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Senate passes a new bipartisan bill that would enact the toughest new guns laws since the 1990s — with 15 Republican senators joining every Democrat in support

The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act is expected to pass the House with minimal GOP support and could head to President Biden's desk this weekend. Republican Sen. Joni Ernst of Iowa, a member of party leadership who voted to back the new law, speaks at a press conference on Capitol Hill on June 22, 2022.Brandon Bell/Getty Images The Senate passed the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act by a wide bipartisan margin on Thursday. 15 Republican senators supported the bill, which would enact the toughest new gun restrictions since the 1990s. The bill would close the "boyfriend loophole," support state-level "red flag" laws, and makes new mental health investments. The US Senate approved a bipartisan bill to enact new gun restrictions by a 65-33 vote on Thursday, with 15 Republicans joining every Democratic senator in support.The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, the full text of which can be found here, includes multimillion dollar investments in mental health services and school security, as well as a new federal ban on gun trafficking."We are passing the first significant gun safety bill in nearly 30 years," Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Thursday ahead of the vote, adding that the bill is "not a cure-all for all the ways gun violence affects our nation, but it is a long overdue step in the right direction."The gun safety bill would offer new funding supporting states and tribes that seek to enact "red flag" laws — which allows authorities to confiscate guns from individuals deemed a threat to themselves or others — closing the so-called "boyfriend loophole, and subjecting gun purchasers under the age of 21 to new background check requirements."Our schools should be a sanctuary for our children, not a place where they plan what will happen during the next shooting and how they can hide under their desks or try to make their escape," GOP Sen. John Cornyn of Texas said on the Senate floor. "Schools should be a sanctuary, and this bill will provide the kind of services that will help identify students in crisis and help intervene to provide them the assistance they need."He added: "We probably can't eliminate human error like we saw in Uvalde, Texas, but we can promulgate the best practices, which we have done in this bill."The National Rifle Association announced their opposition to the bill within an hour of the text's release, and House Republicans cited the group's opposition as it urged their members to vote against the bill when it comes to the House.But the bill is expected to easily pass in the House, even with some Republican support, and it will later head to President Joe Biden's desk.The White House released a statement on Thursday indicating that Biden "strongly supports" the bill."While the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act does not include additional important steps the President has called for as part of his comprehensive gun crime reduction agenda, it would make meaningful progress to combat gun violence," read the statement. "As communities continue to experience gun violence every day, the Administration calls for swift passage of this life-saving legislation.The bill was supported even by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, on top of the 10 Republican senators who endorsed a framework of the bill released last week. Following the Thursday vote, Schumer was seen giving McConnell a pat on the shoulder.But four more Republicans — including Sens. Joni Ernst of Iowa, Todd Young of Indiana, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia — came out in support of the bill this week, voting to advance it in a procedural vote on Tuesday.Here are the Republican senators who supported the bill:Sen. Mitch McConnell of KentuckySen. John Cornyn of TexasSen. Roy Blunt of MissouriSen. Richard Burr of North CarolinaSen. Shelley Moore Capito of West VirginiaSen. Bill Cassidy of LouisianaSen. Susan Collins of MaineSen. Joni Ernst of IowaSen. Lindsey Graham of South CarolinaSen. Lisa Murkowski of AlaskaSen. Rob Portman of OhioSen. Mitt Romney of UtahSen. Thom Tillis of North CarolinaSen. Pat Toomey of PennsylvaniaSen. Todd Young of Indiana"I've talked to even Republican lawmakers in the state of Iowa, and they're like, 'We're hearing from our constituents too, about this issue,'" Ernst, a member of Senate Republican leadership who came out in support of the bill this week, told The New York Times. "So I think people recognize something needs to be done."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 23rd, 2022

The NRA and the House Freedom Caucus announced their opposition to the bipartisan Senate gun bill less than an hour after it was released

14 Republican senators voted to advance the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, which will enact the toughest new gun restrictions since the 1990s. CEO and Executive Vice President of the National Rifle Association Wayne LaPierre speaks at the group’s annual convention in Houston, Texas on May 27, 2022.Brandon Bell/Getty Images The Bipartisan Safer Communities Act was unveiled Tuesday and will likely pass both chambers this week. Both the NRA and House Freedom Caucus announced their opposition within an hour of the bill's release. 14 Republican senators broke ranks and voted to advance the legislation on Tuesday evening. Senators unveiled on Tuesday evening the much-anticipated Bipartisan Safer Communities, which will enact the most significant new federal gun restrictions since the 1990s.Within the hour, two major conservative groups declared their opposition."This legislation can be abused to restrict lawful gun purchases, infringe upon the rights of law-abiding Americans, and use federal dollars to fund gun control measures being adopted by state and local politicians," declared the National Rifle Association in a release sent less than 30 minutes after the legislative text became available on Tuesday.—NRA (@NRA) June 21, 2022The hardline conservative House Freedom Caucus declared it "will oppose any legislation that implements, funds, or expands unconstitutional and ineffective red flag laws," the group said in a statement sent less than an hour after the bill's release.—House Freedom Caucus (@freedomcaucus) June 22, 2022Lawmakers released a framework last week outlining key provisions authored by a bipartisan group of senators, including Democratic Sens. Chris Murphy of Connecticut and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona alongside Republican Sens. John Cornyn of Texas and Thom Tillis of North Carolina. Conservatives quickly began registering their opposition.On Friday, Cornyn was drowned out by boos from members of his own party amid anger on the right over the bill's new provisions.But in the Senate, the legislation has ultimately garnered significant bipartisan support. After McConnell expressed support for the framework last week, he and 13 other Senate Republicans voted late on Tuesday to tee up a Thursday vote on the bill.That included three Republican senators —  Todd Young of Indiana, Joni Ernst of Iowa, and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska — who weren't among the ten who had initially announced their support for the framework.Still, most Senate Republicans voted against the measure, and it's not expected to garner significant GOP support when the House takes up the bill later this week.—Josh Hawley (@HawleyMO) June 22, 2022Both the NRA and the House Freedom Caucus took issue with the "red flag" law provision of the bill — according to the text, $750 million is allocated to support states and tribes in enacting these laws, which give authorities and courts the power to temporarily confiscate guns from individuals if they are deemed to pose an immediate threat to themselves or others.Nineteen states and the District of Columbia currently have some form of red flag laws. But both the NRA and the House Freedom Caucus say that those measures infringe on Americans' Second Amendment rights."These laws are ripe for abuse as they give government the power to decide who is deemed mentally fit to own a firearm based on the say-so of any accuser, and that should concern every American," said the Freedom Caucus.The caucus also called on Republican senators to "use every procedural tool at their disposal" to slow the process down.Meanwhile, the NRA's objection to the bill was more general, arguing that the legislation "leaves too much discretion in the hands of government officials and also contains undefined and overbroad provisions."Tellingly, the NRA's statement against the bill included a photo of President Joe Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris, and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer — not the group of senators, half of whom were Republicans, who worked on the bill.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 22nd, 2022

14 House Republicans, including Uvalde"s congressman, voted to back the most significant new gun restrictions since the 1990s

Among the Republicans who voted for the bill was Rep. Tony Gonzales, a survivor of domestic abuse who represents Uvalde, Texas in Congress. Republican Reps. Fred Upton of Michigan, Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, and Tony Gonzales of Texas all voted for the bill.Win McNamee and Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images The House passed the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, sending it to President Joe Biden's desk. 14 Republicans joined every Democrat in supporting new gun restrictions in the wake of several mass shootings. Most Republicans voted against the measure, citing the bill's "red flag" provisions. The House of Representatives passed the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act on Friday, sending the most significant new gun restrictions since the 1990s to President Joe Biden's desk.The bill passed by a 234-193 margin, with 14 House Republicans voting in favor. It comes after 15 Senate Republicans broke ranks and voted for the bill late Thursday night.The bipartisan measure, negotiated by Democratic and Republican senators with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's blessing, includes multimillion dollar investments in mental health services and school security, as well as a new federal ban on gun trafficking.The gun safety bill would also offer new funding to support states and tribes that seek to enact "red flag" laws — which allow authorities to confiscate guns from individuals deemed a threat to themselves or others — closing the so-called "boyfriend loophole," and subjecting gun purchasers under the age of 21 to new background check requirements.The National Rifle Association announced their opposition to the bill within an hour of the text's release, and House Republicans cited the group's opposition as it urged their members to vote against the bill when it comes to the House. Republicans argue that the red flag provisions in particular could be abused, and not do enough to ensure due process protections.Many of the Republicans that voted for the bill, including Reps. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois and Fred Upton of Michigan, are retiring and don't have to face primary voters again.But the congressman who represents Uvalde, Texas — where a gunman shot and killed 19 students and two teachers at Robb Elementary School — also voted for the bill, explaining that he's a survivor of domestic violence.—Tony Gonzales (@TonyGonzales4TX) June 22, 2022And Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming released a statement following her vote arguing that the bill does not infringe on the Second Amendment."As a mother and a constitutional conservative, I'm proud to support this sensible bill that will protect our children and limit violence," she said. "Nothing in the bill restricts the rights of responsible gun owners. Period."Here are the 14 House Republicans who voted for the bill:Rep. Fred Upton of MichiganRep. Peter Meijer of MichiganRep. Steve Chabot of OhioRep. Anthony Gonzalez of OhioRep. Mike Turner of OhioRep. David Joyce of OhioRep. Liz Cheney of WyomingRep. Chris Jacobs of New YorkRep. John Katko of New YorkRep. Brian Fitzpatrick of PennsylvaniaRep. Adam Kinzinger of IllinoisRep. Tony Gonzales of TexasRep. Maria Elvira Salazar of FloridaRep. Tom Rice of South CarolinaHere's what's in the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 24th, 2022

Senators just released legislative text for the "Bipartisan Safer Communities Act," including the most significant new gun restrictions since the 1990s. Here"s what"s in the bill.

The bill would close the "boyfriend loophole, support states enacting "red flag" laws, and increase background checks for gun buyers under 21. Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut at a press conference at the Capitol on June 14, 2022.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images A bipartisan group of senators just released the legislative text for a new bill to enact tougher gun restrictions. The bill enacts the most significant new gun restrictions since the 1990s, including closing the "boyfriend loophole." Congress could send the bill to President Biden's desk as soon as this week. A bipartisan group of senators unveiled the "Bipartisan Safer Communities Act" on Tuesday, a new bill that would enact the most significant new federal gun restrictions since the 1990s.House Democratic leaders have also made clear that they're likely to support the bill, and proponents hope to pass it through both chambers and send it to President Joe Biden's desk before Congress goes on recess for the July 4th holiday.It comes after major mass shootings, including at a grocery store in Buffalo, New York, and an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, spurred new interest in preventing gun violence.The group, led by Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut and Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, previously announced a framework last week outlining the contours of the bill.But senators working on the deal encountered hiccups when working to close the so-called "boyfriend loophole," which prevents convicted domestic abusers from owning a gun only if they lived with, were married to, or had a child with their victim."This doesn't limit law-abiding gun owners' rights. Unless someone is convicted of domestic abuse under their state laws, their gun rights will not be impacted," Cornyn said on the Senate floor shortly before the text was released. "Those who are convicted of non-spousal misdemeanor domestic abuse — not felony, but misdemeanor domestic violence — will have an opportunity after five years to have their Second Amendment rights restored. But they have to have a clean record."Additionally, Cornyn was loudly booed for his work on the gun bill by members of his own party at a Texas GOP convention on Friday.Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell endorsed the framework last week, and ten Republican senators have already announced their support for the framework, increasing the chances that the bill would survive a filibuster and clear the Senate's 60-vote threshold.Here's what's in the text of the bill. Full legislative text can be found here.Support for state-level "red flag" laws"Red flag" laws give authorities and courts the power to temporarily confiscate a gun from individuals if they are deemed to pose an immediate threat to themselves or others.Nineteen states and the District of Columbia currently have some form of red flag laws.The bill allocates $750 million to support states and tribes in enacting crisis intervention programs."We just saw Connecticut's Red Flag Law be used, just in the last month or so, to take weapons away from a young man who was making threats to shoot up schools," said Murphy on the Senate floor on Tuesday. He said that instance of the law's use potentially saved "dozens of lives."New investments in community behavioral health centersThe bill allocates $250 million to support community behavioral health centers, freeing up new federal money for states to set up new centers for treating addiction and other mental health issues.That provision was adopted from a previous bipartisan bill put forward by Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow of Michigan and Republican Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri. In a statement last year, they said that these clinics already serve 1.5 million people across 300 communities in 40 states.Closing the 'boyfriend loophole'The bill includes convicted domestic violence abusers and other individuals who are subject to domestic violence restraining orders in a national criminal background check system, closing the so-called "boyfriend loophole."Patrick Perion, a child protection specialist with the Department of Children and Family Services in Illinois, recently told Insider that the boyfriend loophole was present in all of the intimate partner violence cases that he's investigated when children and guns were involved."We have good evidence that tells us that separating people who are violent toward their intimate partners from guns when they are subject to a domestic violence restraining order makes a difference in terms of victim safety," Shannon Frattaroli, a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, told Insider.Funding for school-based mental health servicesThe bill allocates $5 million for the fiscal years of 2023 and 2024 toward mental health and support services in schools, including early identification and intervention programs.Funding for school safety and securityThe bill allocates $100 million toward increasing security at schools, along with programs that are "interrupting cycles of violence in our communities," according to Murphy.Clarifying the definition of a Federally Licensed Firearms DealerThe bill also seeks to clarify who and what is defined as a federally licensed firearms dealer."One of the individuals who sold a weapon to a mass shooter in Odessa, Texas, should have been licensed as a federal dealer," noted Murphy on the Senate floor ahead of the bill's release. "But he wasn't, and he sold the gun to a person who was prohibited from buying the gun because of his mental health history, without a background check."Investments in telehealthThe bill will also allocate $8 million — with $50 million in grants — toward increasing access to mental and behavioral health services for youth and families in crisis via telehealth, or consultations with medical professionals via phone and video calls.Enhanced background checks for gun buyers under age 21The bill also includes greater scrutiny for gun buyers under the age of 21, requiring them to go through a review process that would include a call to the local police department and take up to 3 days."What we know is that the profile of the modern mass shooter is often in the 18 to 21 year old range," said Murphy.New penalties for straw gun purchasing and a federal ban on gun traffickingThe bill enacts a new federal ban on gun trafficking, as well as penalties for straw gun purchases — when an individual has someone else buy a gun on their behalf, avoiding the necessary paperwork."This is incredibly important for our cities. We have a flow of illegal guns that come into the cities," said Murphy. "And yet, for decades, for some reason, Congress has not given our federal authorities the ability to interrupt these gun-running rings because we have no effective ban at the federal level on trafficking."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 21st, 2022

