among the biggest decliners, while energy stocks tumbled as crude oil headed for the worst monthly loss this year; every industry sector fell led by travel stocks. Earlier in the session, the Asia Pacific Index dropped 0.6% while the Hang Seng China Enterprises Index lost 1.5% to finish at its weakest level since May 2016. Asian stocks erased early gains to head for a third day of losses on fresh concerns that existing Covid-19 vaccines will be less effective at tackling the omicron variant. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index extended its fall to nearly 1% after having risen as much as 0.8% earlier on Tuesday. The current crop of vaccines may need to be modified next year, Moderna Chief Executive Officer Stephane Bancel said in an interview with the Financial Times, adding that it may take months before pharmaceutical firms can manufacture new variant-specific jabs at scale. U.S. futures also reversed gains. Property and consumer staples were the worst-performing sectors on the regional benchmark. Key gauges in Hong Kong and South Korea were the biggest losers in Asia, with the Kospi index erasing all of its gains for this year. The Hang Seng China Enterprises Index lost 1.5% to finish at its weakest level since May 2016. The fresh bout of selling offset early optimism spurred by data showing China’s factory sentiment improved in November. “With the slower vaccination rate and more limited health-care capacity in the region, uncertainty from the new omicron variant may seem to bring about higher economic risks for the region at a time where it is shifting towards further reopening,” said Jun Rong Yeap, a market strategist at IG Asia Pte. Asia’s stock benchmark is now down 3.5% for the month, set for its worst performance since July, as nervousness remains over the U.S. Federal Reserve’s tapering schedule and the potential economic impact of the omicron variant. “Moderna is one of the primary mRNA vaccines out there, so the risk-off sentiment is justified,” said Kelvin Wong, an analyst at CMC Markets (Singapore) Pte. Liquidity is thinner going into the end of the year, so investors are “thinking it’s wise to take some money off the table,” he added Japanese equities fell, reversing an earlier gain to cap their third-straight daily loss, after a report cast doubt on hopes for a quick answer to the omicron variant of the coronavirus. Telecoms and electronics makers were the biggest drags on the Topix, which dropped 1%, erasing an earlier gain of as much as 1.5%. Fast Retailing and SoftBank Group were the largest contributors to a 1.6% loss in the Nikkei 225. The yen strengthened about 0.4% against the dollar, reversing an earlier loss. Japanese stocks advanced earlier in the day, following U.S. peers higher as a relative sense of calm returned to global markets. Tokyo share gains reversed quickly in late afternoon trading after a Financial Times report that Moderna’s Chief Executive Officer Stephane Bancel said a new vaccine may be needed to fight omicron. “The report of Moderna CEO’s remarks has bolstered an overall movement toward taking off risk,” said SMBC Trust Bank analyst Masahiro Yamaguchi. “Market participants will probably be analyzing information on vaccines and the new virus variant for the next couple of weeks, so shares will likely continue to fluctuate on these headlines.” In FX, the dollar dropped alongside commodity-linked currencies while the yen and gold climbed and bitcoin surged as safe havens were bid. The yen swung to a gain after Moderna Inc.’s chief executive Stephane Bancel was quoted by the Financial Times saying existing vaccines may not be effective enough to tackle the omicron variant. Commodity-linked currencies including the Aussie, kiwi and Norwegian krone all declined, underperforming the dollar In rates, treasuries held gains after flight-to-quality rally extended during Asia session and European morning, when bunds and gilts also benefited from haven flows. Stocks fell after Moderna CEO predicted waning vaccine efficacy. Intermediates lead gains, with yields richer by nearly 6bp across 7-year sector; 10-year Treasuries are richer by 5.6bp at 1.443%, vs 2.5bp for German 10-year, 4.7bp for U.K. Long-end may draw support from potential for month-end buying; Bloomberg Treasury index rebalancing was projected to extend duration by 0.11yr as of Nov. 22. Expectations of month-end flows may support the market, and Fed Chair Powell is slated to testify to a Senate panel.       In commodities, crude futures are off their late-Asia lows but remain in the red. WTI trades close to $68.30, stalling near Friday’s lows; Brent is off over 2.5% near $71.50. Spot gold rises ~$11 near $1,796/oz. Base metals are mixed: LME zinc outperforms, rising as much as 1.6%.  To the day ahead now, and the main central bank highlight will be Fed Chair Powell’s appearance before the Senate Banking Committee, alongside Treasury Secretary Yellen. In addition, we’ll hear from Fed Vice Chair Clarida, the Fed’s Williams, the ECB’s Villeroy and de Cos, and the BoE’s Mann. On the data side, we’ll get the flash November CPI reading for the Euro Area today, as well as the readings from France and Italy. In addition, there’s data on German unemployment for November, Canadian GDP for Q3, whilst in the US there’s the Conference Board’s consumer confidence measure for November, the FHFA house price index for September, and the MNI Chicago PMI for November. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures down 1.2% to 4,595.00 STOXX Europe 600 down 1.4% to 460.47 MXAP down 0.5% to 190.51 MXAPJ down 0.6% to 620.60 Nikkei down 1.6% to 27,821.76 Topix down 1.0% to 1,928.35 Hang Seng Index down 1.6% to 23,475.26 Shanghai Composite little changed at 3,563.89 Sensex down 0.2% to 57,122.74 Australia S&P/ASX 200 up 0.2% to 7,255.97 Kospi down 2.4% to 2,839.01 German 10Y yield little changed at -0.36% Euro up 0.6% to $1.1362 Brent Futures down 3.0% to $71.26/bbl Brent Futures down 3.0% to $71.26/bbl Gold spot up 0.7% to $1,796.41 U.S. Dollar Index down 0.65% to 95.72 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg Euro-area inflation surged to a record for the era of the single currency and exceeded all forecasts, adding to the European Central Bank’s challenge before a crucial meeting next month on the future of monetary stimulus. If the drop in government bond yields on Friday signaled how skittish markets were, fresh declines are leaving them looking no less nervous. One of Germany’s most prominent economists is urging the European Central Bank to be more transparent in outlining its exit from unprecedented monetary stimulus and argues that ruling out an end to negative interest rates next year may be a mistake. The Hong Kong dollar fell into the weak half of its trading band for the first time since December 2019 as the emergence of a new coronavirus variant hurt appetite for risk assets. A more detailed look at global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asian equities traded mixed with early momentum seen following the rebound on Wall Street where risk assets recovered from Friday’s heavy selling pressure as liquidity conditions normalized post-Thanksgiving and after some of the Omicron fears abated given the mild nature in cases so far, while participants also digested a slew of data releases including better than expected Chinese Manufacturing PMI. However, markets were later spooked following comments from Moderna's CEO that existing vaccines will be much less effective against the Omicron variant. ASX 200 (+0.2%) was underpinned by early strength across its sectors aside from utilities and with gold miners also hampered by the recent lacklustre mood in the precious metal which failed to reclaim the USD 1800/oz level but remained in proximity for another attempt. In addition, disappointing Building Approvals and inline Net Exports Contribution data had little impact on sentiment ahead of tomorrow’s Q3 GDP release, although the index then faded most its gains after the comments from Moderna's CEO, while Nikkei 225 (-1.6%) was initially lifted by the recent rebound in USD/JPY but then slumped amid the broad risk aversion late in the session. Hang Seng (-1.6%) and Shanghai Comp. (Unch) were varied in which the mainland was kept afloat for most the session after a surprise expansion in Chinese Manufacturing PMI and a mild liquidity injection by the PBoC, with a central bank-backed publication also suggesting that recent open market operations demonstrates an ample liquidity goal, although Hong Kong underperformed on tech and property losses and with casino names pressured again as shares in junket operator Suncity slumped 37% on reopen from a trading halt in its first opportunity to react to the arrest of its Chairman. Finally, 10yr JGBs were initially contained following early momentum in stocks and somewhat inconclusive 2yr JGB auction which showed better results from the prior, albeit at just a marginal improvement, but then was underpinned on a haven bid after fears of the Omicron variant later resurfaced. Top Asian News China’s Biggest Crypto Exchange Picks Singapore as Asia Base SoftBank-Backed Snapdeal Targets $250 Million IPO in 2022 Omicron Reaches Nations From U.K. to Japan in Widening Spread Slump in China Gas Shows Spreading Impact of Property Slowdown Major European bourses are on the backfoot (Euro Stoxx 50 -1.5%; Stoxx 600 -1.5%) as COVID fears again take the spotlight on month-end. APAC markets were firmer for a large part of the overnight session, but thereafter the risk-off trigger was attributed to comments from Moderna's CEO suggesting that existing vaccines will be much less effective against the Omicron COVID strain. On this, some caveats worth keeping in mind - the commentary on the potential need for a vaccine does come from a vaccine maker, who could benefit from further global inoculation, whilst data on the new variant remains sparse. Meanwhile, WSJ reported Regeneron's and Eli Lilly's COVID antiviral cocktails had lost efficacy vs the Omicron variant - however, the extent to which will need to be subject to further testing. Furthermore, producers appear to be confident that they will be able to adjust their products to accommodate the new variant, albeit the timeline for mass production will not be immediate. Nonetheless, the sullied sentiment has persisted throughout the European morning and has also seeped into US equity futures: the cyclically bias RTY (-1.7%) lags the ES (-1.0%) and YM (-1.3%), whilst the tech-laden NQ (-0.5%) is cushioned by the slump in yields. Back to Europe, broad-based losses are seen across the majors. Sectors tilt defensive but to a lesser extent than seen at the European cash open. Travel & Leisure, Oil & Gas, and Retail all sit at the bottom of the bunch amid the potential implications of the new COVID variant. Tech benefits from the yield play, which subsequently weighs on the Banking sector. The retail sector is also weighed on by Spanish giant Inditex (-4.3%) following a CEO reshuffle. In terms of other movers, Glencore (-0.9%) is softer after Activist investor Bluebell Capital Partners called on the Co. to spin off its coal business and divest non-core assets. In a letter seen by the FT, Glencore was also asked to improve corporate governance. In terms of equity commentary, analysts at JPM suggest investors should take a more nuanced view on reopening as the bank expects post-COVID normalisation to gradually asset itself over the course of 2022. The bank highlights hawkish central bank policy shifts as the main risk to their outlook. Thus, the analysts see European equities outperforming the US, whilst China is seen outpacing EMs. JPM targets S&P 500 at 5,050 (closed at 4,655.27 yesterday) by the end of 2022 with EPS at USD 240 – marking a 14% increase in annual EPS. Top European News Omicron Reaches Nations From U.K. to Japan in Widening Spread ECB Bosses Lack Full Diplomatic Immunity, EU’s Top Court Says Adler Keeps Investors Waiting for Answers on Fraud Claims European Gas Prices Surge Above 100 Euros With Eyes on Russia In FX, the Greenback may well have been grounded amidst rebalancing flows on the final trading day of November, as bank models are flagging a net sell signal, albeit relatively weak aside from vs the Yen per Cit’s index, but renewed Omicron concerns stoked by Moderna’s CEO casting considerable doubt about the efficacy of current vaccines against the new SA strain have pushed the Buck back down in any case. Indeed, the index has now retreated further from its 2021 apex set less than a week ago and through 96.000 to 95.662, with only the Loonie and Swedish Krona underperforming within the basket, and the Antipodean Dollars plus Norwegian Crown in wider G10 circles. Looking at individual pairings, Usd/Jpy has reversed from the high 113.00 area and breached a Fib just below the round number on the way down to circa 112.68 for a marginal new m-t-d low, while Eur/Usd is back above 1.1350 having scaled a Fib at 1.1290 and both have left decent option expiries some distance behind in the process (1.6 bn at 113.80 and 1.3 bn between 1.1250-55 respectively). Elsewhere, Usd/Chf is eyeing 0.9175 irrespective of a slightly weaker than forecast Swiss KoF indicator and Cable has bounced firmly from the low 1.3300 zone towards 1.3375 awaiting commentary from BoE’s Mann. NZD/AUD/CAD - As noted above, the tables have turned for the Kiwi, Aussie and Loonie along with risk sentiment in general, and Nzd/Usd is now pivoting 0.6800 with little help from a deterioration in NBNZ business confidence or a decline in the activity outlook. Similarly, Aud/Usd has been undermined by much weaker than forecast building approvals and a smaller than anticipated current account surplus, but mostly keeping hold of the 0.7100 handle ahead of Q3 GDP and Usd/Cad has shot up from around 1.2730 to top 1.2800 at one stage in advance of Canadian growth data for the prior quarter and month of September as oil recoils (WTI to an even deeper trough only cents off Usd 67/brl). Back down under, 1 bn option expiry interest at 1.0470 in Aud/Nzd could well come into play given that the cross is currently hovering near the base of a 1.0483-39 range. SCANDI/EM - The aforementioned downturn in risk appetite after Monday’s brief revival has hit the Sek and Nok hard, but the latter is also bearing the brunt of Brent’s latest collapse to the brink of Usd 70/brl at worst, while also taking on board that the Norges Bank plans to refrain from foreign currency selling through December having stopped midway through this month. The Rub is also feeling the adverse effect of weaker crude prices and ongoing geopolitical angst to the extent that hawkish CBR rhetoric alluding to aggressive tightening next month is hardly keeping it propped, but the Cnh and Cny continue to defy the odds or gravity in wake of a surprise pop back above 50.0 in China’s official manufacturing PMI. Conversely, the Zar is struggling to contain losses sub-16.0000 vs the Usd on SA virus-related factors even though Gold is approaching Usd 1800/oz again, while the Try is striving to stay within sight of 13.0000 following a slender miss in Turkish Q3 y/y GDP. In commodities, WTI and Brent front month futures are once again under pressure amid the aforementioned COVID jitters threatening the demand side of the equation, albeit the market remains in a state of uncertainty given how little is known about the new variant ahead of the OPEC+ confab. It is still unclear at this point in time which route OPEC+ members will opt for, but seemingly the feasible options on the table are 1) a pause in output hikes, 2) a smaller output hike, 3) maintaining current output hikes. Energy journalists have suggested the group will likely be influenced by oil price action, but nonetheless, the findings of the JTC and JMMC will be closely watched for the group's updated forecasts against the backdrop of COVID and the recently coordinated SPR releases from net oil consumers – a move which the US pledged to repeat if needed. Elsewhere, Iranian nuclear talks were reportedly somewhat constructive – according to the Russian delegate – with working groups set to meet today and tomorrow regarding the sanctions on Iran. This sentiment, however, was not reciprocated by Western sources (cited by WSJ), which suggested there was no clarity yet on whether the teams were ready for serious negotiations and serious concessions. WTI Jan resides around session lows near USD 67.50/bbl (vs high USD 71.22/bbl), while Brent Feb dipped under USD 71/bbl (vs high USD 84.56/bb). Over to metals, spot gold remains underpinned in European trade by the cluster of DMA's under USD 1,800/oz – including the 100 (USD 1,792/oz), 200 (USD 1,791/oz) and 50 (1,790/oz). Turning to base metals, LME copper is modestly softer around the USD 9,500/t mark, whilst Dalian iron ore futures meanwhile rose over 6% overnight, with traders citing increasing Chinese demand. US Event Calendar 9am: 3Q House Price Purchase Index QoQ, prior 4.9% 9am: Sept. FHFA House Price Index MoM, est. 1.2%, prior 1.0% 9am: Sept. Case Shiller Composite-20 YoY, est. 19.30%, prior 19.66%; S&P/CS 20 City MoM SA, est. 1.20%, prior 1.17% 9:45am: Nov. MNI Chicago PMI, est. 67.0, prior 68.4 10am: Nov. Conf. Board Consumer Confidenc, est. 111.0, prior 113.8 10am: Nov. Conf. Board Present Situation, prior 147.4 10am: Nov. Conf. Board Expectations, prior 91.3 Central Banks 10am: Powell, Yellen Testify Before Senate Panel on CARES Act Relief 10:30am: Fed’s Williams gives remarks at NY Fed food- insecurity event 1pm: Fed’s Clarida Discusses Fed Independence DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap Just as we go to print markets are reacting negatively to an interview with the Moderna CEO in the FT that has just landed where he said that with regards to Omicron, “There is no world, I think, where (the effectiveness) is the same level... we had with Delta…… I think it’s going to be a material drop (efficacy). I just don’t know how much because we need to wait for the data. But all the scientists I’ve talked to . . . are like ‘this is not going to be good’.”” This is not really new news relative to the last 3-4 days given what we know about the new mutation but the market is picking up on the explicit comments. In response S&P futures have gone from slightly up to down just over -0.5% and Treasury yields immediately dipped -4bps to 1.46%. The Nikkei has erased gains and is down around -1% and the Hang Seng is c.-1.8%. This is breaking news so check your screens after you read this. In China the official November PMI data came in stronger than expected with the Manufacturing PMI at 50.1 (49.7 consensus vs 49.2 previous) and the non-manufacturing PMI at 52.3 (51.5 consensus vs 52.4 previous). The negative headlines above as we go to print followed a market recovery yesterday as investors hoped that the Omicron variant wouldn’t prove as bad as initially feared. In reality, the evidence is still incredibly limited on this question, and nothing from the Moderna CEO overnight changes that. However the more positive sentiment was also evident from the results of our flash poll in yesterday’s EMR where we had 1569 responses so very many thanks. The poll showed that just 10% thought it would still be the biggest topic in financial markets by the end of the year, with 30% instead thinking it’ll largely be forgotten about. The other 60% thought it would still be an issue but only of moderate importance. So if that’s correct and our respondents are a fair reflection of broader market sentiment, then it points to some big downside risks ahead if we get notable bad news on the variant. For the record I would have been with the majority with tendencies towards the largely forgotten about answer. So I will be as off-side as much as most of you on the variant downside risk scenario. When I did a similar poll on Evergrande 2 and a half months ago, only 8% thought it would be significantly impacting markets a month later with 78% in aggregate thinking limited mention/impact, and 15% thinking it would have no impact. So broadly similar responses and back then the 15% were most correct although the next 78% weren’t far off. In terms of the latest developments yesterday, we’re still waiting to find out some of the key pieces of information about this new strain, including how effective vaccines still are, and about the extent of any increased risk of transmission, hospitalisation and death. Nevertheless, countries around the world are continuing to ramp up their own responses as they await this information. President Biden laid out the US strategy for tackling Omicron in a public address yesterday, underscoring the variant was a cause for concern rather than panic. He noted travel bans from certain jurisdictions would remain in place to buy authorities time to evaluate the variant, but did not anticipate that further travel bans or domestic lockdowns would be implemented, instead urging citizens to get vaccinated or a booster shot. Over in Europe, Bloomberg reported that EU leaders were discussing whether to have a virtual summit on Friday about the issue, and Poland moved to toughen up their own domestic restrictions, with a 50% capacity limit on restaurants, hotels, gyms and cinemas. In Germany, Chancellor Merkel and Vice Chancellor Scholz will be meeting with state premiers today, whilst the UK government’s vaccination committee recommended that every adult be eligible for a booster shot, rather than just the over-40s at present. Boosters have done a tremendous job in dramatically reducing cases in the elder cohort in the UK in recent weeks so one by product of Omicron is that it may accelerate protection in a wider age group everywhere. Assuming vaccines have some impact on Omicron this could be a positive development, especially if symptoms are less bad. Markets recovered somewhat yesterday, with the S&P 500 gaining +1.32% to recover a large portion of Friday’s loss. The index was driven by mega-cap tech names, with the Nasdaq up +1.88% and small cap stocks underperforming, with the Russell 2000 down -0.18%, so the market wasn’t completely pricing out omicron risks by any means. Nevertheless, Covid-specific names performed how you would expect given the improved sentiment; stay-at-home trades that outperformed Friday fell, including Zoom (-0.56%), Peloton (-4.35%), and HelloFresh (-0.8%), while Moderna (+11.80%) was the biggest winner following the weekend news that a reformulated vaccine could be available in early 2022. Elsewhere, Twitter (-2.74%) initially gained after it was announced CEO and co-founder Jack Dorsey would be stepping down, but trended lower throughout the rest of the day. The broader moves put the index back in positive territory for the month as we hit November’s last trading day today. Europe saw its own bounceback too, with the STOXX 600 up +0.69%. Over in rates, the partial unwind of Friday’s moves was even smaller, with yields on 10yr Treasuries moving up +2.6bps to 1.50%, driven predominantly by real rates, as inflation breakevens were a touch narrower across the curve. One part of the curve that didn’t retrace Friday’s move was the short end, where markets continued to push Fed rate hikes back ever so slightly, with the first full hike now being priced for September (though contracts as early as May still price some meaningful probability of Fed hikes). We may see some further movements today as well, with Fed Chair Powell set to appear before the Senate Banking Committee at 15:00 London time, where he may well be asked about whether the Fed plans to accelerate the tapering of their asset purchases although it’s hard to believe he’ll go too far with any guidance with the Omicron uncertainty. The Chair’s brief planned testimony was published on the Fed’s website last night. It struck a slightly more hawkish tone on inflation, noting that the Fed’s forecast was for elevated inflation to persist well into next year and recognition that high inflation imposes burdens on those least able to handle them. On omicron, the testimony predictably stated it posed risks that could slow the economy’s progress, but tellingly on the inflation front, it could intensify supply chain disruptions. The real fireworks will almost certainly come in the question and answer portion of the testimony. The bond moves were more muted in Europe though, with yields on 10yr bunds (+2.0bps), OATs (+1.0bps) and BTPs (+0.4bps) only seeing a modest increase. Crude oil prices also didn’t bounce back with as much rigor as equities. Brent gained +0.99% while WTI futures increased +2.64%. They are back down -1 to -1.5% this morning. Elsewhere in DC, Senator Joe Manchin noted that Democrats could raise the debt ceiling on their own through the reconciliation process, but indicated a preference for the increase not to be included in the build back better bill, for which his support still seems lukewarm. We’re approaching crucial deadlines on the debt ceiling and financing the federal government, so these headlines should become more commonplace over the coming days. There were some further developments on the inflation front yesterday as Germany reported that inflation had risen to +6.0% in November (vs. +5.5% expected) on the EU-harmonised measure, and up from +4.6% in October. The German national measure also rose to +5.2% (vs. +5.0% expected), which was the highest since 1992. Speaking of Germany, Bloomberg reported that the shortlist for the Bundesbank presidency had been narrowed down to 4 candidates, which included Isabel Schnabel of the ECB’s Executive Board, and Joachim Nagel, who’s currently the Deputy Head of the Banking Department at the Bank for International Settlements. Today we’ll likely get some further headlines on inflation as the flash estimate for the entire Euro Area comes out, as well as the numbers for France and Italy. There wasn’t much in the way of other data yesterday, though UK mortgage approvals fell to 67.2k in October (vs. 70.0k expected), which is their lowest level since June 2020. Separately, US pending home sales were up +7.5% in October (vs. +1.0% expected), whilst the Dallas Fed’s manufacturing activity index for November unexpectedly fell to 11.8 (vs. 15.0 expected). Finally, the European Commission’s economic sentiment indicator for the Euro Area dipped to 117.5 in November as expected, its weakest level in 6 months. To the day ahead now, and the main central bank highlight will be Fed Chair Powell’s appearance before the Senate Banking Committee, alongside Treasury Secretary Yellen. In addition, we’ll hear from Fed Vice Chair Clarida, the Fed’s Williams, the ECB’s Villeroy and de Cos, and the BoE’s Mann. On the data side, we’ll get the flash November CPI reading for the Euro Area today, as well as the readings from France and Italy. In addition, there’s data on German unemployment for November, Canadian GDP for Q3, whilst in the US there’s the Conference Board’s consumer confidence measure for November, the FHFA house price index for September, and the MNI Chicago PMI for November. Tyler Durden Tue, 11/30/2021 - 07:50.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 30th, 2021

After "Red Friday" Rout, Will The Fed Slow Their Roll?

After 'Red Friday' Rout, Will The Fed Slow Their Roll? Authored by Lance Roberts via RealInvestmentAdvice.com, “Black Friday” As Market Plunges Last week, we discussed the weakness of the underlying market as “FOMO” had returned to the market. “The only concern we have is the lack of breadth as of late. As shown, the number of stocks above the 50-dma turned sharply lower this week. Furthermore, they are well below levels when markets typically make new highs. The same goes for the number of stocks trading above their 200-dma’s.” Chart updated through Friday. Over the last couple of weeks, the market has been warning to the risk of a downturn, all that was needed was a catalyst to change sentiment. That occurred as news of a new “Covid” variant broke, stocks marked “Black Friday” by plunging firmly through the 20-dma and support at recent lows. Notably, that downside break broke the consolidation pattern (blue box in the chart below) that began in early November. While there is some minor support around 4550, critical support lies at the 50-dma at 4527. That support level also corresponds to the September peak. With mutual fund distributions running through the first two weeks of December, there is additional downside pressure on stocks near term. However, our “money flow sell” signal is firmly intact and confirmed by the MACD signal. Such suggests we continue to maintain slightly higher levels of cash. Notably, the market is getting oversold near-term, with the money-flow signal depressed. Such suggests that any further weakness will provide a short-term trading opportunity. As discussed last week, the statistical odds are high that we will see a “Santa Rally” as most professional managers will position for year-end reporting. Just remember, nothing is guaranteed. We can only make educated guesses. Will The Fed Slow Their Roll While “Black Friday” usually marks the beginning of the retail shopping season, the question is whether the new “variant,” which is flaring concerns of additional lock-downs, will reverse the current economic recovery. As Barron’s notes, it will be worth watching the Fed closely. “Fixed-income markets are signaling that the Federal Reserve will have to increase interest rates sooner than expected, which could put a dent in the stock market. The yield on the 2-year Treasury note has gone from 0.5% in early November to 0.64% as of Wednesday. The move suggests that investors expect the Fed to raise interest rates to combat inflation that remains higher than expected because of soaring consumer demand and supply chains that are struggling to match demand. Indeed, minutes released Wednesday from the Fed’s meeting earlier this month show that members of the central bank are prepared to increase rates sooner than previously anticipated if inflation remains high.” Of course, this was before “Black Friday” sent yields plunging 10% lower in a single day. Suddenly, the bond market is starting to question the sanity of hiking rates in the face of an ongoing pandemic. While many pundits have suggested higher interest rates won’t matter to stocks, as we will discuss momentarily, they do matter and often matter a lot. The surge in the new variant gives the Fed an excuse to hold off tightening monetary policy even though inflationary pressures continue to mount. But, what is most important to the Fed is the illusion of “market stability.” What “Black Friday’s” plunge showed was that despite the Fed’s best efforts, “instability” is the most significant risk to the market and you. More on this in a moment. Time To Buy Oil? Once a quarter, I review the Commitment Of Traders report to see where speculators place their bets on bonds, the dollar, volatility, the Euro, and oil. In October’s update, I looked at oil prices that were then pushing higher as speculators were sharply increasing their net-long positioning on crude oil. We suggested then that “the current extreme overbought, extended, and deviated positioning in crude will likely lead to a rather sharp correction. (The boxes denote previous periods of exceptional deviations from long-term trends.) The dollar rally was the most crucial key to a view of potentially weaker oil prices. Given that commodities are globally priced in U.S. dollars, the strengthening of the dollar would reduce oil demand. To wit: “The one thing that always trips the market is what no one is paying attention to. For me, that risk lies with the US Dollar. As noted previously, everyone expects the dollar to continue to decline, and the falling dollar has been the tailwind for the emerging market, commodity, and equity ‘risk-on trade.” – June 2021 Since then, as expected, the dollar rally is beginning to weigh on commodity prices, and oil in particular. While the dollar could certainly rally further heading into year-end, oil prices are becoming much more attractive from a trading perspective. The recent correction did violate the 50-dma, which will act as short-term resistance. However, prices are beginning to reach more attractive oversold levels. There are also reasons to believe higher oil prices are coming. Higher Oil Prices Coming The Biden administration released oil from the “Strategic Petroleum Reserve,” attempting to lower oil prices. He also tasked the DOJ to “investigate oil companies for potential price gouging.” These actions are thinly veiled attempts to regain favor with voters but will not lower oil prices. Oil prices are NOT SET by producers. Instead, speculators and hedgers set oil prices on the NYMEX. Think about it this way: If oil companies are setting prices to “reap profits,” why did oil prices go below ZERO in 2020? Furthermore, would producers need to “hedge” current production against future delivery? There are two drivers reflecting positioning by speculators and hedgers: The expected supply and demand for oil; and, The value of the dollar. The more critical problem comes from the Administrations’ attack on production over “climate change” policies. As noted in Crude Investing: Energy Stocks & ESG (kailashconcepts.com): “This isn’t rocket science.  Look at the sharply lagging rig response to the rise in energy prices post the Covid crash. This is an anomaly.  According to history, there should be ~1,300 rigs in operation today based on current oil prices. With only ~480 rigs running today, oil’s prospects may be bright over the long haul.” With output at such low levels, OPEC+ refusing to increase production, and “inefficient clean energy” increasing demand on “dirty energy,” higher future prices are likely. If the economy falls into a tailspin, oil prices will fall along with demand, so nothing is assured. However, the ongoing decline in CapEx in the industry suggests production will continue to contract, leaving it well short of future demand. Chart courtesy of Kailash Concepts That is the perfect environment for higher prices. Higher Interest Rates Will Lead To Market Volatility Did “Black Friday’s” plunge send a warning about rates? Last week, we discussed that it isn’t a question of if, but only one of when. I showed the correlation between interest rates and the markets. With the sharp drop in rates, it is worth reminding you of the analysis. It is all about “instability.” The chart below is the monthly “real,” inflation-adjusted return of the S&P 500 index compared to interest rates. The data is from Dr. Robert Shiller, and I noted corresponding peaks and troughs in prices and rates. To try and understand the relationship between stock and bond returns over time, I took the data from the chart and broke it down into 46 periods over the last 121-years. What jumps is the high degree of non-correlation between 1900 and 2000. As one would expect, in most instances, if rates fell, stock prices rose. However, the opposite also was true. Rates Matter Notably, since 2000, rates and stocks rose and fell together. So bonds remain a “haven” against market volatility. As such, In the short term, the markets (due to the current momentum) can DEFY the laws of financial gravity as interest rates rise. However, as interest rates increase, they act as a “brake” on economic activity. Such is because higher rates NEGATIVELY impact a highly levered economy: Rates increases debt servicing requirements reducing future productive investment. Housing slows. People buy payments, not houses. Higher borrowing costs lead to lower profit margins. The massive derivatives and credit markets get negatively impacted. Variable rate interest payments on credit cards and home equity lines of credit increase, reducing consumption. Rising defaults on debt service will negatively impact banks which are still not as well capitalized as most believe. Many corporate share buyback plans and dividend payments are done through the use of cheap debt. Corporate capital expenditures are dependent on low borrowing costs. The deficit/GDP ratio will soar as borrowing costs rise sharply. Critically, for investors, one of the main drivers of assets prices over the last few years was the rationalization that “low rates justified high valuations.” Either low-interest rates are bullish, or high rates are bullish. Unfortunately, they can’t be both. What “Black Friday’s” plunge showed was the correlation between rates and equity prices remains. Such is due to market participants’ “risk-on” psychology. However, that correlation cuts both ways. When something changes investor sentiment, the “risk-off” trade (bonds) is where money flows. The correlation between interest rates and equities suggests that bonds will remain a haven against risk if something breaks given exceptionally high market valuations. The market’s plunge on “Black Friday” was likely a “shot across the bow.” It might just be worth evaluating your bond allocation heading into 2022. Tyler Durden Sun, 11/28/2021 - 10:30.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 28th, 2021

OLED DDI supply may fall short of demand in 2022

OLED display driver ICs (DDI) supply may fall short of demand in 2022, with the chip shortage likely to disrupt shipments for smartphones, according to industry sources......»»