GOP Sen. John Cornyn was loudly booed at Texas Republican convention amid his push for bipartisan gun legislation

Despite Mitch McConnell's backing for a new gun framework, Cornyn faces backlash from other Republican senators and from conservatives back home. Sen. John Cornyn of Texas speaks at the Republican Party of Texas state convention in Dallas on May 13, 2016.Paul Moseley/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/Tribune News Service via Getty Images GOP Sen. John Cornyn was met with loud booing and jeering at a Texas Republican convention on Friday. He's the chief GOP negotiator on a new slate of gun restrictions in the wake of the Uvalde school shooting. Despite McConnell's backing, Cornyn is facing resistance both from colleagues and from voters back home. Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas was met with loud booing and jeering as he spoke at the Republican Party of Texas's state convention on Friday."Go back home!" attendees could be heard chanting on one video shared by Houston Chronicle reporter Jeremy Wallace as Cornyn concluded his speech.—Jeremy Wallace (@JeremySWallace) June 17, 2022Other videos from attendees showed similar booing.—Alex Bruesewitz (@alexbruesewitz) June 17, 2022—Sergio Martínez-Beltrán (@SergioMarBel) June 17, 2022 Christopher Hooks, a senior editor for Texas Monthly, noted that Cornyn has been booed in past years by convention attendees.Cornyn's appearance came just hours after the state party approved a resolution condemning the senator for his work on a bipartisan deal on new gun restrictions in the wake of the Uvalde, Texas school shooting on May 24 that left 19 elementary students and two teachers dead at the hands of an 18-year-old gunman."We reject the so called 'bipartisan gun agreement," read the resolution, which also said that red-flag laws "violate one's right to due process" and said "those under 21 are most likely to be victims of violent crime."The agreement currently being hashed out by Cornyn and other senators — including Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, a prominent advocate for gun safety legislation — includes providing resources to state and tribes to allow them to enact so-called "red flag" laws, expanding support for community behavioral health centers, closing the "boyfriend loophole" by keeping guns from unmarried people found guilty of violence against a partner, and funding for school security. Ten Republican senators announced their support for the initial framework, and even Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Tuesday that he was supportive."For myself, I'm comfortable with the framework, and if the legislation ends up reflecting what the framework indicates, I'll be supportive," McConnell said at his weekly press conference.Lawmakers had hoped to turn the agreed-upon framework into legislative text this week, but left town without doing so. They hope to put the bill up for a vote next week ahead of the July 4 recess.Axios reported on Thursday that several of Cornyn's Republican colleagues are uneasy with the new agreement."I understand the framework is shifting. But you know, I'm not a huge fan of it," Republican Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri told the outlet."There's considerable unhappiness in the conference that we seem to be approaching a bill that will unite all the Democrats and divide the Republicans," another Republican senator anonymously told Axios.A spokesman for Cornyn declined to comment. According to a tweet from Texas reporter Scott Braddock that was re-tweeted by the senator's official account, Cornyn later told attendees: "I've never given in to mobs and I'm not starting today."—Scott Braddock (@scottbraddock) June 17, 2022  Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: personnelSource: nytJun 17th, 2022

Senate negotiators announce framework for bipartisan gun reform package, which includes incentives for red flag laws and mental health funding — but not an assault weapons ban

The gun reform framework comes as the country has endured a slew of mass shootings across the country, including murders in Uvalde, Tex., and Buffalo. People hold signs and pictures of family members killed in shootings during a demonstration by victims of gun violence in front of the Supreme Court as arguments begin in a major case on gun rights on November 3, 2021.Joshua Roberts/Getty Images A bipartisan group of senators on Sunday announced a tentative agreement on gun reform legislation. According to NBC News, the framework will include funding for mental health and school security. The gun reform framework comes after high-profile mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo. After weeks of discussions, a bipartisan group of Senate negotiators on Sunday released an outline for gun reform legislation in the wake of deadly mass shootings in Buffalo and Uvalde, Texas, according to NBC News.The prospective deal represents a major breakthrough in gun reform, as it includes incentives for states to create red flag laws, which generally allow police to temporarily seize guns from individuals who are a threat to themselves or others. The agreement also increases funding for mental health services and provides additional money to be used to strengthen school security.The agreement would also allow the availability of juvenile records of gun purchases who are under 21 years old when they are subject to background checks.Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, one of the most prominent gun control advocates in Congress, and Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, a conservative lawmaker who has spoken of the need to ensure that Second Amendment rights are not infringed upon, have been the lead negotiators of the 20-member Senate group during their lengthy talks."Today, we are announcing a commonsense, bipartisan proposal to protect America's children, keep our schools safe, and reduce the threat of violence across our country," the group, led by Murphy and Cornyn, said in a statement. "Families are scared, and it is our duty to come together and get something done that will help restore their sense of safety and security in their communities."According to NBC News, a final piece of legislation has not yet been written.The proposal is less aggressive than what most Democrats sought, as it does not include an assault weapons ban, but the agreement might allow a potential bill to pass the upper chamber with at least 60 votes and withstand a legislative filibuster.Democrats enacted a federal assault weapons ban in 1994, but the legislation expired in 2004 — and Republicans have argued that such a restriction would not halt the spate of mass shootings that have become an epidemic throughout the country.President Joe Biden on Sunday heralded the agreement despite his hopes for more sweeping legislation."I want to thank Senator Chris Murphy and the members of his bipartisan group — especially Senators Cornyn, [Kyrsten] Sinema, and [Tom] Tillis — for their tireless work to produce this proposal," he said in a statement. "Obviously, it does not do everything that I think is needed, but it reflects important steps in the right direction, and would be the most significant gun safety legislation to pass Congress in decades."He emphasized: "With bipartisan support, there are no excuses for delay, and no reason why it should not quickly move through the Senate and the House. Each day that passes, more children are killed in this country: the sooner it comes to my desk, the sooner I can sign it, and the sooner we can use these measures to save lives."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: worldSource: nytJun 12th, 2022

As Biden begs for gun control action, here are the measures Congress is working on, from raising the semiautomatic rifle purchase age to 21, to banning bump stocks

The House will soon vote on an expansive gun-safety package while a bipartisan group of Senators also negotiate on a deal. Speaker Nancy Pelosi also says there will be a hearing on legislation to ban "assault weapons." "Ghost guns" are displayed at the headquarters of the San Francisco Police Department in San Francisco, on Nov. 27, 2019.AP Photo/Haven Daley, File The House will soon vote on a package of gun safety bills called the "Protecting Our Children Act." One bill would raise the buying age for some firearms from 18 to 21. Senators are also negotiating.  The measures come as Biden begs Congress to finally act to control gun violence. The recent spate of deadly shootings has pushed Congress once again to try to take action on a host of gun-safety measures. The latest attempt at controlling America's gun violence comes as Biden begs Congress to finally act on it, including banning assault weapons and high capacity magazines, and "repealing the immunity" that protects gun manufacturers.The House will in the coming days vote on an expansive gun-control package called the "Protecting Our Children Act." And House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has also said there will soon be a hearing on legislation to ban "assault weapons." More limited bipartisan measures are under negotiation in the 50-50 Senate, where anti-gun-control Republicans are likely to block more aggressive action."Saving our children can and must be a unifying mission for our nation," Pelosi wrote in a letter Thursday to Democrats. "To all those in the Congress who would stand in the way of saving lives: your political survival is insignificant compared to the survival of our children."The action follows mass shootings last month that killed 10 mostly Black people in a racist rampage at a Buffalo, New York supermarket, and 19 children and two teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. On Wednesday, five people were killed on the campus of a Tulsa, Oklahoma hospital, including the gunman who shot himself."For Gods' sake, how much more carnage are we willing to accept?" Biden asked on Thursday in a speech delivered from the White House, singling out Republicans for blocking gun safety measures. "This time we must actually do something."House Democrats have already passed legislation to expand background checks for gun sales. The Senate has not taken up the legislation. The latest package of bills coming from the House also faces tough prospects in the evenly-divided Senate, but Democrats are still pushing them in part to put their Republican colleagues on the record for opposing gun safety measures."For the children we've lost, for the children we can save, for the nation we love, let's hear the call and the cry," Biden said. "Let's meet the moment. Let us finally do something."Here's a look at the measures under consideration and what's ahead:Raising the purchase age for semi-automatic rifles to 21The House will vote next week on the Protecting Our Children Act package, which would raise the purchasing age for semi-automatic rifles from 18 to 21. The shooters in Buffalo and Uvalde were both 18 and acquired their guns legally."Don't tell me raising the age won't make a difference," Biden said in his Thursday speech.The bill would also limit access to high-capacity magazines and ban bump stocks for civilian use. Bump stocks use the recoil of a semiautomatic firearm to rapidly pull the trigger and mimic fully automatic firing. Purchases of ghost guns, or homemade guns that are assembled from parts, would be subjected to existing firearm regulations and new federal offenses would be established for gun trafficking and straw purchasers.Another measure in the package would create criminal penalties for violating requirements for the residential storage of firearms.'Red Flag' bill to remove firearms from people who pose a danger to themselves and othersThe House will also vote next week on the Federal Extreme Risk Protection Order Act, a  federal "Red Flag" legislation that would allow family members and law enforcement to seek a court order to temporarily remove access to firearms for those who pose a danger to themselves or others. It would also encourage states to enact their own "extreme risk" laws. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia currently have extreme risk protection orders in place.The legislation is proposed by Rep. Lucy McBath, a Georgia Democrat who lost her son to gun violence, and Rep. Salud Carbajal, a California Democrat, whose sister took her own life with a gun.Lindsey Graham, a former Senate Judiciary Committee chairman, introduced similar legislation in the past, saying "it seeks to balance the Second Amendment rights of the individual with concerns from law enforcement and family members about those who may be experiencing a mental health crisis."—Steny Hoyer (@LeaderHoyer) May 25, 2022 Creating an Amber-alert style notification for mass shootings In her letter to colleagues, Pelosi said the House will also consider legislation to create an "AMBER Alert-style notification" in the event of a mass shooting.This bill — dubbed the Active Shooter Alert Act — introduced by Reps. David Cicilline, a Rhode Island Democrat, and Fred Upton, a Michigan Republican, will be brought to the floor "in the weeks ahead," she said."I've talked to my law enforcement at home in Michigan and they support this," Upton said in a statement. "It's a way that they can be there to respond to the scene and get innocent people out of the area to safety.Rep. David N. Cicilline, a Rhode Island Democrats speaks during a House Judiciary Committee mark up hearing on gun safety measures on June 02, 2022 in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images'Assault weapons' banPelosi said the House will "soon" hold a hearing on legislation to ban "assault weapons," or military-style weapons that Congress banned in 1994. Congress allowed the ban to expire a decade later, in 2004.Pelosi said the ban "was proven to save lives and one that the American people support today." During the time of the ban, some researchers have found, gun massacres dropped by as much 37% but rose by 183% in the decade after the prohibition expired.Senate negotiationsTwo overlapping bipartisan groups of senators are discussing measures that include red flag laws, expanding background checks, school safety measures, and mental health resources.Sen. Chris Murphy, the Connecticut Democrat who pleaded with his colleagues to do something after the Uvalde shooting, is at the helm of the negotiations. In a Fox News op-ed, Murphy, a leading gun-control advocate since the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newton, Connecticut, wrote on Wednesday that he acknowledges that he will need to accept a smaller set of reforms than he would prefer to find common ground. "My desire is simple – to find a way for Republicans and Democrats to come together around a small but meaningful set of changes to our nation's gun laws, along with major investments in mental health, that will make it less likely that another Sandy Hook or Uvalde ever happens again," he wrote.Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has signaled he's willing to work with Democrats on gun safety legislation but has not said which measure he'd endorse.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 2nd, 2022

After a spate of mass shootings, here are the gun safety measures Congress is working on, from raising the semiautomatic rifle purchase age to 21, to banning bump stocks

Next week, the House will vote on an expansive gun-safety package while a bipartisan group of Senators also negotiate on a deal. Speaker Nancy Pelosi also says there will be a hearing on legislation to ban "assault weapons." "Ghost guns" are displayed at the headquarters of the San Francisco Police Department in San Francisco, on Nov. 27, 2019.AP Photo/Haven Daley, File The House will soon vote on a package of gun safety measures called the "Protecting Our Children Act." The package would raise the purchasing age for semiautomatic rifles from 18 to 21. Negotiations are ongoing in the Senate on several measures, including expanded background checks. The recent spate of deadly shootings has pushed Congress once again to try to take action on a host of gun-safety measures.The House will in the coming days vote on an expansive gun-control package called the "Protecting Our Children Act." And House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has also said there will soon be a hearing on legislation to ban "assault weapons." More limited bi-partisan measures are under negotiation in the 50-50 Senate, where anti-gun-control Republicans are likely to block more aggressive action."Saving our children can and must be a unifying mission for our nation," Pelosi wrote in a letter Thursday to Democrats. "To all those in the Congress who would stand in the way of saving lives: your political survival is insignificant compared to the survival of our children."The action follows mass shootings last month that killed 10 mostly Black people in a racist rampage at a Buffalo, New York supermarket, and 19 children and two teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. On Wednesday, five people were killed on the campus of a Tulsa, Oklahoma hospital, including the gunman who shot himself.Pelosi noted that House Democrats have already passed legislation to expand background checks for gun sales. The Senate has not taken up that bill. The latest package of bills coming from the House also faces tough prospects in the evenly-divided Senate, but Democrats are still pushing them in part to put their Republican colleagues on the record for opposing gun safety measures.Here's a look at the measures under consideration and what's ahead:Raising the purchase age for semi-automatic rifles to 21The House will vote next week on the Protecting Our Children Actpackage, which would raise the purchasing age for semi-automatic rifles from 18 to 21, limit access to high-capacity magazines, and ban bump stocks for civilian use. Bump stocks use the recoil of a semiautomatic firearm to rapidly pull the trigger and mimic fully automatic firing. Purchases of ghost guns, or homemade guns that are assembled from parts, would be subjected to existing firearm regulations and new federal offenses would be established for gun trafficking and straw purchasers.Another measure in the package would create criminal penalties for violating requirements for the residential storage of firearms.'Red Flag' bill to remove firearms from people who pose a danger to themselves and othersThe House will also vote next week on this Federal Extreme Risk Protection Order Act, a  federal "Red Flag" legislation that would allow family members and law enforcement to seek a court order to temporarily remove access to firearms for those who pose a danger to themselves or others. It would also encourage states to enact their own "extreme risk" laws. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia currently have extreme risk protection orders in place.The legislation is proposed by Rep. Lucy McBath, a Georgia Democrat who lost her son to gun violence, and Rep. Salud Carbajal, a California Democrat, whose sister took her own life with a gun.Lindsey Graham, a former Senate Judiciary Committee chairman, introduced similar legislation in the past, saying "it seeks to balance the Second Amendment rights of the individual with concerns from law enforcement and family members about those who may be experiencing a mental health crisis."—Steny Hoyer (@LeaderHoyer) May 25, 2022 Creating an Amber-alert style notification for mass shootings In her letter to colleagues, Pelosi said the House will also consider legislation to create an "AMBER Alert-style notification" in the event of a mass shooting.This bill — dubbed the Active Shooter Alert Act — introduced by Reps. David Cicilline, a Rhode Island Democrat, and Fred Upton, a Michigan Republican, will be brought to the floor "in the weeks ahead," she said."I've talked to my law enforcement at home in Michigan and they support this," Upton said in a statement. "It's a way that they can be there to respond to the scene and get innocent people out of the area to safety.Rep. David N. Cicilline, a Rhode Island Democrats speaks during a House Judiciary Committee mark up hearing on gun safety measures on June 02, 2022 in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images'Assault weapons' banPelosi said the House will "soon" hold a hearing on legislation to ban "assault weapons," or military-style weapons that Congress banned in 1994. Congress allowed the ban to expire a decade later, in 2004.Pelosi said the ban "was proven to save lives and one that the American people support today." During the time of the ban, some researchers have found, gun massacres dropped by as much 37% but rose by 183% in the decade after the prohibition expired.Senate negotiationsTwo overlapping bipartisan groups of senators are discussing measures that include red flag laws, expanding background checks, school safety measures, and mental health resources.Sen. Chris Murphy, the Connecticut Democrat who pleaded with his colleagues to do something after the Uvalde shooting, is at the helm of the negotiations. In a Fox News op-ed, Murphy, a leading gun-control advocate since the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newton, Connecticut, wrote on Wednesday that he acknowledges that he will need to accept a smaller set of reforms than he would prefer to find common ground. "My desire is simple – to find a way for Republicans and Democrats to come together around a small but meaningful set of changes to our nation's gun laws, along with major investments in mental health, that will make it less likely that another Sandy Hook or Uvalde ever happens again," he wrote.Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has signaled he's willing to work with Democrats on gun safety legislation but has not said which measure he'd endorse.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 2nd, 2022

Democrats offer outrage and F-bombs after Uvalde school shooting — but no viable gun safety legislation that can pass Congress

Democrats were heavy on profanity but offered few legislative proposals that could pass Congress and curb the epidemic of gun violence. Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona speaks at a Senate hearingRod Lamkey/Pool/AFP via Getty Images Democrats are outraged after the Uvalde school shooting. Some used profanity to express their anger. But Democrats have not come up with gun safety legislation that can pass Congress. A possible Republican filibuster in the Senate means passing any gun reform is nearly impossible. Democratic lawmakers unleashed a deluge of rage and uncharacteristic profanity after an elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas left 19 small children and two adults dead. But what they have not yet offered in the hours after the tragedy are pieces of legislation that could pass Congress. "It's fucking nuts to do nothing about this," Sen. Mark Kelly of Arizona told reporters at the Capitol on Wednesday.Rep. Ruben Gallego, another Arizona Democrat, let fly a swarm of f-bombs directed at conservatives who support greater access to guns."Fuck you, @NRA," he tweeted at the powerful gun lobby.—Ruben Gallego (@RubenGallego) May 24, 2022"Fuck you, @TedCruz," he tweeted to one of Texas' Republican senators, who opposes most gun safety measures. In a follow up tweet, he called Cruz a "fucking baby killer.""Just quit and let someone who actually gives a damn do it instead," Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York tweeted at Rep. Lauren Boebert, a Colorado conservative who had posted "You cannot legislate away evil" in response to calls for gun reform."Please, please, please, damn it, put yourself in the shoes of these parents for once," Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer implored Senate Republicans, whose opposition to gun safety proposals makes passing any reforms in Congress nearly impossible."What are we doing?" asked Sen. Chris Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat who was sworn in just weeks after a shooter gunned down 27 people, including 20 children, at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newton.Murphy's question to Congress on Tuesday was a moral one, but also a practical one. What, if anything, were they going to as a legislative body to prevent killings like the ones in Uvalde? Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut.Sarah Silbiger/Pool via APDemocrats haven't made progress on gun safety during this Congress because of Republican oppositionIn the hours since the Uvalde shooting, Democrats had yet to put forth a piece of viable legislation that could gain bipartisan consensus and pass Congress. Two Democratic senators who stand in the way of striking down the Senate filibuster, Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema, did not change their positions.Sinema deflected when asked by reporters if she would consider changing her position on the filibuster to allow Democrats to force through gun safety legislation.Instead, she signaled a desire to work with Republicans to create "an opportunity for us to actually have real conversations and try to do something."In a Wednesday morning floor speech, Schumer, who is responsible for putting any gun legislation up for a vote to the full Senate, blamed Republicans for standing in the way of legislation but did not propose a specific path forward or promise a vote. He told Americans to vote in November for lawmakers who supported gun safety legislation.Later that day, he pledged, "We are GOING to vote on gun legislation," Punchbowl News' Jake Sherman reported.Democrats do control the House of Representatives, which only requires a simple majority vote to pass legislation. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer pledged on Wednesday that the chamber would consider Rep. Lucy McBath's "Extreme Risk Protection Order Act", which she first introduced in 2019. But even if it passes the House, it's unclear if it will win enough bipartisan support in the Senate.—Steny Hoyer (@LeaderHoyer) May 25, 2022 UVALDE, TX - MAY 25: A Texas State Trooper receives flowers for the victims of a mass shooting yesterday at Robb Elementary School where 21 people were killed, including 19 children.Photo by Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty ImagesThe inability to pass gun safety legislation is a problem Democrats have faced for nearly a decade since Sandy Hook. But the issue has become more pronounced since they took over Congress in January 2021. Last year, America experienced 61 active shooter incidents, according to the FBI. In March of 2021, newly in possession of both chambers of Congress, Democrats made a renewed attempt to pass gun safety legislation. Their best hope, the Bipartisan Background Checks Act, passed the House but failed to advance in the Senate, where Republicans could filibuster the legislation. That spring, there was talk of reviving a bill by Manchin and Sen. Pat Toomey, a Pennsylvania Republican, that would have closed a loophole that allows private sales of guns purchased at gun shows or online to evade background checks. The proposal, known as "Manchin-Toomey," failed in 2013 in the months after Sandy Hook and hasn't gained serious traction since.On Wednesday, Toomey told Capitol Hill reporters he did not have any updates on the status of the legislation.In 2021, several other proposals floated around Capitol Hill, including some authored by Republicans or introduced with bipartisan support. They included so-called red flag or extreme risk laws, which allow law enforcement or family members to request a judge temporarily prevent individuals who may harm themselves or others from possessing or buying firearms.None of these proposals have gone anywhere during this Congress, and it's unclear if Democrats will be able to cut a deal that will win over the 10 Republicans they would need to clear any legislative blockades in the Senate."My Republican colleagues can work with us now," Schumer said in his floor speech Wednesday.But Schumer also acknowledged the odds were against any Republican cooperation."I know this is a slim prospect. Very slim. All too slim," he said. "We've been burnt so many times before. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderMay 25th, 2022

House Democrats cheerfully sang "God Bless America" on the steps of the Capitol as crowds protested the overturning of Roe v. Wade at the Supreme Court across the street

An ill-timed press conference celebrating the passage of a gun safety bill came as the country reeled from the revocation of the right to an abortion. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Democrats sang "God Bless America" as they celebrated the impending passage of a new gun law. But across the street, protesters were grappling with the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade. It represented an awkward collision of two of the Democratic Party's main priorities. On Friday, House Democrats gathered on the steps of the Capitol outside the House Chamber to celebrate the passage of a new gun safety law, cheerfully singing "God Bless America" at an event helmed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.It couldn't have come at a more awkward time.Across the street, protesters had swarmed the Supreme Court building in the wake of an historic ruling that overturned both Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey and revoked the constitutionally protected right to an abortion in America.Associated Press reporter Farnoush Amiri shared a video of the press conference, which quickly went viral on Twitter.—Farnoush Amiri (@FarnoushAmiri) June 24, 2022"NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!" wrote former Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson in response, noting the juxtaposition. "The Democrats have never looked so clueless."Others, including the Daily Show with Trevor Noah and the Freedom from Religion Foundation, also registered their disapproval.The confluence of events, which seemed to underscore the inability of Democrats to change the country's abortion laws despite maintaining control of both the White House and Congress, was actually the result of two different political movements colliding.Later on Friday, the House voted to pass the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, a bill introduced in the wake of mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas and Buffalo, New York, that enacts the toughest new gun restrictions since the 1990s. A full description of what's in the bill can be found here.Fourteen House Republicans and 15 Senate Republicans even broke ranks to support the legislation, handing President Joe Biden a much-need bipartisan victory. The bill now heads to his desk.But shortly after 10am on Friday morning, the court announced its decision, prompting several Democratic lawmakers to walk to the Court as part of spontaneous protests. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill and in state legislatures across the country — not to mention average citizens who may rely on abortion access — are now grappling with the implications of the high court's ruling.It's not the first time House Democrats have been seen as failing to meet the moment.In January, as the House commemorated the one year anniversary of the January 6 attack on the Capitol, Pelosi displayed a video from "Hamilton" star Lin-Manuel Miranda.—Human Rights Watch Watcher (@queeralamode) January 6, 2022 Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 24th, 2022

House Republicans urge vote against Senate gun reform compromise, citing NRA opposition

House Republican leadership is urging GOP lawmakers to vote against a gun safety measure that passed the Senate with 14 Republican votes. A convention goer passes the NRA desk at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention.KAREN BLEIER/AFP via Getty Images House Republican leaders are urging a vote against the Senate gun reform compromise. In a message to lawmakers, Rep. Steve Scalise cites opposition from the NRA. The Senate bill would restrict gun sales to domestic abusers and increase mental health funding. House Republican leadership is urging GOP lawmakers to vote against a bipartisan Senate gun reform bill, citing opposition from the NRA."Leadership recommends a NO vote," states a message from Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana that was sent to lawmakers Wednesday evening. The message claims the Senate bill, which passed Tuesday with the support of 14 Republicans, is part of an effort to "slowly chip away at law-abiding citizens' 2nd Amendment rights."The Senate bill — supported by Republican Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky — includes increased funding for mental health services and the state-level enforcement of "red flag" laws that allow police to temporarily remove firearms from someone believed to present an imminent threat. The measure would also close the so-called "boyfriend loophole," prohibiting convicted domestic abusers from obtaining guns."Our colleagues have put together a commonsense package of popular steps that will help make these horrifying incidents less likely while fully upholding the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding citizens," said McConnell in a statement on Tuesday.But in their message of opposition, House Republican leaders claimed the bill "fails to provide explicit due process requirements" for red-flag gun seizures and includes unnecessary funding. In addition to gun manufacturers, House Republicans cite opposition from conservative groups such as Gun Owners of America and Heritage Action for America.Despite the Republican stance, the bill is expected to pass the Democratic-controlled House and be signed into law by President Joe Biden.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 22nd, 2022

Trump trashes bipartisan Senate bill as the "first step" to taking away guns — even though he once supported one of its key parts

Trump may trash Republicans' efforts now, but he has pulled a 180 on the views he once held on restricting gun rights. Former President Donald Trump (L) speaks during Pennsylvania rally on May 6, 2022. Mitch McConnell (R) is pictured on May 3, 2022.Getty Images Trump blasted a bipartisan Senate gun bill, calling it "the first step in the movement to TAKE YOUR GUNS AWAY." But Trump once supported state "red flag" laws that are incentivized in the bill. In fact, nothing in the legislation remotely resembles what Trump is saying. Former President Donald Trump on Wednesday slammed a bipartisan Senate effort to respond to a series of mass shootings, arguing without evidence that the proposal backed by Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is the first step to "TAKE YOUR GUNS AWAY.""The deal on "Gun Control" currently being structured and pushed in the Senate by the Radical Left Democrats, with the help of Mitch McConnell, RINO Senator John Cornyn of Texas, and others, will go down in history as the first step in the movement to TAKE YOUR GUNS AWAY. Republicans, be careful what you wish for!!!" Trump wrote on his social media platform, Truth.Trump's opposition to the proposal comes after senators cleared an early hurdle for advancing the gun safety legislation on Tuesday. Fourteen Republicans, including McConnell, voted to advance the bill that includes incentives for more states to pass so-called red flag laws, a provision that closes the "boyfriend loophole" in background checks, and roughly $15 billion in funding for mental health and school security measures.A spokesperson for McConnell pointed to the top Republican's defense of his record on protecting law-abiding gun owners. In discussing his support for the bill, McConnell said that Republicans brushed back previous attempts to "take massive bites out of the Second Amendment" and that Democrats "came our way" in advancing the current legislation."It does not so much as touch the rights of the overwhelming majority of American gun owners who are law-abiding citizens of sound mind," McConnell said of the bill on the Senate floor on Wednesday. "I've spent my career, supporting, defending, and expanding law-abiding citizens' Second Amendment rights: the right to bear arms, the right to defend oneself and one's family is a core civil liberty."A spokesperson for Republican Sen. John Cornyn, a Texas Republican who led his party's negotiations over the plan, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.The former president's statement also underlines the vast and often abrupt changes Trump has made to his views on guns throughout his public life and even his presidency. After deadly shootings, he expressed an openness to expanded federal background checks, an age limit to buy AR-15s and similar firearms, and even privately mused about reining in so-called assault-style weapons."What are we going to do about assault rifles?" Trump reportedly asked White House aides in 2019 after back-to-back mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, according to The New York Times.Most Republicans have strongly opposed a renewed assault weapons ban, which expired in 2004. In 2000, Trump, who was once a registered Democrat, called for such an action in his book "The America We Deserve."Trump once even supported the "red flag" provisions that are a key piece of this legislation."We must make sure that those judged to pose a grave risk to public safety do not have access to firearms and that, if they do, those firearms can be taken by rapid due process," Trump said in 2019. "That is why I have called for red flag laws, also known as extreme risk protection orders."The bipartisan bill would not create a federal red flag law, as some Democrats once hoped, rather it would simply create grants to encourage officials to join the 19 states and the District of Columbia that have a version of such a law — those laws can give the authorities the right to temporarily confiscate someone's firearm if they pose an immediate threat to themselves or others. As NPR points out, the grants aren't even restricted to states that pass a red flag law.The former president's opposition is notable as it comes amid a flurry of speculation on whether he will announce a presidential campaign. GOP officials and pundits are closely watching how Republican voters respond to his efforts to shape the party's future through endorsements and other statements.Now out of office, Trump's declaration is not a guarantee that a bill will fail. The former president repeatedly attacked President Joe Biden's bipartisan $1 trillion infrastructure plan and went after McConnell and House GOP lawmakers who supported it.But his efforts failed. Biden signed the plan into law in November 2021.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 22nd, 2022