Category: topSource: digitimesNov 25th, 2021

Vacuum pump supply to fall short of demand in 2022

The supply of vacuum pumps at major international vendors will be falling short of demand in 2022, buoyed by strong demand from IC foundries, according to fab toolmaker Forward Science......»»

Category: topSource: digitimesNov 23rd, 2021

BofA Is Bearish On Markets Ahead Of The 2022 "Rates Shock"

BofA Is Bearish On Markets Ahead Of The 2022 "Rates Shock" For those who have been following BofA CIO Michael Hartnett's sometimes disjointed thoughts and observations, dutifully jotted down in his weekly Flow Show report (and summarized here), it will come as no surprise that the Bank of America strategist has been turning decisively bearish in recent months (see BofA Chief Strategist: Markets Are About To Be Hit With Three Shocks; This Is How One Bank Will Trade The Bursting Of The Biggest Ever Asset Bubble In 2022; and ""2022: The Year Of The Rate Shock": The Fed's Policy Mistake Already Happened And Next Year Everyone Pays"). Even so, it was certainly helpful for Hartnett's clients (and our readers) to be presented with a more structured and organized version of the CIO's views for the year ahead, which is what he did overnight in his latest periodical The Thundering Word, titled appropriately "Fin de Siecle" in which he finally makes it clear that "we are market bearish" for many of the same reasons we have discussed previously namely that the "growth show" of 2020, which was followed by the "inflation shock" of 2021 will be followed by the "rates shock" in '22 (as described here). The sharply higher rates, a taste of which we got today when real rates spiked following news that Powell will be renominated for another 4 years... ... will tighten financial conditions via Wall St and/or policy action; and since asset prices are driven by rates & profits, with short rates rising in 2022 (as QE ends, threatening to invert the yield curve) and as EPS sharply slow... ... Hartnett expects low/negative and  volatile asset returns in '22 after 18 months of fat returns in crypto, credit & US equities. Hartnett's bearish views aside, the strategist admits that BofA economists and strategists predict robust GDP growth with weak China the outlier; and while inflation is predicted to be above consensus like GDP it too should decelerate next 12 months; All this leads to the bank's house view of 3 Fed rate hikes forecast in '22 (unlike Morgan Stanley which stubbornly expects no rate hikes in 2022 and with more covid lockdowns on the way, may well be right) with 10-year Treasuries ending the year at 2%; BofA also expects the US dollar & oil to remain well-bid (oil peaks around $117/barrel in Q2), and gold will appreciate. So with that macro background in mind, here is Hartnett summarizing 2021, or "The Year Behind"... The Year Behind: ’21 started with an insurrection, ended with inflation, narratives flipped from political “blue waves”, China credit/regulatory crackdowns, institutionalization of cryptocurrencies, US infrastructure, supply-chain disruptions and so on, but 3 dominant investment themes were… The Vaccine: number of global vaccinations against COVID-19 surged from 10 million jabs to over 7 billion; this in turn led to a "reopening" of the US & European economies and a surge in corporate profits (e.g. US EPS flipped from -20% in '20 to 49% in '21); at the same time the world was unable to say "end of COVID" and summer delta fear and “growth shock” in Aug/Sept engorged the bull via prolonging… The Stimulus: policy makers added almost $9tn in policy stimulus this year ($4tn fiscal, $5tn QE) to the $23tn announced in '20 ($15tn fiscal, $8tn QE); central banks remained exceptionally dovish & behind-the-curve, led by the Fed (see real rates); the vaccine & the stimulus led to… The Inflation: excess stimulus/demand clashed with insufficient supply across a wide range of sectors and markets including transportation, energy, goods, services, housing and labor. 2021 in Returns: Inflation explains commodities (up 46% for best year since '73) & government bonds (down 8% for worst year since '49)... ... as well as outperformance of energy & banks (Table 2). Excess liquidity helps explain the ascent of cryptocurrencies (a transformative technology). Dovish central banks & V-shape in EPS explain splendid performance of stocks ($1.0tn of institutional flows to stocks in ’21), particularly US stocks which have outperformed the RoW by most since '97 (19.8pps); note 10-year rolling outperformance of US stocks vs government bonds widest since 1964 (12.2pps). China & monetary tightening meant miserable performance of Emerging Markets (LatAm stocks relative to US just hit lowest level since LTCM crisis of 1998). * * * Which brings us to 2022: The Year Ahead, and the bank's three scenarios Base case… 2021-22 investment backdrop similar to early stagflation of late-60s, early-70s…period of inflation & interest rates breaking higher from secular low/stable trading ranges on back of high budget deficits, Vietnam, “Great Society” policies, civil unrest, political & acquiescent Fed; late-60s/70s “stagflation” winners were real assets, real estate, commodities, volatility, cash, EM, all of which held their own vs inflation; losers were bonds, credit, equities, tech, all of which ultimately struggled (see Stagflation Quilt chart below); we think we’re in the ’69-’71 period. Hartnett is convinced 2020 was the secular low point on inflation and interest rates; last 2 great inflection points for bond markets were 1966, 1980...2020 watershed driven by social/economic shifts from Wall St to Main St, Deregulation to Intervention, Globalization to Isolationism, Wealth to Health, Capital to Labor…COVID simply the accelerator. The CIO also believes that the 2020s will see secular bull markets in volatility & commodities beginning, while the bull market in stocks & credit ending (as shown in secular return charts 5-10); He also expects the US dollar to peak in 2022; note the "permanent portfolio" of 25/25/25/25 of cash, commodities, stocks, bonds appreciated 15.4% annualized in 2021 highlighting an era where greater diversification rewarded also beginning. For 2022, Hartnett sees consensus bullishly positioned for another year of “stocks go up, bonds go nowhere, and Fed does nothing.” And indeed, BofA's Bull & Bear Indicator does not suggest an immediate “short” opportunity but as in 2018 that can change quickly. Here Hartnett is quick to note that asset price sensitivity to central bank liquidity has been extremely high in past decade, and a global tapering has begun (G5 liquidity add was $8.5tn in 2020, $2.1tn in 2021, will be just $0.1 in 2022); meanwhile BofA's global EPS growth model peaked at 40% in June, it is currently running around 30% and predicts further EPS deceleration to 10%, CPI>5%, house prices >20%, largest worker shortages in 50 years…this most unconventional of cycles highly unlikely to follow a conventional path…the-mother-of-all bubbles in crypto & tech remains a “fat tail”. More prosaically stock market upside could continue if it becomes clear in H1 that Fed determined to keep real rates deeply negative (expect a market narrative that the Fed can’t “bankrupt” US Treasury), and US monetary policy dictated by a credo of Wall St "too big to fail" (this goes without saying but a "big fall in credit & stocks prices quickest route to recession, civil unrest, institutional crisis and so on"). Bear case… By far the biggest downside risk is Fed stays hawkish even if Wall Street corrects because fears of wage-price spiral grow; in addition a return of bond vigilantes across developed world (they returned in EM in 2021) causes bond & currency volatility. Even more extreme downside risks include a crypto-derivatives crash, geopolitical events related to China & Taiwan, and that a receding liquidity wave exposes credit-events to the detriment of private & public equity. Not even the bearish Hartnett expects these to materialize (just yet). Finally, this is how BofA will trade based on these views: Macro trades: long US$, MOVE, VIX (tighter financial conditions); long quality, defensives e.g. staples, telco, big pharma (EPS deceleration); long oil, energy (inflation); long real asset (best inflation hedge), short copper/semis (IP lower); short PE/XBD (wider credit spreads). Contrarian trades: long GT30 & gold (yield curve inversion/recession); long EM (spring peak in US dollar); long CRE/CMBS (global reopening); long China credit; long small cap value (hedge for US tech bubble); long income streams in commodity markets (dollar debasement); short Nasdaq (rates & regulation). Tyler Durden Mon, 11/22/2021 - 19:20.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 22nd, 2021

How To Make A Billion Dollars When Your Ships Are Stuck At Anchor

How To Make A Billion Dollars When Your Ships Are Stuck At Anchor Authored by Greg Miller via FreightWaves.com, Zim volumes fall due to port congestion, profits rise to $1.46 billion... Ocean carrier Zim, by far the largest U.S.-listed shipping company by market cap, just blew away the profit forecasts. Again. But it’s not all smooth sailing. The Israel-based shipping line (NYSE: ZIM) is particularly exposed to the trans-Pacific trade lane, where port congestion is now having an extremely negative effect on volumes. Ship scheduling data confirms significant and growing fallout to Zim’s trans-Pacific services in the fourth quarter. On Wednesday, the company reported net income for Q3 2021 of $1.46 billion, its highest quarterly profit ever, up 913% from net income of $144 million in Q3 2020. Earnings per share of $12.16 far exceeded the consensus forecast of $8.99. Adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization came in at $2.08 billion for Q3 2021. Zim’s new full-year guidance, raised again on Wednesday, implies Q4 2021 adjusted EBITDA of $1.96 billion-$2.96 billion, with a midpoint just below Q3 levels. Why Zim’s rates are higher Soaring freight rates have been the overwhelming driver of Zim’s returns. Its average rate per forty-foot equivalent unit was $6,452 in the third quarter, 2.7 times rates the year before and up 38% from rates in the second quarter of this year. Zim does not expect average rates to fall in Q4 versus Q3, despite indexes’ recent dip. Zim’s rates are higher than most other carriers’. It specifically concentrates on markets with the highest returns, as opposed to larger players with more global footprints like Denmark-listed Maersk. Zim also keeps a high emphasis on spot cargoes, which make up 50% of its trans-Pacific volume, as opposed to seeking more contract coverage for more sustainable returns, the strategy pursued by Maersk. The result: Zim’s average rates were 81% higher than Maersk’s in the third quarter. Chart: American Shipper based on data from financial filings Volume falls 4% vs Q2 But putting more spot-centric eggs in fewer baskets, as Zim does, creates risks. First, shipping-service demand can be more volatile, both short and long term. Second, some trade lanes are a lot more impaired by congestion than others. Case in point: the trans-Pacific, now more congested than any other trade lane, and also Zim’s most important market, accounting for 41% of Q3 volumes. Zim carried 884,000 twenty-foot equivalent units globally in the third quarter, down 4% from 921,000 TEUs in the second quarter (its Pacific volumes fell 6%). During the conference call Wednesday, CFO Xavier Destriau confirmed, “That was very much linked to the current bottlenecks, especially in the U.S. West Coast but also other locations on the East Coast.” Destriau maintained that the company does not expect further volume reductions in Q4 versus Q3. However, the company’s own online schedules, as well as information from a third party, tell a different story. At least when it comes to the trans-Pacific, volumes appear to be under much greater pressure in the current quarter. Zim schedules deteriorating Zim operates three weekly services from Asia to Los Angeles: ZEX, ZX2 and ZX3. In addition, it has a weekly service from Asia to the Pacific Northwest together with the 2M Alliance: ZP9. Scheduling data compiled by Copenhagen-based eeSea shows that ZEX volumes have been relatively unscathed by congestion, ZP9 a little more, and ZX2 and ZX3 extremely hard-hit. Simon Sundboell, CEO of eeSea, told American Shipper that of 26 sailings in July through December, only three ZEX sailings have been “blanked” (canceled). ZP9 has six blank sailings in the second half. But for ZX2, 18 of 27 sailings have been blanked — two-thirds of second-half sailings — including five in November-December. For ZX3: 13 of 26 or 50% of second-half sailings have been canceled, including a full suspension of the service through the month of December, said Sundboell. American Shipper analyzed second-half Los Angeles arrival and departure data for ships in ZEX, ZX2 and ZX3 listed on Zim’s website. A total of 10 Zim ship calls in these three services were made in Los Angeles in July (two less calls than normal), nine in August, seven in September and just four in October. The average turnaround time for ZEX, ZX2 and ZX3 ships in Los Angeles (including time at anchor as well as unloading and loading at berth) averaged 15.8 days for ships arriving in July, 17.2 in August, 23.7 in September and 28 days in October. Congestion fallout increased as the third quarter progressed and looks much worse in the fourth. Ships are now spending more time in Los Angeles or surrounding waters than they are crossing the Pacific in both directions. As for ZP9 Asia-Pacific Northwest service in Q4, given congestion in Seattle, the call in that port was temporarily omitted “to stabilize schedules” starting earlier this month, according to Alphaliner. In addition, the 4,253-TEU Zim Kingston has been taken out of service by a container fire on Oct. 23. It could be out of service for an extended period: As of Thursday, it was still at the same anchorage off the island of Vancouver Island where the fire occurred almost a month ago. Meanwhile, Zim ZP9 partner Maersk announced Friday that all rail service to and from the Vancouver port was halted due to severe weather. Countering congestion with more ships However, rates are so high that freight upside still vastly outweighs volume downside from congestion — and congestion itself supports high freight rates. Thus, despite all the scheduling chaos in the trans-Pacific and Zim’s own ships getting badly stuck in Los Angeles queues, Destriau characterized congestion as a positive driver of market fundamentals during the conference call. “We continue to view fundamentals as favorable,” Destriau said. “In the immediate term, supply chain challenges are persistent and there are no near-term signs of import weakness. The queue at the port of LA/Long Beach has recently reached as high as 80 vessels, with the ports continuing to struggle with the sheer volume of boxes arriving.  “Given inland logistics bottlenecks, such as truck driver shortages, chassis shortages and limited inland warehouse space, we expect these market conditions to continue at least over the next six months, supporting elevated freight rates.” Even if more ships are tied up at ports, ocean carriers can eventually counteract the negative effect on volume by adding more ships to their fleets, whether by chartering or buying them, as long as freight rates remain high enough to offset the extremely high cost of chartering or buying more ships. That’s exactly what Zim is doing.  Unlike other major listed carriers, Zim does not publish quarter-end fleet TEU stats; those disclosures are conspicuously absent. However, fleet information is available from Alphaliner, which currently lists Zim’s fleet size at 441,454 TEUs, up 32,431 TEUs or 8% from five months ago, not including recent acquisitions. Zim has chartered ships, not bought them, until recently. In October and November, it bought eight ships for an aggregate price of $355 million: five 4,250-TEU “classic Panamaxes,” one 2,553-TEU vessel and two 1,100-TEU ships. Alphaliner reported last month that four of the Panamax acquisitions — the Harpy Hunter, Heron Hunter, ALS Fauna and ALS Juno — went for a combined $240 million. “The value of classic Panamaxes has gone through the roof in the past 12 months, having risen from $15 million in October 2020 to approximately $60 million currently,” it commented. Zim also continues to be active in charter markets, despite the shortage of available tonnage and still-close-to-record-high charter rates. On Tuesday, Alphaliner reported that “ubiquitous” Zim recently chartered the 1,421-TEU Navi Baltic for three years at $30,000 a day; the 2,554-TEU ALS Venus for three years at $38,000 per day; two 11,860-TEU newbuilds, owned by Regional Container Lines to be delivered in late 2022 and early 2023, for five years at $65,000 per day; and six 5,300-TEU newbuilds ordered by Navios Partners (NYSE: NMM) for deliveries in 2023-24, for periods of 60-64 months at an average rate of $37,050 per day. Tyler Durden Fri, 11/19/2021 - 14:20.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytNov 19th, 2021

Futures Tumble, Oil And Treasury Yields Plunge As Lockdowns Return

Futures Tumble, Oil And Treasury Yields Plunge As Lockdowns Return Having briefly touched new all time highs of 4,723.5 overnight, S&P futures tumbled shortly after Europe opened as a fourth wave of the pandemic in Europe resulted in a new lockdown in Austria and the prospect of similar action in Germany wiped out earlier gains and forced stock markets down close to 1% as it overshadowed optimism about corporate earnings and the economic recovery. Friday is also a major options-expiry day, which could trigger volatility in equities. Two progressive Democratic senators said they oppose the renomination of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell to a second term, because he "refuses to recognize climate change" joining Elizabeth Warren in urging President Joe Biden to choose someone else. S&P and Dow futures fell tracking losses in banks, airlines, and other economically sensitive sectors. Uncertainty over rising inflation and the Federal Reserve's tightening also kept demand for value stocks low. At 745am Dow e-minis were down 218 points, or 0.609%. S&P 500 e-minis were down 12.25 points, or 0.26% and Nasdaq 100 e-minis were up 68 points, or 0.41%. With the lockdown trade storming back, Nasdaq futures hit a record high on Friday as investors sought economically stable sectors after a small delay in voting on President Joe Biden's $1.75 trillion spending bill, while fears of Europe-wide lockdowns sent yields plunging. The U.S. House of Representatives early on Friday delayed an anticipated vote on passage of Biden's social programs and climate change investment bill, and will instead reconvene at 8 a.m. EST (1300 GMT) to complete the legislation “Everyone is holding his and her breath to find out who will be the next Fed Chair,” said Ipek Ozkardeskaya, senior analyst at Swissquote. “More or less dovish, will it really matter? The one that will take or keep the helm of the Fed will need to hike rates at some point.” Among major premarket movers, Intuit Inc jumped 10.3% as brokerages raised their price targets on the income tax software company after it beat quarterly estimates and raised forecast. The stock was the top S&P 500 gainer in premarket trade. Chipmaker Nvidia also boosted Nasdaq futures, rising 1.7% in heavy trade after posting strong quarterly results late Wednesday. On the other end, Applied Materials dropped 5.7% after the chipmaker forecast first-quarter sales and profit below market estimates on supply chain woes. Oil firms Exxon and Chevron slipped 2.1% and 1.8% as crude prices sank, while big banks including JPMorgan and Bank of America were down between 0.9% and 1.1%, tracking a fall in U.S. Treasury yields. Carriers Delta Air Lines, United Airlines and American Airlines and cruiseliners Norwegian Cruise Line and Carnival Corp fell between 1.4% and 2.3%. Here are all the other notable movers: Farfetch (FTCH US) shares drop 23% after the online apparel retailer reported 3Q revenue that missed estimates and trimmed its FY forecast for digital platform gross merchandise value growth. Analysts see scope for the shares to stay in the “penalty box” in the near term, but recommend buying on weakness. Workday (WDAY US) analysts say that the software firm’s strong quarterly results and guidance were not quite enough to meet high expectations. The stock dropped as much as 11% in extended trading on Thursday. Intuit (INTU US) climbed 9.7% in premarket as analysts said the tax software company posted strong results that were ahead of expectations and raised its outlook. Several increased their price targets for the stock, including a new Street high at Barclays. Palo Alto Networks (PANW US) shares rise 2.8% in U.S. premarket trading after the cyber- security firm reports results and hikes full-year sales guidance, with RBC saying co. saw a strong quarter. Tesla (TSLA US) shares dip 0.5% in premarket trading. The EV maker’s price target is raised to a joint Street-high at Wedbush, with the broker saying that the EV “revolution” presents a $5t market opportunity over the next decade. Datadog (DDOG US) rises 1.8% after it is upgraded to outperform from sector perform at RBC, with the broker saying that it has more conviction on the software firm following its TMIT conference. Mammoth Energy (TUSK US) jumps as much as 34% in U.S. premarket trading after the energy-services company said a subsidiary has been awarded a contract by a major utility to help build electric-vehicle charging station infrastructure. Ross Stores (ROST US) shares dropped 2.2% in postmarket trading on Thursday after its profit outlook for fourth quarter missed the average analyst estimate. In Europe, banks and carmakers led the Stoxx Europe 600 Index down 0.3%, reversing early gains. Fears of fresh lockdowns have hit travel stocks, but boosted the delivery sector and other pandemic winners, with German meal-kit company HelloFresh jumping as much as 7.1% to a record. Stoxx Europe 600 index tumbled after Germany’s health minister said he couldn’t rule out a lockdown as infections surge relentlessly in the region’s largest economy. That came after Austria said it would enter a nationwide lockdown from Monday. Here are some of the biggest European movers today: Ocado shares jump as much as 8.4%, the most intraday since November 2020, after a Deutsche Bank note on joint venture partner Marks & Spencer highlighted scope for a potential transaction. VGP shares gain as much as 7.7% to a record after KBC raised its rating to accumulate from hold, based on a “strong” 10-month trading update. HelloFresh shares surge as much as 7.1% and other lockdown beneficiaries including Delivery Hero, Logitech and Zalando gain after the German health minister says a lockdown can’t be ruled out. Mall landlords Unibail and Klepierre and duty-free retailer Dufry drop. Truecaller shares rise as much as 14% after it received its first analyst initiations after last month’s IPO. Analysts highlighted the company’s potential for continued strong growth. JPMorgan called current growth momentum “unparalleled.” Hermes shares jump as much as 5.2% to a fresh record, rising for a seventh day, amid optimism that the stock may be added to the Euro Stoxx 50 Index as soon as next month. Shares also rise after bullish current- trading comments of peer Prada. Kingfisher shares drop as much as 5.8%, even after the home-improvement retailer said it expects profit to be toward the higher end of its forecast. Investor focus has probably shifted to 2022, and Friday’s update doesn’t have any guidance for next year, according to Berenberg. GB Group shares tumble as much as 18%, the most since October 2016, after the identity-verification software company raised about GBP300m in a placing of new shares at a discount. Mode Global shares sink as much as 19%, reversing most of this week’s gains, after it said some brands had withdrawn the company as an affiliate. In Fx, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index jumped at the London open and the greenback was higher versus all of its Group-of-10 fears apart from yen. Norway’s krone was the biggest loser as energy prices prices dropped after Austria announced a nationwide lockdown starting on Monday, while Germany’s health minister refused to rule out closures in the country.  The pound fell on the back of a stronger dollar; data showed U.K. retail sales rose for the first time in six months as consumers snapped up toys, sports equipment and clothing, while the cost of servicing U.K. government debt more than tripled in October from a year earlier due to surging inflation The euro plunged by 1% to a new YTD low of $1.1255 as the repricing in the front-end of euro options suggests the common currency is settling within a new range. The euro is also falling at the end of the week following the announcement that Austria will begin a 20-day full Covid-19 lockdown from Monday in response to surging case numbers which have far surpassed last year's peak. While fatalities remains well below the peak, they are accelerating and the government is clearly keen to arrest it before the situation potentially becomes much worse. With Germany seeing a similar trend, the question now becomes whether the regions largest economy will follow the same path. Its Health Minister, Jens Spahn, today suggested nothing can be ruled out and that they are in a national emergency. In rates, Treasury yields fell by around 4bps across the board and the bunds yield curve bull flattened, with money markets pushing back bets on a 10bps ECB rate hike further into 2023. Treasury 10-year yields richer by 4.5bp on the day at around 1.54% and toward lows of the weekly range -- bunds, gilts outperform Treasuries by 1bp and 1.5bp in the sector as traders reassess impact of future ECB rate hikes. Treasuries rally across the curve, following wider gains across EGB’s and gilts as investors weigh the impact of further European lockdowns amid a fourth wave of Covid-19. Flight-to-quality pushes Treasury yields lower by up to 5bp across front- and belly of the curve, which slightly outperform.  Bunds and Treasury swap spreads widen, while gilts move tighter as risk assets mostly trade to the downside and demand for havens increases on news regarding coronavirus restrictions. German 10-year swap spreads climbed above 50bps for the first time since March 2020. In commodities, spot gold is little changed around $1,860/oz, while base metals are in the green, with LME copper and aluminum leading peers. Oil tumbled with WTI and Brent contracts down well over 2%.  Brent crudes brief dip below $80 was short-lived on Thursday and prices were continuing to recover on the final trading day of the week until Austria announced its lockdown. Brent crude quickly reversed course and trades almost 2% lower on the day as it takes another run at $80. Oil has been declining over the last week as demand forecasts have been pared back, OPEC and the IEA have warned of oversupply in the coming months and the US has attempted to coordinate an SPR release with China and others. The market still remains fundamentally in a good position but lockdowns are now an obvious risk to this if other countries follow Austria's lead. A move below $80 could deepen the correction, perhaps pulling the price back towards the mid-$70 region. This looks more likely now than it did a day ago and if Germany announces similar measures, it could be the catalyst for such a move. Perhaps OPEC+ knows what it's talking about after all. Looking at To the day ahead now, there is no macro news; central bank speakers include ECB President Lagarde, Bundesbank President Weidmann, Fed Vice Chair Clarida, the Fed’s Waller and BoE Chief Economist Pill. Separately, data highlights include UK retail sales and German PPI for October. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures down 0.09% to 4,696.25 STOXX Europe 600 up 0.2% to 488.66 MXAP little changed at 199.11 MXAPJ down 0.2% to 648.18 Nikkei up 0.5% to 29,745.87 Topix up 0.4% to 2,044.53 Hang Seng Index down 1.1% to 25,049.97 Shanghai Composite up 1.1% to 3,560.37 Sensex down 0.6% to 59,636.01 Australia S&P/ASX 200 up 0.2% to 7,396.55 Kospi up 0.8% to 2,971.02 Brent Futures little changed at $81.17/bbl Gold spot up 0.1% to $1,860.34 U.S. Dollar Index up 0.43% to 95.96 German 10Y yield little changed at -0.32% Euro down 0.6% to $1.1304 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg Germany’s Covid crisis is about to go from bad to worse, setting the stage for a grim Christmas in Europe. With infections surging relentlessly and authorities slow to act amid a change in power, experts warn that serious cases and deaths will keep climbing Austria will enter a nationwide lockdown from Monday as a record spike in coronavirus cases threatens to overwhelm the country’s health care system The pundits are coming for the Fed and Chair Jerome Powell. Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic adviser to Allianz SE and a Bloomberg Opinion columnist, recently said the central bank has made one of the worst inflation calls in its history. Writing in the Financial Times, the economist Willem Buiter called on the Fed to abandon the more flexible inflation target it established last year Bitcoin continued its slide Thursday, falling for a fifth consecutive day as it slipped below $57,000 for the first time since October, in a retreat from record highs. The world’s largest cryptocurrency hasn’t slumped that long since the five days that ended May 16 House Democrats pushed expected passage of President Joe Biden’s $1.64 trillion economic agenda to Friday as Republican leader Kevin McCarthy delayed a vote with a lengthy floor speech that lasted into the early morning hours ECB President Christine Lagarde said policy makers “must not rush into a premature tightening when faced with passing or supply- driven inflation shocks” Markets are increasingly nervous about the common currency with the pandemic resurgent, geopolitical tensions rising and gas supply issues mounting A more detailed look at global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asia-Pac stocks traded mostly positive after the mixed performance stateside where the S&P 500 and Nasdaq notched fresh record closes, but cyclicals lagged as comments from Senator Manchin cast some uncertainty on the Build Back Better bill. The ASX 200 (+0.2%) was rangebound with upside in healthcare and consumer stocks offset by weakness in tech and a lacklustre mining sector. Crown Resorts (CWN AT) was the stellar performer after it received an unsolicited, non-binding takeover proposal from Blackstone (BX) valued at AUD 12.50/shr which boosted its shares by around 16%, although gains in the broader market were limited as COVID-19 concerns lingered following a further jump of cases in Victoria state. The Nikkei 225 (+0.5%) benefitted from a mostly weaker currency and after PM Kishida confirmed the details of the incoming stimulus package valued at a total JPY 79tln including JPY 56tln in fiscal spending. The KOSPI (+0.8%) was also positive but with gains initially capped as South Korean wholesale inflation surged to a 13-year high and further added to the case for the BoK to hike rates for the second time this year at next week’s meeting. The Hang Seng (-1.1%) and Shanghai Comp. (+1.1%) were mixed with the mainland kept afloat amid press reports that China is considering measures to reduce taxes and fees by up to CNY 500bln, although the mainland was initially slow to start after another liquidity drain by the PBoC and with stocks in Hong Kong spooked amid substantial losses in Alibaba following a miss on its earnings and Country Garden Services suffered on reopening from the announcement of a 150mln-share placement. Finally, 10yr JGBs were rangebound with mild gains seen after the modest bull flattening stateside, but with upside restricted amid the gains in Japanese stocks and lack of BoJ purchases, as well as the incoming fiscal spending and extra budget from the Kishida government. Top Asian News Bitcoin Falls Almost 20% Since Record as Crypto Bulls Retreat Singapore’s Insignia Ventures Intensifies Push Into Healthtech Binance Chief Zhao Buys His First Home in ‘Pro-Crypto’ Dubai Property Stocks Surge; Land Sale Rules Eased: Evergrande Update The earlier positive sentiment in Europe dissipated amid a string of back-to-back downbeat COVID updates – with Austria now resorting to a full-scale lockdown and Germany sounding alarms over their domestic COVID situation and not ruling out its own lockdown. European bourses flipped from the mostly positive trade at the open to a negative picture (Euro Stoxx 50 -0.5%; Stoxx 600 Unch), with headlines also flagging the European stock market volatility gauge jumping to three-week highs. It is also worth noting the monthly option expiries for stocks today, with desks pointing to the second-largest expiry day on record. US equity futures have also seen headwinds from the pullback in Europe, but US futures are mixed with the NQ (+0.4%) benefitting from the slide in yields. Back to Europe, Austria’s ATX (-1.0%) sit as the laggard after the Austrian Chancellor said a full domestic COVID lockdown will be imposed as of Monday for a maximum of 20 days with compulsory vaccination from 1st February 2022. Switzerland’s SMI (+0.2%) owes its gains to the defensive flows into healthcare propping up heavyweights Novartis (+0.5%) and Roche (+0.7%). Sectors overall are mostly negative with Healthcare the current winner, whilst Tech benefits from the yield slump and Basic Resources recover from yesterday’s slide as base metals rebound. The downside sees Banks on yield dynamics, whilst Oil & Gas lost the ranks as crude prices were spooked by the COVID headlines emanating from Europe. In terms of individual movers, Ocado (+6%) resides at the top of the FTSE 100 – with some citing a Deutsche Bank note which suggested shareholder Marks & Spencer could be mulling a buyout, although the note is seemingly speculation as opposed to chatter. Top European News Ryanair Drops London Listing Over Brexit Compliance Hassles ECB Mustn’t Tighten Despite ‘Painful’ Inflation, Lagarde Says Austria to Lock Down, Impose Compulsory Covid Vaccinations German Covid Measures May Bolster ECB Stimulus Stance: El-Erian In FX, it remains to be seen whether the Dollar can continue to climb having descended from the summit, and with no obvious fundamental drivers on the agenda in terms of US data that has been instrumental, if not quite wholly responsible for the recent bull run. However, external and technical factors may provide the Greenback and index with enough momentum to rebound further, as the COVID-19 situation continues to deteriorate in certain parts of Europe especially. Meanwhile, the mere fact that the DXY bounced off a shallower low and appears to have formed a base above 95.500 is encouraging from a chart perspective, and only the Yen as a safer haven is arguably capping the index ahead of the aforementioned w-t-d peak within 95.554-96.090 extremes. Ahead, more Fed rhetoric and this time via Waller and Clarida. EUR - The Euro has been hit hardest by the Greenback revival, but also the latest pandemic waves that have forced Austria into total lockdown and are threatening to see Germany follow suit. Moreover, EGBs are front-running the latest squeeze amidst risk-off trade in stocks, oil and other commodities to widen spreads vs Treasuries and the divergence between the ECB/Fed and other more hawkishly or less dovishly positioned. Hence, Eur/Usd has reversed further from circa 1.1374 through 1.1350 and 1.1300, while Eur/Yen is eyeing 128.50 vs almost 130.00 at one stage and Eur/Chf is probing fresh multi-year lows around 1.0450. NZD/GBP/AUD/CAD - All catching contagion due to their high beta, cyclical or activity currency stature, with the Kiwi back under 0.7000, Pound hovering fractionally above 1.3400, Aussie beneath 0.7250 and Loonie striving to contain declines beyond 1.2650 pre-Canadian retail sales against the backdrop of collapsing crude prices. JPY/CHF - As noted above, the Yen is offering a bit more protection than its US counterpart and clearly benefiting from the weakness in global bond yields until JGBs catch up, with Usd/Jpy down from 114.50+ towards 113.80, but the Franc is showing its allure as a port in the storm via the Euro cross rather than vs the Buck as Usd/Chf holds above 0.9250. In commodities, WTI and Brent front month futures retreated with the trigger point being back-to-back COVID updates – with Austria confirming a full-scale lockdown from Monday and Germany not ruling out its own lockdown. Crude futures reacted to the prospect of a slowdown in activity translating to softer demand. That being said, COVID only represents one factor in the supply/demand equation. Oil consuming nations are ramping up rhetoric and are urging OPEC+ to release oil. The White House confirmed the US discussed a possible joint release of oil from reserves with China and other countries, while it reiterated that it has raised the need for available oil supply in the market with OPEC. Meanwhile, the Japanese Cabinet said it will urge oil-producing nations to increase output and work closely with the IEA amid risks from energy costs. Further, energy journalists have also been flagging jitters of Chinese crude demand amid the likelihood of another tax probe into independent refiners. All in all, a day of compounding bearish updates (thus far) has prompted the contracts to erase all of their APAC gains, with WTI Dec just above USD 76/bbl (76.06-79.33/bbl range) and Brent Jan back under USD 79/bbl (78.75-82.24/bbl range). Elsewhere, spot gold saw a pop higher around the flurry of European COVID updates and despite a firmer Buck – pointing to haven flows into the yellow metal – which is nonetheless struggling to convincingly sustain a breach its overnight highs around USD 1,860/oz and we are attentive to a key fib at USD 1876/oz. Base metals prices are relatively mixed but have waned off best levels amid the risk aversion that crept into the markets, but LME copper holds onto a USD 9,500+/t status. US Event Calendar Nothing major scheduled Central Banks 10:45am: Fed’s Waller Discusses the Economic Outlook 12:15pm: Fed’s Clarida Discusses Global Monetary Policy Coordination DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap It was another mixed session for markets yesterday, with equities and other assets continuing to trade around their recent highs even as a number of risk factors were increasingly piling up on the horizon. By the close of trade, the S&P 500 had advanced +0.34% to put the index at its all-time high, whilst oil prices pared back their losses from earlier in the day to move higher. That said, there was more of a risk-off tone in Europe as the latest Covid wave continues to gather pace, with the STOXX 600 (-0.46%) snapping a run of 6 successive gains and being up on 17 out of the previous 19 days as it fell back from its all-time high the previous day, as haven assets including sovereign bonds were the beneficiaries. Starting with those equity moves, it was difficult to characterise yesterday’s session in some ways, since although the S&P advanced +0.34%, it was driven by a relatively narrow group of sectors, with only a third of the index’s components actually moving higher on the day. Indeed, to find a bigger increase in the S&P 500 on fewer advancing companies, one needs to go back to March 2000 (though it came close one day in August 2020, when the index advanced +0.32% on 153 advancing companies). Consumer discretionary (+1.49%) and tech (+1.02%) stocks were the only sectors to materially advance. Nvidia (+8.25%), the world’s largest chipmaker, was a key outperformer, and posted very strong third quarter earnings and revised higher fourth quarter guidance. Following the strong day, Nvidia jumped into the top ten S&P 500 companies by market cap, ending yesterday at number eight. The S&P gain may have been so narrow due to some negative chatter about President Biden’s build back better package, with CNN’s Manu Raju tweeting that Senator Joe Manchin “just told me he has NOT decided on whether to vote to proceed to the Build Back Better bill.” Manchin’s position in a 50-50 senate has given him an enormous amount of influence, and separate comments created another set of headlines yesterday on the Fed Chair decision, after The Hill reported Manchin saying that he’s “looking very favourably” at supporting Chair Powell if he were re-nominated, following a chat between the two about inflation. Mr Manchin is seemingly one of the most powerful people in the world at the moment. While the Senate still presents a hurdle for the President’s build back better bill, House Democrats are close to voting on the bill but couldn’t last night due to a three hour speech by House Republican leader McCarthy. It will probably happen this morning. This follows the Congressional Budget Office’s ‘score’ of the bill, which suggested the deficit would increase by $367bn as a result of the bill, higher figures than the White House suggested, but low enough to garner support from moderate House Democrats. Over in Europe there was a much weaker session yesterday, with the major equity indices falling across the continent amidst mounting concern over the Covid-19 pandemic. Germany is making another forceful push to combat the recent increase in cases, including expanded vaccination efforts, encouraging work from home, and restricting public transportation for unvaccinated individuals. Elsewhere, the Czech Republic’s government said that certain activities will be limited to those who’ve been vaccinated or had the virus in the last six months, including access to restaurants and hairdressers. Slovakia also agreed a similar move to prevent the unvaccinated accessing shopping malls, whilst Hungary is expanding its mask mandate to indoor spaces from Monday. Greece imposed further restrictions for its unvaccinated population. So a theme of placing more of the restrictions in Europe on the unvaccinated at the moment and trying to protect the freedoms of those jabbed for as long as possible. That risk-off tone supported sovereign bonds in Europe, with yields on 10yr bunds (-3.0bps), OATs (-4.1bps) and BTPs (-5.5bps) all moving lower. That was a larger decline relative to the US, where yields on 10yr Treasuries were only down -0.3bps to 1.59%, with lower real yields driving the decline. One asset class with some pretty sizeable moves yesterday was FX, where a bunch of separate headlines led to various currencies hitting multi-year records. Among the G10 currencies, the Swiss Franc hit its strongest level against the euro in over 6 years yesterday on an intraday basis. That came as the Covid wave has strengthened demand for haven assets, though it went on to weaken later in the day to close down -0.15%. Meanwhile, the Norwegian Krone was the weakest G10 performer (-0.72% vs USD) after the Norges Bank said it would be stopping its daily foreign exchange sales on behalf of the government for the rest of the month. Finally in EM there were some even bigger shifts, with the Turkish Lira falling to a record low against the US dollar, which follows the central bank’s decision to cut interest rates by 100bps, in line with expectations. And then in South Africa, the Rand also fell to its weakest in over a year, in spite of the central bank’s decision to hike rates, after the decision was interpreted dovishly. Overnight in Asia stocks are trading mostly higher led by the Nikkei (+0.45%), KOSPI (+0.43%), Shanghai Composite (+0.34%) and CSI (+0.18%). The Hang Seng (-1.76%) is sharply lower and fairly broad based but is being especially dragged down by Alibaba which dived -11% after it downgraded its outlook for fiscal year 2022 and missed sales estimate for the second quarter. Elsewhere in Japan headline CPI for October came in at +0.1% year-on-year (+0.2% consensus & +0.2% previous) while core CPI matched expectations at +0.1% year-on-year. The numbers reflect plunging mobile phone fees offsetting a 21% surge in gas prices. If the low mobile phone costs are stripped out, core inflation would be at 1.7% according to a Bloomberg calculation. Prime Minister Fumio Kishida is expected to deliver a bigger than expected stimulus package worth YEN 78.9 trillion ($690 bn) according to Bloomberg. We should know more tomorrow. Moving on futures are pointing to a positive start in US and Europe with S&P 500 (+0.42%) and DAX (+0.39%) futures both up. Turning to commodities, oil prices had been on track to move lower before paring back those losses, with Brent Crude (+1.20%) and WTI (+0.83%) both up by the close and edging up around half this amount again in Asia. That comes amidst continued chatter regarding strategic oil releases, and follows comments from a spokeswoman from China’s National Food and Strategic Reserves Administration, who Reuters reported as saying that they were releasing crude oil reserves. New York Fed President, and Vice Chair of the FOMC, John Williams, upgraded his assessment of inflation in public remarks yesterday. A heretofore stalwart member of team transitory, he noted that they wouldn’t want to see inflation expectations move much higher from here, and that recent price pressures have been broad-based, driving underlying inflation higher. Williams is one of the so-called core members of FOMC leadership, so his view carries some weight and is a useful barometer of momentum within the FOMC. Indeed, Chicago Fed President Evans, one of the most resolutely dovish Fed Presidents, expressed similar sentiment, recognising that rate hikes may need to come as early as 2022 given the circumstances. There wasn’t much in the way of data yesterday, though the weekly initial jobless claims from the US for the week through November 13 came in higher than expected at 268k (vs. 260k expected), and the previous week’s reading was also revised up +2k. That said, the 4-week moving average now stands at a post-pandemic low of 272.75k. Otherwise, the Philadelphia Fed’s manufacturing business outlook survey surprised to the upside at 39.0 in November (vs. 24.0 expected), the highest since April. That had signs of price pressures persisting, with prices paid up to 80.0, the highest since June, and prices received up to 62.9, the highest since June 1974. Finally, the Kansas City Fed’s manufacturing index for November fell to 24 (vs. 28 expected). To the day ahead now, and central bank speakers include ECB President Lagarde, Bundesbank President Weidmann, Fed Vice Chair Clarida, the Fed’s Waller and BoE Chief Economist Pill. Separately, data highlights include UK retail sales and German PPI for October. Tyler Durden Fri, 11/19/2021 - 08:11.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 19th, 2021