Mitch McConnell says he"s "comfortable" with with the deal on gun legislation struck by senators Murphy and Cornyn and may even vote for it

"I'm comfortable with the framework, and if the legislation ends up reflecting what the framework indicates, I'll be supportive," he said on Tuesday. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell stands behind Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer at a ceremony at the Capitol on June 8, 2022.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images Mitch McConnell signaled that he's likely to support a new Senate proposal to curb gun violence. It would be the first major gun legislation taken up by Congress in decades. He said he's "comfortable with the framework" and will be "supportive" if the legislation ends up being similar. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell offered his public blessing to a nascent framework on new gun safety legislation struck by senators over the weekend."For myself, I'm comfortable with the framework, and if the legislation ends up reflecting what the framework indicates, I'll be supportive," McConnell told reporters at his weekly press conference on Tuesday.Taking questions from reporters, he also noted that Sen. John Cornyn of Texas — the main Republican involved in the negotiations — had shown GOP lawmakers a poll during their Tuesday caucus lunch indicating that gun owners are supportive."Support for the provisions of the framework is off the charts. Overwhelming," McConnell said."I think if this framework becomes the actual piece of legislation, it's a step forward," he said, adding that the framework "further demonstrates to the American people that we can come together, which we have done from time to time on things like infrastructure and postal reform, to make progress for country."—CSPAN (@cspan) June 14, 2022 The proposal, first announced on Sunday, includes providing resources to state and tribes to allow them to enact so-called "red flag" laws, expanding support for community behavioral health centers, closing the "boyfriend loophole" by keeping guns from unmarried people found guilty of violence against a partner, and funding for school security. Cornyn and Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut led the negotiations among senators alongside Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema and Republican Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina."There's no doubt that our framework is a breakthrough," Murphy told reporters at Senate Democrats' weekly press conference on Tuesday. "The bill in and of itself is going to save thousands of lives."Crucially, Senate negotiators secured the support of ten Republican senators, enough to overcome a potential filibuster and reach 60 votes.Those Republican senators include:John Cornyn of TexasThom Tillis of North CarolinaRichard Burr of North CarolinaMitt Romney of UtahBill Cassidy of LouisianaSusan Collins of MaineRoy Blunt of MissouriLindsey Graham of South CarolinaRob Portman of OhioPat Toomey of PennsylvaniaSenate negotiators have not yet introduced text for the legislation, but Cornyn told Fox News on Tuesday that he hopes to get it done "this week" in time for a vote next week.—The Recount (@therecount) June 14, 2022The deal does not go as far as Democrats would like; perhaps most significantly, it does not involve an assault weapons ban or raising the minimum to 21 for purchasing an assault rifle.But the Democratic-controlled House could still approve the measure. Asked by Insider on Tuesday whether he believed his caucus would support the bill, House Democratic Caucus Chair Rep. Hakeem Jeffries of New York offered praise for the framework.Citing gun violence prevention advocacy groups and families affected by gun violence, he said the package was a "strong, meaningful, positive step in the right direction" and said that the "overwhelming majority of House Democrats share that view as well."Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 14th, 2022

Live updates: Texas abortion clinic staff describe how patients "begged for help" after Roe v. Wade fell — report

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Olivia Rodrigo calls out SCOTUS justices who voted to overturn Roe v. Wade with a rendition of 'F--- You'Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Glastonbury Festival on Saturday.Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage via Getty ImagesPop star Olivia Rodrigo on Saturday sent a message to the Supreme Court justices responsible for overturning Roe v. Wade, calling them out during her set at the Glastonbury music festival. Rodrigo invited her guest, British singer Lily Allen, on stage and the pair performed Allen's 2009 song, "Fuck You" — but not before Rodrigo named all five SCOTUS justices who helped gut the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America."Today is a very, very special day. This is actually my first Glastonbury," Rodrigo said. "But I'm also equally as heartbroken over what happened in America yesterday." Rodrigo told the crowd that the SCOTUS decision infringed on a woman's ability to secure a safe abortion, which she called a basic human right. Read Full StoryAfter Roe fell, Steve Bannon called for an 'army of the awakened' to 'shatter' DemocratsIn a Gettr post, Steve Bannon urged "patriots" to take advantage of the "Roe momentum" to win the MAGA movement a "massive victory" at the midterm elections.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRight-wing figure Steve Bannon has called for an "army of the awakened" to "shatter" the Democratic party in post-Roe America. Bannon made a post on Gettr on Saturday lauding the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, a controversial decision that has led to abortion being halted in some states.In his post, Bannon called on "the army of the awakened" to rally and capitalize on the verdict. "This is the key take-away for MAGA … the pro-abortion movement is shattered and is now turning in on itself — because for 50 years they didn't have to work— the Courts and Regime Media covered for them — now The Abyss," Bannon wrote."That's the Democratic Party in November— we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shatter it into a million small pieces," Bannon added, referring to the upcoming midterm elections.Read Full StoryTexas abortion clinic staff describe how patients 'begged for help' when Roe v. Wade was overturned: reportA patient at the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services Clinic in San Antonio, Texas, is informed by a staff member on Friday that the clinic can no longer provide her with an abortion.Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesStaff at an abortion clinic in Texas said they had to turn away people seeking abortions away just minutes after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.Speaking to The 19th, an independent news organization, clinic administrator Andrea Gallegos described how she had to turn away a dozen patients waiting in the lobby of the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services clinic in San Antonio, Texas. Gallegos told The 19th that she and the clinic's staff had to tell the people gathered that, because of the ruling, "unfortunately, your geographical location affects your bodily autonomy." Per the outlet, Gallegos described the scene at the clinic as being one of "complete despair," with people screaming, crying, and begging for help.Read Full Story'Full House' star Jodie Sweetin was thrown to the ground by LAPD during freeway protest for abortion rightsJodie Sweetin told People that she was "proud" of those who showed up to protest.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty ImagesLos Angeles Police Department officers shoved Jodie Sweetin onto the ground of a freeway in Los Angeles on Saturday during an abortion rights protest, video shows.The "Full House" and "Fuller House" star, wearing all black with a black backpack, can be seen in a video of the incident with a megaphone in hand when a couple of LAPD officers shove her to the ground. Protesters can be heard yelling "Jodie, you good?" and  "What the f*** is wrong with you guys?"Sweetin is then picked up and the crowd immediately begins to chant "no justice, no peace."Read Full StorySince the Roe ruling a gynecology clinic in Texas has received increased requests for permanent sterilization: 'I sense that they're scared'Protesters march during an abortion-rights rally on June 25, 2022 in Austin, Texas.Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesA women's health clinic in Austin, Texas, has received dozens of requests for permanent sterilizations after Friday's decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that established a constitutional right to an abortion. After the Women's Health Domain closed on Friday evening for the weekend, it received 109 new patient requests, the majority of which were requesting tubal ligation, or permanent sterilization. Read Full StoryThe impact of Kavanaugh's confirmation on the 2018 elections may reveal how the reversal of Roe v. Wade could impact this year's midtermsU.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAs political analysts seek to understand the possible impact of Roe v. Wade being overturned on this year's midterm elections, some suggest that data from 2018 may reveal possible trends. In 2018, following the contentious confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh — who was accused of sexual assault by Christine Ford — 40 Republican US House seats flipped to Democratic candidates. GOP candidates led in polls taken prior to the hearings and went on to lose in November in 27 of those races, indicating increased mobilization among partisan voters following the hearings.  Read Full StoryLindsey Graham said Alito's abortion opinion was correct for distinguishing Roe from same-sex marriage and contraception rulingsRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham.J. Scott Applewhite/APRepublican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said Sunday that Justice Samuel Alito, unlike Justice Clarence Thomas, was correct for saying same-sex marriage and contraception would not be affected by the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In his concurring opinion on the ruling, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for cases regarding contraceptive access, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage.Read Full StoryAOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Live updates: Texas abortion clinic staff describe how patients "begged for help" when after Roe v. Wade fell — report

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. Olivia Rodrigo calls out SCOTUS justices who voted to overturn Roe v. Wade with a rendition of 'F--- You'Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Glastonbury Festival on Saturday.Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage via Getty ImagesPop star Olivia Rodrigo on Saturday sent a message to the Supreme Court justices responsible for overturning Roe v. Wade, calling them out during her set at the Glastonbury music festival. Rodrigo invited her guest, British singer Lily Allen, on stage and the pair performed Allen's 2009 song, "Fuck You" — but not before Rodrigo named all five SCOTUS justices who helped gut the landmark ruling that protected abortion rights in America."Today is a very, very special day. This is actually my first Glastonbury," Rodrigo said. "But I'm also equally as heartbroken over what happened in America yesterday." Rodrigo told the crowd that the SCOTUS decision infringed on a woman's ability to secure a safe abortion, which she called a basic human right. Read Full StoryAfter Roe fell, Steve Bannon called for an 'army of the awakened' to 'shatter' DemocratsIn a Gettr post, Steve Bannon urged "patriots" to take advantage of the "Roe momentum" to win the MAGA movement a "massive victory" at the midterm elections.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesRight-wing figure Steve Bannon has called for an "army of the awakened" to "shatter" the Democratic party in post-Roe America. Bannon made a post on Gettr on Saturday lauding the Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade, a controversial decision that has led to abortion being halted in some states.In his post, Bannon called on "the army of the awakened" to rally and capitalize on the verdict. "This is the key take-away for MAGA … the pro-abortion movement is shattered and is now turning in on itself — because for 50 years they didn't have to work— the Courts and Regime Media covered for them — now The Abyss," Bannon wrote."That's the Democratic Party in November— we have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to shatter it into a million small pieces," Bannon added, referring to the upcoming midterm elections.Read Full StoryTexas abortion clinic staff describe how patients 'begged for help' when Roe v. Wade was overturned: reportA patient at the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services Clinic in San Antonio, Texas, is informed by a staff member on Friday that the clinic can no longer provide her with an abortion.Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times via Getty ImagesStaff at an abortion clinic in Texas said they had to turn away people seeking abortions away just minutes after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.Speaking to The 19th, an independent news organization, clinic administrator Andrea Gallegos described how she had to turn away a dozen patients waiting in the lobby of the Alamo Women's Reproductive Services clinic in San Antonio, Texas. Gallegos told The 19th that she and the clinic's staff had to tell the people gathered that, because of the ruling, "unfortunately, your geographical location affects your bodily autonomy." Per the outlet, Gallegos described the scene at the clinic as being one of "complete despair," with people screaming, crying, and begging for help.Read Full Story'Full House' star Jodie Sweetin was thrown to the ground by LAPD during freeway protest for abortion rightsJodie Sweetin told People that she was "proud" of those who showed up to protest.Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty ImagesLos Angeles Police Department officers shoved Jodie Sweetin onto the ground of a freeway in Los Angeles on Saturday during an abortion rights protest, video shows.The "Full House" and "Fuller House" star, wearing all black with a black backpack, can be seen in a video of the incident with a megaphone in hand when a couple of LAPD officers shove her to the ground. Protesters can be heard yelling "Jodie, you good?" and  "What the f*** is wrong with you guys?"Sweetin is then picked up and the crowd immediately begins to chant "no justice, no peace."Read Full StorySince the Roe ruling a gynecology clinic in Texas has received increased requests for permanent sterilization: 'I sense that they're scared'Protesters march during an abortion-rights rally on June 25, 2022 in Austin, Texas.Sergio Flores/Getty ImagesA women's health clinic in Austin, Texas, has received dozens of requests for permanent sterilizations after Friday's decision by the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that established a constitutional right to an abortion. After the Women's Health Domain closed on Friday evening for the weekend, it received 109 new patient requests, the majority of which were requesting tubal ligation, or permanent sterilization. Read Full StoryThe impact of Kavanaugh's confirmation on the 2018 elections may reveal how the reversal of Roe v. Wade could impact this year's midtermsU.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesAs political analysts seek to understand the possible impact of Roe v. Wade being overturned on this year's midterm elections, some suggest that data from 2018 may reveal possible trends. In 2018, following the contentious confirmation hearings of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh — who was accused of sexual assault by Christine Ford — 40 Republican US House seats flipped to Democratic candidates. GOP candidates led in polls taken prior to the hearings and went on to lose in November in 27 of those races, indicating increased mobilization among partisan voters following the hearings.  Read Full StoryLindsey Graham said Alito's abortion opinion was correct for distinguishing Roe from same-sex marriage and contraception rulingsRepublican Sen. Lindsey Graham.J. Scott Applewhite/APRepublican South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said Sunday that Justice Samuel Alito, unlike Justice Clarence Thomas, was correct for saying same-sex marriage and contraception would not be affected by the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. In his concurring opinion on the ruling, Thomas wrote "we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents" for cases regarding contraceptive access, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage.Read Full StoryAOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 27th, 2022

Live updates: Democrats condemn a "crisis of legitimacy" for Supreme Court; Trump praises justices for "courage" amid Roe v. Wade reversal

The Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that granted a nationwide, constitutional right to an abortion. Abortion rights and anti-abortion rights activists fill the street in front of the U.S. Supreme Court during a protest in the wake of the decision overturning Roe v. Wade outside on June 25, 2022, in Washington, DC.Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on last week. The 1973 landmark ruling established the constitutional right to an abortion. Over a dozen states have laws meant to immediately outlaw abortion upon a reversal of Roe. The Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion. The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the ruling as the nation's highest court sided with Mississippi and other states, which passed restrictive anti-abortion laws.Immediately after last week's ruling, politicians on both sides of the aisle issued statements — with Republicans praising the Supreme Court and Democrats slamming the decision. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe, as the legality of abortion is now left up to state legislatures. AOC says Supreme Court justices who lied under oath must face consequences for 'impeachable offense'U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).Alex Wong/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Sunday said she believes it's an "impeachable offense" for a Supreme Court justice to lie under oath. Following the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Sens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin said they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch during their individual confirmation hearings. The two senators, both pro-choice, voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch because they assured them that they believed Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark Supreme Court decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide, was law. Both Gorsuch and Kavanaugh, however, voted to strike down Roe earlier this week.Ocasio-Cortez, speaking in an interview with NBC News' "Meet the Press," said she believes the court is facing a "crisis of legitimacy" and justices must face consequences if they lie under oath. "If we allow Supreme Court nominees to lie under oath and secure lifetime appointments to the highest court of the land and then issue, without basis," she said, "we must see that through. There must be consequences for such a deeply destabilizing action and a hostile takeover of our democratic institutions."Read Full StoryElizabeth Warren: Supreme Court 'set a torch' to the last of its legitimacySen. Elizabeth Warren.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesSen. Elizabeth Warren said the US Supreme Court has lost all legitimacy following the rollback of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that made abortion a constitutional right nationwide.Speaking on ABC News' "This Week" on Sunday, Warren suggested that Republicans have tried to stack the Supreme Court with justices who would be against abortion. "The Republicans have been very overt about trying to get people through the court who didn't have a published record on Roe, but who they knew — wink wink nod nod — were going to be extremist on the issue of Roe v. Wade." Warren said. "And that is exactly what we have ended up with.""This court has lost legitimacy. They have burned whatever legitimacy they may still have had," Warren continued. "They just took the last of it and set a torch to it with the Roe v. Wade opinion."Read Full StoryAn abortion clinic in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 in two days to fund its move to MinnesotaActivists march along Constitution Avenue to the US Supreme Court on May 14, 2022.Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post via Getty ImagesAn abortion clinic based in North Dakota has raised more than $550,000 to fund its move in the two days since the Supreme Court's decision to roll back Roe v. Wade. The Red River Women's Clinic of Fargo, North Dakota, set up a GoFundMe to assist with a planned move to Moorhead, Minnesota. North Dakota is one of the at least 13 states that has a "trigger" law, which immediately bans abortions following the overturn of Roe v. Wade. But moving out of North Dakota means there will no longer be an operating abortion clinic in the state. READ FULL STORYThe overturning of Roe v. Wade will 'exacerbate the mental health crisis' in the US, American Psychological Association saysRear view of an unrecognizable abused woman sitting on her bed looking out the window. - stock photoAlvaro Medina Jurado/ Getty ImagesThe American Psychological Association warned on Friday that the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will exacerbate mental health in the United States.Research suggests that "adding barriers to accessing abortion services may increase symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression," APA President Frank C. Wornell said in a statement."We are alarmed that the justices would nullify Roe despite decades of scientific research demonstrating that people who are denied abortions are more likely to experience higher levels of anxiety, lower life satisfaction and lower self-esteem compared with those who are able to obtain abortions," Wornell added. READ FULL STORYTrump congratulated his conservative Supreme Court justice picks for their 'courage' amid the overturn of Roe v. WadeFormer President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe MaioranaFormer President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his three conservative justice picks on the Supreme Court, all of whom voted to overturn Roe v. Wade."Yesterday the court handed down a victory for the Constitution, a victory for the rule of law, and above all, a victory for life," Trump said during a rally in Mendon, Illinois. "Thanks to the courage found within the United States Supreme Court, this long divisive issue will be decided by the states and by the American people," he added.He congratulated his three picks — Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, and Amy Coney Barrett — and praised the decision.READ FULL STORYAOC recalls thanking God she had the choice to get an abortion when she took a pregnancy test after being rapedRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday shared a personal sexual assault story during a pro-abortion rights rally, saying she felt grateful she had the freedom to obtain an abortion if she needed one in that moment. "I myself, when I was about 22 or 23 years old, was raped while I was living here in New York City," she told a crowd in New York's City Union Square Park. "I was completely alone. I felt completely alone. In fact, I felt so alone that I had to take a pregnancy test in a public bathroom in midtown Manhattan.""When I sat there waiting for what the result would be, all I could think was thank God I have, at least, a choice," she continued. "Thank God I could, at least, have the freedom to choose my destiny."READ FULL STORYGloria Steinem slams Roe v. Wade repeal, says 'there is no democracy' without the right to choseGloria Steinem was one of the most important activists of the Women's Movement.Mike Coppola/Getty ImagesJournalist and feminist leader Gloria Steinem has slammed the impact of repealing Roe v. Wade will have on democracy, in an email to AP."Obviously, without the right of women and men to make decisions about our own bodies, there is no democracy," she said. She has called for action to fight the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, protecting US abortion rights."Banning abortions does not stop the need. It just bans their safety."Read Full StoryGOP privately worrying overturning Roe v. Wade could impact midterms: 'This is a losing issue for Republicans,' report saysProtests outside of the Supreme Court after it overturned Roe v. WadeCamila DeChalusWhile Republicans are publicly celebrating the overturning of Roe v. Wade, some are privately worrying that the timing could negatively impact the November midterms. Some Republicans fear the abortion ruling could give Democrats ammunition to attack them and mobilize voters, Politico reported, based on interviews with more than a dozen GOP strategists and officials."This is not a conversation we want to have," Republican strategist John Thomas told Politico. "We want to have a conversation about the economy. We want to have a conversation about Joe Biden, about pretty much anything else besides Roe. This is a losing issue for Republicans."Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood sues Utah to stop trigger law that makes abortion a felony punishable by up to 15 years in prisonPro-choice supporters and staff of Planned Parenthood hold a rally outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty ImagesThe Planned Parenthood Association of Utah is suing to stop the state's "trigger law" abortion ban that took effect on Friday following the overturning of Roe v. Wade.The Utah law makes abortions, with limited exceptions, a second-degree felony punishable by up to 15 years in prison. Read Full StoryMany Republicans rejoiced at Roe being overturned but these 4 GOP governors want to protect the right to abortionGov. Chris Sununu of New Hampshire.AP Photo/Charles Krupa, FileAfter Friday's Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling, which revoked the constitutional right to abortion, many Republicans celebrated it as a win. The GOP has long been at the forefront of the fight to restrict abortion access and many Republican-led states have enacted or will enact abortion bans as a result of the decision.Read Full StoryGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explains the change in her position on abortion: There is 'no place in that medical decision for ideology or for politicians'Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks to the media during a press conference, May 24, 2022Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGeorgia Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams explained in a Friday interview with CNN how her perspective on abortion rights has evolved over the years and how she came to support the right to abortion services after being raised in a religious household. "I was very much on the side of anti-abortion, through much of my upbringing. I grew up in Mississippi, in a very religious family, in a religious community," Abrams told CNN host Sara Sidner. "And I was raised to have a very uncritical eye to this question."Read Full StoryWhat is the Hyde Amendment and how is it related to the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade?People protest the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v Wade abortion decision in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2022.REUTERS/Caitlin OchsFollowing the Supreme Court's Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, there have been renewed calls from lawmakers and activists to abandon the Hyde Amendment, a legislative provision preventing federal funds from being used on abortion services. The Hyde Amendment, named for anti-abortion Congressman Henry Hyde who introduced the provision, was passed in 1976, just four years after the landmark Roe vs. Wade ruling that established the right to an abortion. The amendment, which prevents federal funds from services such as Medicaid to be used to provide abortions, was mired in legal challenges for its first years, leading to the Supreme Court case Harris v. McRae. Read Full StoryAfter calls from AOC and other Dems to expand the court, White House says Biden 'does not agree' with the movePresident Joe Biden.Getty ImagesAs calls for remedies to restrictions on abortion access grow, White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said Saturday that President Joe Biden "does not agree with" expanding the Supreme Court. "I was asked this question yesterday, and I've been asked it before... about expanding the Court. That is something that the President does not agree with. That is not something that he wants to do," Jean-Pierre said during a press briefing on Air Force One.Read Full StoryVirginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin pushes state lawmakers for a 15-week abortion banRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia.AP Photo/Steve HelberRepublican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia on Friday said he would push for a ban on most abortions after 15 weeks in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.Youngkin, who took office earlier this year, said in a statement that the court's decision was an "appropriate" return of power "to the people and their elected representatives in the states.""Virginians do want fewer abortions as opposed to more abortions," the governor said in a meeting at The Washington Post shortly after the decision was made public. "I am not someone who is going to jump in and try to push us apart … There is a place we can come together."Youngkin assembled four Republican legislators to help write legislation that could potentially attract bipartisan support in a legislature. In the state, the GOP has a 52-48 majority in the House of Delegates while Democrats have a 21-19 edge in the Senate.Read Full StoryMan uses truck to repeatedly block entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic as tensions run high after Roe v. Wade rulingA man blocked the entrance to the Jackson Women's Health Organization, Mississippi's only abortion clinic, with his truck on June 25, 2022 after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.Kenneth NiemeyerJACKSON, MS — A man used his truck to block the entrance to Mississippi's only abortion clinic on Saturday as tensions continue to run high at the clinic after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade earlier in the week.The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the only abortion clinic in Mississippi, has vowed to remain open for at least nine more days after the Supreme Court voted 5-4 to overturn Roe V. Wade, a landmark decision that legalized abortion nationally. Mississippi has a trigger law that requires the state attorney general to certify the Supreme Court's decision and allows for the clinic to remain open for 10 days after the certification.Pro-life demonstrators continued to clash with clinic volunteer escorts, who call themselves Pink House Defenders, on Saturday. The clinic, housed in a large pink building, is commonly referred to locally as the Pink House.A man in a white truck blocked the entrance to the clinic at least twice on Saturday.Read Full StoryDemocratic lawmakers urge FTC to investigate Apple and Google over mobile tracking data practices targeting abortion seekersDaniil Dubov/Getty ImagesFour Democratic lawmakers on Friday urged the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Apple and Google's mobile tacking practices regarding abortion seekers. Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Sara Jacobs of California wrote a letter to FTC Chair Lina Khan — accusing Apple and Google of collecting and selling "Hundreds of millions of mobile phone users' data." The lawmakers argued that for individuals seeking abortion services in states where abortion would be illegal it is essential that their data won't fall into the wrong hands.Read Full StorySens. Susan Collins and Joe Manchin, who voted to confirm justices Kavanaugh and Gorsuch, say they were misled on Roe v. WadeSen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME).Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesCentrist Senators Susan Collins and Joe Manchin criticized Friday's landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade, suggesting they felt misled by Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.Collins, a Maine Republican, and Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, both voted to confirm Kavanaugh and Gorsuch. Both senators are pro-choice and said that the justices had assured them they believed Roe v Wade was settled law."I trusted Justice Gorsuch and Justice Kavanaugh when they testified under oath that they also believed Roe v. Wade was settled legal precedent. I am alarmed they chose to reject the stability the ruling has provided for two generations of Americans," Manchin said in a statement.Manchin, a self-described centrist, was one of three Democrats to vote to confirm Gorsuch in 2017 and the only Democrat who voted to confirm Kavanaugh in 2018. Kavanaugh's 50-48 confirmation vote was historically close.Manchin said that while he is personally pro-life, he would "support legislation that would codify the rights Roe v. Wade previously protected."Read Full StorySenators Elizabeth Warren and Tina Smith call on Biden to 'declare a public health emergency' now that Roe v Wade 'is gone'Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., right, and Sen. Tina Smith, D-Minn.Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)US Senators Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Tina Smith of Minnesota are calling on President Joe Biden to  "declare a public health emergency," following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.In an op-ed for the New York Times on Saturday, the Democratic senators said that "with the release of the Dobbs decision," the US is facing " a perilous time that threatens millions of women across this nation.""We urge the president to declare a public health emergency to protect abortion access for all Americans, unlocking critical resources and authority that states and the federal government can use to meet the surge in demand for reproductive health services. The danger is real, and Democrats must meet it with the urgency it deserves," Warren and Smith wrote. The senators blamed the reversal of Roe v. Wade on "right-wing politicians and their allies" who they said "have spent decades scheming."Read Full StorySearches for how to move to Canada from the US spike by over 850% after Roe v. Wade rulingMary Meisenzahl/InsiderSearches for how to move to Canada spiked over 850% on Google after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v Wade, Axios reported. Citing Simon Rogers' Google Trends newsletter, Axios reported that searches for  "How to become a Canadian citizen" also rose by 550% as of Friday evening.In a 5-4 majority opinion, the Supreme Court on Friday overturned the 50-year-old landmark ruling that legalized abortion nationwide.Read Full StoryA pickup truck driver in Iowa ploughed into pro-choice protesters opposing the overturning of Roe v. Wade abortion rightsProtesters approach a pickup truck that attempted to run over abortion-rights protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.Isacc Davis via ReutersA truck drove into a group of pro-choice protesters in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Friday, leading to at least one woman being hospitalized. The group of mostly women protesters was demonstrating against the landmark Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade when an unidentified man driving a black Ford truck drove into them.In videos of the incident, protesters can be seen trying to stand in the car's way and shouting at the driver to stop. He accelerates and a protester is knocked to the ground.Read Full StoryBill Gates and George Soros among billionaires denouncing Roe v. Wade decisionBill Gates voiced opposition to the Roe v. Wade decision, while Warren Buffett is reportedly planning a big investment in abortion rights.Spencer Platt/Getty ImagesSome of America's most prominent billionaires have denounced the overturning of Roe v. Wade, as Warren Buffett reportedly sets in motion plans for big donations to reproductive rights.Bill Gates, Melinda French Gates, and George Soros all tweeted their opposition to the Supreme Court decision to roll back abortion rights nationally, overturning a near-50-year precedent. Bill Gates tweeted: "This is a sad day. Reversing Roe v. Wade is an unjust and unacceptable setback. And it puts women's lives at risk, especially the most disadvantaged."Read Full StoryMeta bans staff from open discussion of Roe v. Wade decision and is deleting internal messages that mention abortion: reportMeta has disallowed employees to discuss abortion on internal messaging system.Joan Cros/Getty ImagesMeta has warned employees not to discuss the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade on its internal system and deleting messages that do so, The New York Times reported.Managers cited a policy that put "strong guardrails around social, political and sensitive conversations" in the workplace, according to company insiders, the newspaper reported. Read Full StoryVatican praises US Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade, says it 'challenges the whole world'Pope Francis gestures, during his weekly general audience in the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 23, 2022.Alessandra Tarantino/Associated PressThe Vatican's Pontifical Academy for Life has praised the US Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v Wade which protected abortion rights for women. They also called that legislation ensures that those giving birth are given the support needed to keep and care for their children. In a statement released on Twitter, the Catholic organization said "The fact that a large country with a long democratic tradition has changed its position on this issue also challenges the whole world."Read Full Story The Arizona State Senate had to be evacuated after tear gas police deployed on protesters spread into the buildingArizona State Capitol Building at sunrise, features Winged Victory statue and was modeled after Greek statue Nike of Samothrace.Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images GroupThe Arizona State Senate Building in Phoenix was evacuated on Friday after police deployed tear gas at demonstrators.A video posted on social media by Republican State Senator Michelle Ugenti-Rita shows dozens of people protesting outside the government building in response to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryObergefell, the plaintiff in the SCOTUS same-sex marriage ruling, said it's 'quite telling' Clarence Thomas omitted the case that legalized interracial marriage after saying the courts should go after other right to privacy casesAssociate Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife and conservative activist Virginia Thomas arrive at the Heritage Foundation on October 21, 2021.Drew Angerer/Getty ImageJim Obergefell, the plaintiff behind the Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, said Friday that Justice Clarence Thomas omitted Loving v. Virginia on his list of  Supreme Court decisions to "reconsider" because it "affects him personally." "That affects him personally, but he doesn't care about the LGBTQ+ community," Obergefell said on MSNBC's "The Reid Out."Read Full StoryStanding among protestors after the fall of Roe vs. Wade, AOC calls on Biden to create abortion clinics on federal landRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks to abortion-rights activists in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after the Court announced a ruling in the Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization case on June 24, 2022 in Washington, DC.Nathan Howard/Getty ImagesRep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Friday called on President Biden to create abortion clinics on federal land, following the landmark Supreme Court ruling which overturned Roe v. Wade and removed federal abortion protections. Speaking to a crowd of protestors gathered in New York's Union Square, Rep. Ocasio-Cortez encouraged people to "be relentless to restore and guarantee all of our rights." She detailed her own experience after sexual assault in her 20s, when she was grateful that abortion would have been an option for her if she needed it, and pushed for federal action to preserve access to reproductive healthcare.  Read Full StoryThe states passing strict abortion bans have some of the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the countryPRODUCTION - 17 April 2021, Berlin: A midwife listens to the heart tones of an unborn child with an ultrasound device. The woman is in her 2nd trimester of pregnancy and is lying on a bed in the midwife's office. 5.5.2021 is International Midwifery Day, which is intended to draw attention to the importance of the profession.Annette Riedl/picture alliance via Getty ImagesWith Friday's Supreme court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade – the landmark case guaranteeing a right to abortion – 13 states with automatic trigger laws enacted total or near-total bans on abortions. The surge of new abortion bans and clinic closures has highlighted the recent rise in America's maternal mortality rates that are disproportionately affecting women of color and have placed the US first in maternal deaths among all developed nations.Read Full StoryPro-choice advocates come out in force vowing to continue the fight after the Supreme Court strikes down Roe v. WadeA massive crowd gathered in New York's Washington Square Park, hours after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade.Anna Watts for InsiderHours after the Supreme Court announced it had struck down the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, throngs of pro-choice Americans took to the streets vowing to continue the fight. In New York's Washington Square Park, a somber and angry crowd began assembling at 5 p.m. ET. They held handwritten signs with words like "Betrayed" or "My corpse has more rights." Some were smeared with red paint.Read Full StoryWhich Supreme Court justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade? Here's where all 9 judges standReproductive rights activists hold cut out photos of the Supreme Court justices as oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Womens Health Organization case are held on Wednesday, December 1, 2021.