Futures Flat Amid Fresh Inflation Jitters; Yen Tumbles To 5 Year Low

Futures Flat Amid Fresh Inflation Jitters; Yen Tumbles To 5 Year Low Price action has been generally uninspiring, with US index futures and European stocks flat after UK inflation climbed faster than expected to the highest in a decade, heaping pressure on the Bank of England to raise interest rates, while Asian markets fell as investors fretted over early rate hikes by the Federal Reserve after strong retail earnings dented the stagflation narrative.  Ten-year Treasury yields held around 1.63% and the dollar was steady. Cryptocurrencies suffered a broad selloff, while oil extended losses amid talk of a coordinated U.S.-China release of reserves to tame prices. Gold rose. At 7:30 a.m. ET, Dow e-minis were down 14 points, or 0.04%. S&P 500 e-minis were up 1.25 points, or 0.0.3% and Nasdaq 100 e-minis were up 24.75 points, or 0.15%, boosted by gains in Tesla and other electric car-makers amid growing demand for EV makers. Target Corp was the latest big-name retailer to report positive results, as it raised its annual forecasts and beat profit expectations, citing an early start in holiday shopping. But similar to Walmart, shares of the retailer fell 3.1% in premarket trade as its third-quarter margins were hit by supply-chain issues. Lowe's rose 2.2% after the home improvement chain raised its full-year sales forecast on higher demand from builders and contractors, as well as a strong U.S. housing market. Wall Street indexes had ended higher on Tuesday after data showed retail sales jumped in October, and Walmart and Home Depot both flagged strength in consumer demand going into the holiday season. While the readings showed that a rise in inflation has not stifled economic growth so far, any further gains in prices could potentially dampen an economic recovery. Indeed, even as global stocks trade near all-time highs, worries are rising that growth could be derailed by inflation, the resurgent virus, or both. The question remains whether the jump in costs will prove transitory or become a bigger challenge that forces a sharper monetary policy response, roiling both shares and bonds. The market now sees a 19% probability of a rate hike by the Fed in their March 2022 meet, up from 11.8% probability last month. “The markets are still driven by uncertainty regarding how transitory inflation is,” according to Sebastien Galy, senior macro strategist at Nordea Investment Funds. “The market is assessing the situation about inflation -- what is in the price and what is not.” On the earnings front, Baidu reported a 13% jump in sales after growth in newer businesses such as the cloud helped offset a slowdown in its main internet advertising division. Nvidia and Cisco Systems are scheduled to report results later today In premarket trading, Tesla inexplicably rose as much as 2.4% in U.S. pre-market trading, extending a bounce from the previous session after CEO Elon Musk disclosed even more stock sales. Peers Rivian and Lucid added 0.9% and 8.8%, respectively. Here are some of the biggest U.S. movers today: Electric-vehicle makers Rivian Automotive (RIVN US), Lucid (LCID US) and Canoo (GOEV US) all move higher in U.S. premarket trading on heavy volumes, extending their gains and after Rivian and Lucid notched up milestones in their market values on Tuesday. The gains for Rivian on Tuesday saw its market capitalization surpass Germany’s Volkswagen, while Lucid’s market value leapfrogged General Motors and Ford. Tesla (TSLA US) shares rise 1.3% in U.S. premarket trading, extending the bounce the EV maker saw in the prior session and after CEO Elon Musk disclosed more share sales. Visa (V US) shares slip in U.S. premarket trading after Amazon.com said it will stop accepting payments using Visa credit cards issued in the U.K. starting next year. Boeing (BA US) gains 1.9% in premarket trading after Wells Fargo upgrades the airplane maker to overweight from equal weight in a note, saying the risk-reward is now skewed positive. Citi initiates a pair trade of overweight Plug Power (PLUG US) and underweight Ballard Power Systems (BLDP US), downgrading the latter to neutral on weak sales in China and likely delay in meaningful fuel cell adoption. Ballard Power falls 3.4% in premarket trading. La-Z-Boy (LZB US) climbed 7% in postmarket trading after it reported adjusted earnings per share for the fiscal second quarter of 2022 that beat the average analyst estimate and boosted its quarterly dividend. StoneCo’s (STNE US) shares fall as much as 9% in postmarket trading Tuesday after the fintech reported a weaker-than-expected adjusted results for the third quarter. Chembio Diagnostics (CEMI US) rose 11% in extended trading after saying it submitted an Emergency Use Authorization application to the U.S FDA for its new DPP SARS-CoV-2 Antigen test. European stocks treaded water with U.S. equity futures as the worst outbreak of Covid infections since the start of the pandemic held the rally in check. In the U.K., inflation climbed faster than expected to the highest in a decade, heaping pressure on the Bank of England to raise interest rates, pressing on the FTSE 100 to lag peer markets. Asian stocks fell, halting a four-day rally, as investors factored in higher Treasury yields and the outlook for U.S. monetary policy to assess whether the region’s recent gains were excessive.   The MSCI Asia Pacific Index slid as much as 0.7%, pulling back from a two-month high reached Tuesday. The banking sector contributed the most to Wednesday’s drop as the Commonwealth Bank of Australia reported cash earnings that were below some estimates. South Korea led the region’s decline, with the Kospi falling more than 1%, weighed down by bio-pharmaceutical firms. Asia’s stocks are taking a breather from a run-up driven by expectations for earnings to improve and economies to recover from quarters of pandemic-induced weakness. The benchmark is coming off a two-week gain of 1.5%.  “Shares are correcting recent gains, although I’d say it’s not much of a correction as the drop is mild,” said Tomo Kinoshita, a global market strategist at Invesco Asset Management in Tokyo. “The relatively solid economic performances in the U.S. and Europe signal positive trends for Asian exporters,” which will support equities over the long term, he said.  U.S. stocks climbed after data showed the biggest increase in U.S. retail sales since March, while results from Walmart Inc. and Home Depot Inc. showed robust demand. The 10-year Treasury yield hit 1.64%, gaining for a fourth day. Japanese equities fell, cooling off after a four-day advance despite the yen’s drop to the lowest level against the dollar since 2017. Service providers and retailers were the biggest drags on the Topix, which dropped 0.6%. Recruit and Fast Retailing were the largest contributors to a 0.4% loss in the Nikkei 225. The yen slightly extended its decline after tumbling 0.6% against the greenback on Tuesday. The value of Japan’s exports gained 9.4% in October, the slowest pace in eight months, adding to signs that global supply constraints are still weighing on the economy. Indian stocks fell, led by banking and energy companies, as worries over economic recovery and inflation hurt investors’ sentiment. The S&P BSE Sensex fell 0.5% to 60,008.33 in Mumbai, while the NSE Nifty 50 Index declined by 0.6%. The benchmark index has now dropped for five of seven sessions and is off 3.7% its record level reached on Oct. 18. All but five of the 19 sector sub-indexes compiled by BSE Ltd. declined, led by a gauge of real estate companies.  Fitch Ratings kept a negative outlook on India’s sovereign rating, already at the lowest investment grade, citing concerns over public debt that’s the highest among similar rated emerging-market sovereigns.  While high-frequency data suggests India’s economic recovery is taking hold, central bank Governor Shaktikanta Das said at an event on Tuesday that the recovery is uneven. “Feeble global cues are weighing on sentiment,” Ajit Mishra, a strategist with Religare Broking, said in a note. He expects indexes to slide further but the pace of decline to be gradual with Nifty having support at 17,700-17,800 level. Shares of Paytm are scheduled to start trading on Thursday after the digital payment company raised $2.5b in India’s biggest initial share sale. Local markets will be closed on Friday for a holiday.  Reliance Industries contributed the most to Sensex’s decline, decreasing 2.1%. The index heavyweight has lost 5% this week, headed for the biggest weekly drop since June 27. In rates, Treasuries were steady with yields slightly richer across the curve and gilts mildly outperforming after paring early losses. Treasury yields except 20-year are richer by less than 1bp across curve with 30-year sector outperforming slightly; 10-year yields around 1.63% after rising as high as 1.647% in early Asia session. Focal points for U.S. session include 20-year bond auction -- against backdrop of Fed decision to not taper in the sector, made after last week’s poorly bid 30-year bond sale, and seven Fed speakers scheduled. The $23BN 20-year new issue at 1pm ET is first at that size after cuts announced this month; WI yield at 2.06% is 4bp richer than last month’s, which tailed the WI by 2.5bp. In Europe, gilts richen slightly across the short end, short-sterling futures fade an open drop after a hot inflation print. Peripheral spreads are marginally wider to core. In FX, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index drifted after earlier rising to its highest level in over a year, spurred by strong U.S. retail sales and factory output data Tuesday; the greenback traded mixed versus its Group-of-10 peers though most currencies were consolidating recent losses against the greenback. The pound reached its strongest level against the euro in nearly nine months after U.K. inflation climbed faster than expected to the highest in a decade, heaping pressure on the Bank of England to raise interest rates. The Australian dollar hit a six-week low as third quarter wage data missed the central bank’s target, prompting offshore funds to sell the currency; the three-year yield fell back under 1%. The yen declined to its lowest level in more than four years as growing wagers of quicker policy normalization in the U.S. contrasted with the outlook in Japan, where interest rates are expected to be kept low. Super-long bonds fell. Volatility broke through the recent calm in currency markets, where the cost of hedging against volatility in the euro against the dollar over the next month climbed the most since the pandemic struck in March 2020. The move comes as traders bake in bets on faster rate hikes to curb inflation. The Turkish lira extended the week’s downward move, weakening another 2% against the dollar after comments from Erdogan sent the USDTRY hitting record highs of 10.5619 The Chinese yuan advanced to its highest level since 2015 against a basket of trading partners’ currencies following the dollar’s surge. Bloomberg’s replica of the CFETS basket index rises 0.3% to 101.9571, closer to the level that triggered a shock devaluation by the PBOC in 2015, testing the central bank’s tolerance before stepping in with intervention. In commodities, crude futures dropped as the market weighs the potential for a join U.S.-China stockpile-reserve release. WTI is down more than 1%, back on a $79-handle; Brent slips back toward $81.50, trading near the middle of this week’s range. Most base metals are under pressure with LME copper down as much as 1.4%. Spot gold adds $10 near $1,860/oz. European gas surged to the highest level in a month as delays to a controversial new pipeline from Russia stoked fears of a supply shortage with winter setting in. Cryptocurrencies remained lower after a tumble, with Bitcoin steadying around the $60,000 level. Looking at the day ahead now, and data releases include October data on UK and Canadian CPI, as well as US housing starts and building permits. Central bank speakers include ECB President Lagarde and the ECB’s Schnabel, the Fed’s Williams, Bowman, Mester, Waller, Daly, Evans and Bostic, and the BoE’s Mann. Finally, the ECB will be publishing their Financial Stability Review, and earnings releases today include Nvidia, Cisco, Lowe’s and Target. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures little changed at 4,696.00 STOXX Europe 600 up 0.1% to 489.79 MXAP down 0.5% to 200.06 MXAPJ down 0.4% to 656.01 Nikkei down 0.4% to 29,688.33 Topix down 0.6% to 2,038.34 Hang Seng Index down 0.2% to 25,650.08 Shanghai Composite up 0.4% to 3,537.37 Sensex down 0.4% to 60,064.33 Australia S&P/ASX 200 down 0.7% to 7,369.93 Kospi down 1.2% to 2,962.42 Brent Futures down 0.8% to $81.79/bbl Gold spot up 0.5% to $1,859.93 U.S. Dollar Index little changed at 95.95 German 10Y yield little changed at -0.25% Euro little changed at $1.1310 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg Bond traders are bracing for a key test Wednesday as the Treasury looks to sell its first long-dated debt since inflation worries spooked buyers at last week’s poorly received 30-year auction Increasingly stretched prices in property and financial markets, risk-taking by non-banks and elevated borrowing pose a threat to euro-area stability, the European Central Bank warned Germany is giving investors a rare chance to grab some of Europe’s safest and positive-yielding debt. The country will sell one billion euros ($1.13 billion) of its longest-dated debt at 10:30 a.m. London on Wednesday. The country’s 30-year notes are currently trading with a yield 0.09%. It’s a paltry rate, but probably the last time for a while that Germany will offer the maturity ECB Governing Council member Olli Rehn says euro- area inflation is accelerating due to increasing demand pushing up the price of energy and supply bottlenecks, according to interview in Finland’s Talouselama magazine The yuan’s advance to a six-year high versus China’s trading partners this week has investors asking how far the central bank will let the rally run. The yuan extended gains on Wednesday against a basket of 24 currencies of the nation’s trading partners, bringing it close to the level that triggered a shock devaluation by the People’s Bank of China in 2015 Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan vowed to continue fighting for lower interest rates, sending a clear signal to investors a day before the central bank sets its policy. The lira weakened A more detailed look at global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asian equity markets traded mixed and struggled to sustain the positive lead from the US where better than expected Industrial Production and Retail Sales data spurred the major indices, in which the S&P 500 reclaimed the 4,700 level and briefly approached to within four points of its all-time high. ASX 200 (-0.7%) was led lower by underperformance in the top-weighted financials sector amid weakness in the largest lender CBA despite a 20% jump in quarterly cash profit, as operating income was steady and it noted that loan margins were significantly lower. Mining related stocks also lagged in Australia due to the recent declines in global commodity prices amid the stronger USD and higher US yields. Nikkei 225 (-0.4%) retraced its opening gains after disappointing Machinery Orders and miss on Exports which grew at the slowest pace in eight months, while the KOSPI (-1.2%) suffered due to virus concerns with daily infections at the second highest on record for South Korea. Hang Seng (-0.3%) and Shanghai Comp. (+0.4%) were varied with Hong Kong dragged lower by tech stocks including NetEase post-earnings, while the mainland was choppy as markets continued to digest the recent Biden-Xi meeting that was described by President Biden as a 'good meeting' and in which they discussed the need for nuclear “strategic stability” talks. US and China also agreed to provide access to each other’s journalists, although there were also comments from Commerce Secretary Raimondo that China is not living up to phase 1 trade commitments and it was reported that China is to speed up plans to replace US and foreign tech. Finally, 10yr JGBs were flat with demand hampered following the declines in T-notes, although downside was stemmed amid the flimsy sentiment across Asia-Pac trade and with the BoJ also in the market for JPY 925bln of JGBs mostly concentrated in 1-3yr and 5-10yr maturities. Top Asian News Asia Stocks Set to Snap Four-Day Advance as Kospi Leads Decline Gold Rises as Fed Officials Feed Debate on Inflation Response Deadly Toxic Air Chokes Delhi as India Clings to Coal Power PBOC May Start Raising Rates by 10bps Every Quarter in 2022: TD European equities (Stoxx 600 +0.1%) trade with little in the way of firm direction as the Stoxx 600 lingers around its ATH printed during yesterday’s session. The handover from the APAC session was mostly a softer one after the region failed to sustain the positive lead from the US which saw the S&P 500 approach within four points of its all-time high. Stateside, US futures are just as uninspiring as their European counterparts (ES flat) ahead of another busy day of Fed speak and pre-market earnings from retail names Target (TGT) and TJX Companies (TJK) with Cisco (CSCO) and NVIDIA (NVDA) due to report after-hours. Markets still await a decision on the next Fed Chair which President Biden said will come in around four days yesterday; as it stands, PredictIt assigns a circa 65% chance of Powell winning the renomination. Sectors in Europe have a marginal positive tilt with Media names outperforming peers alongside gains in Vivendi (+1.0%) after Italian prosecutors asked a judge to drop a case against Vivendi's owner and CEO for alleged market manipulation. Travel & Leisure names are the notable underperformer amid losses in sector heavyweight Evolution Gaming (-9.6%) who account for 14% of the sector with the Co. accused of taking illegal wagers. In terms of individual movers, Siemens Healthineers (+4.6%) is one of the best performers in the region after the Co. noted that revenues are on track to grow 6-8% between 2023 and 2025. UK Banking names such as Lloyds (+1.3%) and Natwest (+1.1%) have benefitted from the favourable rate environment in the UK with today’s inflation data further cementing expectations for a move in rates by the BoE next month. Conversely, this acted as a drag on the UK homebuilder sector at the open before moves were eventually scaled back. SSE (-4.5%) underperforms after announcing a GBP 12.5bln investment to accelerate its net zero ambitions. Top European News Epstein’s Paris Apartment Listed for $14 Million, Telegraph Says Volkswagen Shares Stall as Analysts Doubt Its EV Street Cred Germany to Move Ahead With Tighter Covid Curbs Amid Record Cases U.K. Urges EU Not to Start Trade War If Brexit Deal Suspended In FX, the Greenback extended Tuesday’s post-US retail sales and ip gains to set new 2021/multi-year highs overnight when the index hit 96.266 and several Dollar pairs probed or crossed psychological round numbers. However, the latest bull run has abated somewhat amidst some recovery gains in certain rival currencies and a general bout of consolidation ahead of housing data, another raft of Fed speakers and Usd 23 bn 20 year supply that will be of note after a bad debut for new long londs last week, not to mention tepid receptions for 3 and 10 year offerings prior to that. NZD/AUD - A marked change in the tide down under as the Aud/Nzd cross reverses sharply from around 1.0450 to sub-1.0400 and gives the Kiwi enough impetus to regain 0.7000+ status vs its US peer with extra incentive provided by NZ PM Ardern announcing that the entire country is expected to end lockdown and move to a new traffic light system after November 29, while Auckland’s domestic borders will reopen from December 15 for the fully vaccinated and those with negative COVID-19 tests. Conversely, the Aussie is struggling to stay within sight of 0.7300 against its US counterpart in wake of broadly in line Q3 wage prices that leaves the y/y rate still some way short of the 3% pace deemed necessary to lift overall inflation by the RBA. GBP/CAD - Sterling is striving to buck the overall trend with help from more forecast-topping UK data that should give the BoE a green light for lifting the Bank Rate in December, as headline CPI came in at 4.2% y/y, core at 3.4% and PPI prints indicate more price pressure building in the pipeline. Cable printed a minor new w-t-d peak circa 1.3474 in response before waning and Eur/Gbp fell below the prior y-t-d low and 0.8400, but is now back above awaiting more news on the Brexit front and a speech from one of the less hawkish MPC members, Mann. Elsewhere, the Loonie is hovering around 1.2550 vs the Greenback and looking toward Canadian inflation for some fundamental direction as oil prices continue to fluctuate near recent lows, but Usd/Cad may also be attracted to decent option expiry interest between 1.2540-55 in 1.12 bn. CHF/EUR/JPY - All straddling or adjacent to round numbers against the Dollar, but the Franc lagging below 0.9300 on yield differentials, while the Euro has recovered from a fresh 2021 trough under 1.1300 and Fib support at 1.1290 to fill a gap if nothing else, and the Yen just defended 115.00 irrespective of disappointing Japanese machinery orders and internals within the latest trade balance. In commodities, WTI and Brent benchmarks are pressured this morning but the magnitude of the action, circa USD 0.70/bbl at the time of writing, is less pronounced when compared to the range of the week thus far and particularly against last week’s moves. Newsflow has been slim and the downside action has arisen without fresh catalysts or drivers; note, participants are cognisant of influence perhaps being exerted by today’s WTI Dec’21 option expiry. To briefly surmise the morning’s action, Vitol executives provided bullish commentary citing limited capacity to deal with shocks and on that theme, there were reports of an explosion at an oil pipeline in Southern Iran, said to be due to aging equipment. This, alongside reports that Belarus is restricting oil flows to Poland for three-days for maintenance purposes, have not steadied the benchmarks. Elsewhere, last night’s private inventories were mixed but bullish overall, with the headline a smaller than expected build and gasoline a larger than expected draw. On gasoline, some desks posit that this draw may serve to increase pressure for a US SPR release, and as such look to today’s EIA release which is expected to print a gasoline draw of 0.575M. Moving to metals, spot gold and silver are firmer this morning but, in a similar vein to crude, remain well within familiar ranges as specific catalysts have been light and initial USD action has largely fizzled out to the index pivoting the U/C mark. More broadly, base metals are pressured as inventories of iron ore are at their highest for almost three years in China as demand drops, with this having a knock-on impact on coking coal, for instance. US Event Calendar 7am: Nov. MBA Mortgage Applications, prior 5.5% 8:30am: Oct. Building Permits, est. 1.63m, prior 1.59m, revised 1.59m 8:30am: Oct. Building Permits MoM, est. 2.8%, prior -7.7%, revised -7.8% 8:30am: Oct. Housing Starts MoM, est. 1.5%, prior -1.6%; Housing Starts, est. 1.58m, prior 1.56m DB's Henry Allen concludes the overnight wrap Even as inflation jitters remained on investors’ radars, that didn’t prevent risk assets pushing onto fresh highs yesterday, as investor sentiment was bolstered by strong economic data and decent corporate earnings releases. In fact by the close of trade, the S&P 500 (+0.39%) had closed just -0.02% beneath its all-time closing record, in a move that also brought the index’s YTD gains back above +25%, whilst Europe’s STOXX 600 (+0.17%) hit an all-time high as it posted its 16th gain in the last 18 sessions. Starting with the data, we had a number of positive US releases for October out yesterday, which echoed the strength we’d seen in some of the other prints, including the ISMs and nonfarm payrolls that had both surprised to the upside in the last couple of weeks. Headline retail sales posted their biggest gain since March, with a +1.7% advance (vs. +1.4% expected), whilst the measure excluding autos and gas stations was also up by a stronger-than-expected +1.4% (vs. +0.7% expected). Then we had the industrial production numbers, which showed a +1.6% gain in October (vs. +0.9% expected), though it’s worth noting around half of that increase was a recovery from Hurricane Ida’s effects. And that came against the backdrop of solid earnings results from Walmart and Home Depot as well earlier in the session. They saw Walmart raise their full-year guidance for adjusted EPS to around $6.40, up from $6.20-$6.35 previously, whilst Home Depot reported comparable sales that were up +6.1%. To be honest it was difficult to find much in the way of weak data, with the NAHB’s housing market index for November up to a 6-month high of 83 (vs. 80 expected). Amidst the optimism however, concerns about near-term (and longer-term) inflation pressures haven’t gone away just yet, and the 5yr US breakeven rose again, increasing +1.1bps yesterday to an all-time high of 3.21%. Bear in mind that just 12 days ago (before the upside CPI release) that measure stood at 2.89%, so we’ve seen a pretty sizeable shift in investor expectations in a very short space of time as they’ve reacted to the prospect inflation won’t be as transitory as previously believed. The increase was matched by a +1.3bps increase in nominal 5yr yields to a post-pandemic high of 1.27%. The 10yr yield also saw a slight gain of +1.9bps to close at 1.63%, and this morning is up a further +0.7bps. Against this backdrop, the dollar index (+0.58%) strengthened further to its highest level in over a year yesterday, though the reverse picture has seen the euro weaken beneath $1.13 this morning for the first time since July 2020. Speaking of inflation, there were fresh pressures on European natural gas prices yesterday, which surged by +17.81% to €94.19 per megawatt-hour. That’s their biggest move higher in over a month, and follows the decision from the German energy regulator to temporarily suspend the certification of the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, adding further short-term uncertainty to the winter outlook. UK natural gas futures (+17.15%) witnessed a similar surge, and their US counterparts were also up +3.19%. Elsewhere in the energy complex, Brent crude (+0.46%) oil prices moved higher as well. Overnight in Asia, equity indices are trading lower this morning including the CSI (-0.05%), the Nikkei (-0.45%) and the Hang Seng (-0.55%), though the Shanghai Composite (+0.19%) has posted a modest advance. There were also some constructive discussions in the aftermath of the Biden-Xi summit the previous day, with US national security adviser Jake Sullivan saying that the two had spoken about the need for nuclear “strategic stability” talks, which could offer the prospect of a further easing in tensions if they do come about. Looking forward, futures are indicating a muted start in US & Europe later on, with those on the S&P 500 (-0.03%) and the DAX (-0.15%) pointing to modest declines. Elsewhere, markets are still awaiting some concrete news on who might be nominated as the next Fed Chair, though President Biden did say to reporters that an announcement would be coming “in about four days”, so investors will be paying close attention to any announcements. Senator Sherrod Brown, who chairs the Senate Banking Committee, who earlier in the week noted a pick was imminent, followed up by proclaiming he was “certain” that the Senate would confirm either of Chair Powell or Governor Brainard. Staying on the US, as Congress waits for the Congressional Budget Office’s score on Biden’s social and climate spending bill, moderate Democratic Senator Manchin noted continued uncertainty about the bill’s anti-inflationary bona fides. Elsewhere, the impending debt ceiling has worked its way back into the spotlight, with Treasury Secretary Yellen saying that she’ll soon provide updates on how much cash the Treasury will have to pay the government’s bills. The market has started to price in at least some risk, with yields on Treasury bills maturing in mid-to-late December higher than neighbouring maturities, and the Washington Post’s Tony Romm tweeted yesterday that the new deadline that the Treasury was expected to share soon was on December 15. Turning to Germany, coalition negotiations are continuing between the centre-left SPD, the Greens and the liberal FDP, and yesterday saw SPD general secretary Lars Klingbeil state that “The goal is very clear, to have a completed coalition agreement in the next week”. We’ve heard similar comments from the Greens’ general secretary, Michael Kellner, who also said that “We aim to achieve a coalition agreement next week". One issue they’ll have to grapple with is the resurgence in Covid-19 cases there, and Chancellor Merkel and Vice Chancellor Scholz (who would become chancellor if agreement on a traffic-light coalition is reached) are set to have a video conference with regional leaders tomorrow on the issue. Staying on the pandemic, it’s been reported by the Washington Post that the Biden administration will announce this week that it plans to purchase 10 million doses of Pfizer’s Covid pill. The company will submit data for the pill to regulators before Thanksgiving. It’s not just the US that will benefit from Pfizer’s pill however, as the pharmaceutical company will also license generic, inexpensive versions of the pill to low- and middle-income countries, which should be a global boost in the fight against the virus. Looking at yesterday’s other data, the main release came from the UK employment numbers, which showed that the number of payrolled employees rose by +160k in October, whilst the unemployment rate in the three months to September fell to 4.3% (vs. 4.4% expected). That release was better than the Bank of England’s MPC had expected in their November projections, and sterling was the top-performing G10 currency yesterday (+0.06% vs. USD) as the statistics were seen strengthening the case for a December rate hike. In response to that, gilts underperformed their European counterparts, with 10yr yields up +2.7bps. That contrasted with yields on 10yr bunds (-1.4bps), OATs (-1.8bps) and BTPs (-2.6bps), which all moved lower on the day. Interestingly, that divergence between bunds and treasury yields widened further yesterday, moving up to 188bps, the widest since late-April. To the day ahead now, and data releases include October data on UK and Canadian CPI, as well as US housing starts and building permits. Central bank speakers include ECB President Lagarde and the ECB’s Schnabel, the Fed’s Williams, Bowman, Mester, Waller, Daly, Evans and Bostic, and the BoE’s Mann. Finally, the ECB will be publishing their Financial Stability Review, and earnings releases today include Nvidia, Cisco, Lowe’s and Target. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/17/2021 - 07:50.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytNov 17th, 2021