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade in a 5-4 majority opinion that guts federal abortion rights protections previously upheld by the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling.The conservative majority voted to uphold the Mississippi law at the heart of the case which seeks to ban abortion after 15 weeks of pregnancy, a contradiction to the standard set by Roe, which allowed abortions until about 24 weeks of pregnancy, at which point a fetus could feasibly survive outside the womb. Six justices ruled in favor of upholding Mississippi's 15-week ban, but it was the majority opinion of five judges that ultimately led to the total overhaul of Roe v. Wade. Read the full story to find out how each justice voted. READ FULL STORYThis map shows where abortion is illegal, protected, or under threat across all 50 US statesPro-life and abortion-rights advocates crowd the Supreme Court building after Roe v. Wade was overturned Friday morning.Brandon Bell/Getty ImagesOn Friday, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the near 50-year-old court ruling that legalized abortion across all 50 US states.Some states have been preparing for years for the possibility that Roe could be overturned.A handful of states had trigger laws designed to immediately ban abortions within their borders once the decision was reversed. Some "sanctuary states," like New York, put in place legal framework that would protect abortion, even if Roe were overturned. In other areas of the country, it isn't totally clear what happens next — abortion isn't legally protected, but it's also not expressly forbidden.Read Full StoryThe Supreme Court just overturned Roe v. Wade, but the vast majority of Americans don't even know who the court's justices areSeated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett.Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the nearly 50-year-old landmark ruling that protected abortion rights nationwide.But recent polling suggests that the vast majority of American voters don't even know who these influential justices are, highlighting an apparent disconnect between the nation's top court and the very people affected by its rulings.Ahead of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's Senate confirmation earlier this year, C-SPAN and Pierrepont Consulting & Analytics surveyed more than 1,000 likely voters to gauge the public's interest in and awareness of the Supreme Court's work and relevance. While 84% of voters said the Supreme Court's decisions affect their everyday life, far fewer respondents could provide basic details about the court's history or inner workings.Keep ReadingWisconsin patients who were scheduled to receive abortions were turned away in the waiting room after Roe v. Wade was overturnedA volunteer escort outside Affiliated Medical Services, a Milwaukee abortion clinic, on Wednesday, May 28, 2014, in Milwaukee.AP Photo/Dinesh Ramde FileIn Wisconsin, Planned Parenthood clinics had been scheduling patients through Saturday, June 25, but had stopped scheduling for next week in anticipation of the Supreme Court ruling that would overturn Roe v. Wade, which was leaked in May.When the news broke Friday morning that the court had rendered its opinion, Tanya Atkinson, president of Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin, said her clinics had patients waiting to receive services."Our team had to go out into the lobby and let those individuals know that they would not be able to access the healthcare that they needed," Atkinson told the local PBS station.Keep ReadingProtestors planning to protest on Justice Clarence Thomas' streetProtestors are planning to head over to Justice Clarence Thomas' house on Friday night after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade."Enraged? Devastated? Pissed the fuck off? So are we," Our Rights DC tweeted on Friday afternoon."Meet us at 5711 Burke Centre Pkwy. 6:30 PM we meet, 7 PM we carpool to the Thomas's street. WEAR A MASK," the human rights organization added. Read Full StoryThe sports world is speaking out against Friday's Supreme Court rulingPro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the US Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty ImagesSome of the biggest names in sports — from tennis to basketball — are speaking out after the Supreme Court ruled to overturn Roe v. Wade on Friday.The Minnesota Lynx's Natalie Achonwa wrote on Twitter that she's "feeling sick & heartbroken" after hearing about the decision. Tennis legend and feminist icon Billie Jean King said on Twitter that it's a "sad day" in the US. The WNBA's Seattle Storm tweeted that they are "furious and ready to fight."Orlando Magic point guard Devin Cannady tweeted that the "country needs to be better," adding in a follow-up note that the ruling is "a POWER grab over WOMEN."Read Full StoryThese organizations are asking for donations after Roe v. Wade was overturnedIn the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, organizations fighting for abortion rights are calling on supporters to donate.Click the link below for some organizations that are asking for help to either fight the ruling or provide access to abortion for women in states where it will be banned. Read Full StoryAttorney General says states can't ban abortion pills that are approved by FDAUS Attorney General Merrick Garland said states can't ban abortion medication mifepristone "based on disagreement" with the US Food and Drug Administration.Garland said on Friday that the FDA already ruled on the pill's "safety and efficacy," so the decision can't be overturned by states that want to restrict abortion access."Women who reside in states that have banned access to comprehensive reproductive care must remain free to seek that care in states where it is legal," Garland said, after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade earlier.He continued: "Moreover, under fundamental First Amendment principles, individuals must remain free to inform and counsel each other about the reproductive care that is available in other states."Read Full Story House Democrats sang 'God Bless America' on Capitol steps as crowds protested at Supreme CourtHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi leads a rally celebrating the passage of gun safety legislation as protesters swarm the court just yards away on June 24, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty ImagesHouse Democrats gathered outside the Capitol on Friday to celebrate passing new gun safety legislation, and cheerfully sang "God Bless America."Across the street, however, protesters swarmed the Supreme Court after the decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Read Full StoryVideos show police in riot gear head to Supreme Court after decisionCapitol Police in riot gear could be seen marching towards the Supreme Court earlier on Friday after Roe v. Wade was overturned. A video shared to Twitter by CNN correspondent Manu Raju showed dozens of officers march from the Capitol building and to the Court.Law enforcement also closed streets around the high court, where peaceful protesters gathered by the hundreds after the decision. —Manu Raju (@mkraju) June 24, 2022 Read Full StoryMassive protests erupt outside Supreme Court after Roe v. Wade rulingProtesters outside of Supreme CourtCamila DeChalusHundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court on Friday to protest the ruling that overturns Roe v. Wade. Abortion-rights advocates waived green and black signs and shouted "my body, my choice."Across from the abortion-rights protesters, a group of abortion opponents wore red shirts with white letters that read: "The pro-life generation votes."Read Full StoryThe 13 states with abortion-ban 'trigger laws' are not prepared to enforce themThirteen states with abortion "trigger laws" — where the practice could become illegal — are not prepared for how to go about implementing a ban.An Insider investigation over the last few months found that, through over 100 records requests and reaching out to nearly 80 state and local officials, just one agency could detail any sort of plan. This story is part of an investigative series from Insider examining the demise of abortion rights in so-called "trigger law" states. It was originally published on May 7, 48 days before the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization that abortion is no longer a constitutionally protected right. Read all the stories from "The First 13" here.Read Full StoryStates where abortion access will be on the ballot in 2022Abortion-rights supporters chant their objections at the Kentucky Capitol on Wednesday, April 13, 2022, in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky is one of at least four states with abortion-related ballot measures in 2022.AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, FileAbortion policy will be on the ballot in at least four states during the upcoming 2022 midterm elections — the highest number of abortion-related ballot measures to appear in a year since 1986. Kansas and Kentucky will vote on constitutional amendments to establish no right to an abortion, while Montana will vote on a "born-alive" amendment that would extend personhood to infants "born alive" at any stage.On the other side, voters in Vermont will decide on an amendment that will enshrine the right to an abortion in the state's constitution.Read Full StoryBiden says Americans can have 'the final word' after the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. WadePresident Joe BidenStefani Reynolds/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Joe Biden said Friday was a "sad day" for the nation after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, and vowed his administration would do everything it can to protect women."With this decision, the conservative majority of the Supreme Court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of the country," Biden said during an address to the nation. He continued: "But this decision must not be the final word," urging Americans to vote.Read Full StoryGetting an abortion is going to get a lot more expensive for many AmericansParticipants hold signs during the Women's March at the US Supreme Court.Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for Women's March IncExperts told Insider that the cost of getting an abortion is all but guaranteed to rise after the Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade. Many who live in states where abortion will become mostly, or entirely, illegal will have to face travel costs if they want a procedure in a different state where it is legal. Wage loss for taking time off to get a procedure is another issue. "You might be salaried and I might be salaried, and you can take time off," said Anna Rupani, executive director of Fund Texas Choice (FTC), a nonprofit organization that pays for low-income Texans' associated abortion costs. "A lot of our clients are living paycheck to paycheck, they're not in salaried positions… they're experiencing wage loss."Read Full StoryPelosi warns 'Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban'House Speaker Nancy Pelosi warned that congressional Republicans want to pass a federal abortion ban into law after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.Be aware of this: the Republicans are plotting a nationwide abortion ban," Pelosi said during her weekly press briefing. "They cannot be allowed to have a majority in the Congress to do that. But that's their goal."She continued: "What this means to women is such an insult. It's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment to make decisions about their reproductive freedom."Read Full StoryTrump reportedly believes overturning Roe v. Wade is 'bad for Republicans'Trump stands with now-Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House after she was sworn in on October 26, 2020.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty ImagesFormer President Donald Trump praised the Supreme Court for overturning Roe v. Wade on Friday."This is following the Constitution, and giving rights back when they should have been given long ago," he told Fox News.Privately, Trump has said that overturning Roe would be "bad for Republicans," according to The New York Times' Maggie Haberman and Michael C. Bender.Read Full StoryLead plaintiff in case that made same-sex marriage legal slams Justice Thomas' call for case to be reconsideredThe lead plaintiff in the case that made same-sex marriage legal slammed Justice Clarence Thomas' call for the case to be reconsidered.Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect same-sex marriage, in the wake of Friday's decision to overturn nationwide access to abortions."The millions of loving couples who have the right to marriage equality to form their own families do not need Clarence Thomas imposing his individual twisted morality upon them. If you want to see an error in judgment, Clarence Thomas, look in the mirror," Jim Obergefell said in a statement obtained by HuffPost.Read Full StoryMichelle Obama said she is 'heartbroken' after the Supreme Court's decisionFormer first lady Michelle ObamaJae C. Hong/Associated PressFormer First Lady Michelle Obama said she is "heartbroken" after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday.She said before Roe was established, women "risked their lives getting illegal abortions.""That is what our mothers and grandmothers and great-grandmothers lived through, and now here we are again," Obama wrote in her statement. "So yes, I am heartbroken — for the teenage girl full of zest and promise, who won't be able to finish school or live the life she wants because her state controls her reproductive decisions," she added.Read Full StoryAG Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt 'a devastating blow' to abortion rightsAttorney General Merrick Garland said the Supreme Court dealt a "devastating blow to reproductive freedom in the United States" by eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.Garland said in a statement that the Justice Department disagreed with the decision and predicted that it "will have an immediate and irreversible impact on the lives of people across the country.""And it will be greatly disproportionate in its effect – with the greatest burdens felt by people of color and those of limited financial means," he added.Read Full StorySenate announces hearing 'to explore the grim reality of a post-Roe America'The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced a hearing to explore the "grim reality" of life in the US in the aftermath of Friday's Supreme Court ruling."Today's decision eliminates a federally protected constitutional right that has been the law for nearly half a century," said Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin in a statement.He continued: "As a result, millions of Americans are waking up in a country where they have fewer rights than their parents and grandparents."The hearing is set for July 12, a day after the Senate returns from a two-week July 4 recess.Read Full StoryBiden to deliver remarks on Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. WadePresident Joe Biden will deliver remarks at 12:30 p.m. local time on Friday about the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The White House told reporters that he plans to speak about "the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization to overturn Roe v. Wade."Read Full StoryVarious politicians react to Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn RoeCurrent and former politicians from both sides of the aisle are reacting to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.Sen. Lindsey Graham said the decision is "a long overdue constitutional correction allowing for elected officials in the states to decide issues of life." Roe was "constitutionally unsound from its inception," he said. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer called Friday "one of the darkest days our country has ever seen." "Millions upon millions of American women are having their rights taken from them by five unelected Justices on the extremist MAGA court," he said in a statement shared with Insider.  Read Full StoryNancy Pelosi and other Democrats are using the Supreme Court decision as a fundraising opportunity for the 2022 midtermsUS Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi speaks in front of the steps to the House of Representatives with congressional members to speak on the Roe v. Wade issue May 13, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty ImagesHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi and fellow Democrats are using the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade as a fundraising opportunity ahead of the fall midterms. "Can you chip in $15 so we can WIN these midterms and finally codify reproductive rights into law?" Pelosi wrote supporters."Our ONLY option is to marshal a response so historic — 100,000 gifts before midnight — that we DEFEAT every anti-choice Republican that made this happen, EXPAND our Majorities, and FINALLY codify our reproductive rights into law. So, can I expect to see your name on my "Pro-Choice Champion" list tomorrow morning?"Read Full StoryPlanned Parenthood president slams Supreme Court decisionAlexis McGill Johnson, president of Planned Parenthood, addresses abortion-rights supporters at the "Bans Off Our Bodies Abortion Rally" at Los Angeles City Hall, Saturday, May 14, 2022.AP Photo/Damian DovarganesPlanned Parenthood Action Fund President Alexis McGill Johnson said the Supreme Court gave politicians "permission to control what we do with our bodies" after the Friday decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Due to centuries of racism and systemic discrimination, we already know who will feel the consequences of this horrific decision most acutely: Black, Latino and Indigenous communities, people with disabilities, those living in rural areas, young people, immigrants and those having difficulties making ends meet," she said. "All of our freedoms are on the line," she added. Read Full StoryDC police are fully activated in response to protests from the Supreme Court decisionPro-choice signs hang on a police barricade at the U.S. Supreme Court Building in Washington, DC, on May 3, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty ImagesThe Washington, D.C. Police Department has been fully activated after protests broke out over the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. The Metropolitan Police Department said in an alert that it would "be fully activated to support expected First Amendment demonstrations," and added that "all members should be prepared to work extended tours as necessary" through Tuesday, June 28. A heavy police presence could be seen outside the Supreme Court Friday morning.Read Full StoryBarack Obama says overturning Roe v. Wade is an attack on 'essential freedoms of millions of Americans'Former president Barack Obama slammed the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, and urged people to vote and "join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years.""Today, the Supreme Court not only reversed nearly 50 years of precedent, it relegated the most intensely personal decision someone can make to the whims of politicians and ideologues — attacking the essential freedoms of millions of Americans," he wrote on Twitter. He continued: "Join with the activists who've been sounding the alarm on abortion access for years — and act. Stand with them at a local protest. Volunteer with one of their organizations. Knock on doors for a candidate you believe in. Vote on or before November 8 and in every other election. Because in the end, if we want judges who will protect all, and not just some, of our rights, then we've got to elect officials committed to doing the same."Read Full StoryStoking fears of violence, Marjorie Taylor Greene credits Trump for the end of RoeFar-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene praised former President Donald Trump and demonized Democrats in her live reaction to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade."Thank you President Trump," Greene said to a pro-Trump YouTube channel. "God bless you. This got overturned today because of your great work as president, and we want him back.""I do fear for the safety of people here in D.C.," she said, speculating without citing any evidence that Democrats will riot. Read Full StoryHillary Clinton says decision to overturn Roe will 'live in infamy' and is a 'step backward' for women's rightsExecutive Producer Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on stage during "Below The Belt" New York Premiere at Museum of Modern Art on May 24, 2022 in New York City.Cindy Ord/Getty ImagesHillary Clinton said Friday's Supreme Court ruling is a "step backward" for women's rights."Most Americans believe the decision to have a child is one of the most sacred decisions there is, and that such decisions should remain between patients and their doctors," she tweeted after the decision. She continued: "Today's Supreme Court opinion will live in infamy as a step backward for women's rights and human rights."Read Full StoryFriday's decision could undo much of women's economic progress since the 1970sAbortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2021, in Washington, as the court hears arguments in a case from Mississippi, where a 2018 law would ban abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, well before viability.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade will have enormous consequences for women's economic progress.Experts told Insider before the ruling that research points to the fact that abortion legalization has greatly contributed to women's progress in many ways, like reducing rates of teen motherhood and maternal mortality, increasing rates of workforce participation, earnings, and educational attainment."This is going to create just a perfect storm of concentrated human misery," said Kimberly Kelly, a sociology professor focused on abortion politics at a Mississippi college, before Friday's decision, adding that overturning Roe means "abortion is going to become a function of class privilege."Read Full StorySupreme Court's liberal justices warn more rights are at stake with the end of Roe v. WadeThe Supreme Court's three liberal justices warned in a dissent that other rights could be on the line after Friday's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. "Whatever the exact scope of the coming laws, one result of today's decision is certain: the curtailment of women's rights, and of their status as free and equal citizens," read the dissenting opinion authored by Justices Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan."No one should be confident that this majority is done with its work," they wrote. "The right Roe and Casey recognized does not stand alone."Read Full StoryChief Justice John Roberts says Supreme Court went too far in taking 'the dramatic step' of overturning Roe v. WadeChief Justice John Roberts.Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesChief Justice John Roberts said he felt the Supreme Court's five other conservatives went too far in their decision to overturn Roe v. Wade."The Court's decision to overrule Roe and Casey is a serious jolt to the legal system — regardless of how you view those cases," Roberts wrote in his concurring opinion that was released on Friday along with the majority opinion.He continued: "A narrower decision rejecting the misguided viability line would be markedly less unsettling, and nothing more is needed to decide this case."Read Full StoryPence says the overturning of Roe v. Wade has 'righted a historic wrong'Former Vice President Mike Pence said the Supreme Court "righted a historic wrong" when it undid nearly 50 years of abortion rights nationwide on Friday."Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we will take the defense of the unborn and support for women in crisis pregnancies to every state Capitol in America," Pence said in the statement, in one of the first reactions from a politician. Read Full StoryJustice Thomas says Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception and same-sex marriageJustice Clarence ThomasDrew Angerer/Getty ImagesJustice Clarence Thomas said the Supreme Court should reconsider rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships, and same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion with the ruling to overturn the precedent set in Roe v. Wade."For that reason, in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswold, Lawrence, and Obergefell," the conservative justice wrote. Read Full StorySupreme Court overturns 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade rulingThe Supreme Court has overturned the 1973 landmark Roe v. Wade ruling that established the constitutional right to an abortion.The opinion in the case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization threw out the decades-old ruling by siding with Mississippi and other states that had passed restrictive anti-abortion laws."The Constitution does not confer a right to abortion; Roe and Casey are overruled; and the authority to regulate abortion is returned to the people and their elected representatives," the Friday ruling said. The ruling now leaves the legality of abortion up to state legislatures. Over a dozen states have "trigger laws" meant to ban abortion immediately upon the overturning of Roe.A leaked draft majority opinion obtained by Politico last month seemed to show the court was set to overturn Roe — immediately galvanizing nationwide protests along with condemnation by Democratic lawmakers.Read Full StoryRead the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 26th, 2022