Hazelton Capital Partners 3Q21 Commentary: REGI And MU

Hazelton Capital Partners commentary for the third quarter ended September 2021, discussing their top holdings; Renewable Energy Group Inc (NASDAQ:REGI) and Micron Technology, Inc. (NASDAQ:MU). Q3 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Dear Partner, Hazelton Capital Partners, LLC (the “Fund”) declined by 7.8% from May 1, 2021 through September 30, 2021 and has returned […] Hazelton Capital Partners commentary for the third quarter ended September 2021, discussing their top holdings; Renewable Energy Group Inc (NASDAQ:REGI) and Micron Technology, Inc. (NASDAQ:MU). if (typeof jQuery == 'undefined') { document.write(''); } .first{clear:both;margin-left:0}.one-third{width:31.034482758621%;float:left;margin-left:3.448275862069%}.two-thirds{width:65.51724137931%;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element input{border:0;border-radius:0;padding:8px}form.ebook-styles .af-element{width:220px;float:left}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer{width:115px;float:left;margin-left: 6px;}form.ebook-styles .af-element.buttonContainer input.submit{width:115px;padding:10px 6px 8px;text-transform:uppercase;border-radius:0;border:0;font-size:15px}form.ebook-styles .af-body.af-standards input.submit{width:115px}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy{width:100%;font-size:12px;margin:10px auto 0}form.ebook-styles .af-element.privacyPolicy p{font-size:11px;margin-bottom:0}form.ebook-styles .af-body input.text{height:40px;padding:2px 10px !important} form.ebook-styles .error, form.ebook-styles #error { color:#d00; } form.ebook-styles .formfields h1, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-logo, form.ebook-styles .formfields #mg-footer { display: none; } form.ebook-styles .formfields { font-size: 12px; } form.ebook-styles .formfields p { margin: 4px 0; } Get The Full Series in PDF Get the entire 10-part series on Charlie Munger in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues. (function($) {window.fnames = new Array(); window.ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';}(jQuery));var $mcj = jQuery.noConflict(true); Q3 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more Dear Partner, Hazelton Capital Partners, LLC (the “Fund”) declined by 7.8% from May 1, 2021 through September 30, 2021 and has returned 7.0% year-to-date. By comparison, the S&P 500 returned 0.6% during the same quarter and 15.9% year-to-date. The Quarter in Review Hazelton Capital Partners ended the 3rd quarter with a portfolio of 16 equity positions and a cash level of less than 10% of assets under management. The top five portfolio holdings, which are equal to roughly 57% of the Fund’s net assets, are: Renewable Energy Group Inc (NASDAQ:REGI), Micron Technology, Inc. (NASDAQ:MU), Caesars Entertainment Inc (NASDAQ:CZR), Apple Inc (NASDAQ:AAPL), and DXC Technology Co (NYSE:DXC). Renewable Energy Group and Micron Technology were responsible for the majority of the portfolio’s quarterly decline, falling 18% and 14% respectively in the quarter. Both companies had earnings that beat expectations and in REGI’s case, guided for earnings slightly better for the upcoming quarter. In September, the S&P 500 declined nearly 5% as slowing supply chains, disappointing employment numbers, and the delta variant began to weigh on consumer spending. By October 19, the market had not only quickly recovered from the selloff but continued its upward climb. Market sentiment has become very reactionary as investors, fearful of a market reversal, are quick to sell stocks on any negative outlook. At the same time, not wanting to miss out on the upside, investors are crowding into technology names that have little exposure to supply chains or staffing issues (technology jobs pay well and are coveted), especially with the flexibility to work remotely. This bifurcated market will continue until market sentiment becomes less reactionary. Renewable Energy Group (REGI) - Current Holding Since the beginning of the year, Renewable Energy Group’s share price has declined over 35% and nearly 60% since February when Hazelton Capital Partners cut its position in half. During the 3rd quarter, Hazelton Capital Partners repurchased another tranche, returning REGI to the Fund’s largest portfolio holding with a share count greater than where the position started the year. Renewable Energy Group continues to execute well in a market where supply and demand pressures remain both dynamic and uncertain. Beneath the veneer of a company that has a track record of meeting/beating its revenue and profit guidance, lies a management team whose main focus is on its supply chain and logistic operations. REGI leverages its competitive edge at both procuring cheap feedstocks and delivering its refined biodiesel & renewable diesel to the highest value markets while growing downstream opportunities. The company recently announced partnerships with both GoodFuels, which supplies biofuels to the marine industry and Canadian National Railway. Both companies are looking to expand biodiesel into their fuel mix to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. In October of 2021, Renewable Energy Group broke ground on its 250 million gallon/year (mmgy) renewable diesel refinery expansion at its Geismar, Louisiana refinery. The $950 million project is expected to come online by 2023, achieving a full run rate by 2024. With debt of $550 million and a net cash position of roughly $500 million, REGI’s balance sheet is prepared for the upcoming expansion. About 80% of the long lead items have been procured, and their prices locked in. The construction costs will be spread out over the upcoming years, with 15% of the total construction costs hitting in 2021, 45% in 2022, and the remainder in 2023. The nameplate capacity of the new refinery is 250mmgy but given that all of REGI’s refineries have an effective capacity that exceeds their nameplate, one can expect that Geismar will be producing over 400mmgy (Geismar 1st refinery effective capacity should benefit from site improvements as well). That will greatly change Renewable Energy Group’s renewable diesel mix from 17% to 46% of total production and have a meaningful impact on the company’s future margins and cash flows. Micron Technology (MU) - Current Holding It’s hard to explain how shares of Micron Technology, manufacture of DRAM and NAND semiconductor chips, can fall during a global chip shortage. In most industries, focusing on demand can give you a clear insight into what lays ahead for a company. Today, the memory and storage chip industry is no different. However, in the past, companies focused on market share led to the reckless build out of chip fabrication plants (FABs), oversupply, falling average selling prices (ASPs) of memory and storage chips, lower margins, and declining cash flows. As the industry consolidated – there are now just 3 major producers of DRAM and 5 on the NAND side – rational behavior among the key players began to take hold as competitors began focusing more on R&D. Currently, chip pricing remains cyclical although less so than in the past and that cyclicality has a long-term upward bias. The ongoing transition to newer and more robust platforms (3D 176-layer NAND & 1-Alpha node DRAM) has provided the memory and storage chip industry with improved supply capacity under its current manufacturing footprint, ultimately pressuring ASPs. Over the past three years, as most of the large platform conversions have already taken place, being able to add more bits per wafer has reached a saturation point. With no major FAB build outs planned in the near-term by competitors Samsung or SK Hynix, constrained supply and flattening cost curves should lead to durable and upward sloping ASPs once the recent volatility from the chip shortage subsides. Currently Micron Technology trades at just 8x 2022 estimate earnings. MU is expecting growth in both DRAM and NAND not just from the supply of more chips to data centers, artificial intelligence, the auto sector, and mobile devices, but also from greater demand for gigabyte capacity per unit within those segments. With a healthy balance sheet, improving return on invested capital, and expanding cash flows, not only should Micron benefit from improving future earnings but its multiple should also reflect the transition to a flattening cost curve. Interest Rates are Still Driving the Boat In late August, the Federal Reserve Chairman, Jerome Powell, tried to calm inflation fears by reiterating that “longer-term inflation expectations have moved much less than actual inflation … suggesting that households, businesses, and market participants also believe that current high inflation readings are likely to prove transitory." Powell went on to frame “transitory” to mean that the recent rapid increase in both wages and cost of goods will continue in the near term but will “likely moderate.” For those of us not used to the often-obscure language of the Federal Reserve, let me try to translate: Expect prices of goods and services to be more expensive now and in the future. There are two key factors impacting inflation: the source and the speed of the price increase. The source of inflation, like all economic conditions, is generated by supply and demand imbalances. This was demonstrated during Covid, when people from the cities began to move to the suburbs and the demand for homes inflated suburban housing prices. Currently, the costs of goods have been rising due to inflated shipping and delivery costs. Reopening of the global economy has led to greater consumer demand, especially from the US, and US ports are currently seeing a 15-20% increase in shipments compared to 2019. In 2019, it took less than 40 days to get products from China to US store shelves vs. nearly 80 days today. The extended shipping times comes, in part, from overwhelmed US ports that are unable to unload ships at their prior cadence due to increased shipments and the lack of “free” workable space at the shipyards. A shipyard is a complex ecosystem that unloads, stores, delivers, and reloads shipping containers daily. The speed at which a yard can accomplish this choreographed dance is dependent on space. Because of the significant shipping imbalance that started during Covid (more products being shipped to the US vs. from the US) a glut of empty shipping containers has been building up at the shipyards, making it difficult to find working space to unload cargo ships and drastically slowing the unloading process. This, in turn, is causing a logjam of anchored ships just outside the port waiting for weeks to get a berth to unload. Once unloaded, getting shipping containers to the warehouse and distribution centers has also been a challenge due to a shortage of truck drivers. It is estimated that there are currently 22,000 fewer truck drivers in the US than in 2019 and to attract drivers, trucking companies have had to increase their wages and benefits. In addition, as shipyards are limiting the amount of empty shipping containers they are willing to stockpile, truck drivers/trucking companies are scrambling to find places to store the empty containers in order to return to the shipyard, slowing down the delivery process even further. All of these headwinds are causing delays in addition to the higher shipping and transportation costs that most retailers and businesses are forced to pass along to their customers. The rate at which these costs are rising is also impacting consumers and the economy. Most consumers are used to the idea of “creeping” inflation, where goods and services have an upward bias over time. Business can often adjust their expenses or structure deals with their suppliers to offset the impact. However, when costs continue to spike higher most businesses have no alternative other than to pass those higher costs of goods onto their customers. In the short-run, consumers may be accepting of the higher costs but, over time, even consumers flush with cash will begin to reduce their spending habits, decrease restaurants visits, pause monthly subscriptions, and cut back on holiday travel. Although it appears that we are not at that stage just yet, continued higher expenses and uncertainty could cause the US consumer to recoil. In addition to inflation, the US economy is also facing headwinds in the form of an exploding national debt (~$29 trillion), ongoing domestic and geopolitical conflicts, and the continued overhang from the Covid-19 pandemic. In the past, any one of these headwinds would have easily disrupted the stock market’s upward glide path. So how is it that the stock market continues to appreciate unabated? The one economic variable yet to be mentioned is interest rates. What the last twelve years have taught investors is that cheap and accessible money can overpower most economic and geopolitical headwinds. Providing cheap and accessible money is like pouring lighter fluid on a barbecue, it will create an intense fire, but the only way to keep that towering fire going is to continue dousing the flames with lighter fluid. That is exactly what the Federal Reserve’s “zero” interest rate policy and monthly bond purchases (~120 billion/month) were designed to do. “Winter is Coming” The Federal Reserve is expected to begin tapering its monthly bond purchases by year’s end in advance of raising interest rates. Consider the Fed’s tapering to be a clear indication that the carefree days of summer are coming to an end and it’s time to start preparing for the change in seasons. In the HBO series, “Game of Thrones,” the phrase “winter is coming” is used throughout the series as a reminder that challenging times lie ahead. The ongoing uncertainty surrounding geopolitics, interest rates, and inflation will have an impact on the markets, but will this affect the way Hazelton Capital Partners manages its portfolio? The short answer is no. The more involved answer is that market headwinds will not change the Fund’s investing criteria, but they may influence the margin of safety required before investing. It is a lot easier to ride a bike when the wind is at your back. Riding into the wind requires more energy, focus, and time to get to your destination. A strong investing headwind, all things being equal, will require a greater margin of safety as more uncertainty is created as to when the company’s share price will reflect its future intrinsic value. In the short run, headwinds can disrupt a company’s business model, negatively impact its profit margins, and, if left unchecked, reduce its competitive edge. It is important to remember that a company’s value today is a discount of its future value based on its expected revenues, margins, earnings, and cash flows. Since those future metrics are uncertain, the company’s stock price today is more a reflection of changes in market sentiment. However, over a longer period of time a company’s share price will reflect management’s ability to improve revenues, margins, and profitability. Embedded in Hazelton’s core strategy is a 5–7 year investing horizon, reflecting the historic business cycle which is roughly 5-1/2 years long (trough to peak). Given that Hazelton Capital Partners tends to be early in its investments, the Fund rarely initiates a full position from the start, choosing instead to invest gradually in tranches that reflect a growing margin of safety. Having a long-term outlook helps the Fund weather the periodic financial storm, flood, and hurricane. However, these supposedly infrequent events have been occurring with chronic regularity and disruption making it difficult for investors to remain calm and anchored to a longterm plan. Winter is always coming. It has been a long time since the US economy has had to deal with inflationary pressures, let alone the possibility of rising interest rates. Investors have naturally forgotten that companies can continue to prosper even during economic headwinds, it will just take more focus and time. Having cheap and easy access to capital has been a huge tailwind for the equity markets and the main reason why the stock market has appreciated to its current level. Unfortunately, a company’s ability to borrow cannot offset the current supply chain bottlenecks and labor shortages that inflate prices and impact corporate margins. Hazelton Capital Partners fully expects there to be continued disruption and downward pressure on the market and its portfolio as assets move from the weak hands of reactionary investors to the strong hands of long-term investors. As long as there is a meaningful margin of safety between the current price of a stock and its future intrinsic value, Hazelton Capital Partners will continue to invest for the long-term and not try and time the market. Investing in Hazelton Capital Partners Hazelton Capital Partners was created as an investment vehicle, allowing those interested in long-term exposure to the equity market to invest alongside me. With a substantial portion of my own capital in the fund, I manage Hazelton Capital Partners’ assets in the same way I manage my own capital. The best source of introduction to potential investors in the Fund has come from those that have invested or followed Hazelton Capital Partners progress over the years. Introductions are both welcome and appreciated. If you are interested in making or increasing your contribution to Hazelton Capital Partners or just learning more about The Fund, please feel free to contact me. Please do not hesitate to call me at (312) 970-9202 or email me bpasikov@hazeltoncapital.com with any questions or concerns. Warm Regards, Barry Pasikov Managing Member Hazelton Capital Partners Updated on Nov 15, 2021, 2:03 pm (function() { var sc = document.createElement("script"); sc.type = "text/javascript"; sc.async = true;sc.src = "//mixi.media/data/js/95481.js"; sc.charset = "utf-8";var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(sc, s); }()); window._F20 = window._F20 || []; _F20.push({container: 'F20WidgetContainer', placement: '', count: 3}); _F20.push({finish: true});.....»»

Category: blogSource: valuewalkNov 15th, 2021

Morgan Stanley"s 2022 Outlook: The Training Wheels Come Off

Morgan Stanley's 2022 Outlook: The Training Wheels Come Off By Andrew Sheets, Chief Cross-Asset Strategist for Morgan Stanley The 2022 Outlook: Normalizing but Not Normal, as the Training Wheels Come Off We’ll publish our year-ahead outlook later today. This is the 18th outlook I’ve had the pleasure to be a part of in Morgan Stanley Research. Each one is the result of a highly collaborative process across strategy and economics, and each has felt uniquely difficult at the time. 2022 is no different. In the global economy, my colleague Seth Carpenter and our global economics team think it is a story of 'normalizing, but not normal'. Normalizing, because we think global growth continues to improve, led by strong consumer spending and capital investment. We forecast growth of 4.6%Y in both the US and euro area next year, and think China will also top expectations, albeit with improvement that may not be apparent for several more months. A robust capex cycle, driven by strong demand, rising labor costs and cheap capital, is an important way this recovery differs from the last. Another difference is inflation. We forecast DM inflation to peak in the coming months, then decline throughout 2022 as supply chains normalize and commodity price gains slow. Importantly, we see major regional differences to this story; one reason we like equities in Europe and Japan is that we think inflationary challenges there are much less daunting than elsewhere. As the recovery continues, monetary policy shifts. The Fed ends asset purchases by mid-2022, and the Bank of England and Bank of Canada start raising rates. EM policy continues to normalize, with ~70% of EM central banks tightening. We think moderating inflation and a sustained rise in labor force participation mean the first Fed hike is in early 2023, but these trends might not be immediately apparent. For markets, shifting policy means the training wheels are off, so to speak. After 20 months of unprecedented support from governments and central banks, this aid is winding down. Asset classes will need to rise and fall under their own power. In some places, this should be fine. From a strategy perspective, we continue to believe this is a (surprisingly) ‘normal’ cycle, albeit hotter and faster given the scale of the recession and the subsequent response. Our cycle indicator, a key part of our framework, is back above trend. And we think markets are facing many ‘normal’ mid-cycle problems: better growth colliding with higher inflation, shifting policy and more expensive valuations. Overall, we think that valuations and this stage of the cycle support equity over credit and duration. The equity case is significantly stronger in Europe and Japan than EM or the US, where the former enjoy more reasonable valuations, limited central bank tightening and less risk from higher taxes. Those same issues drive a below-consensus forecast for the S&P 500 (4,400 by end-2022). That ‘bearish’ forecast is still a historically high multiple (18x) on an optimistic 2023 EPS number (US$245). The ‘equity over spread’ theme extends to credit, where we attempt to re-run much of the 2004-05 playbook. Better growth and good corporate liquidity should keep default rates low. Along with rising rates, this supports loans over high yield over investment grade credit (the same hierarchy that reigned in 2004-05). Also in line with that period, we prefer securitized to corporate credit, and think the best risk/reward is down the capital structure (CMBX BBBs, CLO equity). For macro markets, my strategy colleagues see a year of two parts. As we forecast that the Fed will wait until 2023 to make its first hike, it may not be in a rush to signal this action right away. We remain positive on USD and expect US real yields to rise to start the year, factors that mean we suggest patience before buying EM assets. We forecast the US 10-year at 2.10% by end-2022. As a delay of the first hike becomes more likely, these factors should all shift. To generate alpha, we like owning CAD/CHF, which should benefit from policy divergence and our expectation of higher oil prices in 1H22. If that’s the story, what are the risks? A better version of our 2022 narrative is more aggressive stimulus by China, a quicker repair of supply chains and a faster jump in labor participation. This would lead markets to price our 'no Fed hikes in 2022' view sooner, and mean a stronger rally, especially in EM, than we forecast. To the downside, it’s all about inflation and real rates. The biggest surprise of 2021 was global real rates hitting new all-data lows as growth recovered, a boon to asset prices. Markets could reasonably assume these are the wrong financial conditions relative to the level of inflation, and that terminal rates should be higher. Our rate strategists like several trades that hedge such a risk: steepeners in US 2s5s and GBP 2s10s and short EUR 10y10y. Best wishes for the year ahead, and enjoy your Sunday. Tyler Durden Sun, 11/14/2021 - 18:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 14th, 2021

Orbit Garant Drilling Reports Fiscal 2022 First Quarter Financial Results

̶  Continued year-over-year growth in revenue and metres drilled reflects increased capacity utilization to meet strong customer demand  ̶  VAL-D'OR, QC, Nov. 11, 2021 /CNW/ - Orbit Garant Drilling Inc. (TSX:OGD) ("Orbit Garant" or the "Company") today announced its financial results for the three-month period ended September 30, 2021 ("Q1 2022"). All dollar amounts are in Canadian dollars unless otherwise stated. Financial Results Summary ($ amounts in millions, except per share amounts) Three months endedSeptember 30, 2021 Three months endedSeptember 30, 2020 Revenue $50.6 $35.6 Gross Profit $3.8 $8.7 Gross Margin (%) 7.4 24.6 Adjusted Gross Margin (%)¹ 12.3 31.3 EBITDA2 $2.7 $8.4 Net earnings (loss) $(1.3) $3.5 Net earnings (loss) per share        - Basic and diluted $(0.04) $0.09 Total metres drilled 463,755 351,373 1 Adjusted Gross Margin is a non-IFRS financial measure and is defined as Gross Profit excluding depreciation expenses. See "Reconciliation of Non-IFRS financial measures". 2 EBITDA is a non-IFRS financial measure and is defined as earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. See "Reconciliation of Non-IFRS financial measures". "We achieved record first quarter revenue and metres drilled. Our continued year-over-year growth in revenue and metres drilled reflects the increased capacity utilization of our drill fleet as we strive to meet this high level of customer demand," said Eric Alexandre, President and CEO of Orbit Garant. "Similar to last quarter, our margins were impacted by increased driller training, project ramp-up and mobilization costs. This quarter we also absorbed higher costs for materials and supplies due to supply chain issues, which are currently impacting the entire global economy. We expect our margins to expand over the course of the fiscal year as driller productivity improves, short-term mobilization costs fall away, and we offset cost pressures through contract price increases. We expect supply chain issues to be largely resolved by early 2022." "We are encouraged by our positive business outlook. Gold and copper prices remain strong, and our customers are signalling that they will maintain high levels of exploration and development spending in their budgets for the 2022 calendar year," added Mr. Alexandre. "We will continue to focus on margin enhancement as we adapt to this sustained high level of business activity." First Quarter Results Revenue for Q1 2022 totalled $50.6 million, an increase of 41.9% compared to $35.6 million for the three-month period ended September 30, 2020 ("Q1 2021"), reflecting an increase in drilling activities in Canada and internationally. Canada revenue totalled $37.9 million in the quarter, an increase of 20.7% compared to $31.4 million in Q1 2021, reflecting strong domestic demand for the Company's drilling services. International revenue increased to $12.7 million in Q1 2022, from $4.2 million in Q1 2021, reflecting increased drilling activities. Orbit Garant drilled 463,755 metres in the quarter, an increase of 32.0% compared to 351,373 metres drilled in Q1 2021. The Company's average revenue per metre drilled in Q1 2022 was $108.46, compared to $100.51 in Q1 a year ago. The ...Full story available on Benzinga.com.....»»

Category: earningsSource: benzingaNov 11th, 2021

Rabo: The Fed Is Getting Flattened, Whatever Happens Now

Rabo: The Fed Is Getting Flattened, Whatever Happens Now By Michael Every of Rabobank "How much worse could I make it?" The Atlantic, in an article titled: ‘Populism Always Sounds Great in the Abstract’, bewails “A New Jersey truck driver defeated the state Senate president, but politics needs people who know what they’re doing,” adding the witty line: “I love the David and Goliath stories of politics, but only if David isn’t also a Philistine.” Ed Durr, who’s $153 home-made social-media-free campaign strategy just beat a political warhorse responded: “How much worse could I make it?” Without being partisan, it’s a question worth asking. Which of the brilliant minds at the Fed, White House, or in Wall Street had a 6.2% y/y US inflation print penciled in for October, the highest since December 1990, and, given base effects into end-year, the possibility we close 2021 close to 7%, the highest since June 1982: that’s so far back it was five years before even Biden first ran for president. “Bueller? Bueller?” That’s right – nobody. This is not just about lumber, or used cars, or energy, or food. Inflation is evident across a broad spectrum of goods; yes, with energy prices high, it will spread; into food, for sure; with supply-chains still strained, it will spread if demand does not fall; and in so-far-restrained services, the next big shock will be from rising rents, where demand is inelastic. This hurts - like the deleted MSNBC tweet telling us ‘inflation is good’. Did you get a 7% pay rise this year? Atlanta Fed wage growth data says those who stick with their jobs are seeing pay rises of 3.5% y/y; those who switch are getting 5.4%. Churn, baby, churn: and who fills the lower-paid positions left behind? Post-Virginia and New jersey, the White House realizes just saying “transitory” does not play well with voters, and President Biden has pledged that "Inflation hurts Americans (sic) pocketbooks, and reversing this trend is a top priority for me.” How, though? There is the infrastructure bill, but it will take years to kick in. Given the White House just rejected an appeal by US solar panel producers to impose tariffs on imports, it would also appear less Building Back will be done in the US, and more strain placed on ports. The bill also doesn’t address warehouse space, underpaid truckers, absent chassis, or structural monopolies in logistics that ensure high profitability and low resilience. As Matt Stoller underlines, “The consolidation of power over supply chains in the hands of Wall Street, and the thinning out of how we make and produce things over forty years in the name of efficiency, has made our economy much less resilient to shocks.” Moreover, Freightwaves notes just 16 companies - all outside the US - control 80% of global liner shipping, container production, and box-leasing capacity. Their economic power is growing, and they have no incentive to bring prices down. July’s White House executive order to tackle cartels only applies domestically. Perhaps oil will be released from the strategic reserve given President Biden’s view that this is the core problem - which will not add to US refining capacity or help supply chains or lower rents. And the planned $1.75 trillion Build Back Better bill puts more money in Americans’ pockets - which even Citadel is now saying would cement inflation by increasing demand when supply is constrained. Childcare is a ‘good thing’: but it is not transportation infrastructure. The message for the Fed from the yield curve, pre-CPI, was that merely jawboning was a policy error prompting bull curve flattening. An inflation print that suggests the Fed may be behind the curve saw US yields surge --2s up 10bp, 10s up 10bp, 30s up 12bp at their intraday peak, and TIPS 10-year break-evens topping 2.70%-- and bear curve flattening. In short, the Fed is getting flattened whatever happens now - and the US dollar is getting pumped. What are the FOMC going to do – hike? Jawbone? Write articles in The Atlantic? Indeed, the outlook continues to confound those in charge who failed to notice that pre-Covid the global economy was already heading for a recession - our 2020 outlook back in late 2019 was titled “Titanic”. There still appears to be painfully little dot-joining going on, just spurious dot-plotting. Meanwhile, in China Evergrande walked right up to the edge of default before making an interest payment. Word now seems to be the PBOC will help “good” developers sell bonds to Chinese banks to refinance their CNY debts (at lower interest rates, despite soaring credit risk). At the same time, the PBOC took the rare step of announcing mortgage lending picked up in October to CNY348bn (USD54bn) vs. CNY247bn (USD38bn) in September despite the controls in place. That’s the tactical picture. The strategic one is a Wall Street Journal article claims Beijing aims for a “controlled implosion of the real-estate giant, selling off some assets while limiting damage to home buyers and businesses.” Less attention is allegedly being paid to foreign investors - but just enough not to let faith collapse completely. The meta picture is what China’s growth model looks like once property speculation is excised, not just in 2022, but from here on out. For that, we will need to pay attention to the CCP’s Sixth Plenum that wraps up today. The US and China have announced a joint declaration to cooperate on climate change. Which is nice. They signed the same document back on 12 November, 2014. When US CPI was just 1.6% y/y. Which year is the following from? “The United States of America and the People’s Republic of China have a critical role to play in combating global climate change, one of the greatest threats facing humanity. The seriousness of the challenge calls upon the two sides to work constructively together for the common good.” Aussie jobs data were their usual random walk at -46.3K vs. an expected rise of 50K despite a decline in the participation rate. Full-time employment sank -40.4k and part-time -5.9K, and unemployment rose from 4.8% to 5.2%. Further volatility for a bond market expecting the RBA to be wrong on saying it won’t hike in 2022, backed up by the US CPI print overnight. And in geopolitics, Russia is flying nuclear bombers over Belarus as the border row with Poland blazes on. Donald Tusk has penned a letter stating: “I am addressing you, the leaders of EU Member States with an earnest appeal for full solidarity with Poland and Lithuania in the face of the growing crisis on the border with Belarus. Irrespective of your views regarding migration and your evaluation of the internal situation in Poland, we must, I underline, we must, as a political community, use all available means of pressure in order to contain the escalation of tension on the Eastern border of the Union…There is no more time nor space for hesitation.” He calls for “tough decisions vis-à-vis Minsk,” and warns, “Lack of reaction or postponing will only embolden the provocateurs and their protectors and may lead to dramatic, difficult to predict consequences." But numerous lines in the sand have been crossed already, with no slings proffered in response. “How much worse could I make it?” We shall soon find out. Not just in the US, but globally, aren’t we lucky the ‘Goliaths’ are in charge rather than the philistine “Davids”? By the way, evidence suggests the Philistines were related to bronze-age Greek civilisation, so the linguistic insult hardly fits; and it’s not the Davids whose dignity is now being covered by the smallest of fig leaves. Tyler Durden Thu, 11/11/2021 - 09:29.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 11th, 2021

Futures Rebound From Post-CPI Rout As China Property Stocks Soar

Futures Rebound From Post-CPI Rout As China Property Stocks Soar US futures rose and European bourses once again rebounded from overnight lows, this time after concerns that scorching US and Chinese CPI and PPI prints will prompt central banks to tighten much sooner than expected. The bounce was aided by a surge in Chinese property developers which booked their best two-day gain in six years, joined by a jump in technology stocks, as investors speculated Beijing may soften regulatory crackdowns on the two industries. At 730am S&P futures were up 16.75 ot 0.36 to 4,658.50, Dow Jones futs were up 40 points or 0.11% and Nasdaq futures were up 97.50 or 0.61%. The dollar index rose and cash Treasurys are closed today for Veterans day. Wednesday’s stronger-than-forecast data on U.S. consumer prices finally crushed the argument that inflation is transitory and weighed on the tech sector in particular as Treasury yields spiked. Tesla shares rose 5% in premarket trading following filings that showed Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk sold $5 billion in stock in the electric-vehicle maker a few days after the shares hit a record high. Disney dropped 4.8% in premarket trading to lead declines among Dow components after reporting the smallest rise in Disney+ subscriptions since the service's launch and posted downbeat profit at its theme park division. SoFi rose as much as 16% in premarket after Jefferies said the fintech’s third-quarter results were a “strong” beat. Amazon-backed electric-vehicle maker Rivian Automotive jumped 4.9%, adding to the nearly 30% gain on its blockbuster trading debut. Chinese tech stocks got some comfort from a report that ride-hailing company Didi Global Inc. is getting ready to relaunch its apps in China by the end of the year as an investigation wraps up. Here are some of the biggest U.S. movers today: Beyond Meat (BYND US) shares plunged 20% in premarket after the maker of plant-based meats released a disappointing sales projection for 4Q. Fossil (FOSL US) jumped 33% premarket after the accessory maker boosted its net sales forecast for the full year. Bumble (BMBL US) the dating app that lets women make the first move, reported earnings in the third quarter that missed analysts’ estimates. The shares fell 7% premarket. Disney (DIS US) shares fall as much as 5.3% in premarket, with analysts flagging softness in its Disney+ subscribers and net income in its fiscal fourth quarter. Rivian (RIVN US) jumps 8% in premarket after the electric truck maker soared in its trading debut on Wednesday. Didi (DIDI US) gains 4% in premarket after Reuters reported that the company is preparing to reintroduce its apps in China by the end of the year as regulators wrap up their investigations into the ride- hailing giant. Marqeta (MQ US) gains 17% premarket, with analysts saying the payments platform delivered a strong beat-and-raise report for 3Q. SoFi Technologies (SOFI US) rises 15% premarket with Jefferies saying the fintech’s 3Q results are a “strong” beat. Figs (FIGS US) shares sank 14% in postmarket trading on Wednesday, after the seller of scrubs for health-care workers reported a third-quarter profit in line with analysts’ estimates. Oscar Health (OSCR US) fell 10% postmarket Wednesday after the upstart health insurer projected a deeper adjusted Ebitda loss for the full year. Payoneer Global (PAYO US), the payment solutions company, gained 8% premarket after its full- year revenue forecast beat the average analyst estimate. Wish (WISH US) fell 2% after the e-commerce services company posted an Ebitda loss for the fourth quarter Despite today's mini relief rally, investors are bracing for tighter monetary policy sooner rather than later, after Wednesday’s stronger-than-forecast data on U.S. consumer prices dealt a blow to the argument that inflation is transitory. Meanwhile, Bloomberg reported that the European Central Bank could stop buying bonds as early as next September if inflation looks to have sustainably returned to the official target, Governing Council member Robert Holzmann said. “This is the perfect time to gravitate toward defensive plays, to take profit and to be in the sectors that are strategically positioned toward this volatile market that presents a lot of challenges,” Katerina Simonetti, senior vice president at Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management, said on Bloomberg Television. Market participants were also watching developments around the nomination of the Federal Reserve Chair, with President Joe Biden still weighing whether to keep Jerome Powell for a second term or elevate Fed Governor Lael Brainard to the post In Europe, equities pushed into the green after a muted start, with the Stoxx 600 Index up 0.1% while the Euro Stoxx 50 is little changed as France's CAC outperformed and the U.K.’s exporter-heavy FTSE 100 Index rose as the pound held near an 11-month low after better-than-expected economic growth data. Basic resources, construction and banking names are the strongest sectors; travel and oil & gas the notable laggards. The Stoxx Europe 600 basic resources sub-index rose as much as 2.9%, the most in about a month, as iron ore rebounds and other metals rise. Anglo American, Rio Tinto, BHP, Glencore and Norsk Hydro among those leading gains by index points.ArcelorMittal also rallied after 3Q results. Miners are outperforming gains on the Stoxx Europe 600, which is up 0.2%. Iron ore’s rout halted as expectations build for an easing of the real-estate turmoil in China that’s battered demand, while aluminum jumped as supplies of the metal tighten. And speaking of Europe, ECB-dated OIS rates now price ~20bps of hikes by end-2022 as STIRs globally wrestle with the latest hot inflation prints. Here are some of the biggest European movers this morning: Auto Trader jumped as much as 15% to a record high, with Jefferies saying its new guidance should drive mid-single-digit upgrades to consensus estimates for the online car listings platform. Sika shares surge as much as 12% following the acquisition of construction chemicals peer MBCC, with Baader, Vontobel and Morgan Stanley all positive on the deal. ArcelorMittal shares rise as much as 4.4% after the steelmaker’s results, with Citi saying the update has a positive tone despite the numbers missing estimates. Siemens shares rise as much as 2.8% with analysts saying the German industrial group’s update was encouraging, with its dividend among the main positives. Johnson Matthey shares plummet as much as 20% after the company warned on its current trading and said it will exit its battery business. Burberry shares slump as much as 10% after the luxury goods company’s comparable store sales missed market expectations, with analysts saying consensus estimates are likely to remain unchanged, and the focus will be on the upcoming management change. Earlier in the session, Asia’s regional benchmark declined, on track for a third day of losses, after monthly U.S. consumer prices rose at the fastest annual pace since 1990, raising concerns over costs and monetary policy moves. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index slid as much as 0.6%, before paring most of the losses, with several tech hardware stocks weighing on the benchmark and Tencent the biggest drag after its 3Q revenue missed analyst estimates. Still, the Hang Seng Tech Index ended the day higher after Reuters reported that Didi Global is getting ready to relaunch apps in China by the end of the year. Investors have been cautiously eyeing inflation data as the next market catalyst amid the ongoing pandemic. China helped lead Asian stocks lower Wednesday after reporting a spike in producer prices. “The inflation number spoke to scope for greater and longer-lasting tightening, which understandably hurt the tech sector,” said Ilya Spivak, head of Greater Asia at DailyFX. “The vulnerability there is to longer-term financing, because near-term is pretty well locked in for the most part,” he said. India, Taiwan and the Philippines posted the steepest declines Thursday, while Australian equities slid after unemployment unexpectedly jumped in October. China was the top performer as property developers rallied, while Japan’s benchmarks posted their first rise in five sessions as the yen weakened.  Japanese equities rose, rebounding after after a four-day loss, as electronics and auto makers climbed while the yen weakened. Trading houses and machinery makers were also among the biggest boosts to the Topix, which rose 0.3%. Fanuc and SoftBank Group were the biggest contributors to a 0.6% gain in the Nikkei 225. The yen slightly extended its 0.9% overnight loss against the dollar. Tokyo shares fluctuated in early trading after U.S. stocks fell by the most in a month and Treasury yields spiked. Labor Department data showed consumer prices rose last month at the fastest annual pace since 1990, putting pressure on the Federal Reserve to end near-zero interest rates sooner than expected “Investors had been selling value stocks and buying up growth stocks, but now that’s being reversed,” said Mamoru Shimode, chief strategist at Resona Asset Management. Going forward “the environment will be a favorable one for Japanese equities,” he said, noting the local market’s underperformance against global peers. In rates, Treasury futures are mixed with a curve-flattening bent, remaining near low end of Wednesday’s range, when above-estimate CPI and poor 30-year bond auction caused a selloff across the curve. As noted above, the Cash Treasuries market is closed Thursday for Veteran’s Day. Treasury 10-year yields closed Wednesday at 1.549%, nearly 10bp higher on the day; EGBs and gilts are slightly richer on the day out to the 10-year sector, while curves are mildly steeper. Wednesday’s price action in the U.S. sent ripples through European markets, which now price 20bps of ECB rate hikes in December 2022 for the first time since the start of the month.  Euribor futures add 4-6 ticks in red and green packs. Bunds and gilts bear steepen gently. Peripheral spreads widen at the margin. Short end Italy underperforms despite a decent reception at today’s auctions. In FX, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index reached its strongest level in a year and the greenback advanced against all of its Group-of-10 peers, with the biggest losses seen among some commodity currencies. Cable inched lower to trade below $1.34 for the first time since December 2020. The U.K. economy grew more strongly than expected in September after a surge in service industries and construction. GDP rose 0.6% from August, the Office for National Statistics said Thursday. That was quicker than the 0.4% pace anticipated by economists. The Australian and New Zealand dollars were the worst G-10 performers; Aussie fell and Australian sovereign yields trimmed an opening spike after the nation’s jobless rate jumped to 5.2%. The initial move was in line with Treasuries, which plunged after U.S. inflation came in at the hottest since 1990. In commodities, crude futures fade a pop higher after quiet Asian trade; WTI is little changed near $81.20, Brent stalls below $83. Spot gold rises back toward Wednesday’s best levels, trading near $1,860/oz. Base metals are in the green with LME aluminum outperforming To the day ahead now, and the main data highlight will be the UK’s preliminary Q3 GDP reading. From central banks, the ECB will be publishing their Economic Bulletin, and speakers include the ECB’s Makhlouf, Schnabel and Hernandez de Cos, along with the BoE’s Mann. Otherwise, the European Commission will be releasing their latest economic forecasts, and it’s the Veterans’ Day Holiday in the United States. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures up 0.4% to 4,658.25 STOXX Europe 600 up 0.1% to 484.44 MXAP little changed at 197.72 MXAPJ down 0.2% to 647.07 Nikkei up 0.6% to 29,277.86 Topix up 0.3% to 2,014.30 Hang Seng Index up 1.0% to 25,247.99 Shanghai Composite up 1.2% to 3,532.79 Sensex down 0.8% to 59,898.81 Australia S&P/ASX 200 down 0.6% to 7,381.95 Kospi down 0.2% to 2,924.92 Gold spot up 0.7% to $1,862.18 U.S. Dollar Index up 0.19% to 95.03 German 10Y yield little changed at -0.24% Euro down 0.2% to $1.1461 Brent Futures up 0.7% to $83.18/bbl Top Overnight News from Bloomberg The European Central Bank could stop buying bonds as early as next September if inflation looks to have sustainably returned to the official target, Governing Council member Robert Holzmann said China’s efforts to limit fallout from China Evergrande Group’s crisis are gathering steam. A series of articles published in state media in the past few days signal support measures are on the way to help developers tap debt markets, potentially easing a liquidity crunch that began with Evergrande’s meltdown five months ago Customers of international clearing firm Clearstream received overdue interest payments on three dollar bonds issued by Evergrande, a spokesperson for Clearstream said A more detailed look at global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asian equity markets traded mixed as positive Chinese developer headlines including news of Evergrande payments, helped the region partially shrug off the losses seen stateside where duration sensitive stocks underperformed as yields surged following a hot CPI print and a soft 30yr auction. ASX 200 (-0.6%) declined with the index led lower by tech and energy which followed suit to the heavy losses in their US counterparts and with disappointing jobs data adding to the headwinds. Nikkei 225 (+0.6%) coat-tailed on the advances in USD/JPY which briefly climbed above the 114.00 level and with a slew of earnings releases providing a catalyst for individual stock prices. Hang Seng (+1.0%) and Shanghai Comp. (+1.2%) were varied with notable strength in property names after Evergrande was reported to have paid the overdue interest on three bonds to avoid a default and with China said to be considering moderating property curbs to help troubled developers unload assets. In addition, the PBoC continued with its mild liquidity efforts and it was also reported that the Biden-Xi virtual meeting is tentatively scheduled for next Monday, although weakness in tech capped upside in the Hong Kong benchmark with shares in index heavyweight Tencent pressured post-earnings as the Beijing crackdown decelerated revenue growth to the slowest pace since the Co. listed in 2004. Finally, 10yr JGBs suffered spillover selling from global peers including T-notes which declined by a point to below 131.00 and with prices also hampered after a weak 30yr auction, while focus in Japan shifted to the enhanced liquidity auction for longer dated government bonds which printed a lower b/c although the highest accepted spread returned positive. Top Asian News Indonesian Stocks Close at Record High on Economic Rebound Signs of Easing as Delayed Bond Coupons Paid: Evergrande Update Asia Stocks Slip After U.S. Inflation Spike, Weak Tencent Sales Kaisa Tells Investors It May Not Make Coupon Payments: REDD European equities (Eurostoxx 50 -0.1%) broadly trade mixed following on from this week’s firm inflation reports from the US and China. The handover from APAC was also mixed with focus on China amid notable strength in property names after Evergrande was reported to have paid the overdue interest on three bonds to avoid a default. Furthermore, the PBoC continued with its mild liquidity efforts and it was also reported that the Biden-Xi virtual meeting is tentatively scheduled for next Monday. Stateside, futures are a touch firmer (ES +0.2%) in the wake of yesterday’s cash market losses which saw duration sensitive stocks underperform as yields surged. From a macro perspective, Axios reported overnight that inflation concerns could see US Senator Manchin “punt” President Biden's Build Back Better agenda into next year. Eyes on the Wall St. open will be on Tesla after CEO Musk offloaded USD 5bln of stock in the Co. Back to Europe, Goldman Sachs outlook for 2022 sees a price target for the Stoxx 600 of 530 (vs. current 483) which would deliver a total return of around 13% and mark a continuation of the current bull market, albeit at a slower pace. Sectors in Europe are somewhat mixed with Basic Resources a clear outperformer amid broad strength in mining names and following earnings from ArcelorMittal (+2.9%) which sent the Co.’s shares to the top of the CAC. Banking names are also on a firmer footing amid the favourable yield environment post-CPI with Lloyds (+1.3%) and Commerzbank (+3.0%) supported by broker upgrades at Keefe Bruyette and Morgan Stanley respectively. To the downside, Oil & Gas names are softer as the crude complex struggles to recoup recent losses. Retail names have been weighed on by Burberry (-6.2%) post-earnings with the Co. noting that performance in Europe remains under pressure. Renault (-3.1%) sits at the foot of the CAC after Daimler opted to sell its stake in the Co. for USD 364mln. Finally, Johnson Matthey (-16.3%) is the clear laggard in the region after its CEO announced his decision to step down and the Co. announced it is to exit the battery materials business. Top European News U.K. Growth Data Leave December BOE Rate Rise in the Balance Scholz Aims to ‘Winter Proof’ Germany Against New Covid Wave Kering Says Creative Head Daniel Lee to Leave Bottega Veneta Gas Crunch Fuels RWE Profits as Energy Giant Burns Coal In FX, the Dollar took some time out for reflection and a rest after extending yesterday’s post-US CPI gains with the additional thrust of a supply-related ramp up in Treasury yields following a poor new long bond auction. However, the index could not quite muster enough bullish momentum to touch 95.000 until APAC buyers got a chance to respond to the strength of the inflation data and bear-steepening reaction in debt markets that evolved after initial bear-flattening. The DXY subsequently reset, refuelled and cleared the psychological barrier more convincingly, at 95.101 before fading again as several basket components found underlying bids and technical support around key levels, but still seems bid and upwardly mobile in thinner trading volumes due to Veteran’s Day. NZD/AUD - Perhaps perversely given overnight macro fundamentals, the Kiwi is lagging down under with Aud/Nzd cross elevated near 1.0400, though this could be in recognition of a sharp retreat in NZ food prices and mitigating factors leading to Aussie labour metrics missing consensus by some distance right across the board. Whatever the rationale, Nzd/Usd is lower than Aud/Usd in absolute terms even though the former is holding above 0.7100 and latter has now lost 0.7300+ status. CAD - Weaker WTI crude (in relative terms rather than on the day per se) is not helping the Loonie’s cause after it managed to contain losses on Wednesday, as Usd/Cad hovers near the top of a 1.2535-1.2473 range awaiting the BoC’s Q3 Senior Loan Officer Survey tomorrow for further direction from a Canadian perspective. CHF/EUR/JPY/GBP - All giving up more ground to the Greenback, but to varying degrees with the Franc trying to keep sight of 0.9200, the Euro defend 1.1450 having closed below 1.1500 and a key Fib retracement just shy of the round number, the Yen stay within touching distance of 114.00 and Sterling stop the rot after letting go of the 1.3400 handle again. On that note, a late December 2020 low in Cable at 1.3361 remains intact ahead of 1.3350 for semi-sentimental reasons and then a deep channel trendline from 1.3330-20, while Usd/Jpy has scope to be drawn to decent option expiry interest at 113.70 (1.6 bn) if not similar size spanning 113.60-00. In commodities, WTI and Brent have been choppy this morning with catalysts limited and conditions thinner than normal on account of Veteran’s Day. Price action thus far has seen the benchmarks print a range in excess of USD 1.00/bbl in a narrow timespan, note, that these parameters remain comfortably within yesterday’s levels; currently, both WTI and Brent are at the lower-end of this band as any initial attempt at a recovery has fizzled out with the USD likely a factor. While newsflow directly for the complex has been sparse attention remains on the monthly oil surveys, COVID-19 and geopolitics. Firstly, the OPEC MOMR is scheduled for release today and as a reminder the EIA STEO, under greater focus given US crude/SPR watch, raised 2021 world oil demand growth forecast by +60k BPD to 5.11mln BPD Y/Y increase this week, but cut its 2022 forecast by 130k BPD to 3.35mln BPD Y/Y increase. On COVID, the demand-side is attentive to increasing cases in areas such as Germany with the effective Chancellor-in-waiting Scholz saying further measures will be needed through Winter; additionally, the Netherlands outbreak team are recommending a short lockdown and Beijing has implemented various local measures. Finally, geopolitics is attentive to the situation in Belarus after Lukashenko said they will respond to any sanctions and has suggested closing gas and goods transit through the area. Moving to metals, spot gold and silver remain towards the top-end of yesterday’s parameters, but are only modestly firmer on the session, as newsflow has been slim and the USD’s more gradual upside and lack-of cash UST action is providing a respite from yesterday’s upside. Action that saw spot gold supported by almost USD 40/oz from opening levels. Elsewhere, ArcelorMittal’s earnings update featured a forecast for global steel demand to increase between 12-13% this year excluding China given a softening of real demand. US Event Calendar 9:45am: Nov. Langer Consumer Comfort, prior 49.2 Central Banks Nothing major scheduled DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap Yesterday was one of those days to just go “wow” at. The headline YoY US CPI rate of 6.2% was the highest since the 6.3% in 1990, which means that unless you’re at least 50 this will be the highest US inflation print of your career. In fact, apart from 2 months in 1990 at 6.3%, you’d have to go back to 1982 to find a higher print. So you’d have to probably be at least 60 to remember anything like this in your work life, other than that brief spike in 1990. In more detail, for the 6th time in the last 8 months, the headline print came in above the consensus estimate on Bloomberg, with prices up by +0.9% on a month-on-month basis (vs. +0.6% expected). If you look at the reading to two decimal places, it was actually the strongest monthly inflation since July 2008, so hardly a sign that those pressures have been dimming as we move towards year end. We’ll go through some of the moves in more depth below, but markets didn’t react well to the prospect of a more inflationary future, with both bonds and equities moving lower as investors moved to price in earlier and a more rapid pace of future rate hikes by the Fed. A horrible 30 year auction 4.5 hours later cemented a big rise in yields on the day. Note US bond markets are closed today for Veterans Day. Equities remain open but trading will be thin. Just completing the inflation picture, the October price rise was a fairly broad-based one that included upward pressure across all the main categories, including components that are tied to more persistent inflation. Admittedly, a big driver was energy inflation (+4.8% on a monthly basis), but even if you stripped out the more volatile factors, core inflation was still up +0.6% (vs. +0.4% expected), sending the annual core inflation measure up to its highest since 1991, at +4.6% (vs. +4.3% expected). There were also further signs of pressure from the housing categories, with owners’ equivalent rent (+0.44%) seeing its largest monthly increase since June 2006. This housing inflation is coming in bang on script (see page 19 of my 1970s chart book here). Medical care services (+0.49%) was also a big contributor to the upside surprise. The broad-based price gains drove trimmed mean and median CPI, measures of underlying trend inflation, to their highest levels since 1983. There’ll understandably be questions for the Fed off the back of this release, and markets responded by bringing forward their pricing of the first rate hike to the July 2022 meeting. In fact, by the close of trade, roughly an extra 13bps of hikes were priced in by end-2022 relative to the previous day. It’s also worth noting that the latest CPI release means that the real fed funds rate in October was beneath -6%, which is lower than at any point in the 1970s, where the bottom was -5% (see page 3 in the same 1970s chart book and draw the line down another few tenths of a basis point). So by this measure, monetary policy is even more accommodative now than it was back then, in a decade that saw inflation get progressively out of control. For more on those 1970s comparisons, take a look at our full note from last month (link here.) Treasuries understandably sold off, led by the front end and belly of the curve, as investors brought forward the likely timing of future rate hikes. 5yr Treasuries increased +13.5bps (the biggest one-day increase since February), and 10yrs +11.4bps (largest increase since September). The yield curve flattened, with 5s30s down -4.9bps to 68.5bps, the flattest since March 2020. Longer-dated yields were drifting higher through the New York session but accelerated after a 5.2bp tail in the 30yr Treasury auction. The tail was the highest since 2011, and primary dealer takedown was almost 2 standard deviations above average over the last year. Unlike after less-than-stellar auctions earlier this year, bonds stabilised for the rest of the day, with the 30yr +8.6 bps higher, only +1.7bps above pre-auction trading. After all, 30yr yields have rallied 26.0bps since early October, inclusive of today’s poor auction, as there has been some long-end duration demand. Indeed, even with the policy rate repricing, 5y5y rates, one proxy for long-run or terminal policy rates, remain below 2%, after increasing just +6.2bps. This is also manifest in record low real yields through the curve. 10yr real yields initially sunk to an all-time low intraday at -1.253% after the CPI print before ultimately increasing +3.0bps on the day to -1.17%. Likewise, 5yr real yields touched -1.97% in the aftermath of the CPI print, and closed the day +2.5bps higher than Tuesday’s close at -1.88%. With nominal yields outpacing real yields, inflation compensation increased across the curve: 5yr breakevens increased +11.1bps to 3.10%, an all-time high, whilst 10yr breakevens increased +6.4bps to a post-2006 high of 2.71%. Gold (+0.97%), and other precious metals, including silver (+1.37%) and platinum (+0.75%) gained, as did Bitcoin, which clipped another all-time high, $68,992, intraday. The dollar (+0.90%) also benefitted. The continued prevalence of high inflation is having increasing political ramifications, and President Biden put out a statement following the release, commenting on the inflation data (as well as the more positive weekly jobless claims). He said that reversing the trend in inflation was “a top priority for me” and laid a decent chunk of the blame at rising energy costs. He said that he’d directed the National Economic Council to look at further ways of reducing energy costs, and that he’d also “asked the Federal Trade Commission to strike back at any market manipulation or price gouging in this sector”. However, we also heard from moderate Democratic senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, who tweeted that “the threat posed by record inflation to the American people is not ‘transitory’ and is instead getting worse. … DC can no longer ignore the economic pain Americans feel every day.” Manchin is a key swing vote on Biden’s Build Back Better Plan, and he has already influenced cutting the bill from the $3.5tn initially envisaged to a framework half that size, due in part to the potential inflationary impact of additional spending. From the Fed however, the only signal we got came from San Francisco Fed President Daly (one of the most dovish FOMC members), who gave an interview with Bloomberg TV shortly following the CPI print. She notably referred to inflation as “eye-popping”, but demurred when asked about changing the course of Fed policy, asserting that it would be premature to “start changing our calculations about raising rates” or to accelerate the pace of tapering. Higher inflation and pricing of aggressive Fed tightening was not a good combination for US risk. The S&P 500 fell -0.82% in its second consecutive decline (which feels like its own record after the recent run), and was down more than a percent intraday. Energy (-2.97%) led the declines (more below) but, tech (-1.68%) and communication services (-1.25%) each declined more than a percent due to the increase in discount rates. Commensurate with the big rate selloff, the Nasdaq (-1.66%) also underperformed. Meanwhile, European equities outperformed, with the STOXX 600 up +0.22% to reach an all-time high, just as the DAX (+0.17%) and the CAC 40 (+0.03%) also hit new records. To be fair, US equities were only slightly down on the day when European bourses closed. Sovereign bonds echoed the US moves however, and a selloff across the continent saw yields on 10yr bunds (+4.9bps), OATs (+6.8bps) and BTPs (+9.5bps) all move higher. Stocks in Asia are trading mixed overnight with CSI (+0.89%) leading the pack, followed by the Shanghai Composite (+0.59%), and the Nikkei (+0.56%) in the green while the Hang Seng (-0.16%) and KOSPI (-0.59%) have lost ground. Staying on inflation, Japan’s PPI for October came out at 8.0% year-on-year (7.0% consensus and 6.3% previous), the highest since 1981. Elsewhere, in Australia the unemployment rate for October saw a big surprise, jumping to 5.2% (4.9% consensus, 4.6% previous) as many people re-entered the labour force after lockdowns. The participation rate rose to 64.7% from 64.5% in September. Futures are indicating a muted start to the day in the US & Europe with S&P 500 futures (+0.08%) up but DAX futures (-0.28%) catching down with the late US sell-off. One solace on the inflation front was a decline in energy prices yesterday, with both Brent crude (-2.52%) and WTI (-3.34%) losing ground. That followed 3 consecutive gains and came after the US EIA reported that crude oil inventories had risen by +1.00m barrels last week. There was also another decline in natural gas prices, with US futures falling -1.99% in their 4th consecutive decline, whilst European futures were down -4.06%. Looking at yesterday’s other data, the weekly initial jobless claims for the US over the week through November 6 fell to 267k (vs. 260k expected). That’s their 6th successive weekly decline and takes the measure to a post-pandemic low. To the day ahead now, and the main data highlight will be the UK’s preliminary Q3 GDP reading. From central banks, the ECB will be publishing their Economic Bulletin, and speakers include the ECB’s Makhlouf, Schnabel and Hernandez de Cos, along with the BoE’s Mann. Otherwise, the European Commission will be releasing their latest economic forecasts, and it’s the Veterans’ Day Holiday in the United States. Tyler Durden Thu, 11/11/2021 - 07:48.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 11th, 2021