Biden signs bipartisan gun reform bill into law, one of the most significant pieces of federal firearms legislation in decades

The highly consequential bill includes millions of dollars for mental health services and school security. President Joe Biden.Susan Walsh/AP PhotoPresident Joe Biden on Saturday signed into law the critical gun safety bill known as the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, one of the most consequential pieces of federal firearms legislation since the 1990s.The Senate passed the bill on Thursday, followed by the House on Friday.In response to mass shootings at the Topps supermarket in Buffalo and Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, lawmakers were under immense pressure to pass legislation, and they worked for weeks to craft a bill that includes millions of dollars for mental health services and school security.The bill also provides funding for states to implement red flag laws, which generally allows law enforcement to temporarily seize guns from individuals who are a threat to themselves or others."After 28 years of inaction, bipartisan members of Congress came together to heed the call of families across the country and passed legislation to address the scourge of gun violence in our communities," said Biden on Thursday after the Senate passed the bill into law. "Families in Uvalde and Buffalo — and too many tragic shootings before — have demanded action. And tonight, we acted."This is a breaking news story and will be updated.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 25th, 2022

Supreme Court strikes down century-old New York law, dramatically expanding Second Amendment rights to carry guns outside the home

The landmark decision is expected to loosen gun restrictions in several states amid an uptick in gun violence nationwide. The gun-control activist David Hogg at a rally outside the US Supreme Court on November 3.AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a century-old New York gun law. The ruling expands Second Amendment rights, alarming gun-control advocates. The decision was 6-3. The court's three liberal justices dissented. The Supreme Court on Thursday declared that the US Constitution protects an individual's right to carry a gun outside the home for self-defense purposes, a 6-3 decision that dramatically expands Second Amendment rights.The court struck down a century-old gun-permit law in New York that required people seeking a license to carry a gun outside their homes to demonstrate a "proper cause," or a special reason, for doing so.In an opinion delivered by Justice Clarence Thomas, the court's conservative majority supported the view that New York's rule violated the Constitution."We know of no other constitutional right that an individual may exercise only after demonstrating to government officers some special need," Thomas wrote. "That is not how the First Amendment works when it comes to unpopular speech or the free exercise of religion. It is not how the Sixth Amendment works when it comes to a defendant's right to confront the witnesses against him. And it is not how the Second Amendment works when it comes to public carry for self defense."The court's three liberal justices — Stephen Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan — dissented."Many States have tried to address some of the dangers of gun violence just described by passing laws that limit, invarious ways, who may purchase, carry, or use firearms of different kinds. The Court today severely burdens States' efforts to do so," Breyer wrote in a dissenting opinion. The move delivers a major win to gun-rights activists and a blow to gun-safety advocates, who had advocated for the court to uphold the New York statute as the US experiences an uptick in gun violence. The landmark decision comes 14 years after the nation's top court last significantly expanded gun rights. In that 2008 ruling, District of Columbia v. Heller, the majority decided individuals had the right to own a gun for personal use in the home, rejecting the decades-old interpretation of the Second Amendment as a collective right to "keep and bear arms" for a "well regulated militia.""The argument for the gun-rights advocates is this: The Second Amendment protects a right to keep and bear arms. Heller was about keeping arms. And this is a case about bearing them. Both those words are in the Amendment, so they both got to have some meaning," Joseph Blocher, a professor at the Duke University School of Law who is a codirector of the school's Center for Firearms Law, told Insider ahead of the decision. The current case was brought by two New York men who applied for state permits to carry a concealed gun in public for self-defense and were denied. Their challenge, backed by the National Rifle Association, claimed the New York law infringed on the Second Amendment. The court heard arguments in the case in November. At the time, the conservative justices appeared open to tossing out the law, which had been upheld by lower courts. Legal experts say the ruling is likely to bring more guns into public spaces. Besides New York, at least seven other states — California, Massachusetts, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Hawaii — have similar concealed-carry licensing rules. Those states together are home to about 73 million people.Supporters of gun rights argue the decision will allow more people to protect themselves."Opponents would say the sky's going to fall, there's going to be all this crime in the streets," said Stephen P. Halbrook, a senior fellow at the Independent Institute, adding that the people who seek permits to carry "don't have criminal backgrounds.""The impact on public safety, if anything I would think, would be positive because then you could have people who are law-abiding with the ability to protect themselves from criminal predators," Halbrook, author of "The Right to Bear Arms," told Insider before the ruling.Though the decision alters gun laws across the country, numerous legislative actions might be taken in response, according to legal experts. For instance, states could start to pass more "place-based restrictions" on concealed carry in large public areas such as college campuses and sports stadiums along with smaller settings like bars, Blocher said.A recent string of deadly mass shootings across the country has prompted congressional Democrats and Republicans to draft legislation that would combat gun violence after years of inaction. The bipartisan bill falls short of what President Joe Biden and Democrats have proposed, but offers the most significant gun regulations in decades, including tightened background checks for gun buyers under the age of 21, investments in mental health, funds for states to enact "red flag" laws, which grants authorities the power to temporarily confiscate a gun from an individual deemed to pose a threat, and closing the so-called boyfriend loophole by putting convicted domestic abusers in a national criminal background check system. In the wake of the Supreme Court's decision, gun-control activists are widely expected to put more pressure on state and national lawmakers to tackle the crisis. Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: topSource: businessinsiderJun 23rd, 2022

How more than $422 million in taxpayer money got locked away in a forgotten government fund — and lawmakers won"t spend it or return it