Futures Fall, Yields And Dollar Jump Ahead Of Highest CPI In 31 Years

Futures Fall, Yields And Dollar Jump Ahead Of Highest CPI In 31 Years For the third day in a row, early weakness in futures - in this case as a result of China's soaring, record producer price inflation - reversed and spoos rose from session lows but were still down on the session as traders awaited inflation data due later on Wednesday. Treasury yields climbed and the dollar and cryptos rose. At 7:45 a.m. ET, Dow e-minis were down 47 points, or 0.12%, S&P 500 e-minis were down 10.25 points, or 0.22%, and Nasdaq 100 e-minis were down 68 points, or 0.42%. Earlier, China's Shanghai Composite fell as much as 1.7% and the Hang Seng dropped more than 1% after China’s factory inflation soared to a 26-year high. The number came just hours before today's US CPI print is expected to rise 5.8% in October, the highest level since since December 1990, after a 5.4% increase in the previous month. The report comes a day after producer prices data showed a solid rise in October and will be scrutinized for clues on the extent to which manufacturers were passing on higher costs to consumers, whose spending accounts for 70% of the U.S. economy Elevated inflationary pressures “would be the latest test for the Fed’s ‘transitory’ view and challenge the central bank’s stance on policy tightening,” Han Tan, chief market analyst at Exinity Group, said in written comments. “The worry is that such stubborn inflationary pressures could choke the recovery in global demand or hasten policy tightening by major central banks.” On Tuesday, Wall Street's main indexes ended their long streak of record closing highs on Tuesday as Tesla tumbled and as investors booked profits from the recent run-up in gains, especially in the absence of market-moving catalysts. The declines on Wednesday came after data showed Chinese factory gate prices hit a 26-year high in October, while economic advisers to the German government said they expected the current rise in inflation to continue well into 2022. It has been a busy premarket trading session with lots of movers. We start with Coinbase which fell 11% as analysts said the crypto exchange’s quarterly results were well below expectations. DoorDash shares surged as analysts raised price targets on the food-delivery firm after expectation-beating results and purchase of Finnish food-delivery startup Wolt Enterprises Oy.  Here are some other premarket movers today: DoorDash (DASH US) shares surge 19% in U.S. premarket trading, with analysts raising their price targets on the food-delivery firm after expectation-beating results and its biggest ever acquisition Chinese technology stocks listed in the U.S. rise premarket after Tencent reported 3Q profit that exceeded expectations even as revenue missed amid China’s crackdown on the tech industry Tesla (TSLA US) shares inch higher 1.9% in premarket trading, set for a positive open after a 16% slump in two days amid several negative headlines for the stock Stran & Co. (STRN US) shares jump as much as 43% in U.S. premarket trading, recovering ground after a sharp drop following the branding solutions firm’s IPO Society Pass (SOPA US) shares drop as much as 54% in U.S. pre trading hours, after the loyalty tech platform had surged following its IPO in the prior session Upstart Holdings (UPST US) plunged 19% in U.S. premarket trading after the company released 3Q earnings and 4Q forecasts; Piper Sandler ascribes share drop to “elevated investor expectations” and lack of quantification of auto opportunity Poshmark (POSH US) shares sink 29% in U.S. premarket trading with Berenberg (buy) saying the online retail platform’s 3Q results and guidance were disappointing PubMatic (PUBM US) surges 22% in U.S. premarket trading after the company’s 4Q sales forecast topped expectations and it posted 3Q results that Jefferies called “impressive” FuboTV (FUBO US) shares drop 4.3% in U.S. premarket trading as a 3Q results beat for the “sports first” streaming-video platform was overshadowed by higher costs and some weakness on its ad revenue Purple Innovation (PRPL US) slumps 31% after it cut its net revenue forecast for the full year; the guidance missed the average analyst estimate RingCentral (RNG US) rises 22% premarket, a day after the provider of cloud-based communications services forecast 4Q revenue that beat the average analyst estimate Toast (TOST US) slides after reporting financial results that included a net loss that widened compared with the same period last year Turning back to CPI, here is a lenghtier preview courtesy of DB's Jim Reid: I may have just about found it vaguely conceivable at the start of the year that on November 10th we’d see a 5.9% YoY US CPI print and the sixth month above 5%; however, I would certainly not have thought that such a number if it had materialized would be greeted with a collective market “meh” with 10yr Treasury yields 450bps below this rate. A lot is resting on this inflation being transitory. This will be the multi-trillion dollar question for 2022, that’s for sure. Last month saw yet another upside surprise that further undermined the transitory narrative, and, in fact, if you look at the last 7 monthly readings, 5 of them have come in above the median estimate on Bloomberg, with just 1 below and the other in line. In terms of what to expect, our US economists are looking for a reacceleration in the monthly prints, with a +0.47% forecast for the headline measure (+0.6% consensus), and +0.37% for core (+0.4% consensus). Their view is that the main driver is likely to be price pressures in those categories most sensitive to supply shocks, such as new and used vehicles. But they also see some downside risk from Covid-19-sensitive sectors like lodging away and airfares, where prices fell over the late summer as the delta variant slowed the recovery in travel. Look out for rental inflation too – last month we saw owners’ equivalent rent experience its strongest monthly increase since June 2006. It’s a measure that reflects underlying trend inflation, so it is important to monitor moving forward. Many models suggest it will be over 4% for much of next year, which is large given that it makes up around a third of the headline rate and c.40% of core. Shifting back to markets, we next look at Europe, where equities also recovered off opening lows with the Euro Stoxx 50 and DAX recovering to trade flat. FTSE 100 outperformed, rising as much as 0.6%. Sector gains in oil & gas, utilities and insurance names are broadly offset by losses in luxury, tech, household & personal goods and travel. Earlier in the session, Asian equities fell for a second day after data showed China’s monthly factory-gate prices grew at the fastest pace in 26 years. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index slid as much as 0.6% before paring its loss, with materials and IT the biggest drags. The CSI 300 Index slid as much as 1.9% before sharply paring its drop, after China’s producer and consumer price inflation numbers both exceeded forecasts. Commodity prices have soared globally this year amid expectations for a rebound from the pandemic, with energy getting a further boost from a supply crunch. Traders await Wednesday’s U.S. consumer-price report for further clues on monetary policy and economic growth. “Eyes are now closely watching inflation as that is the next market catalyst,” said Justin Tang, head of Asian research at United First Partners. For some Asian companies “the candle is burning on both ends -- with the supply chain crisis as a ceiling on revenues while obligations to expenses and liabilities remain.”  The Hang Seng turned higher in late trading as real estate developers climbed on a report that China’s bond-issuance policies may be loosened, while Tencent led a surge in tech stocks ahead of its earnings report. Vietnam and Taiwan showed small gains, while benchmarks in most other markets fell. Japanese equities fell, following Asian peers lower after China reported worse than expected inflation. Electronics makers and trading houses were the biggest drags on the Topix, which fell 0.5%. SoftBank Group and Tokyo Electron were the largest contributors to a 0.6% drop in the Nikkei 225. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index slid 0.5%, while China’s CSI 300 Index tumbled 1.1% after monthly factory-gate prices in Asia’s largest economy grew at the fastest pace in 26 years. U.S. consumer price data is scheduled to be reported later Wednesday. “Asia is on inflation alert, fearing future costs of inputs from goods sourced from the mainland,” Jeffrey Halley, senior market analyst at Oanda, wrote in a note. “It seems that investors are keen to lower exposure into the U.S. CPI data tonight.” Australian stocks ended lower for a third session as miners tumbled: the S&P/ASX 200 index fell 0.1% to close at 7,423.90 after a volatile session. Miners were the worst performing industry group as iron ore prices dropped, with eight of the 11 subgauges closing lower.  Bluescope was the day’s biggest laggard after iron ore plunged to a fresh 18-month low as debt troubles in China’s real-estate market deal blow after blow to prospects for steel demand. United Malt advanced after a media report said the company could be a takeover target. Australia’s central bank Governor Philip Lowe is anchoring his bet that he won’t need to raise interest rates until 2024 on a view that unemployment needs to be lower to spur wage gains. In New Zealand, the S&P/NZX 50 index fell 0.5% to 13,022.46. In FX, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index rose as the greenback traded higher against all of its Group-of-10 peers apart from the Canadian dollar. The euro extended an Asia session loss and traded firmly below the $1.16 handle. The pound slipped against a broadly stronger dollar, and edged higher versus the euro before a speech by the BOE’s Tenreyro; market is focused on the outlook for rate hikes and traders are also turning attention back to Brexit risks, with the European Union preparing a package of retaliatory measures in case the U.K. decides to suspend parts of a trade accord. Australia’s dollar fell to a one-month low as a slump in iron ore prices prompted short-term leveraged funds to cut long positions. The kiwi declined after a preliminary New Zealand business confidence index weakened In rates, Treasuries traded weak in the early U.S. session, following a selloff in gilts as U.K. markets start to price a higher terminal rate, bear-steepening the curve. Treasury yields are mostly cheaper by 2bp-3bp across the curve with 10-year around 1.475%; gilts lag by additional 1bp vs Treasuries while bunds outperform. During the Asian session, China’s CPI data beat expectations, adding to downside pressure in front eurodollars. Focal points for U.S. session include October CPI expected to show steep increase in y/y rate and final quarterly refunding auction, a $25b 30-year bond sale. Reduced-size U.S. refunding auctions conclude with $25b 30-year bond vs $27b in previous four; Tuesday’s 10- year sale tailed by 1.2bp after steep gains into the bidding deadline. Wednesday's WI 30-year yield around 1.85% is below 30-year stops since January and ~19bp richer than last month’s, which stopped 1.3bp below the WI level at the bidding deadline. In commodities, Crude futures drift lower: WTI drops 0.5% to trade near $83.70. Brent dips back below $85. Base metals are mixed. LME aluminum is the strongest performer; tin and lead are in negative territory. Spot gold drifts lower, losing $5 to trade near $1,826/oz To the day ahead now, and the main highlight will be the aforementioned CPI release from the US for October. Otherwise, there’ll also be Italian industrial production for September. From central banks, we’ll hear from the ECB’s Elderson and the BoE’s Tenreyro, whilst earnings releases include Disney. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures down 0.2% to 4,669.75 STOXX Europe 600 little changed at 482.35 MXAP down 0.1% to 198.31 MXAPJ up 0.1% to 648.70 Nikkei down 0.6% to 29,106.78 Topix down 0.5% to 2,007.96 Hang Seng Index up 0.7% to 24,996.14 Shanghai Composite down 0.4% to 3,492.46 Sensex little changed at 60,399.20 Australia S&P/ASX 200 down 0.1% to 7,423.90 Kospi down 1.1% to 2,930.17 Brent Futures little changed at $84.75/bbl Gold spot down 0.3% to $1,825.71 German 10Y yield little changed at -0.29% Euro down 0.2% to $1.1574 U.S. Dollar Index up 0.18% to 94.13 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg The European Central Bank would risk exacerbating inequality if it were to raise interest rates before ceasing asset purchases, according to Executive Board member Isabel Schnabel U.S. President Joe Biden and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinpingare are scheduled to hold a virtual summit next week, although no specific date has been set, according to people familiar with the matter A lack of top-tier intelligence on Chinese President Xi Jinping’s inner circle is frustrating senior Biden administration officials struggling to get ahead of Beijing’s next steps, according to current and former officials who have reviewed the most sensitive U.S. intelligence reports China’s inflation risks are building as producers pass on higher costs to consumers, reigniting a debate over whether the central bank has scope to ease monetary policy to support a weakening economy and potentially adding to the pressure on global consumer prices The U.K. opposition called for a parliamentary investigation into former Conservative cabinet minister Geoffrey Cox, as the scandal over sleaze and lobbying engulfing Boris Johnson’s ruling party gains momentum A more detailed look at global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asian equity markets traded negatively after a lacklustre handover from Wall Street where the major indices took a break from recent advances and the S&P 500 snapped an eight-day win streak ahead of looming US inflation data. ASX 200 (-0.1%) was rangebound with early strength in financials gradually offset by losses in the commodity-related sectors and with the improvement in Westpac Consumer Sentiment data doing little to spur risk appetite. Nikkei 225 (-0.6%) was subdued with exporters pressured by unfavourable currency inflows and with the list of biggest movers in the index dominated by companies that recently announced their earnings, although Nissan and NTT Data Corp were among the success stories on improved results including a surprise return to quarterly profit for the automaker. Hang Seng (+0.7%) and Shanghai Comp. (-0.4%) initially underperformed amid ongoing developer default concerns as Evergrande has reportedly failed to pay coupon payments at the end of its 30-day grace period. Rating agencies have also downgraded a couple of developers and Fantasia Holdings shares fell as much as 50% on resumption from a one-month trading halt after it missed bond payments due early last month. Furthermore, tensions continued to brew on the Taiwan Strait after US lawmakers made a surprise visit to Taiwan and with China conducting combat readiness patrols in the area ahead of a potential Biden-Xi virtual meeting that could occur next week, which potentially lifted sentiment, while participants also reflected on the firmer than expected inflation data from China which showed consumer prices registered their fastest increase in more than a year and factory gate prices rose at a fresh record pace. Finally, 10yr JGBs traded marginally higher amid the lacklustre mood in stocks and presence of the BoJ in the market for over JPY 1.3tln of JGBs with 1yr-10yr maturities, although gains were capped by resistance ahead of the 152.00 focal point and a pull-back in T-notes. Top Asian News China SOEs Suggest Govt Ease Debt Rules in Property M&A: Cailian Iron Ore Gloom Deepens as China Property Woes Threaten Demand Chinese Developers Surge on Report Bond Rules May be Eased Tencent’s ‘Other Gains’ Unexpectedly Double, Helping Profit Beat European equities (Eurostoxx 50 -0.1%) have traded with little in the way of firm direction as a slew of earnings dictate the state of play amid a lack of fresh macro impulses. The handover from Asia was mostly a downbeat one with focus on firmer than expected CPI and PPI prints out of China and ongoing developer default concerns as Evergrande bond holders have reportedly not received coupon payments by the end of today's Asia-close grace period, in reference to missed coupon payments totalling USD 148.1mln. Stateside, futures are a touch softer (ES -0.2%) after cash markets saw the S&P 500 snap its eight-day winning streak during yesterday’s session. Ahead, the main event for the US will be the CPI release at 13:30GMT whilst the earnings docket continues to slow down with Disney the main standout after-hours. Back to Europe, sectors are mixed with Oil & Gas outperforming peers alongside price action in the crude complex. Banking names saw initial gains trimmed after earnings from Credit Agricole (-1.1%) and ABN AMRO (+1.9%) were unable to provide sustained support for the sector despite the former exceeding profit expectations. The retail sector has been provided a boost by Marks & Spencer (+11.4%) after the Co. reported stellar earnings and raised guidance. Elsewhere in the UK, ITV (+12.0%) sits at the top of the FTSE 100 after printing solid revenue metrics and a bullish revenue outlook. To the downside, Personal and Household goods lag in the wake of earnings from Adidas (-6.0%) which saw the Co.’s performance hampered by factory closures in Vietnam and product boycotts in China. Finally, Alstom (+9.6%) sits at the top of the CAC post-earnings with the Co. stating that supply chain shortages had no material impact on H1 sales. Top European News ECB May Aid Rich If Rates Rise Before QE Ends, Schnabel Says Merkel Advisers Urge ECB Exit Strategy as Price Pressures Rise King Sinks Impala Plan to Create World’s No. 1 Platinum Firm Alstom’s Cash Drain Is Less Than Forecast; Shares Jump In FX, the Greenback remains relatively firm in the run up to US inflation data having turned a corner of sorts on Tuesday, with the index extending beyond 94.000 following its rebound from 93.872 and inching closer to the current 94.380 w-t-d peak, at 94.221, thus far. Interestingly, the Buck has regained momentum irrespective of the benign Treasury (and global) yield backdrop, softer than forecast elements in the PPI release and most Fed officials maintaining a distance between the end of tapering and tightening. However, risk sentiment if wavering to the benefit of the Dollar more than others and the aforementioned CPI readings may be supportive if in line or above consensus. Note, initial claims are also scheduled due to tomorrow’s Veteran’s Day holiday and the final leg of supply comes via Usd 25 bn long bonds. NZD/JPY - Ironically perhaps, the Kiwi is struggling to keep sight of 0.7100 vs its US peer on the very day that COVID-19 restrictions were eased in Auckland, and a further deterioration in NZ business sentiment alongside a fall in the activity outlook may be the catalyst, while the Yen has run into resistance again above 113.00 and is now relying on decent option expiry interest between the round number and 113.05 (1.1 bn) to keep its bull run going. GBP/EUR/AUD/CHF - All softer against the Greenback, as Cable hovers below 1.3550, the Euro pivots 1.1575, Aussie meanders within a range just above 0.7350 amidst favourable Aud/Nzd crossflows and an improvement in Westpac consumer sentiment, and the Franc treads water inside 0.9150-00 parameters. However, Eur/Usd appears to be underpinned by heavier option expiries on the downside than upside rather than ostensibly hawkish ECB promptings from Germany’s Government advisors given 2.1 bn between 1.1575-65 and a further 1.2 bn from 1.1555-50 vs 1.5 bn at the 1.1600 strike. CAD - The Loonie is outperforming or holding up better than other majors near 1.2400 vs its US rival even though WTI has backed off from best levels just shy of Usd 85/brl, but Usd/Cad could still be drawn to expiry interest starting at 1.2450 and stretching some way over 1.2500 in the absence of anything Canadian specific, and pending US inflation data of course. WTI and Brent have been somewhat choppy this morning, but remain within reach of overnight ranges and well within yesterday’s parameters as fresh newsflow has been light; a performance that is similar to the morning’s directionless equity trade. Focus has been on last nights/yesterday's events after the EIA’s STEO release seemingly lessened the likelihood of a SPR release followed by the weekly private inventory report, which printed a headline draw of 2.485M against the expected build of 2.1mln – reaction was minimal. Later today, we get the DoE equivalent for which expectations remain at a headline build of 2.13mln, but the components are expected to post draws of around 1mln. Elsewhere, spot gold and silver are a touch softer on the session with the US Dollar and yields perhaps weighing, though the previous metals have once again not deviated too far from overnight parameters. On copper, prices were hampered by the Chinese inflation data though LME copper has staged a marginal recovery as the session has progressed. US Event Calendar 8:30am: Oct. CPI YoY, est. 5.9%, prior 5.4%; CPI MoM, est. 0.6%, prior 0.4% 8:30am: Oct. CPI Ex Food and Energy YoY, est. 4.3%, prior 4.0%; MoM, est. 0.4%, prior 0.2% 8:30am: Nov. Initial Jobless Claims, est. 260,000, prior 269,000 8:30am: Oct. Continuing Claims, est. 2.05m, prior 2.11m 8:30am: Oct. Real Avg Weekly Earnings YoY, prior -0.8% 8:30am: Oct. Real Avg Hourly Earning YoY, prior -0.8% 10am: Sept. Wholesale Trade Sales MoM, prior -1.1%; Wholesale Inventories MoM, est. 1.1%, prior 1.1% 2pm: Oct. Monthly Budget Statement, est. -$179b, prior - $61.5b DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap After three days in hospital in traction, little Maisie has a 3-hour hip operation this morning. Showing one benefit of the pandemic, she had a zoom call with her class at school yesterday on their big screen where they all got to ask her questions. The best one apparently was one boy who put his hand up and said “will your new wheelchair have an engine?”. I was reading last night about people with Maisie’s condition (perthes) ending up playing international sport as an adult after a long recovery as a kid, including a Danish striker who played in the semi-finals of the Euros this summer and a 132kg American football player. As long as she waits a polite time after her long recovery to beat me at golf then I’ll be very happy. Keeping my mind off things today will undoubtedly be US CPI. Given my inflationary bias views I may have just about found it vaguely conceivable at the start of the year that on November 10th we’d see a 5.9% YoY US CPI print and the sixth month above 5%; however, I would certainly not have thought that such a number if it had materialised would be greeted with a collective market “meh” with 10yr Treasury yields 450bps below this rate. A lot is resting on this inflation being transitory. This will be the multi-trillion dollar question for 2022, that’s for sure. Last month saw yet another upside surprise that further undermined the transitory narrative, and, in fact, if you look at the last 7 monthly readings, 5 of them have come in above the median estimate on Bloomberg, with just 1 below and the other in line. In terms of what to expect, our US economists are looking for a reacceleration in the monthly prints, with a +0.47% forecast for the headline measure (+0.6% consensus), and +0.37% for core (+0.4% consensus). Their view is that the main driver is likely to be price pressures in those categories most sensitive to supply shocks, such as new and used vehicles. But they also see some downside risk from Covid-19-sensitive sectors like lodging away and airfares, where prices fell over the late summer as the delta variant slowed the recovery in travel. Look out for rental inflation too – last month we saw owners’ equivalent rent experience its strongest monthly increase since June 2006. It’s a measure that reflects underlying trend inflation, so it is important to monitor moving forward. Many models suggest it will be over 4% for much of next year, which is large given that it makes up around a third of the headline rate and c.40% of core. Staying with inflation, China’s year-on-year numbers for October surprised on the upside overnight with CPI +1.5% (consensus +1.4%, last month +0.7%), the highest since September 2020. PPI +13.5% (consensus +12.3%) was also at a 26-year high. Asian stocks are trading lower with the KOSPI (-0.86%), Shanghai Composite (-1.20%), CSI (-1.40%), the Nikkei (-0.49%) and Hang Seng (-1.20%) all down after the China numbers. Futures are pointing to a weak start in the US & Europe too with S&P 500 futures (-0.4%) and DAX futures (-0.23%) both down. As investors look forward to today’s number, the long equity advance finally petered out yesterday as the S&P 500 (-0.35%) snapped a run of 8 successive gains. A 9th day in the green would have marked the longest winning streak since November 2004, but in the end it wasn’t to be.It also prevented an 18th up day out of the last 20 for the first time since September 1954.So reset your counters. Instead, we saw a broader risk-off move as equity indices moved lower on both sides of the Atlantic alongside a fresh rally and flattening in sovereign bond yields and curves. So the S&P 500 (-0.35%), the NASDAQ (-0.60%) and Europe’s STOXX 600 (-0.19%) all fell back from their record highs in the previous session although the equal weighted S&P 500 was almost flat (-0.03%) showing that there wasn’t huge breadth to the US weakness. Sector dispersion was tight in the US, with materials (+0.43%) among the leaders again along with the more typically defensive utilities sector (+0.44%). Financials (-0.55%) declined on the flatter curve story but it was discretionary stocks (-1.35%) that took the biggest hit, dragged down by Tesla declining a further -11.99% and now losing c.$200bn of market cap over two days or the equivalent of 8.5 times Ford’s market cap. The VIX index of volatility ticked up another +0.58pts to hit its highest level in nearly 4 weeks, but remains comfortably below the peaks reached during September’s 5% pullback in the S&P. By contrast, Bitcoin proved to be one of the few winners of yesterday as it increased to an all-time high of $67,734, although that was slightly down from its all-time intraday high of $68,513 earlier in the day. Meanwhile, the question of the various Federal Reserve appointments has been occupying increasing attention and impacting bond markets, but in spite of the gossip there’s been no fresh news over the last 24 hours we didn’t already know. Earlier this week, Politico cited two sources with knowledge of the process saying that a decision would be made by Thanksgiving. But for those with longer memories, it was reported by Bloomberg back in August that people familiar with the process were saying that President Biden was likely to make his choice around Labor Day in early September, and over two months have passed since. So we’ll have to see what the real deadline is. Nevertheless, the news from late Monday night in the US that Fed Governor Brainard had been interviewed for the Fed Chair position helped support US Treasuries, thanks to the perception that Brainard would be a more dovish pick. Regardless of whether Powell or Brainard is Chair come this time next year, the Board will likely become more dovish as President Biden replaces outgoing Governors (and fills empty seats should he choose to do so). By the close of trade, 10yr yields were down -5.4bps to 1.44%, and the 30yr yield was down -6.4bps to 1.82%, which was its lowest closing level since mid-September. Another striking thing was that the moves lower in Treasury yields were entirely driven by a fresh decline in real yields, with the 10yr real yield down -7.0bps to -1.20%, marking its lowest closing level since TIPS began trading in 1997. Meanwhile, there was another round of curve flattening yesterday, with the 5s30s slope down -2.8bps to 73.5bps, which is the flattest it’s been since the initial market panic over the pandemic back in March 2020. For Europe it was a similar story as yields fell across the continent, and those on 10yr bunds (-5.5bps), OATs (-5.5bps) and BTPs (-5.3bps) all saw decent moves lower. Ahead of today’s CPI, investors had the PPI numbers to digest yesterday, though there was little market reaction to speak of as they came in almost entirely in line with the consensus. The monthly reading was up by +0.6% in October, which in turn saw the year-on-year measure remain at +8.6%, with both of those in line with expectations. The core measure did come in a touch below, at +0.4% (vs. +0.5% expected), but again that left the yoy reading at +6.8% as expected. One factor that may help on the inflation front over the coming months was a major decline in natural gas prices yesterday, with both European (-8.16%) and US (-8.26%) futures witnessing substantial declines. This wasn’t reflected elsewhere in the energy complex though, with WTI (+2.71%) and Brent crude (+1.62%) oil prices seeing a further rise following reports that the US would not need to release strategic reserves due to the demand outlook, and gold prices (+0.42%) closed at their highest levels since June. There wasn’t a massive amount of other data yesterday, though the ZEW survey from Germany for November saw the expectations reading unexpectedly rise to 31.7 (vs. 20.0 expected), which is the first increase after 5 consecutive monthly declines. However, the current situation measure did fall to 12.5 (vs. 18.3 expected). Finally out of the US, the NFIB’s small business optimism index for October fell to a 7-month low of 98.2 (vs. 99.5 expected). To the day ahead now, and the main highlight will be the aforementioned CPI release from the US for October. Otherwise, there’ll also be Italian industrial production for September. From central banks, we’ll hear from the ECB’s Elderson and the BoE’s Tenreyro, whilst earnings releases include Disney. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/10/2021 - 07:56.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 10th, 2021

Heidelberg records half-year profit and high order backlog

Half-year incoming orders up 44 percent on previous year at €1,245 million and sales climb by 22 percent to €983 million Order backlog of €886 million exceeds pre-crisis level EBITDA of €75 million – significant operational improvement Free cash flow reaches €74 million – net financial debt completely eliminated Continued high demand in China and Central Europe Wallbox capacities expanded as a result of dynamic growth Growing supply chain challenges Outlook for financial year 2021/2022 unchanged HEIDELBERG, Germany, Nov. 10, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- During the second quarter of financial year 2021/2022 (July 1 to September 30, 2021), Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG (Heidelberg) has built on the encouraging developments of the first three months. The market recovery continued in virtually all regions compared with the previous year and, as already announced, the Group's transformation is making a big contribution to improving the operating result. The Group's half-year sales increased by 22 percent to €983 million (previous year: €805 million). The EBITDA figure of €75 million was also up on the previous year (€67 million), even though the first half of the previous year was positively influenced by earnings from the restructuring of retirement provision amounting to €73 million, the sale of a subsidiary (€8 million), and the widespread use of short-time working. During the current reporting period, Heidelberg benefited from rising sales, far better cost-efficiency, and earnings of over €20 million from the sale of docufy GmbH, which does not form part of the company's core business operations. The international logistics bottlenecks throughout the industry were already making themselves felt during the first half of the year in the form of delivery delays. Material supplies were also subject to the familiar pressures. However, close collaboration with suppliers and the approval of alternative components prevented more serious negative effects during this period. "The highly positive developments in our growth areas and our improved cost-efficiency underline that Heidelberg is doing very well. We also see great potential for the future thanks to our leading position in China and in the areas of digital business models, e-mobility, and packaging printing. In addition to all this, our break-even point will continue to fall. Despite the clearly evident problems in the supply chain at present, we are therefore confident about this year and the years to come," comments Heidelberg CEO Rainer Hundsdörfer. Continuing progress in the four growth areas The encouraging developments during the first half-year are based on further improved cost-efficiency and also on continuing progress in the Group's growth areas, that is to say packaging printing, digital business models, China, and new technology applications, especially in e-mobility. Heidelberg is benefiting from continued high growth in its largest single market – China – partly due to the company's well-established local production operations. ...Full story available on Benzinga.com.....»»