Republicans, Democrats, charities, and special-interest groups all have different designs for the languishing money. A pool of more than $422.6 million contributed by taxpayers is waiting for Congress to decide how best to use it.DigitalStorm via Getty Images The money is supposed to publicly fund presidential campaigns. But it doesn't. Republicans and Democrats in Congress can't agree on what to do with the ever-growing pot. Charities told Insider the money could do great good for suffering Americans. See more stories on Insider's business page. Holed away in a government account is a massive cash stash most anyone — from depleted federal programs to coronavirus-throttled charitable causes — would love to tap.But it sits idle and untouched.The intended beneficiaries of the taxpayer-fueled Presidential Election Campaign Fund — presidential candidates — don't want it, as they're soured by its restrictions on their election fundraising and spending.Other prospective recipients, meanwhile, can't have it.Congress is what's preventing this. Conservatives would prefer to disband the fund and repurpose its money. Many Democrats want the money to seed a reimagined public campaign-finance program contained within a broader "democracy-reform" agenda that's hamstrung on Capitol Hill. Neither side will budge.Meanwhile, the Presidential Election Campaign Fund's pot had topped more than $422.6 million as of May 31 — a record amount during the fund's nearly 50-year history, according to US Treasury records reviewed by Insider. The all-but-unused Presidential Election Campaign Fund has more than $422.6 million in it as of May 31, 2022.US TreasuryThe fund grew by more than $1.9 million from May 1 to May 31 alone, according to US Treasury records.If current trends continue, the fund will continue to grow each month by six- or seven-figures thanks to the financial heft generated by American taxpayers who check that little box on their annual tax return that directs $3 to the fund.'Help people and communities recover'In a congressional session when lawmakers are measuring economic relief and infrastructure bills in the trillions of dollars, a few hundred million deserted federal greenbacks may seem comparatively paltry.But some charitable organizations that serve people often possess next to nothing. Several nonprofit leaders told Insider that Congress could use the Presidential Election Campaign Fund money to immediately ease suffering."The best possible use of $400 million would be to provide funds for charities to help people and communities recover," Steve Taylor, United Way Worldwide's senior vice president and counsel for public policy, said, citing a looming eviction crisis, a burdened childcare system, education challenges, and mental-health needs among urgent pandemic-era problems. "Charities are leading the way in addressing these problems, and $400 million in new funding would be a game changer."While the federal government has directed significant funding toward its COVID-19 response, the pandemic is far from over, and people around the world will endure its aftereffects for a long while, said Judy Monroe, the president and CEO of the CDC Foundation, an independent nonprofit that supports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's health-protection work."Additional federal funds that are not actively being utilized could, as deemed appropriate by Congress, be repurposed and brought to bear to address critical needs from COVID-19 to health inequities to strengthening the nation's public-health system to be prepared for the next, inevitable outbreak," Monroe told Insider.Erika Cotton Boyce, a Habitat for Humanity spokesperson, declined to speak specifically about the Presidential Election Campaign Fund but broadly said Congress should "find resources to fund critical programs that will address housing supply and housing affordability, especially homeownership programs for low-income families."Congress has various mechanisms for directing public funding to nonprofit entities. A bill introduced by Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat, hopes to further help charitable nonprofits "provide services to meet the increasing demand in community needs caused by the coronavirus pandemic, preserve and create jobs in the nonprofit sector, reduce unemployment, and promote economic recovery."Sen. Joni Ernst, a Republican of Iowa, wants the money sent to the US Treasury's general fund and used to help reduce the federal budget deficit.Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty ImagesDebt reduction, pediatric care, Alzheimer's researchSome lawmakers and special-interest advocates have other designs on the more than $422 million.During the 2019-20 congressional session, two Republican lawmakers sponsored similar bills that attempted to kill the Presidential Election Campaign Fund.Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma sought to transfer the campaign fund's cash balance to a pediatric-research initiative administered by the National Institutes of Health.Sen. Joni Ernst of Iowa, meanwhile, wanted the money sent to the US Treasury's general fund and used to help reduce the federal budget deficit.Neither bill received a hearing, let alone a vote.In September, Ernst tried again with a similar bill that so far has garnered little support.That's a shame, said Joshua Sewell, a senior policy analyst at the nonpartisan Taxpayers for Common Sense who deemed the campaign fund "a vestige of a bygone era." He recommended its money be used to help pay down the country's national debt, which stood at more than $30.3 trillion as of April 30, according to the Treasury Department. Bradley Smith, a former Federal Election Commission chairman who now leads the nonprofit Institute for Free Speech, said Congress should repeal the law establishing the fund and direct its money to the Treasury's general fund. In April, the nonprofit Bipartisan Policy Center released a report that recommended reallocating the fund's money to election administration. Doing so, it said, would provide "consistent, additional federal resources to meet a clear and growing need ... this incentivizes state and local governments to invest in their election infrastructure as well."  Cole plans to reintroduce a new bill targeting the presidential fund, he told Insider. And he's open to broadening where the $420.7 million might go."If the money were to be redirected somewhere other than pediatric-disease research, Alzheimer's research would certainly be a worthy cause," Cole said.Resist and reformCongressional Democrats in 2021 made voting, ethics, and campaign-finance reform a chief priority, which is enshrined in bills known as HR 1 and S 1 — colloquially, the "For the People Act of 2021."A historically robust public financing system for federal elections is part of the For the People Act.But Senate Republicans filibustered the For the People Act, effectively killing it. Democrats then floated a similar, but slimmed-down bill called the "Freedom to Vote Act," which does not include strong public financing language.Supporters of publicly funded campaigns say this is no time to give up — or to give away more than $422 million that's already earmarked and available for the public financing of elections.The For the People Act "represents the boldest democracy reform since Watergate, and any funds currently available for the old system should be used for the new system of federal citizen-funded elections, which must pass so we can get big money out of politics," Beth Rotman, the director of money in politics and ethics for Common Cause, said prior to the bill's stall-out."Getting rid of the money at this point would send the wrong signal," said Meredith McGehee, the former executive director of the nonprofit group Issue One, a self-described "crosspartisan movement for political reform."The pro-Democrat organization End Citizens United, which takes its name from the Supreme Court's 2010 decision that unleashed gushers of new political money into elections, also backed keeping the cash in place."The existing presidential system was designed following Watergate for anti-corruption purposes," the group's spokesperson Bawadden Sayed said, "and we would be supportive of potentially using it for future anti-corruption purposes."Former President Barack Obama campaigns for Joe Biden in Atlanta on November 2.Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty ImagesThanks, Obama?Public presidential-campaign funding wasn't always so derelict.From the late 1970s to the late 1990s, the Presidential Election Campaign Fund enjoyed a heyday, distributing eight or nine figures of public money to candidates each election cycle.Supporters lauded the program as an elixir to big-money politics and a defense against corruption. Candidates from both parties routinely opted to use it. Doing so allowed them to spend less time fundraising and more time campaigning.And since both sides participated, neither side engaged in the kind of political money arms races emblematic of contemporary presidential elections.But the détente wouldn't last. Citing financial advantages, George W. Bush rejected public matching funds during the 2000 Republican presidential primary. Both Bush and eventual Democratic nominee John Kerry declined public funding in their 2004 presidential primaries. Come 2008, Democrat Barack Obama rendered the Presidential Election Campaign Fund functionally obsolete by becoming the first major-party presidential candidate in post-Watergate politics to reject public funding during a general presidential election. Obama even broke a campaign promise to do so — he previously said he'd use public funding. The future president knew he could privately raise and spend hundreds of millions of dollars more than the public program would afford him. Republican presidential nominee John McCain accepted public money — and lost.No Democratic or Republican presidential nominee has since used public funding. Only a smattering of minor-party and longshot Democratic-primary candidates have patronized the Presidential Election Campaign Fund, who drew about $3 million combined since the 2012 race.The fund didn't distribute a single dollar to any presidential candidate during the 2020 presidential election.It last provided funding to presidential nominating conventions in 2012, as Congress two years later passed, and Obama signed, a law that axed public funding of conventions.Congress siphoned tens of millions of dollars from the presidential fund that otherwise would have gone to party conventions to a pediatric-research fund — the same one that Cole, the Oklahoma congressman, wants to fill with the account's full balance.Until that or any other repurposing decision comes down, the FEC continues to spend taxpayer resources keeping the Presidential Election Campaign Fund alive.The agency's audit division has administrative, oversight, and enforcement responsibilities over the program, Judith Ingram, an FEC spokesperson, said. The independent, bipartisan FEC, which regulates and enforces the nation's campaign-finance laws, employs about 300 people. Its projected 2022 budget is about $76.5 million, meaning the balance of the Presidential Election Campaign Fund could theoretically fund the agency for a full five years.This article was originally published on July 13, 2021, and has since been updated to include new financial data and legislative developments.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: dealsSource: nytJun 22nd, 2022

Senate Releases Text Of Gun Bill That Would Mark "Biggest Change In Decades"

Senate Releases Text Of Gun Bill That Would Mark 'Biggest Change In Decades' A group of bipartisan Senate negotiators on Tuesday released proposed legislation to limit ownership of firearms in what would mark the biggest change to firearms laws in decades. Photo via Politico The proposed legislation, which comes after a week of negotiations following deadly mass shootings at a Buffalo, NY supermarket and an elementary school in Uvalde Texas, was endorsed by Senate leaders from both parties, raising the likelihood it will be passed in the evenly divided chamber, according to the Wall Street Journal. "We’ve reached agreement," announced Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT) on Tuesday, adding "We’re dotting i’s and crossing the t’s right now. I think we’re in good shape." What's in the bill? As anticipated, it would provide incentives for states to enforce extreme protection orders, also known as red-flag laws, which would allow authorities to seize a person's weapons if they are deemed dangerous to themselves or others. Another expected provision is the boyfriend loophole, which would prohibit dating partners or recent dating partners convicted of domestic violence from purchasing a gun - and which would expire after five years if they haven't been convicted of any other violent crime, two people familiar with the bill told the Journal. In addition, it would establish a grant program for states to expand mental health services, as well as enhanced safety measures for schools (which, we're guessing, won't include arming teachers or other school staff). It will also include some type of crackdown on illegal sales of guns, and would require a review of juvenile records - including mental health records - for 18-21-year-old gun buyers. "Unless a person is convicted of a crime or is adjudicated mentally ill, their ability to purchase a firearm will not be impacted by this legislation," said Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX), the top GOP negotiator. The Senate is aiming to pass the legislation this week, but recent delays have put that timeline in question as leaders would need agreement from all 100 senators to waive some timing rules. President Biden and Democratic leaders in the House have said they would support the bill, though it excludes some measures they demanded, such as raising the age limit for purchasing semiautomatic weapons to 21. The gun legislation is expected to cost several billion dollars, though lawmakers aren’t insisting on waiting for a formal cost estimate to vote on it. One way lawmakers are discussing paying for the legislation is by further delaying the end of a Trump-era rule for rebates that drugmakers give to middlemen in Medicare. The rule never took effect, but because it was expected to cost the government money, Congress can claim a savings. -WSJ According to people familiar with the matter, negotiators hit a snag when Republicans wanted to include language which would ban the use of federal funds in the bill for abortions, a stumbling block that has since been resolved and removed. At least 60 votes will be required to advance the bill in the Senate, meaning at least 10 Republicans will need to vote for the bill which is now much more narrow than Democrats had hoped for, according to the report. Still, the legislation would be the most significant firearms legislation since Congress voted to ban so-called 'assault weapons' (aka scary-looking rifles that still shoot one bullet per trigger pull) in 1994, which lapsed a decade later. We imagine gun sales are going through the roof right about now. * * *  Read the full Senate gun bill below:  Tyler Durden Tue, 06/21/2022 - 20:00.....»»

Category: blogSource: zerohedgeJun 21st, 2022

A child protection specialist says closing the boyfriend loophole in the senate"s gun safety package will have a huge impact on child safety

The loophole is one aspect of the bipartisan gun package deal senators have put forth following the mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Senator Chris Murphy is at the forefront of the gun safety package.Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images The "boyfriend loophole" prevents abusers from owning a gun if they lived with, were married to, or had a child with their victim. Evidence shows a connection between domestic violence and mass shootings. In 53% of mass shootings between 2009 and 2020, the perpetrator shot a current or former partner or family member. A child protection specialist says closing the "boyfriend loophole" in the gun safety package will have a huge impact on child safety.The loophole – which prevents convicted domestic abusers from owning a gun only if they lived with, were married to, or had a child with their victim – is one aspect of the bipartisan deal senators have put forth following the mass shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, that killed 21 people and wounded 17.Patrick Perion, a child protection specialist with the Department of Children and Family Services in Illinois, told Insider that the boyfriend loophole was present in all of the intimate partner violence cases he's investigated when children and guns were involved.Perion said addressing this gap will have a "huge impact" on child safety because of the violence children are subjected to in these disputes. "They're witnessing this ongoing violence which is detrimental to their development," he said.Federal law states convicted domestic abusers are prohibited from having guns, but only if they were married to, lived with, or have a child with a survivor of domestic violence. Dating partners aren't held to the same standard in some states, which has come to be known as the "boyfriend loophole."In the last few years, Perion told Insider guns have become more prevalent in his work. He said in domestic violence altercations where a gun is present, the reason the firearm was allowed to be in the home was because of the boyfriend loophole. "There have been many [incidents] where there was an order of protection issued against the boyfriend and he was still able to legally have a handgun and then later threatened the mother of the children with the handgun," he said. Everytown Research & Policy found that in at least 53 percent of mass shootings between 2009 and 2020, the perpetrator shot a current or former intimate partner or family member during the event.Shannon Frattaroli, a professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health told Insider that historically, there hasn't been enough attention paid to the overlap between intimate partner violence and firearms."We have good evidence that tells us that separating people who are violent toward their intimate partners from guns when they are subject to a domestic violence restraining order makes a difference in terms of victim safety," she said.While the bill hasn't been drafted yet, Frattaroli said she'd like to see a broad definition of what constitutes a dating partner. Additionally, she thinks this is a chance for legislators to be strategic about how the law is written when it comes to domestic violence protection orders.Addressing the loophole doesn't come without its caveats. Stephanie Saxton, a domestic violence survivor, said her ex-husband had access to unregistered firearms. "Obviously, there's limitations with this loophole, and that's one of them," Saxton told Insider.Another challenge is safely storing firearms from those who aren't allowed to have access to them. On Monday, a man in Texas opened fire at a summer camp after stealing his wife's gun. The gun safety package has the support of at least 20 senators, such as Democrat Chris Murphy who is at the forefront of it. According to reporting by The Wall Street Journal, senators have stalled on the language in the bill prior to breaking for the weekend.Read the original article on Business Insider.....»»

Category: smallbizSource: nytJun 18th, 2022