Category: earningsSource: benzingaNov 10th, 2021

Futures Flat As Yields, Dollar Slide On Speculation Demo-Dove Brainard Will Replace Powell

Futures Flat As Yields, Dollar Slide On Speculation Demo-Dove Brainard Will Replace Powell For the second session in a row, S&P 500 futures reversed earlier losses and traded flat after falling as much as 0.3% earlier in the run-up to today's PPI report - the first of a couple of readings on inflation this week - as investors weighed the Federal Reserve’s warning that stock prices are "vulnerable to significant declines should investor risk sentiment deteriorate, progress on containing the virus disappoint, or the economic recovery stall." US Treasury yields fell and the dollar index slipped for a third consecutive day following a late Monday report that Joe Biden interviewed uber-dove and Hillary Clinton fan Lael Brainard for the central bank’s top job, although prediction markets were not impressed. European stocks advanced for a ninth day, the longest streak since June while Asian shares drifted. Some more stats from DB's Jim Reid There wasn’t an awful lot of newsflow for investors yesterday as they looked forward to tomorrow’s US CPI release, but the astonishing equity advance showed no signs of relenting just yet, with the S&P 500 (+0.09%) up for an 8th consecutive session to another record high. For reference, that’s the longest winning streak since April 2019, and if we get a 9th day in the green today, that would mark the longest run of consecutive gains since November 2004, back when George W. Bush had just beaten John Kerry to win a second term. It's also 17 out of 19 days up, which hasn’t happened since December 1971. At 715am S&P futures were up 1 point or 0.02% to 4,965. If, or rather when, the S&P closes green today, it will be up 9 consecutive sessions, the longest such streak since Nov 2004. Nasdaq futures rose another 33.25 points; If the nasdaq index is up today, it will be 12 days in a row, a feat it last achieved in 2009 and which hasn't been topped since 1992. “U.S. indexes continue flirting with all-time high levels following a surprise NFP read, the approval of Biden’s $550 billion spending bill and the discovery of an oral Covid treatment from Pfizer,” said Ipek Ozkardeskaya, senior analyst at Swissquote. “But inflation worries come to overshadow the Monday optimism.” Sysco and DoorDash are among companies reporting earnings. Rivian Automotive is scheduled to price its initial public offering, seeking to raise as much as $10 billion in a listing that could give the producer of electric trucks a fully diluted valuation of more than $70 billion. “The company is seen as the most serious competitor to Tesla in the EV race,” Ozkardeskaya said. “The company will be worth more than Honda and Ferrari." Paypal Holdings fell 4.5% in U.S. premarket trading with analysts saying the payments firm’s full-year guidance was a disappointment and that the shares are likely to remain under pressure near-term despite announcing a new Venmo deal with Amazon, while General Electric surged 11.6% in premarket after the U.S. conglomerate said it would split itself into three companies focused on aviation, healthcare and power. Tesla Inc shares rose 1.4%, rebounding from a nearly 5% fall on Monday after Chief Executive Elon Musk’s Twitter poll proposing to sell a tenth of his holdings garnered 57.9% vote in favor of the sale. The proposal also raised questions about whether Musk may have violated his settlement with the U.S. securities regulator again. Zynga Inc jumped 6.6% after the “FarmVille” creator beat quarterly net bookings estimates, while Tripadvisor Inc fell 7.4% after reporting downbeat quarterly earnings and announcing the departure of Chief Executive Stephen Kaufer. Here are some of the other notable premarket movers today: TripAdvisor (TRIP US) shares fall as much as 7% in U.S. premarket trading with analysts saying the company’s 3Q results and outlook are a disappointment given the travel recovery being seen across the board. Cryptocurrency-exposed stocks rise in U.S. premarket trading on Tuesday, set to extend Monday’s gains after the global crypto market hit the $3 trillion milestone Roblox (RBLX US) shares jump as much as 27% in U.S. premarket trading after the video-game platform firm’s quarterly bookings topped estimates even after the easing of Covid restrictions Naked Brand (NAKD US) shares rise as much as 45% in U.S. premarket trading, after the company said it will acquire commercial EV technology company Cenntro Automotive in a stock-for-stock deal Robinhood Markets (HOOD US) slides 3% in premarket trading after it said personal information of millions of customers was compromised in a data breach last week and that the culprit demanded a payment. Arrival (ARVL US) plunged 19% in extended trading after the electric-vehicle maker says previous long-term forecasts from the merger with the CIIG special purpose acquisition company should no longer be relied upon SmileDirectClub (SDC US) slumps 21% in U.S. premarket trading after its 3Q revenue and 4Q forecast missed the lowest analyst estimates Aterian (ATER US) shares jumped 24% in postmarket trading on Monday, after third-quarter revenue and gross margin topped analysts’ estimates Five9 (FIVN US) shares rose 8.8% in extended trading on Monday, after the software company reported third-quarter results that beat expectations RealReal (REAL US) shares jumped 5.5% in Monday extended trading, after the online marketplace reported third- quarter revenue that beat expectations Invitae (NVTA US) shares tumbled 14% postmarket after the genetics company cut its full- year revenue forecast 3D Systems (DDD US) fell 8.5% postmarket after reporting third-quarter results. The 3D printing firm narrowed its 2021 adjusted gross margin guidance to 41% to 43% from an earlier range of 40% to 44% Data from the Labor Department due at 8:30 a.m. ET is expected to show that its producer price index for final demand rose 0.6% in October, with accelerating inflation and tighter monetary policy becoming a bigger concern for investors than the COVID-19 pandemic. Global equities hovered near all-time highs as investors weigh strong earnings, easing travel curbs and U.S. infrastructure spending against the risk of persistent inflation that may lead to tighter monetary policy.  A better-than-expected earnings season, positive developments around COVID-19 antiviral pills and the loosening of travel curbs have recently helped the market continue its record run. European equities faded small opening losses in otherwise quiet trade, with Euro Stoxx 50 little changed and other major indexes adding ~0.2%. Retailers traded well, insurance and financial services are under pressure but ranges are relatively narrow. Bayer jumped 3% after the German producer of healthcare and agricultural products raised its earnings forecast. In the latest positive development in uranium, Rolls-Royce surged 4.9% after the British engineering company raised an equivalent $617 million to fund the development of small modular nuclear reactors. Investor sentiment in Germany rose unexpectedly in November on expectations that price pressures will ease at the start of next year and growth will pick up in Europe’s largest economy, a survey showed on Tuesday. The ZEW economic research institute said its economic sentiment index increased to 31.7 from 22.3 points in October. A Reuters poll had forecast a fall to 20.0. “Financial market experts are more optimistic about the coming six months,” ZEW President Achim Wambach said in a statement. “For the first quarter of 2022, they expect growth to pick up again and inflation to fall both in Germany and the euro zone,” Wambach added. A fall in a current conditions index to 12.5 from 21.6 - compared with a consensus forecast for 18.0 - showed investors expected that supply bottlenecks and inflationary pressures would hold back the economy in the current quarter, he said. Supply bottlenecks for raw and preliminary materials have weighed down industrial production here in Germany. Exports fell here for a second consecutive month in September. Asian equities were mixed, struggling to follow a positive lead from Wall Street as traders weighed economic optimism and Covid treatments against virus outbreaks across China. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index was up 0.1% on Tuesday, trimming an earlier 0.4% gain. SoftBank surged 11% after the company said it would buy back as much as 1 trillion yen ($8.8 billion) of its own stock. Wuxi Biologics rebounded from the previous day’s tumble, after the U.K. government said it will add some of China’s shots to approved vaccines for visitors.  Taiwan and the Philippines had the region’s top-performing benchmarks, with those in Japan and Malaysia slipping. While Asian markets attempted to follow increases seen on Wall Street overnight, “paring back of initial gains suggest that several factors including China’s Covid-19 situation and its property sector remain of concern,” said Jun Rong Yeap, market strategist with IG Asia Pte. in Singapore.  Investors are also awaiting news from China on the Communist Party’s meeting this week, its first major convention in more than a year. “The sixth plenum will quite possibly be a manifesto from Xi Jinping as he adopts the mantle of effective leader for life,” said Kyle Rodda, an analyst at IG Markets Ltd. “His agenda and rhetoric will be important, with investors nervous about what comes out about China’s strategic and economic direction.”  Over in Japan, a morning rally in Japanese stocks gave way to profit-taking for a second day, even as SoftBank Group surged on its latest buyback announcement. Electronics and chemical makers were the biggest drags on the Topix, which fell 0.8%, reversing an early 0.7% gain. Fast Retailing was the biggest contributor to a 0.8% decline in the Nikkei 225. The yen was up 0.4% against the dollar, in its forth day of advance. SoftBank jumped more than 10% after it said it will repurchase as much as 1 trillion yen ($8.8 billion) of its stock. Its climb helped drive Japanesestocks higher in early trading, after the S&P 500 rose to a new record high. “Futures were sold after the open as investors moved to book profits with the Nikkei 225 approaching 30,000,” said Hideyuki Ishiguro, a strategist at Nomura Asset Management in Tokyo. “There is a lack of catalysts for further gains, and the stronger yen is also limiting the upside.” Australian stocks edged lower, weighed down by bank. The S&P/ASX 200 index fell 0.2% to close at 7,434.20, with banks contributing the most to its drop. Eight of the benchmark’s 11 subgauges declined, while miners rallied. Inghams tumbled to its lowest price since May 27. Chalice Mining surgend after reporting its maiden Mineral Resource Estimate for the Gonneville Deposit at Julimar. In New Zealand, the S&P/NZX 50 index rose 0.4% to 13,090.58. In rates, USTs bull steepened, returning to Asia’s richest levels after speculation about a dovish change in leadership at the Fed. Treasuries advance across the curve, following wider gains across bunds; a bull-flattening move during Europe session was extended after Netherlands 2038 auction. Gilts long-end also well bid, adding support for Treasuries. Focal points for U.S. session include Fed’s Powell speaking at 9am ET, 10-year note auction at 1pm. Treasury yields were richer by 2bp-3bp across the curve, with curve spreads broadly within 1bp of Monday’s close; bunds outperform by ~1bp in the 10-year sector while long-end gilt yields are ~5bp lower on the day. Long-end Germany outperforms gilts and USTs, richening ~4bps. Peripheral spreads tighten with 10y Bund/BTP near 112bps. In FX, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index fell to its lowest level this month and Treasuries rallied following the report that Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard was interviewed for the top job at the central bank, with speculation that a Brainard-led Fed would be more dovish than that of current Chair Jerome Powell. The dollar was weaker against most of its Group-of-10 peers while the yen was among the top performers as traders wound back bets on higher global central- bank interest rates; the euro briefly rose above the $1.16 level before erasing gains. JPY tops the leaderboard with USD/JPY remaining sub-113. Cable briefly regains a 1.36-handle. In commodities, Crude futures push higher after a subdued Asia session. WTI adds 0.9% to trade near $82.60, Brent regains a $84-handle. Spot gold is range bound near $1,825/oz. Base metals hold modest gains with LME zinc the marginal outperformer Looking at the day ahead now, and data releases includethe US PPI reading for October, along with that month’s NFIB small business optimism index. Over in Germany, there’s also the ZEW survey for November and the trade balance for September. Central bank speakers include Fed Chair Powell, ECB President Lagarde, BoE Governor Bailey and PBoC Governor Yi Gang, along with the ECB’s Panetta, Rehn, Knot and Schnabel, the Fed’s Bullard, Daly and Kashkari, and BoE Deputy Governor Broadbent. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures little changed at 4,693.50 STOXX Europe 600 up 0.1% to 484.28 MXAP little changed at 198.97 MXAPJ up 0.3% to 649.50 Nikkei down 0.8% to 29,285.46 Topix down 0.8% to 2,018.77 Hang Seng Index up 0.2% to 24,813.13 Shanghai Composite up 0.2% to 3,507.00 Sensex down 0.3% to 60,381.61 Australia S&P/ASX 200 down 0.2% to 7,434.20 Kospi little changed at 2,962.46 German 10Y yield little changed at -0.26% Euro little changed at $1.1588 Brent Futures up 0.7% to $83.99/bbl Gold spot up 0.0% to $1,824.68 U.S. Dollar Index little changed at 93.96 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg Just weeks ago, Wall Street analysts and central bankers were quick to assure investors that a collapse by China Evergrande Group wouldn’t be a Lehman moment. Regulators in Beijing said that the crisis would be “contained.” Now that a bond selloff has spread to China’s entire real estate sector and beyond, concern is growing about the potential risk to the global financial system The Federal Reserve warned that fragility in China’s commercial real-estate sector could spread to the U.S. if it deteriorates dramatically, as investor focus turns to China Evergrande Group’s next bond payment deadlines Japan ruling Liberal Democratic Party and coalition partner Komeito agree to give 50,000 yen in cash and 50,000 yen in coupons for every child 18 or younger, Kyodo reports, without attribution Boris Johnson is struggling to repress the U.K. backlash over his defense of a ruling party lawmaker who broke lobbying rules, as his government was openly accused of corruption in Parliament and even typically friendly newspapers took aim at his ruling Conservative Party Bitcoin jumped past $68,000 for the first time to a new all-time high, part of a wider recent rally in the cryptocurrency sector. The climb in cryptocurrencies overall has taken their combined value above $3 trillion. Bitcoin hit its October record following the launch of the first Bitcoin-linked exchange-traded fund for U.S. investors A more detailed look at global markets from Newsquawk Asia-Pac stocks traded indecisively as focus centred on earnings and despite the positive handover from Wall St where the S&P 500 notched an 8th consecutive record close amid a lack of catalysts to derail the momentum in stocks. ASX 200 (-0.2%) began marginally higher amid strength in the tech and mining sectors but with upside eventually reversed by losses in the top-weighted financial industry as NAB shares declined despite posting a 77% jump in FY cash earnings and its FY net more than doubled to AUD 6.4bln, although this was still short of some analysts’ forecasts and the Co. also noted that competitive pressures are expected to continue in FY22. Nikkei 225 (-0.7%) was choppy amid a slew of earnings releases with outperformance in SoftBank following its H1 results in which net income declined by more than 80%, but revenue increased and it confirmed a JPY 1tln share buyback. It was also reported that PM Kishida instructed COVID measures to be compiled this week and economic measures by next Friday, while a government panel recommended tax breaks for companies that increase wages, although Tokyo stocks have failed to benefit with early momentum offset by recent flows into the JPY. Hang Seng (-0.1%) and Shanghai Comp. (+0.2%) lacked firm direction amid mixed developer related headlines with Kaisa Group said to be taking several measures to solve liquidity issues and have pleaded for more time and patience from investors, while China Evergrande reportedly scraped together more cash by offloading a 5.7% stake in HengTen Networks for USD 145mln. Furthermore, the PBoC continued with its liquidity efforts but recent source reports noted that chances of a PBoC rate cut looks slim and that the PBoC is expected to be cautious in easing monetary policy amid stagflation concerns. Finally, 10yr JGBs were flat amid the indecisive mood in stocks and was only briefly supported from the improvement across most metrics at the latest 30yr JGB auction. Top Asian News Gold Rally Pauses as Focus Turns to Upcoming Inflation Data Indonesia Bonds Risk Losing Key Support as Outflows Surge Nissan Raises Profit Outlook Despite Supply Disruptions Fed Warns of Woes Spreading as Deadline Looms: Evergrande Update After a soft open, European equities trade in close proximity to the unchanged mark (Eurostoxx 50 +0.1%) with incremental newsflow relatively light thus far with a mixed German ZEW report unable to shift the dial. The handover from the Asia-Pac session was a mixed one with the region unable to benefit from the positive tailwinds on Wall St. Stateside, futures are near-enough unchanged with participants tentative ahead of tomorrow’s US CPI release which is expected to see Y/Y CPI rise to 5.8% from 5.4%. For the Stoxx 600, UBS’ announced today that its end-2022 target is at 520 which would mark around 8% of upside from current levels. In terms of a regional breakdown, UBS upgraded Italy to overweight from underweight whilst holding Germany and the UK as overweight. Sectors in Europe are a mixed bag with Autos outperforming peers as Renault (+4.6%) sits at the top of the CAC in the wake of Nissan earnings, which the Co. says will have a positive impact on its Q3 earnings. Basic Resources, Retail and Media names are also faring well. To the downside, Insurance names are on a softer footing following earnings from Munich Re (-3.4%) with the Co. warning of further COVID-related losses, whilst results have also hampered the performance of Direct Line (-2.6%). Bayer (+2.6%) is one of the better performers in Germany after beating revenue and EBITDA expectations and guiding FY EPS higher. Associated British Foods (+6.5%) is the best performer in the Stoxx 600 after announcing a special dividend alongside results. Finally, other strong stocks in the UK include Rolls Royce (+5.4%) after confirming it has received funding for small modular nuclear reactors, whilst BT (+2.9%) is seen higher after being upgraded to buy from hold at Berenberg. Top European News UniCredit to Take $1.9 Billion Charge From Yapi Kredi Sale Russia’s Gazprom Says Gas Will Flow Into EU Storage This Month European Gas Prices Slide on Some Signs of Higher Russian Flows Polish Key Rate Hikes Past 1.5% May Be Needed, MPC’s Sura Says In FX, the Yen and Dollar are locked around the 113.00 mark after the former extended its mainly technical rally to around 112.73 before running out of steam, and this has given the Greenback in general some breathing space as the index claws back declines from a slightly deeper 93.872 post-NFP low to retest resistance at the psychological 94.000 level. However, Usd/Jpy and Yen crosses are still trending lower following clear breaches of several key chart supports that will now form upside barriers, such as Fibs in the headline pair spanning 113.20-30, while the Buck and DXY retain a bearish tone following their sharp retracement from a new y-t-d high in the case of the former last Friday. Ahead, US PPI data provides a timely inflation gauge for CPI on Wednesday, while there is another array of Fed speakers and more supply to absorb as Usd 39 bn 10 year notes are up for auction. GBP - Sterling continues to regroup in wake of the BoE shock, with Cable cresting 1.3600 and even Eur/Gbp unwinding gains towards 0.8520 amidst ongoing Brexit angst that could reach another critical stage by the end of this week given reports that the EU is formulating a package of short/medium-term retaliatory measures which might be presented by Sefcovic to Frost on Friday, to dissuade the UK from triggering Article 16, according to Eurasia Group's Rahman. Note, however, the cross may be underpinned by decent option expiry interest at the 0.8500 strike (1 bn), if not mere sentimentality. AUD/NZD - Some reasons for the Aussie to reverse recent underperformance vs the Kiwi down under, as NAB business confidence and conditions both improved markedly in October, while consumer sentiment ticked up as a counterweight to an acceleration in NZ electronic card consumption, with Aud/Usd firmly back on the 0.7400 handle, Aud/Nzd rebounding from sub-1.0350 and Nzd/Usd hovering midway between 0.7148-74 parameters. CAD/EUR/CHF - All narrowly divergent vs their US counterpart, as the Loonie gleans traction from a Usd 1/brl rebound in WTI to bounce through 1.2450 and away from 1.1 bn option expiries at 1.2460 in advance of another speech from BoC Governor Macklem, while the Euro is weighing up a mixed ZEW survey against expectations in close proximity to 1.1600 and also ‘comfortably’ above 1.8 bn expiry interest down at 1.1550. Elsewhere, the Franc is keeping its head afloat of 0.9150 and 1.0600 vs the Euro awaiting remarks from the SNB via Maechler and Moser about the changing FX market and implications for the Swiss Central Bank on Thursday. In commodities, WTI and Brent are firmer this morning though the benchmarks have drifted off earlier highs as we approach the entrance of US participants. At best, Brent has surpassed the USD 84.00/bbl mark, a figure which eluded it yesterday, and WTI has been within reach of the USD 83.00/bbl mark. Fresh newsflow explicitly for the complex has been slim but we are, more so than usual, looking to the EIA STEO due at 17:00GMT/12:00EST today. Heightened attention on this stems from US Energy Secretary Granholm commenting earlier in the week that President Biden may make an announcement in relation to crude and the SPR this week; as such, administration officials will be scrutinising the STEO report. For reference, the OPEC+ MOMR and IEA OMR are due on November 11th and 16th respectively. October’s STEO upgraded world 2021 oil demand growth forecasts by 90k but cut the 2022 view by 150k while highlighting that US crude output is to fall 260k vs prev. 200k fall in 2021. As usual, we do have the Private Inventory report due today as well with expectations set for a headline build of 1.9mln. Moving to metals, spot gold and silver are once again lacklustre and remain comfortably within overnight ranges and the upside seen in the metals at the tail-end of last week means we are circa, for spot gold, USD 30/oz from a cluster of DMAs. Elsewhere, base metals are firmer given the support for industrial names on the US infrastructure bill, but the likes of LME copper remain within familiar ranges. US Event Calendar 8:30am: Oct. PPI Ex Food, Energy, Trade MoM, est. 0.3%, prior 0.1% 8:30am: Oct. PPI Ex Food, Energy, Trade YoY, est. 6.2%, prior 5.9% 8:30am: Oct. PPI Ex Food and Energy YoY, est. 6.8%, prior 6.8% 8:30am: Oct. PPI Final Demand YoY, est. 8.6%, prior 8.6% 8:30am: Oct. PPI Ex Food and Energy MoM, est. 0.5%, prior 0.2% 8:30am: Oct. PPI Final Demand MoM, est. 0.6%, prior 0.5% Central Banks 7:50am: Fed’s Bullard Takes Part in Virtual Event 9am: Powell to Speak at Joint Fed, ECB and BoC Diversity Conference 9am: ECB’s Knot, Fed’s Bullard on UBS Panel 11:35am: Fed’s Daly Speaks at NABE Conference 1:30pm: Fed’s Kashkari Takes Part in Moderated Discussion DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap Thanks for all your well wishes yesterday. It was very kind to have a few hundred take the time to email. If you missed it, see yesterday’s EMR to understand why my responsibilities have mounted this week. The latest is that I’ve now got two perfect night’s sleep while my wife who is sleeping by my daughter’s side at hospital on a camp bed all week got hardly any the first night. Nurses coming in every hour, lots of machines beeping, it being too hot and no privacy. A look at my WhatsApp this morning shows she was last seen at 3.58am, so I’m worried I’m going to hear about a repeat. Although I will want to know who she’s whatsApping at that time of the night! There wasn’t an awful lot of newsflow for investors yesterday as they looked forward to tomorrow’s US CPI release, but the astonishing equity advance showed no signs of relenting just yet, with the S&P 500 (+0.09%) up for an 8th consecutive session to another record high. For reference, that’s the longest winning streak since April 2019, and if we get a 9th day in the green today, that would mark the longest run of consecutive gains since November 2004, back when George W. Bush had just beaten John Kerry to win a second term. It's also 17 out of 19 days up, which hasn’t happened since December 1971. All these records for various equity indices might seem jarring when you consider that there are still strong inflationary pressures in the pipeline, and with them the prospect of a renewed hawkish shift by central banks. However, the prevalent view among economists (which continues to influence investors) remains that those pressures will prove transitory and we’ll see price pressures diminish as we move through next year, hence enabling a steady lift-off in rates from central banks. Obviously it remains to be seen if that proves correct, but that’s still the prevailing view. And even though Covid-19 cases have begun to rise again in many countries, not least in Europe, the positive news from both Merck and Pfizer about a new pill that reduces hospitalisations and deaths offers societies another tool alongside vaccines to help prevent the overwhelming of healthcare systems going forward. And on top of all that, we’ve had a further dose of optimism from the latest payrolls data on Friday, which saw an above-consensus print along with positive revisions to previous months. With that in mind, it was another day of records across the board yesterday, with the NASDAQ (+0.07%), the Dow Jones (+0.29%), and Europe’s STOXX 600 (+0.04%) all ascending to fresh highs of their own. Cyclicals tended to outperform, and the small-cap Russell 2000 (+0.23%) was yet another index that hit an all-time high. Not even Tesla declining -4.84% after Elon Musk’s weekend Twitter poll over whether he should sell 10% of his stake was enough to derail things. Materials led the pack (+1.23%) with energy (+0.88%) close behind thanks to a fresh boost in commodity prices. By the close of trade, Brent Crude was up another +0.83% to $83.43/bbl, so still beneath its peak from a couple of weeks ago, but very much remaining in the range above $80/bbl that we’ve seen since the start of October. For sovereign bonds, however, the rally from late last week reversed, 5yr US Treasuries increased +6.1bps, bringing them back above last Thursday’s close, while yields on 10yr US Treasuries were up +3.8bps to 1.49%. Both were entirely driven by higher inflation breakevens, as 5yr and 10yr breakevens both increased +7.1bps. 10yr real yields sank -3.4bps to -1.13%, putting them less than 10bps away from their intraday low back in August of -1.220%. Over in Europe, it was much the same story of higher nominal yields thanks to rising inflation expectations, with yields on 10yr bunds (+3.7bps), OATs (+3.6bps) and BTPs (+1.7bps) all ending the session higher. Overnight in Asia stocks are trading in the red with the Shanghai Composite (-0.02%), Hang Seng (-0.07%), CSI (-0.30%), KOSPI (-0.29%) and the Nikkei (-0.66%) all down. In Japan, wages grew at +0.2% year-on-year in September (vs +0.6% consensus) and real wages actually fell -0.6% as prices rose faster. The new Prime Minister Kishida is expected to announce a stimulus package to boost Japan's recovery in an effort to shore up wages. Staying in Asia, strains on global supply chains continue with Bangladeshi truckers continuing their strike from Friday over a 23% hike in diesel prices. Protests are intensifying as diesel shortages have already sent prices upwards of 64% this year. Futures are indicating that the winning streak in the US and Europe might be under threat with S&P 500 futures (-0.25%) and DAX futures (-0.28%) both down. With all eyes on when we might get some news about the various Fed positions, another place opened up on the Board yesterday after Randal Quarles said that he would be resigning his position as a Governor at the end of December. Quarles had also been Vice Chair for Supervision, though his four-year term for that post came to an end last month. Quarles’ departure from the Fed Board means that there’s now another position at the Fed for President Biden to fill, with Jay Powell’s term as chair concluding in February, Vice Chair Clarida’s position on the board concluding at the end of January, and an additional vacant post on the Board on top of those. Staying on the Fed, yesterday we had the latest Survey of Consumer Expectations from the new York Fed, which showed that one-year inflation expectations hit a series high of 5.7%, while the 3-year inflation expectations remained at a joint-series high of 4.2%. Separately, we also heard from Vice Chair Clarida, who reiterated his belief that the necessary conditions “for raising the target range for the federal funds rate will have been met by year-end 2022.” The Fed also released its bi-annual Financial Stability Report after the closing bell last night. Timely, considering the record run equities have been on, the report noted that “asset prices remain vulnerable to significant declines should investor risk sentiment deteriorate, progress on containing the virus disappoint, or the economic recovery stall.” Other key risks the report mentions include stablecoins, retail-fuelled volatility, and structural vulnerabilities in money market funds. While on structural vulnerabilities, the Inter-Agency Working Group, five key US regulators, also released a progress report on potential Treasury market reforms. There are a number of reforms being considered; what is ultimately adopted will have a sizable impact on the shape of the Treasury market and demand for Treasury securities. To the day ahead now, and data releases includethe US PPI reading for October, along with that month’s NFIB small business optimism index. Over in Germany, there’s also the ZEW survey for November and the trade balance for September. Central bank speakers include Fed Chair Powell, ECB President Lagarde, BoE Governor Bailey and PBoC Governor Yi Gang, along with the ECB’s Panetta, Rehn, Knot and Schnabel, the Fed’s Bullard, Daly and Kashkari, and BoE Deputy Governor Broadbent. Tyler Durden Tue, 11/09/2021 - 08:08.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 9th, 2021

Did The Fed Just Set The Stock Market Up For A Crash?

Did The Fed Just Set The Stock Market Up For A Crash? Authored by Lance Roberts via RealInvestmentAdvice.com, Market Back To Extreme Overbought As noted last week, the more significant concern remains the underlying technical condition of the market. While the rally has been impressive, rising to all-time highs, the market is now back to more extreme overbought levels. Furthermore, our “money flow buy signal” is near a peak and slightly triggered a “sell signal.” However, with the MACD still positive, the signal suggests a consolidation rather than correction. However, a confirming MACD often aligns with short-term corrections at a minimum. Therefore we will watch that signal closely. Also, this entire rally from the recent lows has been on very weak volume, which suggests a lack of commitment. Currently, the bulls control the market as we are in the middle of a “buying stampede.” Historically, buying stampedes last on average between 7 and 12 days. Logically, buying stampedes always get followed by selling stampedes of similar lengths. However, there are times these stampedes can last much longer than expected. We are currently in one of those longer-term periods. As shown below, the S&P 500 has only been down in 2 of the last 18 days. How unusual is that? In the previous 20-years of the S&P 500, the number of times the market accomplished such a feat was precisely ZERO. Of course, that stampede gets driven by exuberance. Irrational Exuberance In our daily market commentary (click the banner below to subscribe for FREE morning delivery), we quoted a piece of analysis from Chartr.com. To wit: “Every week it feels like we get a new headline about financial markets doing something unusual. Just this week we’ve had:“ A “squid game” crypto token falling 99.99% in a few minutes. Tesla adding hundreds of billions of dollars in value over a deal with Hertz that hasn’t even been signed. US stock markets hitting fresh all-time-highs. “All of which begs the question: are we in a bubble?” So where are we now? The latest CAPE ratio for the S&P 500 Index is 38x. That’s pretty close to the all-time record, which was 44x back in 2000. For those with a short memory, that was just before the dotcom bubble burst and stock markets (particularly tech) crashed hard.” As we have noted previously, valuations, by themselves, are a terrible timing metric. However, they tell us a great deal about expected future returns and current market psychology. When it comes to “irrational exuberance,” there are other indicators better at revealing speculation in the markets that have preceded a stock market crash. The CNN Fear/Greed index is now at extreme greed territory. Chart courtesy of TheMarketEar via Zerohedge Furthermore, the demand for protection against a stock market crash (put options) fell to new lows. Chart courtesy of TheMarketEar via Zerohedge Historically, such periods of “speculative” activity led to a minimum of short-term stock market corrections, but a crash is not beyond the realm of possibilities. As noted above, with the market extremely overbought, speculative activity surging, and conviction weak, taking some actions to rebalance and manage risk is warranted. However, for now, investors have “no fear” as they believe the Fed will continue to remain accommodative. The Fed’s Third Mandate Takes Priority My co-portfolio manager, Michael Lebowitz, made an important observation on Thursday. “Jerome Powell made it clear the Fed is in no hurry to raise interest rates. ‘We don’t think it’s time yet to raise interest rates. There is still ground to cover to reach maximum employment, both in terms of employment and in terms of participation.’ The Fed’s reason is the employment picture is not back to pre-pandemic levels. In our mind, there is plenty of evidence such as the outsize quits rate, rising wages, and the record number of job openings that scream the labor market is very healthy. Does Mr. Powell disagree with our assessment, or is there more to the Fed’s policy stance? We believe he answered the question at Wednesday’s press conference. Per Jerome Powell: ‘The Fed’s policy actions have been guided by our mandate to promote maximum employment and stable prices for the American people along with our responsibilities to promote the stability of the financial system.‘” The last sentence is the most important. According to the Federal Reserve’s Congressional authorization, the Fed has only TWO mandates: price stability (inflation) and full employment. The third mandate is a self-imposed mandate from Ben Bernanke, who was the Fed Chairman in 2010: “This approach eased financial conditions in the past and, so far, looks to be effective again. Stock prices rose, and long-term interest rates fell when investors began to anticipate the most recent action. Easier financial conditions will promote economic growth. For example, lower mortgage rates will make housing more affordable and allow more homeowners to refinance. Lower corporate bond rates will encourage investment. And higher stock prices will boost consumer wealth and help increase confidence, which can also spur spending.” Fed Opts To Keep Markets Elevated Jerome Powell ignored surging inflationary pressures and a robust job market in favor of supporting asset prices. With valuations surging, speculative activity rising, and investors heavily leveraged, the Fed faces a difficult choice. There is already a decoupling of markets from consumer confidence. A stock market crash would further devastate confidence pushing the economy into recession. That is the risk the Fed cannot afford. However, while the Fed remains focused on keeping markets elevated, inflation poses a significant risk. Currently, with PPI at the highest spread to CPI in history, it suggests producers can’t pass on costs to customers. Such equates to weaker profit margins and earnings in the future. However, if they elect to pass those costs onto consumers, such will raise living costs well above wages. As Michael concluded: “‘Promoting the stability of the financial system’ seems to be an unofficial mandate. Might the Fed be dragging their feet to reduce crisis-driven policy because they fear a stock market crash? More specifically, can extreme stock valuations be justified without an overly aggressive Fed? The latest Fed meeting makes it increasingly clear that monetary policy changes are more a function of the asset markets and not the Fed’s congressionally stated mandates.” Ignoring the inflation risk is likely unwise. Previous spikes in the inflation spread aligned with weaker economic growth, stock market contractions, or crashes. While the Fed should be tapering monetary policy and hiking rates to prepare for the next recessionary downturn, they will opt to keep asset prices inflating. However, just as in the past, opting to keep monetary policy too loose for too long eventually triggers a more significant crisis. Weaker Economic Growth Coming While the Fed is busy supporting the equity markets, overvaluations, and speculative activity, the bond market has a different message. As discussed this past week,our expectation of weaker economic growth in 2022 is coming to fruition. “The history of stock market crashes due to the Fed’s monetary intervention schemes is evident. Not just over the last decade, but since the Fed became ‘active’ in 1980.” More evidence continues to support that view, as noted by the sharp drop in productivity despite jobless claims falling back to pre-pandemic levels. Thus, while the Fed hopes for “full employment,” such remains a function of “math” as the labor force shrinks. More importantly, “real wages” are not keeping up with the inflationary surge. Such will inevitably weigh on consumption which will weaken economic growth. Lower Bond Yields On The Way Are there currently risks to the bond market that investors should be concerned about near term? Yes. The current spike in inflation will likely last longer than expected due to the break of supply lines. Furthermore, rates tend to rise when the Fed begins to discuss “tapering” their bond purchases as they are doing now. However, both of these issues will resolve themselves going forward. Eventually, the supply chain disruption will mend, and inflation will decline as supply comes back online. More importantly, when the Fed does begin the process of “tapering” their bond purchases, yields historically fall as investors’ “risk-preference” shifts from “risk-on” to “risk-off.” As if always the case with investing, timing, as they say, is everything. Such is why, particularly with the Fed set to hike rates in 2022, we are looking for our next opportunity to add duration to our bond portfolios. Moreover, with the equity market grossly overvalued, we suspect that bonds will provide a chunk of our capital gains over the next couple of years. There is little upside to the equity market given current valuations, slowing earnings growth, a weaker economy, and less liquidity. However, whenever the next recession approaches, yields will once again likely approach zero. Got bonds? The following is worth repeating: “While anything is possible in the near term, complacency has returned to the market very quickly. However, there are numerous reasons to remain mindful of the risks. Earnings and profit growth estimates are too high Stagflation is becoming more prevalent (weak economic growth and rising inflation) Inflation indexes are continuing to rise Economic data is surprising to the downside Supply chain issues are more persistent than originally believed. Inventory problems continue unabated Valuations are high by all measures Interest rates are rising “Furthermore, as noted above, there is limited upside as the annual rate of change in the market declines.” Tyler Durden Sun, 11/07/2021 - 11:00.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytNov 7th, 2021

Year-End Outlook: Climbing Mortgage Rates Strain Buying Power in 2022

Editor’s Note: RISMedia’s Year-End Outlook series provides an in-depth analysis of the housing market’s leading indicators for economic health, and showcases expert insights on what’s to come in 2022.  Homeowners will likely look at the past year of mortgage rate performance with fondness or even regret as the days of historic lows fade. Based on […] The post Year-End Outlook: Climbing Mortgage Rates Strain Buying Power in 2022 appeared first on RISMedia. Editor’s Note: RISMedia’s Year-End Outlook series provides an in-depth analysis of the housing market’s leading indicators for economic health, and showcases expert insights on what’s to come in 2022.  Homeowners will likely look at the past year of mortgage rate performance with fondness or even regret as the days of historic lows fade. Based on recent Freddie Mac reports, 30-year fixed-rate mortgages (FRM) at 3.14%, are breaking from months of sub-3% lows that captured headlines throughout 2021. Economists and real estate experts agree that recent upticks in rates mark an inevitable trend that is likely to last well into the next year as the housing market heads toward its post-pandemic equilibrium. “We expect a somewhat gradual increase throughout the rest of this year and going into 2022,” says Joel Kan, chief economist at the Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA), which expects rates to climb gradually to nearly 4% by the end of next year. While that serves as the highest prediction compared to other reports, that isn’t far off from the consensus that rates will fall somewhere between the mid-to high-three percentile by the close of next year. Kan attributes that forecast mainly to the relatively strong economic recovery that the nation has experienced since the outbreak of COVID-19 in March 2020. Another factor contributing to the upward pressure on mortgage rates comes from the Fed, and their plans to address higher inflation by tapering asset purchases, according to experts from the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR). “The Federal Reserve is getting nervous about rising and persistently high inflation rates,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist. “Therefore, the Fed will be tapering the purchases of mortgage-backed securities later this year and raising short-term interest rates in 2022.” Market Implications The impacts of higher mortgage rates have been discussed at length among real estate pundits and stakeholders that have raised concerns that higher rates would pause market activity. Yun admits that higher rates will shave home sales modestly, but he doesn’t think it will be drastic. His colleagues echoed similar sentiments, but also note that higher rates will play a larger part in persisting affordability challenges. “Typically, we say that an increase in rates, at least if it’s not too severe, doesn’t tend to impact demand quite as much because if someone is looking to buy a home, interest rates and mortgage rates are one part of the equation,” Kan says, pointing to record-level home price appreciation as another factor straining buyers. As mortgage rates ascend, Kan also indicates that refinancing activity will likely take a substantial hit, dropping by more than 60% in 2022. “We’ve been in this lower rate environment for the last year and a half, and we’ve seen a lot of refinances,” he says, noting that 2020 was a banner year for mortgage originations and refinancing under record low rates that lasted well into 2021. Matthew Gardner, the chief economist at Seattle-based Windermere Real Estate, says higher rates could also discourage some would-be buyers that have grown accustomed to the “artificially low mortgage rates” of the past year and a half. “One of the biggest things regarding the increase in rates is that they certainly will act as a headwind to home-price growth,” says Gardner. He explains that for every 1% point increase in rates, that buying power for consumers declines by roughly 10%. However, despite the increase in rates, Gardner doesn’t see a cause for concern in the market, which he suggests will remain competitive with a persisting supply-demand gap as mortgage rates are still relatively low, when compared to previous years. Historically, Gardner says the long-term average for mortgage rates since the 30-year FRM was established has been around 7.5%, with the last peak of 4.87% occurring in November 2018. “It is still remarkably low when you consider it in the bigger picture,” Gardner says. Buyer Behavior  Considering the prognosis for mortgage rate increases in 2022, real estate brokers and leaders have mixed feelings about how buyers are likely to react in the cooling market with additional strain affordability. In Austin, Texas, Buddy Shilling, president of the Austin Divisions of JBGoodwin REALTORS®, says an increase in rates isn’t likely to harm his activity in the coveted area, which has seen an increase in significant employers migrating into the Texas city. “If the rate climbs, Austin is in a good position because many of the new jobs being created in the city are higher-paying ones,” Shilling says, adding that an abundance of developable land and affordable home options will continue to make the Texas city a desirable destination for buyers. “Even if the interest rate goes up, less expensive, affordable homes will be available just a few minutes away,” Shilling adds. Lynn Chute, vice president of HomeSmart Realty’s office in Denver, Colorado, expects rising rates to create some buyer hesitation in her market. However, she says the pause in buying will be short-lived, with still relatively low rates up for grabs. “Buyers will need to make some adjustments, but the ultimate goal of homeownership is still well within reach,” Chute says. “With the drastic increase in rental rates, the benefits of homeownership still outweigh the cost of renting, even with a small rate increase. Buying a home continues to be one of the best long-term investments you can make.” A similar point was raised in a recent interview and panel virtual panel discussion conducted by CNN that featured real estate leaders offering their market predictions. The interview featured Barbara Corcoran, founder of Corcoran Real Estate. The subsequent panelists were Glenn Kelman, CEO of Redfin; David Doctorow, CEO of realtor.com®; and Ryan Williams, founder and CEO of Cadre. Corcoran noted during her interview that rising mortgage rates would add to affordability issues that are already straining the market and squeezing buyers out. “When you do the math on what you pay for your monthly expenses on a house with a 1% increase in mortgage rates, it’s substantial,” she said, noting that aspiring buyers waiting to enter the market may be at risk of being left behind as overall living expenses increase. When asked if she thought rising rates would dissuade people who have gotten used to low rates, Corcoran said, “I don’t think there is cause for panic.” “I don’t think any financial expert is predicting that rates are going to spike,” she said while also opining on the Fed’s plan to incrementally increase interest rates and the potential implications to mortgage rates. “It’s in everyone’s interest to keep the housing market going, so I think that you’re going to find that the bureaucrats are going to be extremely cautious on raising rates, but they will raise rates, but I don’t think the climb will be fast and furious,” Corcoran said. Doctorow agreed with Corcoran’s sentiments, stating, “As consumers think about affordability, it’s really important to understand the two factors—the price of the home and the mortgage rates—together and ultimately try to put themselves in a position to get the most home that they can knowing that interest rates may edge up over time,” Doctorow added. Jordan Grice is RISMedia’s associate online editor. Email him your real estate news to jgrice@rismedia.com. The post Year-End Outlook: Climbing Mortgage Rates Strain Buying Power in 2022 appeared first on RISMedia......»»

Category: realestateSource: rismediaNov 3rd, 2021

Futures Flat Ahead Of Historic Taper Announcement, China Warns Of "Downward Pressure" On Economy

Futures Flat Ahead Of Historic Taper Announcement, China Warns Of "Downward Pressure" On Economy US stock futures were flat ahead of today's Fed meeting, where the central bank is widely expected to announce the reduction of asset purchases with a majority of analysts expecting the Fed reducing its monthly purchases of Treasuries by $10 billion and mortgage- backed securities by $5 billion. Nasdaq 100 futures climbed 0.1% while S&P 500 and Dow Jones futures were little changed. Oil fell as the U.S. ramped up pressure on OPEC+ to boost supplies (which will bear zero results). The two-year Treasury yield was steady, while the 30-year rate shed two basis points. European stocks struggled for direction and the dollar fell less than 0.1%.   Despite turmoil in the bond market which sent the MOVE (or bond VIX) index to post-covid highs... ... stocks remain complacent and are likely not under stress “because we all think we know what will come out from today’s meeting: a gradual start of the tapering of the bond purchases program,” said Ipek Ozkardeskaya, senior analyst at Swissquote. A "taper announcement will likely be seamless, what may be less seamless is the rate discussion," she wrote in a note.  In recent weeks, policy makers have come under pressure to reassess their assessment of inflation being transitory, with bond and currency markets pricing in faster-than-expected rate hikes. “The big question will be whether they will signal anything about when the rate hikes will start,” Jeanette Garretty, chief economist at Robertson Stephens Wealth Management, said on Bloomberg Television. “I think they are going to try and avoid that.” Wall Street has also largely shrugged off concerns around rising price pressures and mixed economic growth, boosted by a stellar third-quarter earnings season and an upbeat commentary about growth going forward. In fact, there is absolutely nothing that can dent the ongoing market meltup which according to Morgan Stanley will continue until just around Thanksgiving. "Anything suggesting that the Fed is confident to keep withdrawing monetary policy support following a start today may allow equity investors to buy more," said Charalambos Pissouros, head of research at JFD group. "After all, they may have already digested the idea that interest rates will start rising at some point soon." Meanwhile, Chinese equities drifted lower after what Bloomberg called was a "dour warning" from Premier Li who cautioned about “downward pressure” for the economy. Hang Seng falls as much as 1.2% after tech shares resume slide. Here are some of the most notable premarket moves: Lyft rose after its third-quarter results showed a continued improvement in key metrics for the ride-sharing company. Zillow dropped as the decision to shut its home-flipping business raised questions about its ability to deliver growth. Shale oil producer Devon Energy rose 4.8% in premarket trading on topping earnings estimates as oil prices hit multi-year highs. Mondelez International added 1.9% after the Oreo maker raised its annual sales forecast, helped by price increases and strong demand from emerging markets. T-Mobile gained 3.4% after the U.S. wireless carrier beat third-quarter estimates for adding monthly bill paying phone subscribers. Activision Blizzard tumbled 12.0% after the videogame publisher delayed the launch of two much-awaited titles, as its co-leader Jen Oneal decided to step down from her role On the economic data front, October readings on ADP private payrolls, IHS Markit composite PMI and ISM non-manufacturing activity is due later in the day. Meanwhile, European stocks were flat as losses in energy stocks offset gains in basic resources shares.  Italy's FTSE MIB outperforms, rising as much as 0.3% while Spain's IBEX underperforms. Oil & gas, retail and utilities are the weakest Stoxx 600 sectors; miners and autos outperform. Asia’s equity benchmark was little changed as traders await the outcome of the U.S. Federal Reserve’s policy meeting, with an announcement expected on tapering amid concerns about elevated inflation. The MSCI Asia Pacific Index traded in a narrow range, with Alibaba Group, AIA Group and Samsung Electronics the biggest drags and Tencent among the winners. South Korea’s Kospi tumbled 1.3% on mounting selling by foreign funds. Hong Kong’s benchmark Hang Seng Index declined for a seventh day, extending its longest losing streak since July. The earnings season has failed to boost Asian shares, with the regional benchmark down more than 10% from a February peak as supply-chain and inflation worries persist. Traders will focus on the Fed’s policy move on Wednesday for cues at a time volatility in the bond market has heightened. “U.S. monetary policy has a very direct impact on the Asian market, especially with their plethora of dirty U.S. dollar pegs,” Jeffrey Halley, senior market analyst at Oanda, wrote in a note. Philippine stocks were among the top gainers, advancing for a second day after local Covid-19 cases fell to fewest since March. Stocks in Australia also rose after the country’s central bank scrapped a bond-yield target on Tuesday and said there’s still some time to go for rate hikes. Iron ore’s rebound on Wednesday also bolstered the mining sector. Japan’s equity market was closed for a holiday. Chinese stocks dripped after Premier Li Keqiang said China’s economy faces new downward pressures and has to cut taxes and fees to address the problems faced by small and medium-sized companies. Li did not specify the extent of the new “downward pressure” or its cause, but the phrase is generally used by Chinese officials to refer to a slowing economy. He has used the phrase before, including several times in 2019. The economy needs “cross-cyclical adjustments” to continue in a proper range, Li said during a visit to China’s top market regulator, state broadcaster CCTV reported. That phrase is associated with a more conservative fiscal and monetary approach that focuses more on the long-term outlook instead of immediate economic performance. “There are no obvious growth drivers now, so the government is looking for one,” said Bruce Pang, head of macro and strategy research at China Renaissance Securities Hong Kong Ltd. “Small businesses’ investment can provide a source of healthier, longer-term growth, compared with government or property investment.” In rates, 10-year Treasury note futures are at the top of Tuesday’s range, gaining over Asia session while eurodollar futures are up 1-2 ticks in red and green packs as shares declined in China and Hong Kong ahead of today’s FOMC decision and after Premier Li’s warning of downward pressures to the economy. Treasury 10-year yields richer by 1.8bp on the day, flattening 2s10s spread with front-end yields unchanged -- bunds and gilts trade slightly cheaper vs. Treasuries. Cash Treasuries resumed trading in London after being closed in Tokyo for a Japanese holiday --curve has flattened with long-end yields richer by as much as 2bp. Focus on U.S. session includes ADP employment and durable goods data, refunding announcement before 2pm ET Fed rate decision. In Europe, Bunds bull flattened, helped in part by dovish comments from ECB’s Lagarde and Muller while peripheral spreads tightened with 10y Bund/BTP narrowing 3bps near 120bps. In FX, the Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index inched lower as the dollar fell versus most of its Group-of-10 peers and Treasury yields fell by up to 3 basis points, led by the long end of the curve. The euro gradually climbed toward the $1.16 handle while European government bonds yields fell and curves flattened. New Zealand’s dollar was among the top G-10 performers, and rose from a two- week low after the unemployment rate dropped more than economists predicted; the Kiwi and Aussie were also boosted by leveraged short covering. The pound inched up from a three-week low against the dollar before a speech by Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey. Hedging the pound on an overnight basis is the costliest since March as traders focus on the upcoming meetings by the Federal Reserve and the BOE. In commodities, crude futures extend Asia’s softness; WTI drops over 2%, stalling near $82, Brent drops a similar magnitude to trade near $83. Spot gold drifts around Asia’s worst levels near $1,783/oz. Most base metals are up over 1% with LME aluminum and tin outperforming Looking at the day ahead the highlight will be the aforementioned Fed's policy decision along with Chair Powell’s subsequent press conference. Other central bank speakers include ECB President Lagarde, alongside the ECB’s Elderson, Centeno, de Cos and Villeroy. Data releases include the final October services and composite PMIs from the UK and the US, and other US data includes the ISM services index for October, the ADP’s report of private payrolls for October and factory orders for September. Finally, earnings today include Qualcomm, Booking Holdings, Fox Corp and Marriott International. Market Snapshot S&P 500 futures little changed at 4,622.00 STOXX Europe 600 little changed at 479.79 MXAP little changed at 197.87 MXAPJ little changed at 645.10 Nikkei down 0.4% to 29,520.90 Topix down 0.6% to 2,031.67 Hang Seng Index down 0.3% to 25,024.75 Shanghai Composite down 0.2% to 3,498.54 Sensex little changed at 59,993.78 Australia S&P/ASX 200 up 0.9% to 7,392.73 Kospi down 1.3% to 2,975.71 German 10Y yield little changed at -0.18% Euro little changed at $1.1587 Brent Futures down 1.8% to $83.23/bbl Gold spot down 0.3% to $1,782.83 U.S. Dollar Index little changed at 94.05 Top Overnight News from Bloomberg The Federal Reserve is widely expected to announce the reduction of asset purchases at the conclusion of its policy meeting Wednesday, which Chair Jerome Powell will likely say is not a step toward raising interest rates any time soon Traders have had a mixed view for most of this year about when emerging-Asia central banks will begin to normalize policy. Suddenly though, they are rushing to price in rate-hike bets across the region. The hawkish shift is most evident in South Korea and India, where markets are now anticipating at least a quarter-point increase in the next three months, while they are also building in Malaysia and Thailand over a two-year horizon China’s economy faces new downward pressures and has to cut taxes and fees to address the problems faced by small and medium-sized companies, according to the country’s Premier Li Keqiang More provinces in China are fighting Covid-19 than at any time since the deadly pathogen first emerged in Wuhan in 2019 The likelihood that elevated inflation will become entrenched is increasing, according to European Central Bank Governing Council member Bostjan Vasle A more detailed look at global markets courtesy of Newsquawk Asian equity markets traded mixed despite another encouraging handover from Wall Street where all major indices notched fresh record closing highs for the third consecutive day, and the DJIA breached the 36k level amid a slew of earnings and absence of any significant catalysts to derail the recent uptrend. Gains in APAC were also capped by holiday-thinned conditions with Japan away for Culture Day and as the FOMC announcement draws closer (full Newsquawk preview available in the Research Suite). The ASX 200 (+0.9%) outperformed amid a resurgence in the top-weighted financials sector as AMP shares were boosted after it announced to divest a 19.1% stake in Resolution Life Australasia for AUD 524mln and with CBA also higher as Australia’s largest bank is to offer customers the ability to conduct crypto transactions via its app. Conversely, the KOSPI (-1.3%) lagged after its automakers posted weak October sales stateside and following comments from South Korean PM Lee that they cannot afford additional cash handouts right now, while there was also attention on Kakao Pay which more than doubled from the IPO price on its debut. The Hang Seng (-0.3%) and Shanghai Comp. (-0.2%) were lacklustre and failed to benefit from the improvement in Chinese Caixin Services and Composite PMI data, amid ongoing concerns related to the energy crunch and with tech subdued after Yahoo pulled out of China due to a challenging business and legal environment. Furthermore, reports also noted that the Chinese version of Fortnite will close in mid-November, while a slightly firmer PBoC liquidity operation failed to spur Chinese markets as its efforts still resulted in a substantial net drain. Aussie yields continued to soften after the RBA affirmed its dovish tone at yesterday’s meeting and with the central bank also present in the market today for AUD 800mln in semi-government bonds which is in line with its regular weekly purchases, while a softer b/c at the 10yr Australian bond auction failed to unnerve domestic bonds and T-notes futures were steady overnight amid the looming FOMC. Top Asian News State Bank of India Profit Tops Estimates on Lower Provisions Chinese Copper Smelters Boost Exports to Ease Historic Squeeze China’s PBOC Says Digital Yuan Users Have Surged to 140 Million Malaysia Holds Rates on Recovery, ‘Benign’ Inflation Outlook European majors have adopted a similarly mixed performance (Euro Stoxx 50 -0.1%; Stoxx 600 Unch) as seen during the APAC session, as markets and participants count down to the FOMC policy decision, with the BoE and NFPs also on the docket for the rest of the week. US equity futures are also mixed but have been drifting mildly higher in European trade thus far, vs a flat overnight session. Back to Europe, there isn’t anything major to report in terms of under/outperformers among European majors, although Spain’s IBEX (-0.7%) lags in the periphery amidst losses in sector heavyweights. Sectors in Europe are mixed with no overarching theme. Basic Resources top the charts in a slight reversal of yesterday’s underperformance and amid a bounce in base metal prices. Travel & Leisure is propped up by Deutsche Lufthansa (+5.0%) post-earnings. Oil & Gas names are pressured by the decline across the crude complex in the run-up to tomorrow’s OPEC+ confab, whilst Banks are lacklustre as yields lose ground. In terms of individual movers, Vestas Wind System (-9.0%) is at the bottom of the Stoxx 600 after cutting guidance. BMW (+0.4%) is choppy after-earnings which saw EBIT top forecasts and targets confirmed, although the group noted that the rise in raw material prices have also had an impact on earnings, but they do not expect short-term magnesium shortage to affect production. Finally, Pandora (+0.8%) reported improvements on their metrics but warned that APAC performance, including China, remains weak and heavily impacted by COVID-19, with China expected to remain a drag on performance for the remainder of the year. Top European News BMW Muscles Through Chip Shortage With Profit Jump Nexans Drops as Morgan Stanley Says 3Q Results Were Weak Russia’s Biggest Alcohol Retailer Seeks $1.3 Billion in IPO LSE Boss Expects London Will Keep EU Clearing Role Post-Brexit In FX, far from all change, but the Kiwi has reclaimed 0.7100+ status against the Greenback and a firmer grasp of the handle in wake of significantly stronger than expected NZ labour market metrics via Q3’s HLFS update overnight, including jobs growth coming in five times higher than forecast and the unemployment rate falling sharply irrespective of a rise in participation. Nzd/Usd is hovering around 0.7135 and the Aud/Nzd cross is under 1.0450 even though the Aussie has regained some composure after its post-RBA relapse to retest 0.7450, albeit with assistance from the Buck’s broad pull-back rather than mixed PMIs and much weaker than anticipated building approvals. Indeed, the Franc has also rebounded from circa 0.9150 with no independent incentive and cognisant that the SNB will be monitoring moves as Eur/Chf meanders within its 1.0604-1.0548 w-t-d range. DXY/JPY/EUR/GBP/CAD - The Dollar index has drifted back down from a fractional new high compared to Tuesday’s best between 94.144-93.970 parameters vs a 94.136-93.818 range yesterday, and for little apparent reason aside from pre-FOMC tinkering and fine-tuning of positions it seems. Nevertheless, DXY components are mostly taking advantage of the situation, albeit in typically tight ranges seen on a Fed day, with the Yen holding above 114.00 on Japanese Culture Day, the Euro just under 1.1600 and amidst more decent option expiry interest (1.1 bn from 1.1585 to the round number), Sterling still trying to retain 1.3600+ status and also close to a fairly big option expiry (821 mn at the 1.3615 strike) and the Loonie striving to contain declines beneath 1.2400 against the backdrop of retreating oil prices. Note, some upside in the Pound via upgrades to UK services and composite PMIs, but limited and Eur/Gbp remains over 0.8500 in advance of the showdown between Britain and France on fishing tomorrow when the BoE also delivers its eagerly anticipated November policy verdict. SCANDI/EM - Not much adverse reaction to a slowdown in Sweden’s services PMI for the Sek, while the Nok is taking the latest downturn in Brent crude largely in stride on the eve of the Norges Bank meeting that is widely seen cementing rate hike guidance for next month. However, scant respite or solace for the Try from sub-consensus Turkish CPI as the near 20% y/y print means more divergence relative to the CBRT’s 1 week repo, and PPI accelerated again to heighten the build up of pipeline price pressures. Conversely, the Cnh and Cny are nudging back above 6.4000 after an encouraging Chinese Caixin services PMI and the Zar is on a firm footing awaiting results of SA local elections. RBNZ said the financial system is well placed to support economic recovery despite uncertainty and risks, while the more recent Delta outbreak is creating stress for some industries and regions, particularly in Auckland. RBNZ also noted that with the risk of global inflation heightened, already stretched asset prices are facing headwinds from rising global interest rates and that supply chain bottlenecks and inflation are adding to stresses in some sectors. Furthermore, they intend to increase the minimum CFR requirement to its previous level of 75% on 1st January 2022, subject to no significant worsening in economic condition, while capital requirements for banks are to progressively increase from 1st July 2022 and it is encouraging to see them increasing ahead of these requirements. (Newswires) In commodities, WTI and Brent front month futures are softer and in proximity to USD 82/bbl and USD 83/bbl respectively with losses today also potentially a function of the downbeat China COVID updates seen overnight. As a reminder, China's most recent COVID-19 outbreak is reportedly the most widespread since Wuhan with infection in 19 of 31 provinces, according to a major newswires article. It was also reported that around half the flights to and from Beijing city’s two airports were cancelled Tuesday, according to aviation industry data site VariFlight. Further, yesterday’s Private Inventory data was also bearish, printing a larger-than-expected build of 3.6mln bbl vs exp. +2.2mln, ahead of today’s DoEs which will take place 1hr earlier for those in Europe. Looking ahead to tomorrow’s OPEC+, markets expect a continuation of the current plan to ease output curbs by 400k BPD/m. Outside calls have been getting louder for the producers to open the taps more than planned amid inflationary feed-through to consumers and company margins, although ministers, including de-factor heads Saudi and Russia, have been putting weight behind current plans, with no pushback seen from members within OPEC+ thus far. Further, the COVID situation in China is deteriorating, hence ministers will likely express a cautious approach. Elsewhere, spot gold and silver are flat within overnight ranges, as is usually the case before FOMC. Base metals are staging a recovery with LME copper back above USD 9,500/t, whilst Chinese thermal coal futures rose some 10% following 10 days of declines US Event Calendar 8:15am: Oct. ADP Employment Change, est. 400,000, prior 568,000 9:45am: Oct. Markit US Services PMI, est. 58.2, prior 58.2 Oct. Markit US Composite PMI, prior 57.3 10am: Sept. Durable Goods Orders, est. -0.4%, prior -0.4% Sept. -Less Transportation, est. 0.4%, prior 0.4% Sept. Cap Goods Orders Nondef Ex Air, prior 0.8% Sept. Cap Goods Ship Nondef Ex Air, prior 1.4% 10am: Sept. Factory Orders, est. 0.1%, prior 1.2% Sept. Factory Orders Ex Trans, est. 0%, prior 0.5% 10am: Oct. ISM Services Index, est. 62.0, prior 61.9 2pm: FOMC Rate Decision DB's Jim Reid concludes the overnight wrap So after much anticipation we’ve finally arrived at the Fed’s decision day, where it’s widely anticipated (including by DB’s US economists) that they’ll announce a tapering in their asset purchases. Such a move has been increasingly anticipated over recent months, not least with the repeated upgrades to inflation forecasts over the course of 2021, and the FOMC themselves flagged this at their September meeting, where their statement said that “if progress continues broadly as expected … a moderation in the pace of asset purchases may soon be warranted.” In terms of what our economists are expecting, their view is that the Fed will announce monthly reductions of $10bn and $5bn in the pace of Treasury and MBS purchases respectively, with the first cut to purchases coming in mid-November. They see this bringing the latest round of QE to an end in June 2022, though this would also offer some flexibility to respond to any changes in the economic environment over the coming eight months should they arise. On the question of rate hikes, they think lift-off won’t take place until December 2022, but don’t see Chair Powell actively pushing back on current market pricing (a full hike nearly priced in by mid-year 22) given the elevated uncertainty about the outlook, particularly on inflation. You can see more details in their preview here. Of course since the Fed’s last meeting, many inflationary pressures have only grown, particularly given the fresh surge in energy prices that’s taken WTI oil up to $83/bbl, having been at just $72/bbl at the time of their September meeting. In turn, this has taken market expectations of future inflation up as well, with the 10yr breakeven now standing at 2.52%, up from 2.28% following Powell’s September press conference. And market pricing has also shifted significantly since the last meeting, with investors having gone from expecting less than one full hike by the December 2022 meeting to more than two. Ahead of all that, global risk assets continued to perform strongly and a number of major indices climbed to fresh all-time highs yesterday. The S&P 500 (+0.37%), the NASDAQ (+0.34%), the Dow Jones (+0.39%) and Europe’s STOXX 600 (+0.14%) all hit new records, whilst France’s CAC 40 (+049%) exceeded its previous closing peak made all the way back in 2000. Positive earnings news helped bolster those indices, with 27 of 29 S&P 500 reporters beating earnings estimates during trading, and 16 of 20 after-hours reporters beating earnings estimates. This included Pfizer during the day, which raised its full-year forecasts on the back of strong vaccine demand and noted it had the capacity to produce as much as 4 billion shots next year. However, the big winner yesterday (the biggest in the small-cap Russell 2000 yesterday) was Avis Budget Group (+108.31%) even if its performance actually marked a fall from its intraday high when the share price had more than tripled. Those moves occurred after Avis posted strong earnings driven by better-than-expected demand. Their CEO said they’d add more electric cars, whilst the stock also got attention on the WallStreetBets forum on Reddit, which readers may recall was behind some big moves at the start of the year in various "meme stocks” like GameStop. The banner day added $8.5bn to its market cap, which helped it leap frog fellow meme stock AMC to become the second biggest company in the Russell 2000 from third slot yesterday. In other such popular retail stocks, Tesla retreated -3.03% after Elon Musk cast some doubt the previous evening over the recently announced deal to sell 100,000 cars to rental car company Hertz. That said, the automaker has still added over $300 billion in market cap over the last month. Sovereign bonds were another asset class that put in a decent performance ahead of the Fed, with yields falling throughout the curve across a range of countries following the relatively dovish tone vs heightened expectations from the RBA yesterday morning. By the close, those on 10yr Treasuries were down -1.4bps to 1.54%, whilst their counterparts in Europe saw even steeper declines, including those on 10yr bunds (-6.3bps), OATs (-8.5bps) and BTPs (-14.1bps). BTPs were the biggest story and the move seemed to coincide with a reappraisal of ECB hike expectations, as pricing through December 2022 declined -6.5 bps, down from c.20 bps of expected tightening priced as of Monday. So a big decline. In Asia, the Shanghai Composite (-0.57%), the Hang Seng (-0.93%) and the KOSPI (-1.23%) are all trading lower. Japan’s markets are closed due to the Culture Day, meaning also that cash treasuries are not trading in the region. In data releases, the Caixin Services PMI for China rose to 53.8 versus 53.1 expected. However, Premier Li’s remarks about new “downward pressure” on China’s economy and latest COVID outbreak, which is now the most widespread since the first emergence of the virus, are weighing down on the sentiment. Meanwhile, China and Hong Kong are discussing reopening of the shared border. The S&P 500 futures (-0.01%) is pretty flat this morning. Aussie yields are again lower especially at the front end with the infamous April 24 bond around -7bps as we type. As we go to print the Associated Press have called the Virginia as a victory for the GOP Youngkin with New Jersey equivalent also looking likely to go to the GOP. So a big blow to the Democrats. Of those, Virginia was being more closely watched. As recently as the Obama years it was a fiercely contested battleground, but it’s trended Democratic over the last few cycles, with Biden’s 10 point margin of victory last year well exceeding his 4.4 point margin nationally. So this will not be good news for the Dems ahead of next year’s mid-terms. It will also increase the odds of legislative and fiscal gridlock after that - although the latter has been increasingly expected. Staying with US Politics, President Biden indicated in a news conference that he was getting closer to announcing whether or not he would re-nominate Fed Chair Powell for another term as head of the central bank, or if he would appoint a new Chair. He said an announcement will come “fairly quickly”. In terms of the latest on the pandemic, the US CDC’s advisory committee on immunization practices met and backed the Pfizer vaccine for 5-11 year olds, joining the FDA who gave the vaccine the green light for the same age group. There wasn’t much in the way of data releases yesterday, though we did get the final manufacturing PMIs from Europe, where the Euro Area PMI for October was revised down two-tenths from the flash estimate to 58.3. Germany also saw a downward revision to 57.8 (vs. flash 58.2), but Italy outperformed expectations with a 61.1 reading (vs. 59.6 expected). To the day ahead now, and the highlight will be the aforementioned policy decision from the Fed, along with Chair Powell’s subsequent press conference. Other central bank speakers include ECB President Lagarde, alongside the ECB’s Elderson, Centeno, de Cos and Villeroy. Data releases include the final October services and composite PMIs from the UK and the US, and other US data includes the ISM services index for October, the ADP’s report of private payrolls for October and factory orders for September. Finally, earnings today include Qualcomm, Booking Holdings, Fox Corp and Marriott International. Tyler Durden Wed, 11/03/2021 - 08:13.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeNov 3rd, 2021